Remote Indigenous Housing Program Municipal and Essential Services Guidelines 2009-2012, - 2010

Table of contents

  • Part A – Information about the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
  1. Program Overview
    1. 1.1 Australian Government Indigenous Housing Policy Context
      1. 1.1.1 Previous Indigenous Housing Programs
      2. 1.1.2 Remote Indigenous Housing Program Outcomes
      3. 1.1.3 Aims and Objectives of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
      4. 1.1.4 Activities of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
      5. 1.1.5 The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) – A Partnership with all Governments
      6. 1.1.6 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing
      7. 1.1.7 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery
      8. 1.1.8 Commonwealth, State, Territory and Local Government Responsibilities
  2. Responsibilities and accountabilities under the program
    1. 2.1 FaHCSIA Responsibilities and Accountabilities
    2. 2.2 Service Provider Responsibilities and Accountabilities
  3. Risk management strategy
  4. Performance management and evaluation
    1. 4.1 Performance Framework And Reporting
    2. 4.2 Financial Reporting
    3. 4.3 Evaluation
    4. 4.4 Complaints
      1. 4.4.1 Service Provider
      2. 4.4.2 Client/Customer
  • Part B – Information about activities funded under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
  1. Policy and Priorities
  2. Activity and management details
    1. 6.1 Funding for the program
    2. 6.2 Service provider eligibility
    3. 6.3 Eligible and in-eligible organisations/bodies
    4. 6.4 Specialist requirements (eg, Legislative requirements)
  3. Funding agreement
  4. Contact information
    1. National Office
    2. New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory
    3. Queensland
    4. Victoria
    5. Tasmania
    6. South Australia
    7. Western Australia
    8. Northern Territory

Preface

These guidelines provide the framework for the implementation and administration of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program. The guidelines provide the basis for the business relationship between the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and the funding recipient/service provider. They should be read in conjunction with the Terms and Conditions for funding agreements in the relevant year.

FaHCSIA reserves the right to amend these guidelines from time to time by whatever means it may determine in its absolute discretion and will provide reasonable notice of these amendments to program funding recipients.

1. Program Overview 

  1. 1.1 Australian Government Indigenous Housing Policy Context
    1. 1.1.1 Previous Indigenous Housing Programs
    2. 1.1.2 Remote Indigenous Housing Program Outcomes
    3. 1.1.3 Aims and Objectives of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
    4. 1.1.4 Activities of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program
    5. 1.1.5 The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) – A Partnership with all Governments
    6. 1.1.6 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing
    7. 1.1.7 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery
    8. 1.1.8 Commonwealth, State, Territory and Local Government Responsibilities

 

1.1 Australian Government Indigenous Housing Policy Context

1.1.1 Previous Indigenous Housing Programs

It was announced in the 2007 Budget that funding for the Community Housing and Infrastructure Program (CHIP) would cease on 30 June 2008 and be replaced with the Australian Remote Indigenous Accommodation (ARIA) Program. The ARIA program was subsequently subsumed under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing, and in January 2009 was replaced with the Remote Indigenous Housing Program.

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1.1.2 Remote Indigenous Housing Program Outcomes

The Remote Indigenous Housing Program is a component of the Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure budget appropriation. Under the National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Remote Indigenous Housing, the majority of the $5.5 billion in funding allocated to the Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure budget appropriation will be provided to the six State Governments and the Northern Territory Government for the delivery of new and refurbished houses.

The remaining funding from the Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure budget appropriation will be allocated by the Commonwealth for the delivery of municipal and essential services and a range of national programs to achieve the objectives of the NPA on Remote Indigenous Housing. Further details about the Remote Indigenous Housing Program are contained in Part B.

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1.1.3 Aims and Objectives of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program

The aim of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program is to provide funding to eligible organisations to deliver a range of municipal and essential services and housing related services to remote Indigenous communities, in accordance with the objectives of the Australian Government and the Council of Australian Government’s Closing the Gap agenda.

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1.1.4 Activities of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program

The types of activities that will receive funding under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program are those that meet the broad objectives of the Australian Government and the Council of Australian Governments Closing the Gap agenda, subject to the eligibility criteria contained in these guidelines, available funding and current and future policy imperatives. (For information about eligibility refer to Part B.)

