Working Together Towards a Better Future in Doomadgee

Table of contents

  1. About Doomadgee
  2. Closing the Gap ‘Building Blocks’
  3. Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement (RSD NPA)
  4. About the Doomadgee Local Implementation Plan (LIP)
  5. The Doomadgee LIP Action Plans

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Artist’s Acknowledgement

The cover art for the Doomadgee Local Implementation Plan and the paintings depicting the COAG Building Blocks that can be found throughout the document were commissioned by the Mt Isa Regional Operations Centre (ROC) from local Doomadgee woman Pietta Aplin, specifically for this purpose.

Pietta’s grandfather Willie Doomadgee was a Gangalidda /Waanyi man. Her grandmother was a Garawa and Yanyula woman. Pietta’s mother is Rita Doomadgee.

Pietta is a mother of four young children and has lived most of her life in Doomadgee. She has only been painting for three years after attending an art workshop held by Margaret Chatfield in Doomadgee.

The artist is hoping to get better at her painting so that she can capture more of the dreaming stories from around her community and country.

The Cover Art

The snake represents the Rainbow Serpent which is the dreaming story of the area and the paw print represents the Dingo Dreaming, another significant dreaming story of the region.

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Statement from Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council

Doomadgee is a strong community built on family, leadership and culture.  Community enjoys a lifestyle that bonds its ancestral heritage with a progressive vision for the future.

This vision recognises the importance of our children, parents and elders being healthy, active, respectful, educated, safe, well cared for and supported by family.

Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council acknowledges the importance of an equal and sustainable partnership with Government to achieving long-term benefits for its people while maintaining traditional cultural links to country.  Council and community are committed to working in partnership with Government to build a stronger and more prosperous Doomadgee now and for our children’s children.

Mayor Frederick O’Keefe

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What is Closing the Gap

In December 2008, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to a partnership between all levels of government to work with Indigenous communities to close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

In recognition that outcomes for Indigenous Australians remain well below those of non-Indigenous Australians, COAG agreed to six targets.

  1. To close the life expectancy gap within a generation.
  2. To halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  3. To ensure access to early childhood education for all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities within five years.
  4. To halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for children within a decade.
  5. To halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 attainment or equivalent by 2020.
  6. To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

As a result of this commitment, the Governments and Doomadgee community have worked together to identify the key community aspirations that they will partner together on, to enable the achievement of the COAG targets.

  1. The Community’s early childhood aspiration is for our babies to be happy, safe, strong and well cared for, and that parents and grand parents also get the help they need to raise our children.
  2. The Community’s schooling aspiration is that all our children are educated and go on to live good lives, with good jobs.  No matter what their circumstance, all children are to be treated well and looked after, and supported to achieve their best.
  3. The Community’s health aspiration is for our people to be healthy, well and grow old with their families in community.
  4. The Community’s healthy home aspiration is for our people to live in good homes, which are looked after and meet the needs of our growing community.
  5. The Community’s safe communities aspiration is for all our community to be safe, healthy and active. Be respectful of culture and each other and make this an even better place to live.
  6. The Community’s economic participation aspiration is for our people to be in the local jobs and run the local businesses.
  7. The Community’s governance and leadership aspiration is for our community to produce strong, respectful leaders that will guide us to a better future for our children.

The Community’s aspirations also include:

  • That we recognise and support our young people who are our future;
  • That we and the services in our community are accountable for good results; and
  • That we actively participate in making a better future for our community.

Key priorities for achieving the vision.

  • A good relationship between community and government, based on honesty, integrity and respect for one another, and delivering on commitments made by each.
  • The alignment of training, employment and business development support to the local economy and mobility potential.
  • Coordination of services on the ground as a first step towards improved service quality.
  • Housing that meets the environmental and social needs of the community and designed with community input.
  • A “whole of community” drive and commitment to all children attending and attaining quality learning outcomes from school.
  • Organised sport, recreational or cultural activities.
  • Positive and active leadership being shown by the community. The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) is the document that captures the aspirations and commitments of government and community in closing the gap on disadvantage. It is a work-in-progress, meaning that it will continue to change and improve.

Signatories to this Agreement:

Mayor Frederick O’Keefe
Doomadgee AboriginalShire Council

Michael Hogan
Government Champion

Rachel Hunter
Government Champion

Kevin Keeffe
Qld State Manager FaHCSIA

Anne-Marie Roberts
Mt Isa ROC Manager

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Welcome to Closing the Gap for Doomadgee

As a key output of the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership a Local Implementation Plan for Doomadgee has been developed. Strategies and actions have been identified and committed to by the Doomadgee Community and Australian and Queensland Governments and the Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council. All parties are committed to working together towards a better future in achieving the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Closing the Gap targets in order to reduce the high levels of disadvantage being experienced.

We would like to acknowledge and thank the Doomadgee Community for their approach in engaging with government. Sharing their aspirations and commitment to their community’s future, by participating in the creation of a Local Implementation Plan that will grow and evolve as the level of service delivery matures. We would especially like to thank and acknowledge the leadership of the Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council for their support, guidance and participation in this process.