Funding under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program is designed to supplement the efforts of state, territory and local governments to ensure Indigenous people have access to services consistent with and appropriate to their need. This funding is generally provided for activities such as essential services operation and maintenance; small scale housing construction repairs and maintenance; the provision of accommodation for Indigenous mothers; environmental health activities; and the management and delivery of municipal services.

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1.1.5 The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) – A Partnership with all Governments

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) is the principal forum through which the Commonwealth, State and Territory governments have committed to closing the gap on Indigenous disadvantage. COAG have agreed to six Closing the Gap targets across urban, rural and remote areas. To support this work, COAG has also agreed to seven strategic platforms or ‘building blocks’ as a means of meeting those targets. One of these building blocks is housing as it is a fundamental contributor to improving living standards and life outcomes for Indigenous Australians in urban, regional and remote Australia.

In 2008, COAG agreed a number of National Partnerships to progress reforms in the delivery of Indigenous housing in remote Australia and to reform current service delivery to remote Indigenous communities. These include:

  • National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing
  • National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery

For more information about COAG and Closing the Gap, visit / or http://www.coag.gov.au/.

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1.1.6 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing

The Council of Australian Governments has committed $5.5 billion over ten years to reform responsibilities between the Commonwealth, States and the Northern Territory in the provision of housing for Indigenous Australians in remote communities and to address overcrowding, homelessness, poor housing conditions and the severe housing shortage in remote Indigenous communities.

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1.1.7 National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery

The Council of Australian Governments commitment to a National Partnership on Remote Service Delivery recognises the need for better service delivery in remote areas, and for improved coordination, implementation and accountability if investments are to help close the gap.

This National Partnership will improve the coordination and delivery of services by all levels of government in 29 remote Indigenous communities across the Northern Territory, Western Australia, Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia.

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1.1.8 Commonwealth, State, Territory and Local Government Responsibilities

All levels of government have a responsibility for the provision of housing and related services to Indigenous Australians.

The Council of Australian Governments, through the National Partnership Agreements on Remote Indigenous Housing and Remote Service Delivery has broadly agreed that:

  • State and Territory Governments have primary responsibility for the provision of housing, with the Commonwealth providing the majority of funding. Essential services are funded through a combination of monies provided by the Commonwealth and the States.
  • Local governments are responsible for the delivery of municipal services and road maintenance when an Indigenous community is within local government boundaries. Funding comes from a combination of the usual local government revenue sources such as rates and charges and Commonwealth provided local government financial assistance grants.

Specifically targeted programs are meant to supplement and complement mainstream programs, and do not alter the fact that all levels of government have an obligation to ensure that residents in their jurisdiction have equitable access to services.

One of the objectives of the National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Remote Indigenous Housing is to provide arrangements that will clarify areas of responsibility for the delivery of services to remote Indigenous communities.

In the Northern Territory, the Memorandum of Understanding Between the Australian Government and the Northern Territory Government on Indigenous Housing, Accommodation and Related Services September 2007, transitioned service delivery responsibility for housing, municipal and essential services to the Northern Territory Government with effect from 1 July 2008. The NPA on Remote Indigenous Housing subsumes those arrangements. As a result of these arrangements, FaHCSIA does not provide funding to Indigenous organisations to deliver housing or typical municipal and essential services to discrete and specific communities in the Northern Territory.

The Commonwealth will continue to work with States and the Northern Territory on a proposal for clearer roles and responsibilities and funding with respect to municipal and essential services and ongoing maintenance of infrastructure and essential services in remote areas, with new arrangements to be in place from 1 July 2012.

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2. Responsibilities and accountabilities under the program 

2.1 FaHCSIA responsibilities and accountabilities

FaHCSIA will be responsible for:

  • providing advice on any amendments to these guidelines;
  • entering into Funding Agreements with eligible organisations;
  • monitoring the performance of funded organisations against the Terms and Conditions of the Funding Agreement; and
  • payment of funding when milestones are met.