We would like to acknowledge the staff of the Mt Isa Regional Operations Centre and their work with community, the Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council, consultants, and representatives of Australian and Queensland Government agencies in an extensive consultation process in preparation of this plan. We would also like to recognise the strategic leadership and support of both the Regional Leadership Group (RLG) and the Queensland Remote Service Delivery Board of Management (B0M).

It has been a privilege to oversee this very important work and we thank you for the opportunity. We endorse the Doomadgee Local Implementation Plan and look forward to working with you implementing the agreed strategies and actions in the years ahead.

Yours sincerely,

Brian Gleeson
Coordinator General
For Remote Indigenous Services

Ron Weatherall
Queensland Coordinator General
Co-Chair
Qld Remote Service Delivery BOM

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1. About Doomadgee

The Aboriginal mission of Doomadgee was originally established on the coast in 1931. It was established by the Christian Brethren and the settlement was moved inland to its present location after a cyclone in 1936 made conditions on the coast impossible. The coastal site had never been satisfactory as it lacked a good and reliable water supply. The present site was settled in 1937.

Doomadgee is on the Nicholson River and is in the semi-arid region of the Carpentaria plain. Doomadgee is 93kms west of Burketown in the Gulf Savannah region of North Queensland and 104kms from the Northern Territory border. It is 500km northwest of Mt Isa - the nearest large town, with mostly unsealed road (about 6 hours drive)—a 4WD vehicle is strongly recommended. Roads are often impassable during the wet season. Doomadgee was originally a Christian Mission community located near Burketown. The community is primarily made up of Gangalidda and Waanyi people, as well as the tribal groups of Lardil, Mingginda and Garawa.

The Indigenous languages of the area are not widely spoken. According to the 2006 Census, 90% of Doomadgee Indigenous residents spoke English only and 1% spoke English and an Australian Indigenous language fluently. Gangalidda and Waanyi are the main Australian Indigenous languages spoken.

The population of Doomadgee was estimated to be 1,005 people in 2006. This estimation was based on the 2006 Census data at a time when Aboriginal status was not required to be reported and it should be noted it may represent an undercount of Indigenous peoples. Local estimates place the population at around 1500 people.The Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council was established in 1985 and is now a fully constituted local government under the Local Government Act 2009. The council consists of a Mayor and four councillors, with a Chief Executive Officer and other council staff to deliver municipal services to the community.In 1983, the community was gazetted as a Deed of Grant in Trust (DOGIT) community under the Community Services Act (Qld), and in 1987 a Deed of Grant in Trust was issued with land covering 186,300 ha. In 2005, the Gangalidda and Garawa Peoples lodged claims over land in Queensland’s north-west.

On 23 June 2010 the Federal Court made two consent determinations over parts of the Gangalidda and Garawa Peoples’ two native title claims, recognising their exclusive native title rights over 1,860sq km of an Aboriginal Land Trust area and their non-exclusive rights over 3,950sq km of predominantly pastoral leases. The claim falls within the local government area of Burke Shire.

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2. Closing the Gap 'Building Block'
Building Blocks Doomadgee Representation Outcomes
Closing the Gap Early Childhood Doomadgee Representation of Early Childhood

For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities.

Access to quality early childhood education and care services, including pre-school, child care and family support services such as parenting programs and supports, is critical. Appropriate facilities and physical infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention.

Action in the areas of maternal, antenatal and early childhood health is relevant to addressing the child mortality gap and to early childhood development.

Closing the Gap Schooling Doomadgee Representation of Schooling

Human capital development through education is key to future opportunity. Responsive schooling requires attention to infrastructure, workforce (including teacher and school leader supply and quality), curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement and opportunities for parental engagement and school / community partnerships.

Transition pathways into schooling and into work, post school education and training are also important and attention is also needed regarding adult literacy and numeracy skills.

Closing the Gap Health Doomadgee Representation of Health

Indigenous Australians’ access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving their health expectancy, and reducing excess mortality caused by chronic disease.

All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care, and being responsive to and accountable for achieving government and community health priorities. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires a concerted effort in the prevention, management and treatment of chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to access programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.

Closing the Gap Healthy Homes Doomadgee Representation of Healthy Homes

A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (design, stock and maintenance). Children need to live in accommodation with adequate infrastructure conducive to good hygiene and study, and free of overcrowding.

Closing the Gap Safe Communities Doomadgee Representation of Safe Communities

Indigenous people (men, women and children) need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Fulfilling this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection and also preventative approaches. Addressing related factors such as alcohol and substance abuse will be critical to improving community safety, along with the improved health benefits obtained.

Closing the Gap Economic Participation Doomadgee Representation of the Ecomonic participation

Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors of the labour market Individuals and communities should have the opportunity to benefit from the mainstream economy – real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation.