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2.2 Service provider responsibilities and accountabilities

Funding recipients/service providers are responsible for:

  • ensuring Indigenous Australians have equal and equitable access to services;
  • providing quality services which are effective, efficient, and appropriately targeted;
  • complying with the terms and conditions of the Funding Agreement
  • ensuring the highest standards of duty of care are applied
  • ensuring the security of data and information, and that all privacy and confidentiality provisions are maintained
  • providing early and timely advice to FaHCSIA on potential risks to the delivery of agreed services
  • contributing to the overall development and improvement of the program
  • complying with all relevant legislation
  • conducting the service consistent with any codes of conduct that may apply within the program

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3. Risk management strategy 

FaHCSIA applies a risk based approach to reporting requirements and the management of funding agreements in line with the Common Business Model for Grant Management approach. The use of performance based funding agreements enables FaHCSIA to manage risk, and includes assessing the risk of provider organisations as well as risks in the delivery of programs and services.

The principles of the FaHCSIA Common Business Model for Grant Management approach are to provide greater consistency in applying funding management processes. This is achieved with flexibility across programs and funding recipients/service providers, applying a differentiated approach to controls (i.e. funding agreements, selection, acquittals, monitoring and reporting), which are determined by the level of risk assessed for the program, provider and for service delivery within the Common Business Model for Grant Management framework.

The following are some of the possible risks that FaHCSIA staff would assess when determining whether an organisation is eligible to be funded:

  • Governance: Does the governance structure of the organisation allow for sound and consistent business practice?
  • Finance: Does the organisation have a good financial record?
  • Performance: Does the organisation deliver the services it would be funded for?
  • Reporting: Does the organisation have the capacity to provide financial and performance reports in accordance with the terms and conditions set out in the Funding Agreement?

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4. Performance management and evaluation 

  1. 4.1 Performance Framework And Reporting
  2. 4.2 Financial Reporting
  3. 4.3 Evaluation
  4. 4.4 Complaints
    1. 4.4.1 Service Provider
    2. 4.4.2 Client/Customer

At the program level, the performance of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program is managed on an ongoing basis through financial reporting and performance progress report requirements contained in the Portfolio Budget Statement.

At the discrete strategy or activity level, performance is managed and monitored through financial and performance progress reports as detailed in the funding agreement. Performance and reporting requirements may be changed subsequent to negotiation and agreement between FaHCSIA and the funding recipient/service provider, and would be actioned through a variation to the Funding Agreement.

4.1 Performance framework and reporting

Funding recipients/service providers will be required to provide regular updates against milestones as specified in the funding agreements. Performance indicators are reviewed annually and may be updated to meet changed business requirements for a new financial year. Current performance indicators for the various activities under the Remote Indigenous Housing program include:

  • Rating of achievement of project objectives (0:Not Met - 5:Fully Met) determined by project officer based on reporting from funding recipient on agreed project objectives
  • Achievement of service delivery as listed in the Funding Agreement including activity details and any schedules and/or annexure.
  • Number of commercial users connected to the Community Power Supply
  • Number of Community Houses connected to the Community Power Supply.
  • Number of accommodation places for Indigenous expectant and new mothers in agreed locations
  • Number of project participants – by type of service
  • Services and targets that funding is provided for are met and reported on using the income and expenditure statement provided in this document.

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4.2 Financial Reporting

The Remote Indigenous Housing Program will be managed to ensure the efficient and effective use of public monies, consistent with best value in service delivery and the FaHCSIA Funding Agreement, and will aim to maintain viable services and act to prevent fraud upon the Commonwealth.

Funding must only be used for the purposes for which it is provided.

Providers will be required to supply a financial statement detailing the expenditure of funds for the purposes set out in the Funding Agreement. Additional requirements for reporting will be detailed in the Funding Agreement in accordance with FaHCSIA’s standard terms and conditions.

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4.3 Evaluation

FaHCSIA reserves the right to conduct an evaluation of the Remote Indigenous Housing Program and any of the activities funded under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program.

The Australian Government will engage an independent party to undertake a formal review of the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing in 2012 and 2017. The outcome of the review will identify progress against performance indicators and targets and inform the future direction of National Partnership Agreements.

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4.4 Complaints

FaHCSIA encourages clients to provide feedback on their experiences with FaHCSIA or FaHCSIA funded service providers so that we can continue to improve the services we offer to the Australian community. Any feedback received through this channel will be provided to the relevant FaHCSIA area for appropriate action.

FaHCSIA has a formal process for the handling of all external complaints it receives about FaHCSIA programs and FaHCSIA funded service providers. Complaints will be dealt with under the FaHCSIA Complaints Management Scheme. The Scheme ensures that any problems an applicant has with the FaHCSIA’s services, decisions or policies and those of FaHCSIA’s funded service providers, are taken seriously and dealt with promptly. More information is available on the Complaints Management Section of the FaHCSIA website.

Please note: Complaints about Australian Government policy, legislation or reviews over eligibility for a benefit or entitlement are not handled by the Complaints Management System. These complaints should be handled by the relevant area of FaHCSIA, such as the national, state and territory offices, Indigenous Coordination Centres and Regional Operations Centres.

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4.4.1 Service Provider

The funding recipient/service provider can contact FaHCSIA complaints if they have any concerns about FaHCSIA’s service(s) or the service of another FaHCSIA funded service provider.

Details of what constitutes an eligible complaint can be provided upon request by FaHCSIA. The funding recipient/service provider can lodge a complaint by contacting:

Ph: 1800 634 035
Fax: (02) 6204 4587
Email: complaints@dss.gov.au
Post: FaHCSIA Complaints
PO Box 7576
Canberra Business Centre
ACT 2610

If a provider is at any time dissatisfied with the FaHCSIA’s handling of a complaint, they can contact the Commonwealth Ombudsman or call 1300 362 072.

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4.4.2 Client/Customer

It is expected that all funding recipients/service providers would have a complaints process for clients.

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5. Policy and Priorities 

Australian Government policy, and in particular the objectives of the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing determines the activities that receive funding under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program.

Under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing, an audit of municipal and essential services in remote communities was agreed to by the Council of Australian Governments partners.

The key objective of the audit of municipal and essential services is to assess levels of outstanding need and clarify funding and service responsibility for the future delivery of municipal and essential services in remote Indigenous communities.

The audit will inform a report back to the Council of Australian Governments on a proposal for:

  • Clearer roles and responsibilities and funding with respect to municipal (and essential services) and ongoing maintenance of infrastructure and essential services in remote areas; and
  • A timeframe for implementation of new arrangements and for these arrangements to be in place from 1 July 2012.

The outcomes of the audit and the proposed transition of responsibility for municipal and essential service delivery from the Commonwealth to State, Territory and local governments could have a significant influence on future funding arrangements under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program.

Other policy issues that influence what activities will receive funding under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program include:

  • Land Tenure

It is Australian Government policy that all significant capital investment on Indigenous land is underpinned by secure tenure prior to the provision of funding and commencement of a capital works project. This requirement applies to a range of Australian Government funded infrastructure including staff housing, office buildings, workshops, clinics, schools and other fixed assets.

Australian Government agencies can confirm specific requirements in the Administered Capital Works Funding Policy by contacting Program Frameworks Branch, FaHCSIA at helpdesk.servicedelivery@dss.gov.au.

Australian Government agencies can also contact secure.tenure@dss.gov.au for assistance with requirements. Service delivery providers should confirm requirements with their FaHCSIA program funding area.

  • Native Title and Land Rights

Indigenous land issues, including native title rights and interests may have implications for the provision of Remote Indigenous Housing Program funding for the construction or major upgrading of assets. Any applicable native title or lands rights process must be followed.

Further information on native title and land rights matters should be sought from FaHCSIA during the scoping phase of the project.

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6. Activity and management details 

  1. 6.1 Funding for the program
  2. 6.2 Service provider eligibility
  3. 6.3 Eligible and in-eligible organisations/bodies
  4. 6.4 Specialist requirements (eg, Legislative requirements)

Activities that receive funding under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program will be those that are provided by eligible organisations that have been selected through a recognised administrative process.

Funding recipients/service providers will be required to deliver a mutually agreed program that meets the broad objectives, policies and priorities identified by the Council of Australian Governments to achieve Closing the Gap, and as further articulated in the National Partnership Agreements of Remote Indigenous Housing and Remote Service Delivery and in the Remote Indigenous Housing Program Guidelines.