Economic participation needs to extend to disadvantaged job seekers and those outside of the labour market. Access to land and native title assets, rights and interests can be leveraged to secure real and practical benefits for Indigenous people.

Other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures and social and physical infrastructure, including communications and transport, are needed to foster economic participation and community engagement. Through this participation, parents and other adults can become effective role models for their families and community.

The design and delivery of welfare (both transfer payments and services) needs to promote active engagement, enhanced capability and positive social norms. Ensuring that communities have support to address factors that are a barrier to engagement such as problem gambling is critical.

Closing the Gap Governanace and Leadership Doomadgee Representation of Governance & leadership

Strong leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels are essential to long term sustainable outcomes.

Indigenous people need to be engaged in the development of reforms that will impact on them. Improved access to capacity building in governance and leadership is needed in order for Indigenous people to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

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3. Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement (RSD NPA)

The Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement (RSD NPA) between the Commonwealth and Queensland (the Governments) is the operational framework that ensures the commitment from all of government. It is through this agreement, that the Governments will work together with local Indigenous people to close the gap on Aboriginal disadvantage in Doomadgee.

The RSD NPA involves:

  • engagement with communities
  • baseline mapping and service audits
  • establishment of integrated plans
  • coordination and service reporting mechanisms
  • the creation of local implementation plans (LIP) that improves service design and delivery
  • sharing best practice
  • risk management

The Governments have established a single Government interface for the community. This interface is the Mt Isa Regional Operations Centre (ROC). The ROC is responsible for ensuring the coherent and coordinated implementation of the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement for Doomadgee.

This includes:

  • community engagement so that community knows and understands what, when and why action is happening;
  • data gathering and monitoring, including identification of service gaps;
  • co-ordinated delivery of resources and activities which address agreed actions identified in the LIP;
  • employment of Remote Service Delivery Co-ordinators and Partnership Community Project Officers, in Doomadgee. These roles are the Government Engagement Co-ordination Officer (GECO) and the Indigenous Engagement Officers (IEO’s);
  • the IEO’s work mainly with the Doomadgee community and liaise between community and government on issues raised by the community. The IEO’s are local Indigenous people from within the community; and
  • liaison with the Australian Government, the Queensland Government, Local Governments and other relevant stakeholders to achieve identified outcomes.

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4. About the Doomadgee Local Implementation Plan (LIP)

4.1 LIP Development

The Doomadgee LIP has developed out of a series of conversations. Some of these conversations have been going on for a number of years, with the Doomadgee community talking to government about the issues facing their community through processes and structures such as the Negotiation Tables. It has been important to acknowledge what community has said before, what has been achieved and why some things haven’t, and to build on this to develop the LIP.

Key to the LIP development process for Doomadgee has been the commitment of three key partner groups (community, service providers and government) to actively engage and contribute. The LIP engagement process has involved multiple conversations with a diverse range of people including:

  • Clan and family groups,
  • Mothers;
  • Health workers;
  • Teacher aides;
  • CDEP participants;
  • Sporting groups;
  • Community leaders;
  • Elders;
  • Justice group members;
  • Student leaders;
  • Local business owners;
  • Groups of men and groups of women;
  • Service providers; and
  • Government at all levels ie Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council, Queensland Government and Australian Government.

Through this process the Doomadgee community and Government have committed to work together towards a better future for Doomadgee, acknowledging that this will mean:

  • the Mt Isa Regional Operations Centre (ROC) will assist, support and facilitate this process;
  • the Government and Community will work together to identify needs and take action to address immediate concerns, without compromising the long term outcome;
  • not all needs or issues identified will require a response by Government, however Government will support community to implement a response should they require it; and
  • the LIP will be a primary mechanism to drive Government business in Doomadgee, and as such, Government will support the development of a comprehensive and robust LIP and continue to do so as the LIP matures and evolves.

It should be noted that the statutory business of Government (eg policing, child safety and justice) will be implemented as required under the relevant legislative frameworks.

4.2 LIP Governance Structures

In order to drive forward and progress the LIP in accordance with the commitment of COAG, and on the basis of the relationships and commitments that have been established through the LIP development process, a governance system that represents the cultural, organisational and government authority and structures will be established.

At the Community level:

The Doomadgee community recognises how critical an effective and holistic governance approach is to Closing the Gap on disadvantage in their community. Central to this is the formation of Building Block Working Groups who will be responsible for informing, promoting and monitoring the progress of the Local Implementation Plan in achieving COAG Outcomes.

There will be six Working Groups in Doomadgee addressing the seven Building Blocks. The Building Blocks ‘Early Childhood’ and ‘Schools’ will be addressed by a single Working Group.

To the greatest extent possible the Working Groups will incorporate appropriate representation from the various cultural and family groups, as well as being inclusive of existing community based committees. Membership of the Working Groups will comprise community members with a special interest in the Building Block, representatives from service providers and Mt Isa ROC staff including the GECO and IEO’s. Council will be represented on an opt-in basis, with Council electing which Working Groups it will join.