These guidelines primarily provide information concerning funding of municipal and essential services which is one component under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program. Other activities funded in the program include:

  • National Aboriginal Health Strategy (NAHS)
  • Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Program (AACAP)
  • Fixing Houses for Better Health Project (FHBH)
  • Indigenous Mothers’ Accommodation Fund (IMAF)
  • Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities (AMRRIC)
  • Bushlight

If information concerning these funded programs is required please contact:

Section Manager
National Programs
Indigenous Housing Programs and Services
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
1300 653 227

  • Municipal and Essential Services

While the delivery of municipal and essential services are primarily a state, territory and local government responsibility, many rural and remote Indigenous communities do not receive funding to cover the costs of these services. Those that do often require additional funding to address a legacy of under-servicing, or the high costs associated with remote area service delivery.

The Remote Indigenous Housing Program provides funding to supplement the efforts of state, territory and local governments to ensure Indigenous people have access to municipal and essential services consistent with and appropriate to their needs. Funding is provided for power, water and sewerage operation and maintenance, road maintenance, aerodrome maintenance, waste disposal, landscaping and dust control, dog control, environment health, and organisational governance.

Funding for the delivery of municipal and essential services is facilitated through regional delivery arrangements, which are typically managed at the state or territory level, and in some instances through FaHCSIA National Office.

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6.1 Funding for the program

Funding available for the Remote Indigenous Housing Program, as contained in the FaHCSIA Portfolio Budget Statement 2009-10 are as follows:

  • 2009-2010 $120,469,000
  • 2010-2011 $ 96,776,000
  • 2011-2012 $ 89,969,000
  • 2012-2013 $ 51,717,000

Funding is available to organisations that deliver services in accordance with the Remote Indigenous Housing Guidelines and with Australian Government and Council of Australian Government (COAG) policy, as reflected in the National Partnership Agreements (NPA) on Remote Indigenous Housing and Remote Service Delivery.

Specific funding for municipal and essential services is funded within the Remote Indigenous Housing Program appropriation.

Housing Minister’s committed the progressive transfer of responsibility for municipal and essential services to jurisdictions by 1 July 2012, depending on the agreement of individual jurisdictions. As a result of the transitional nature of current service delivery arrangements, in most circumstances only organisations that currently receive funding will be considered for Remote Indigenous Housing Program funding in future years. However, there is no guarantee that organisations currently funded will continue to receive funding.

Organisations that deliver typical municipal and essential services to discrete and specific communities will be chosen through a clear administrative process. Existing funding recipients/service providers will normally be direct selected, and following a risk assessment would receive an invitation to continue to deliver services and receive funding from FaHCSIA for a period of one financial year. Where circumstances require it, a competitive selection exercise may be used to identify the appropriate organisation to receive funding for a period of one financial year.

Organisations that deliver specialist municipal and essential services across Indigenous communities will be required to lodge a funding submission, which will be assessed against current and proposed policy imperatives and funding availability. FaHCSIA will then determine whether the specialist services are eligible to receive funding from FaHCSIA for a period of one financial year. A clear administrative process will be used, and if funding an existing funding recipient/service provider, the organisation will normally be direct selected, unless circumstances require a competitive selection exercise.

6.1.1 Eligible and ineligible activities

FaHCSIA reserves the right to exercise discretion on which activities receive funding, based on current and future policy imperatives and funding availability.

Please note: Funding recipients/service providers should contact their nearest FaHCSIA office for clarification about what activities are funded in their state or jurisdiction, and which activities have a higher priority for funding, as this varies from state to state.

Funding recipients/service providers should contact their nearest FaHCSIA office for clarification and advice about activities that fall outside these guidelines.

  • Municipal Services

Activities that may be eligible for municipal services funding are detailed below:

Eligible Municipal Services Activities

Power, Water and Sewerage Operation and Maintenance

Assistance with operational costs and essential/routine repairs and maintenance to community water, power and sewerage systems in discrete communities. This includes assisting in shortfalls in operational costs of energy supply where communities are making significant efforts to collect revenue from users.

Road maintenance

Routine and essential maintenance to internal roads and drainage in discrete communities that are currently not the responsibility of a state/territory or local government body. Access roads on Aboriginal community land, which are clearly not the responsibility of another body, can be considered for assistance.