Expressions of interest will be called to establish the membership of the working groups.

The Working Groups will be solutions focussed, with members bringing their own diverse experiences and knowledge, whilst maintaining a focus on LIP implementation and achieving the COAG Outcomes. GECOs will provide secretariat support to the Working Groups and ensure that Working Groups are not ‘siloed’ but continue to recognise and contribute to other Building Blocks.

Representatives of each of the working groups will also form a LIP Reference Group to work with the ROC, Council and the Queensland Government Champion to monitor progress, and provide feedback to government, through engagement mechanisms such as Negotiation Tables.

At the Government level:

There are a variety of structures to ensure agencies are meeting their accountabilities for the LIP:

  • The ROC Regional Leadership Group (RLG) has been established to oversight the effective implementation of the LIP. Its membership consists of the most senior regional officer from each of the Australian and Queensland government agencies with responsibilities for delivery of services in Doomadgee. The RLG is led by the Mt Isa ROC Manager who will provide regular reports to the Qld RSD BoM.
  • The RSD Board of Management (BOM), is co-chaired by the State Manager of the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and the Queensland Government Coordinator of RSD. BOM members include heads of Australian and Queensland government agencies and departments, the ROC Managers, and the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services.
  • The role of the BOM is to monitor the work of Government in progressing the LIPs. Where actions are not progressing in a timely manner, or to an acceptable standard, the BOM will endeavour to find the solutions and cut through the barriers.
  • The Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services is an independent authority appointed to oversee the implementation of RSD across the 29 communities. The Coordinator General has a critical role in reporting to the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and has the ability to call all government agencies to account for their responsibilities in achieving the Closing the Gap outcomes in these communities. The Coordinator General reports to government every 6 months.

The governance arrangements for the LIP commence at the community level and progress to a formal governance structure enunciated via the Board of Management (BoM). The BoM is co-chaired by the State Manager of the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and the Queensland Government Coordinator of RSD. BoM members include heads of Australian and Queensland government agencies and departments, ROC Managers and the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services.
The governance arrangements for the LIP commence at the community level and progress to a formal governance structure enunciated via the Board of Management (BoM). The BoM is co-chaired by the State Manager of the Australian Government Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) and the Queensland Government Coordinator of RSD. BoM members include heads of Australian and Queensland government agencies and departments, ROC Managers and the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services.

4.3 Addressing Concerns

Concerns can be raised by Community members via the following mechanisms:

  • Through members of the working groups or LIP Reference Group;
  • Directly through the GECO and IEOs who will work with the LIP Reference Group to ensure that concerns are heard; or
  • Contact with the Mt Isa ROC Manager.

The above indicates a sequence of events for problem solving, and if a resolution cannot be reached at the local or regional level, the ROC Manager will determine the need to escalate to the RLG and / or BOM.

It is critical that any concerns raised by community and follow up actions are documented, and that they are followed up in a timely manner. As such, all concerns should be followed up within one month of them being raised, or sooner if they are deemed to be of a critical nature.

4.4 LIP Principles

The LIP recognises the critical need for collaboration and demonstrates the commitment of all signatories to work together in partnership to achieve better outcomes for all residents of Doomadgee.

The Government agrees to implement the LIP in accordance with the principles set out in the RSD NPA:

  • National principles for investments in remote locations;
  • Principles taken into account in deciding sequencing; and
  • Service delivery principles for programs and services for Indigenous Australians.

These principles are included at Attachment A.

4.5 LIP Duration and Review Process

The LIP covers the period from 2010 through to 2014 and will be reviewed every six months, with an annual opportunity for improvement of the LIP. The first review will occur in December 2010.

Working Groups will meet on a monthly basis for the first six months. During this time each Working Group will focus on developing a Theory of Change (Logic Model). The Theory of Change (Logic Model) will allow them to identify intermediate and short term outcomes that are stepping stones to achieving the COAG outcomes.

Developing the Theory of Change will also allow the Working Groups to explore why previous related initiatives were not able to deliver the required outcomes. The Theory of Change (Logic Model) will provide the Working Groups with a clear framework and scope within which to develop a monitoring plan. This monitoring plan will help assess whether the LIP in relation to their building block is progressing and meeting needs, and will enable the group to identify data requirements to assist with this. It is anticipated that the majority of data will be through stories of significant change.

The Working Groups will also initiate data collection, sharing and analysis. This will include existing data that is collected by government via the baseline community profile, relevant service level data from providers, and any additional data that the Working Groups feel is necessary and accessible.

Qualitative data collection in the community may be undertaken by Working Group members, by the ROC GECO and IEO’s. A role of the Working Groups will be to assist in setting the measures and reviewing, analysing and discussing the data.

During the first six months of operation it is anticipated that Working Group members will require specialist support and training. This will include but not be limited to leadership training and skills based training to ensure that they have the tools to monitor LIP progress, and the confidence to use those tools.

In the first six months Working Groups will receive intensive support from the ROC, assisting them to put the groundwork in place that will provide a firm foundation for further work. After six months the Working Groups will meet on a bi- monthly basis, with a regular schedule of data collection between meetings. Meetings will be an opportunity to share and analyse data, and assess progress against intermediate outcomes. Findings will be utilised to inform and adjust LIP strategies, actions and key milestones at the bi-annual review points. They will also form the basis of presentations to Negotiation Tables, RLG and to the BOM.

Data collected by the Working Groups may also contribute to a ‘final’ evaluation undertaken towards the end of the LIP period by an external body. This evaluation should examine the extent to which the LIP activities have contributed to COAG outcomes and could also consider the extent to which the initiative has been effective and appropriate in order to ensure that the governments and community learn from experience.

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5. The Doomadgee LIP Action Plans

The LIP Action Plans included in this section represent a collective plan that brings together the needs and aspirations of the Doomadgee community and all levels of government.

There is an Action Plan for each of the seven COAG building blocks and they are prefaced by artwork and stories provided by the community to represent the significance of these priority areas in their traditional and cultural ways.

Following on from this cultural representation of the significance of each building block is a table that maps the same from a government perspective (the COAG Outcomes) and the National COAG Outputs committed to against each of these Outcomes.

The Action Plans include:

  • The Doomadgee Outcome – a brief statement reflective of the vision the Community has determined would demonstrate improved life outcomes for themselves, their families and most importantly, their children. This vision forms the rationale and basis upon which the Community and government have worked together to unpack and articulate the detail of the Action Plans.
  • Agreed Goals, Strategies and Actions – The Agreed Goals are a direct reflection of the conversations community has shared with government through the LIP engagement process. The Strategies and Actions are a combination of work undertaken with the community to identify how we can achieve the goals, and extensive work undertaken with government to gain commitment to work together to implement items that are reasonable and achievable. The Actions represent a mix of government, community and shared actions.
  • Lead and Responsible Agencies – For each Strategy a lead government agency or agencies have been identified. In addition to this, other agencies who are likely to have some responsibility or contribution to make in achieving these actions have been identified. These responsibilities and contributions are spread across all levels of government.
  • Milestones and Measures – key milestones and options to measure progress have been assigned to actions. As these Action Plans are primarily focussed on the first 12months of implementation, milestones and measures are aligned to that timeframe. The COAG outcomes are the ultimate measure of success. It is understood that the indicators to measure success will become more robust as the LIP matures, and other tools such as Baseline Mapping of data becomes available. As improved forms of qualitative and quantitative data collection are designed and implemented through the building block working groups, improved measures and learnings will be integrated into the LIP.

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5.1 Early Childhood

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Early Childhood

The foot prints in this painting represent the little kids of the community. The small circles are the different skin groups. The red lines show how we all connect together by our skins. The middle circle with the different colour dotted pattern within the circle represents our tribal groups.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Early Childhood Building Block
COAG Target Early Childhood Indigenous Specific Outcomes Early Childhood Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • All four year olds, including in remote indigenous communities, have access to early childhood education within five years
  • Halve the gap for indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians within a decade.
  • Indigenous children are born and remain healthy
  • Indigenous children have the same health outcomes as other Australian children
  • Children benefit from better social inclusion & reduced disadvantage, especially Indigenous children
  • Quality early childhood education and care supports the workforce participation choices of parents in the years before formal schooling
  • Indigenous children acquire the basic skills for life and learning
  • Indigenous children have access to affordable, quality early childhood education in the year before formal schooling as a minimum.
  • Increased provision of antenatal care services targeted at young Indigenous women
  • Increased provision of sexual and reproductive health services for Indigenous teenagers
  • Increased provision of maternal and child health services for Indigenous children and their mothers
  • Establishment of a minimum of 35 Children and Family Centres in urban, regional and remote areas with high Indigenous populations and high disadvantage *
  • Provision of early learning, child care and parent and family support services to Indigenous families at or through each of the Children and Family Centres
  • Children have universal access to a preschool program for 15 hours per week, 40 weeks per year
  • Universal access to a preschool program is delivered across a range of settings at a cost which is not a barrier to access
  • Indigenous children (including those in remote Indigenous communities) enrolled in and attending a preschool program
  • Improve number and qualifications of workforce (including Indigenous)

*Doomadgee is an identified site for the establishment of a Children and Family Centre under the Indigenous Early Childhood National Partnership Agreement.

ACTION PLAN: Early Childhood
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee babies are born healthy and continue to be happy, safe, strong well cared for, that parents grand also get the help they need raise their children.
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Others
  • Mothers care for themselves and their babies throughout their pregnancy.

  • Children are properly cared for by their parents, families and the community, with access to services they need to be healthy and strong.

  • Community members will act as mentors to young parents and encourage them to attend programs and look after their children better.

  • A range of appropriate sex education programs are customised and provided to meet the needs of different target and ‘at risk’ groups.

  • Community members will access and respect any early childhood services that support them to be good parents and working parents.