Aerodrome maintenance

Routine and essential maintenance of aerodromes in discrete remote communities.

Waste disposal

Effective and regular waste removal services and tip maintenance in communities.

Landscaping and dust control

Essential and effective landscaping and dust control services in communities including routine management and maintenance of community ovals/parks/playgrounds.

Management of infrastructure and municipal services

Operational costs required to provide municipal/essential services including assistance with administration costs, and repairs and maintenance to essential community buildings that are specifically used for the delivery of municipal/essential services. Vehicle insurance, running and capital costs may be considered for funding if the vehicle is used primarily for municipal and essential services delivery.

Dog and animal control

Programs should aim to improve the general health of people in the community to diseases, improve health of community dogs and animals, reduce hygiene and nuisance problems, and educational programs for communities on basic health care and control.

Environmental health activities

Activities to reduce environmental health risks and related diseases in communities.

Community Services

Limited provision of support for families and individuals related to interfacing with external organisations such as banks, insurance agencies, benefit agency, licensing bodies etc. However, it is expected that where these services are already being provided through another agency that should continue to be the case.

Other necessary municipal services

Includes fire prevention, preparation of town plans, and insurance on assets used specifically to provide municipal services.

  • Essential Services

Activities that may be eligible for essential services funding are detailed below:

Eligible Essential Services Activities

Water Supply

Adequate supply of good quality water and related services, such as reticulation, bores and pumps to communities.

Power Supply

Adequate and reliable power supply and related services, such as generators, solar and wind systems, reticulation, power cards to communities.

Sewerage Services

Adequate and appropriate sewerage systems and related services, such as reticulation, septic tanks and pumps to communities.

Internal Roads and Drainage

Construction and repair of internal community roads to an adequate standard depending on location and climate and provision of related services, such as adequate and effective drainage and kerbing to communities.

Waste Disposal Facilities/Land Fill

Construction or upgrades to community rubbish/recycling sites including fencing.

Renewable Energy

Provision of funding for new Renewable Energy power generation systems or upgrades.

Other Related Infrastructure

  1. Plant, machinery and tools used on the construction and repair and maintenance of infrastructure assets;
  2. Facilities to enable external transport access (jetties, boat ramps, airstrips) and related access roads on discrete Indigenous communities;
  3. Staff housing where an activity or organisations primary function is the provision of essential or municipal services;
  4. Administration buildings of Indigenous organisations that deliver and/or manage municipal/essential services including essential office equipment, furniture and equipment. Funding is typically only available where substantial infrastructure assets are managed satisfactorily by the organisation, and where viable alternatives (rent, leasing, and joint funding) are not available.
  5. Landscaping and dust control (community parks, windbreaks and trees);
  6. Purchase of community fire control equipment;
  7. Communal refrigeration;
  8. Community work sheds for storage and maintenance of community owned plant and equipment;
  9. Radio communications;
  10. Communal kitchen and ablution blocks, taking into consideration the possible environmental and health risks of such facilities;
  11. Fencing infrastructure and community boundaries, where the absence of such is likely to cause serious damage to housing or infrastructure.

Activities that are generally ineligible for funding are detailed below:

Ineligible Activities

Aged care

The Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) and state/territory governments have primary responsibility for funding the capital and recurrent costs of residential aged care facilities.

Education / training related buildings and equipment

These are the responsibility of the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR), and state/territory educational departments.

Health Clinics and general primary health care

These are the responsibility of DoHA and state/territory health authorities. Hostels, Short-term and crisis accommodation Short-term and crisis accommodation is the responsibility of state/territory governments, or is funded through specifically targeted activities.

Infrastructure for commercial ventures including pastoral leases

These are the responsibility of the DEEWR through Indigenous Business Australia.

Motor Vehicles, ambulances, buses and barges

General purpose motor vehicles or motor vehicles for individual outstations cannot be funded. Ambulances should be funded by DoHA.

Multi-purpose centres

FaHCSIA does not have responsibility for funding multi-purpose centres where an activity or organisations primary function is not the provision of municipal and essential services.

School buses and public transport

These are the responsibility of state/territory education or transport departments.

Sport/recreation buildings, pools

These are the responsibility of state/territory and local governments.

Staff housing

FaHCSIA does not have responsibility for funding staff housing where an activity or organisations primary function is not the provision of municipal and essential services.

Training

These are the responsibility of the DEEWR and state/territory educational departments. If there are particular instances where a strong case can be made for municipal and essential services funds to be used in conjunction with state or other providers, and where training is being provided by an accredited training organisation, a case may be put to the FaHCSIA National Office.

Transient people

As a general rule RIH funds are not to be used to provide accommodation for transient individuals or families. In cases where individuals or families are transient because of an event or crisis, assistance is available from Aboriginal Hostels Limited, or services funded under the Crisis Accommodation Program and the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program.

Consideration may be given in special situations where communities face environmental health hazards through the influx of transient visitors for prolonged periods of time or for regular, though intermittent, periods throughout the year. In these circumstances, funding for alternative accommodation solutions may be considered.

  • Housing

Under the National Partnership on Remote Indigenous Housing, responsibility for the management of community housing (construction, acquisition, upgrades and renovations of houses, and asset and tenancy management) has transitioned to the state and territory governments.

As such, the Remote Indigenous Housing Program does not provide direct or grant funding for housing activities. Through programs such as FHBH, AACAP and NAHS, the Australian Government still provides some funding for these activities, however no new funding agreements will be entered into with Indigenous housing organisations.

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6.2 Service provider eligibility

FaHCSIA will only enter into Funding Agreements with:

  • Incorporated Associations (incorporated under state/territory legislation, commonly have 'Association' or 'Incorporated' or 'Inc' in their legal name);
  • Incorporated Cooperatives (also incorporated under state/territory legislation, commonly have 'Cooperative' in their legal name);
  • Companies (incorporated under the Corporations Act 2001 (Cwlth) - maybe not-for-profit or for-profit proprietary company (limited by shares or by guarantee) or public companies);
  • Aboriginal Corporations (incorporated under the Corporations (Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander) Act 2006 (Cwlth) and administered by the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations);
  • Organisations established through a specific piece of Commonwealth or state/territory legislation (many public benevolent institutions, churches, universities, unions etc);
  • Partnerships;
  • Trustees on behalf of a Trust;
  • Local Governments; and
  • where there is no suitable alternative, an individual or – jointly and separately – individuals.

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6.3 Eligible and in-eligible organisations/bodies

As a general rule, FaHCSIA makes grants available under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program through incorporated Indigenous-controlled organisations. Even where FaHCSIA uses contract program managers to assist in delivery, funding agreements are entered into with the local Indigenous organisation or resource agency.

Organisations eligible for funding through the Remote Indigenous Housing Program are:

  • Those currently providing municipal and essential services or directly supporting such services; or
  • In certain circumstances, such as the result of an open competitive selection process, organisations that are not currently funded may be approached to assume responsibility for service delivery to a discrete or group of discrete communities.

To be eligible for funding an organisation must have a business plan that reflects:

  1. Objectives and activities - of the organisation in relation to the provision of services for which the organisation is funded
  2. Financial management – systems in place to meet accountability requirements, and the identification of resources required to meet operational budgets
  3. Funding sources – identification of all current and potential future funding sources
  4. Asset (property) management – identification of how assets will be managed and maintained
  5. Human resource management – details of staffing that should include salaries, duties, and training strategies

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6.4 Specialist requirements (eg, Legislative requirements)

Organisations in receipt of funding must comply with all laws detailed in the Funding Agreement and/or Terms and Conditions. As an example:

  • Privacy and Confidentiality

The Privacy Act 1988 (Cwlth) governs the manner in which personal information is handled by government agencies and private sector organisations.

  • Security of Information

Funding recipients are required to store records in a secure place and dispose of them in an appropriate manner. Further information surrounding information security can be found in the Funding Agreement Terms and Conditions.

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7. Funding agreement 

The Funding Agreement is a legal contract. It is the responsibility of all organisations funded under the Remote Indigenous Housing Program to seek legal advice on all and any obligations and commitments that organisations may be legally required to meet.

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8. Contact information 

Further information on the Remote Indigenous Housing Program is available from your FaHCSIA National/State/Territory office. General enquiries can be directed through to the relevant office on 1300 653 227 (local call cost only).