  • Community members will start to set community standards and hold each other accountable for inappropriate and insensitive behaviour towards children in the community.

  • We will watch over our children to keep them safe.

  • We will find ways to appropriately manage and discipline our children; stop the bullying and anti-social behaviour of our young kids and create positive and respectful behaviours.

  • We need to have more local people trained to work in childcare and other early childhood services.

1. Develop and deliver improved services and local support systems that provide quality antenatal, child and maternal health care.

1.1 Build and deliver an appropriate child and maternal health service system that caters for community need.

DoHA

Q Health

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA DoC

  • Scoping of child and maternal health services, including gap analysis and identification of opportunities to improve completed by March 2011.

1.2 Ensure that all pregnant girls and pregnant women have access to antenatal and post-natal services and are encouraged to use them.

DoHA

Q Health

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • By June 2011, attendance rates for antenatal and postnatal care services indicate pregnant girls and women are accessing services within appropriate timeframes.

1.3 Expanding on the work of the existing childcare centre, introduce enhancements through the Children & Family Centre model that will assist to coordinate and / or integrate:

  • sustainable quality early childhood education and childcare services;
  • parent and family support services; and
  • child and maternal health services

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoC

DoHA

Q Health

  • Children and Family Centre model developed by January 2011.
  • Additional construction effort completed by July 2011.

1.4 Make comprehensive primary health care and development checks available to school aged children.

DoHA

Q Health

DET

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Comprehensive primary health care and development checks for children at school commenced by October 2010.
1.5 Encourage comprehensive primary health care and development checks for all children prior to commencing school.

DoHA

Q Health

DET

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Children accessing early childhood services are taking up child health checks.
  • Parents have commenced bringing children due to start pre-Prep in 2011 in for checks by November 2010.

1.6 Care plans for children based on the comprehensive primary health care & development checks will be linked to necessary services to respond to their health and wellbeing requirements.

DoHA

Q ealth

DET

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Care plans with links to relevant health and development services are in place for all children that have received a primary health care and development check.
1.7 Establish early detection and intervention supports for children with disabilities and development impediments.

DoHA

Q Health

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FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Individual responses included in Care Plans.
1.8 Identify and support “community champions” for “happy, healthy, thriving babies”.

FaHCSIA

DoC

DoHA

Q Health

DET

DEEWR

  • Community identified local “community champions” endorsed through the relevant Working Group by October 2010.

1.9 Develop a range of local child and maternal health promotional materials with involvement of “community champions”.

Q Health

DoHA

DET

FaHCSIA

DoC

DEEWR

  • Local child and maternal health promotional materials developed by April 2011.
  1. Develop a comprehensive sex education program to be delivered through a range of community based access points.

2.1 Work with the community to design and implement an appropriate sex education program.

Q Health

DET

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Community and local service providers involved in development of local sex education program and resources, to be completed by January 2011.

2.2 Integration of local sex education programs into school curriculum and health system.

Q Health

DET

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Local sex education programs commenced in school and delivered through local health services by February 2011.
  1. Support community members to promote and teach sex education in the home.

3.1Develop a range of local materials and resources that promote sexual education and health programs being delivered in community, with involvement of “community champions”.

Q Health

DET

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Local sexual education and health promotion materials and resources developed by February 2011.
  1. Positive and strong parenting programs for Mums, Dads and caregivers.

4.1Establish an Indigenous Parenting Support Service (IPSS) and a Locational Supported Playgroup (LSP).

FaHCSIA

DoC

Q Health

DoHA

DET

  • IPSS and LSP operating in community by October 2010.
  1. Introduce a range of appropriate and needed services in early childhood education, care and development, which are designed in consultation with community.

5.1 Develop and deliver education programs for mothers, fathers and family members on making a safe and healthy life for babies, with involvement of “community champions”.

Q Health

DoC

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DET

  • Education programs commenced by May 2011.

5.2 Deliver tailored programs to young women, men, care givers and mentors that promote health, wellbeing and parents as first teachers.

DET

Q Health

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoC

DoHA

  • Suite of tailored programs identified / developed by November 2010.
  • Programs commenced by January 2011.

5.3 Establish a Kinder Gym with the introduction of the new PCYC

FaHCSIA

DoC

DoHA

Q Health

  • Kinder Gym operating by February 2011.

5.4 Ensure a seamless transition pathway from early childhood development into schooling years.

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Pathway from early childhood to schooling is tailored through a defined continuum developed as part of a best practice model of learning for 0-17 by January 2011.

5.5 Develop and introduce a community wide campaign of ‘respect’ and ‘positive parenting’ targeting bullying and anti-social behaviour, with support from school, health, Council, Store, CDEP, PCYC and other providers.

DET

FaHCSIA

DoC

DEEWR

Q Health

DoHA

  • Campaign developed by September 2010.
  • Campaign picked up and supported by all stakeholders in community for introduction by November 2010.
  1. Develop a targeted workforce strategy for the Early Childhood sector.