National Office

Indigenous Housing Programs and Services Branch
PO Box 7576 Canberra Business Centre
ACT 2610

New South Wales and Australian Capital Territory

NSW & ACT State Office
GPO Box 9820,
Sydney NSW 2001

Sydney Indigenous Coordination Centre
Level 8, 280 Elizabeth St
Sydney NSW 2000
GPO Box K1176
Haymarket NSW 1240

ACT and South Eastern Region ICC
1 Monaro St (PO Box 172)
Queanbeyan NSW 2620

Tamworth ICC
Unit 2, 180 Peel St
PO Box 684
Tamworth NSW 2340

Coffs Harbour ICC
17 Duke St
PO Box 1335
Coffs Harbour NSW 2450

Wagga Wagga ICC
1st Floor, 2 O'Reilly St
PO Box 144
Wagga Wagga NSW 2650

Bourke ICC
26 Mertin St
PO Box 29
Bourke NSW 2840

Dubbo ICC
Level 1, 65 Church Street
PO Box 1083
Dubbo NSW 2830

Queensland

QLD State Office
GPO Box 9820,
Brisbane QLD 4001

Brisbane ICC
Level 1, 100 Creek St
PO Box 2472
Brisbane QLD 4001

Roma ICC
PO Box 2472
Brisbane QLD 4001

Cairns ICC
Levels 7 & 8 Citi Central
38 Sheridan Street
PO Box 1599
Cairns QLD 4870

Townsville ICC
Level 4, 235 Stanley Street
PO Box 2018
Townsville QLD 4810

Mt Isa ICC
42-44 Simpson St
PO Box 2416
Mt Isa QLD 4825

Rockhampton ICC
Level 1, Central Queensland University Building
Corner Fitzroy & East St
PO Box 550
Rockhampton QLD 4700

Victoria

VIC State Office
GPO Box 9820,
Melbourne, VIC 3001

Melbourne ICC
Level 3 Casselden Place
2 Lonsdale Street
GPO Box 9820
Melbourne VIC 3001

Tasmania

TAS State Office
GPO Box 9820
Hobart TAS 7001

Hobart ICC
199 Collins Street
TAS 7000
GPO Box 9820
Hobart TAS 7001

South Australia

SA State Office
GPO Box 9820,
Adelaide SA 5001

Adelaide ICC
Level 18, 11 Waymouth St
GPO Box 9820
Adelaide SA 5001

Port Augusta ICC
38-40 Stirling Road
PO Box 2214
Port Augusta SA 5700

Ceduna ICC
22B East Terrace
PO Box 396
Ceduna SA 5690

Western Australia

WA State Office
GPO Box 9820,
Perth WA 6848

Perth ICC
Level 10
55 St Georges Tce
Perth WA 6000
PO Box B67
Perth WA 6838

Derby ICC
37 Rowan St
PO Box 1009
Derby WA 6728

Kalgoorlie ICC
39-43 Boulder Road
PO Box 490
Kalgoorlie WA 6430

Geraldton ICC
Level 1, 5 Chapman Rd
PO Box 146
Geraldton WA 6530

South Hedland ICC
Commonwealth Building,
3 Brand St
PO Box 2628
South Hedland WA 6722

Broome ICC
1 Short St
PO Box 613
Broome WA 6725

Kununurra ICC
2250 Coolibah Drive
PO Box 260
Kununurra WA 6743

Northern Territory

Territory Office
GPO Box 9820,
Darwin NT 0801

Darwin ICC
Level 5 Jacana House,
39-41 Woods St
Darwin NT 0800
GPO Box 9820
Darwin NT 0801

Nhulunbuy ICC
74 Chesterfield Street
Nhulunbuy NT 0880
PO Box 246
Nhulunbuy NT 0881

Katherine ICC
Level 1 Randazzo Blding
14 Katherine Terrace
PO Box 84
Katherine NT 0850

Alice Springs ICC
Level 2, Jock Nelson Building
16 Hartley Street
Alice Springs NT 0870
PO Box 2255
Alice Springs NT 0871

Tennant Creek ICC
1-9 Paterson St
PO Box 321
Tennant Creek NT 0861

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Content Updated: 27 September 2013