6.1Develop a targeted strategy to engage local people in a training and employment program that will position them to be job start qualified and ready to be good and effective employees in the early childhood sector.

DEEWR

DEEDI

DET

FaHCSIA

  • Early Childhood Workforce Development strategy developed by October 2010.

6.2 Train and employ more local people in available jobs in the areas of early childhood health and development.

Q Health

DoC

FaHCSIA

DET

DEEWR

DEEDI

DoHA

  • Increase in number of local people who have commenced training or employment in the areas of early childhood health and development since signing of the LIP.
  • Introduction of two (2) Early Childhood traineeships by January 2011.

6.3 Provide the necessary mentoring and support for local people taking up training and employment opportunities.

FaHCSIA

DEEDI

DEEWR

DoC

DoHA

Q Health

DET

  • Mentoring and support services available to trainees and employees in early childhood fields through CDEP and other structured support programs from January 2011.

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5.2 Schooling  

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Schooling

The circle in the middle of this painting represents the school or place of learning. The grouping of half circles together are the children all coming together. The dots on the outside of the children are the community keeping the children together.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Schooling Building Block
COAG Target Indigenous Specific Schooling Outcomes Schooling Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • All four year olds, including in remote indigenous communities, have access to early childhood education within five years
  • Halve the gap for indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade
  • At least halve the gap in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians within a decade.
  • Schooling promotes the social inclusion and reduces the educational disadvantage of children, especially Indigenous children
  • Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving
  • Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study
  • School meals and nutrition programs
  • Establishment of a minimum of 35 Children and Family Centres in urban, regional and remote areas with high Indigenous populations*
  • Provision of early learning, child care and parent and family support services to Indigenous families at or through each of the Children and Family Centres
  • Meals programs in early childhood education programs
  • School/Health/Family Hub Centres for family support
  • Support for parents/carers to actively participate in children’s education
  • Professional development in quality and culturally appropriate teaching methods**
  • Early intervention and specialist teachers for low achievers (Accelerated Literacy Program)
  • Holistic services offered through school hubs
  • School meals programs
  • Improve school retention and completion rates from Year 9 up
  • Provision of innovative and tailored learning opportunities and external partnerships with parents, other schools, businesses and communities

** Doomadgee State School is identified to benefit from implementation of the Low Socio-Economic Status Schools (SES) National Partnership Agreement.

ACTION PLAN: Schooling
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee children are educated and go on to live good lives, with jobs. No matter what their circumstance, all be treated well looked after, supported achieve best.
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • Our children need to be educated to the same quality standards as mainstream schooling.
  • Children with disabilities or learning difficulties are appropriately supported in the school environment to cope with their needs and achieve quality learning.
  • The community will support and encourage their children to attend school and show interest in what they are learning and achieving.
  • The community will become more involved in supporting school activities and offering volunteer services.
  • Our culture is respected and embedded in the curriculum of the school.
  1. Ensure curriculum and educational attainment are in line with national and Queensland standards.
1.1 Through the planning and implementation of the Low Socio-Economic Status Schools (SES) National Partnership Agreement (NPA) and the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan (ATSIEAP), identify improvements to practice and increased resources required to improve numeracy and literacy outcomes.

DET

DSS

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Improvements to practice and increased resources required to improve literacy and numeracy outcomes identified by June 2011.

1.2 Build a Resource Centre in the school.

DET

DSS

DASC

DEEWR

  • Resource Centre to be built and ready to use by the commencement of school in 2011.
  1. Develop a local model of best practice to achieve improved and sustained learning outcomes.
2.1 Relevant government agencies will work with the community to develop a seamless model of learning for the 0-17 years cohort, from early childhood to schooling to post-schooling.

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DSS

DoC

  • Learning modelling completed by January 2011.
  • Plan for implementation of modelling work developed by April 2011, to commence Term 2, 2011.
  1. Understand the individual needs of children in order to ensure required services are working with children (and their care givers and the school) to improve their participation and achievement in school.
3.1 Make comprehensive primary health care and development checks available at school through an arrangement with DSS, parents and service providers.

DoHA

Q Health

DET

FaHCSIA DoC

  • Comprehensive primary health care and development checks commenced by October 2010 (as per Early Childhood Actions 1.4 – 1.6).

3.2 Develop holistic individual learning plans for each student, with links where appropriate to Early Childhood care plans.

DET

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

  • Individual learning plans commenced by November 2010 and in place for all students by May 2011.
       

3.3 Focus on improving teacher capability, learning supports and support for students with disabilities to meet identified needs.

DET

DoC

FaHCSIA

DoHA

Q Health

DASC

DEEWR

  • Individual learning plans reflect supports and learning needs of students with disabilities and learning difficulties, where appropriate.
  • Suite of additional support options identified to meet the needs of students with disabilities and learning difficulties.
  • Sources of funding secured to provide local responses to need by May 2011.
  1. Introduce necessary strategies to attract, retain and increase the number of children at school, in a safe environment.

4.1Conduct cultural camps as part of an attendance and achievement rewards program for students.

DSS

DoC

DET FaHCSIA

Q Health

DASC

DEWHA

  • Cultural camps organised and conducted with participation from parents, elders, community members, the school and other service providers, commencing Term 1, 2011.

4.2

Employment of School Attendance Case Managers.

DoC

DET

DSS

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

  • Funding sourced and School Attendance Case Managers commence in community by January 2011.

4.3 Provide consistent career guidance that promotes local options as well as off community.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DEEDI

  • Career guidance plans incorporated into individual learning plans for students aged 13 and over commencing in Term 1, 2011.

4.4 Provide a nursing service to the Doomadgee State School, based from the local health care centre.

Q Health

DoHA

DSS

DET

  • Nursing service to DSS established by November 2011.
  1. Develop targeted programs for children at risk, or already disengaged, to continue learning.

5.1 Promote and embed locally developed anti-bullying and acceptable behavioural education programs for students and parents.

DET

DSS

DEEWR

Q Health

DASC

DoC

  • “Stop Bullying in School” education program developed by January 2011 (linked to Early Childhood Action 5.4).

5.2 Deliver sport and recreation activities including an inter-school sports program across the lower Gulf region.

DET

DoHA

DSS

DoC

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Increased participation of DSS students in Gulf and North West region sports activities since signing of the LIP.
  1. Develop a local community wide program to support the attainment of a Queensland Certificate of Education (QCE) and post-transition outcomes.

6.1Develop a whole of community program that will support students to achieve a national Year 12 qualification or equivalency of Certificate II or above.

DET

DEEWR

DEEDI

FaHCSIA

DoC

DSS

  • Introduction of school based traineeship program by March 2011 for eligible students, including those who are disengaged or returning from boarding school.

6.2 Increase the levels of school-based Vocational Education and Training programs.

DET

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • School-based VET Coordinator commenced by January 2011.

6.3 Local service providers to commit to providing work experience placements for students, as well as consider options for school based traineeships and apprenticeships.

DSS

DET

DEEDI

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

  • Student Work Experience Program developed by March 2011, including promotion and orientation for “employers” and students.
  • Increase in number of school-based traineeships and apprenticeships since signing of the LIP.

6.4 Continue strong partnership with MMG Century Mine to improve work experience and work placements within the mining and related service industries.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DEEDI

DIP

DoC

  • Formalise agreement between DSS and MMG Century Mine regarding options and targets for work experience and work placements for school leavers by January 2011.

6.5 Conduct at least an annual community wide Careers Day.

DEEWR

DEEDI

FaHCSIA

DASC

DET

DoC

DoHA

Q Health

  • Inaugural community wide Career Day held by April 2011.
  1. Support for children and their families to prepare for and succeed at boarding school.

7.1Provide an educational program for parents on understanding their responsibilities in preparing for their children to attend boarding schools, and what they have to do while they are away at school.

DET

DEEWR

Centrelink

FaHCSIA

DASC

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

  • Boarding school preparation program for parents and students developed by October 2010, for delivery in November and December 2010 and follow up in January 2011.

7.2 Provide a boarding school support program for students.

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DASC

Q Health

DoHA

  • Commencement of an induction program into boarding schools for students from Years 6 – 10, involving students, parents and community, by November / December 2010.
  1. Community engaged in school in a positive and proactive way, delivering culture, supporting students and providing advice to the school about learning and community engagement.

8.1 Local people to be employed to provide cultural learnings in the classroom and wider school environment.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

  • Increase in number of local people participating in the school, either through training, employment or volunteering, since signing of the LIP.

8.2 Local P&C Committee established and maintained and contributing advice to the practice and programs of the school.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

  • Continued development of DSS P&C Committee and promotion of the partnership with the community through targeted engagement and communications.

8.3 Local people employed at the school are encouraged and supported to undertake career planning and professional development.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • Career development plans in place by June 2011 for all local people employed at DSS.

8.4 Work with the community and the DSS P&C to develop targeted PaCE initiatives that ensures increased engagement in the school and promotes the need to support children being educated.

DSS

DEEWR

DET

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Initiatives to be developed by November 2010 in order for implementation to commence January 2011.
  1. Build parental capacity, ability, skills and knowledge to participate in education decision making and support.

9.1 The school will work with other local providers to deliver consistent messages, support and tools for parents.

DSS

DET

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Increase in number of parents engaging with teachers and Principal regarding children’s education, through Parent – Teacher sessions and other activities at DSS since signing of the LIP.

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5.3 Health

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Health

The animals represent the main foods that the community eat. The brown circles represent the waterholes and places that people go to fish. The different colours in the background represent the different colours of the land around the community.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Health Building Block
COAG Targets Indigenous Specific Health Outcomes Health Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • All four year olds, including in remote indigenous communities, have access to early childhood education within five years
  • At least halve the gap in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians within a decade.
  • Indigenous Australians and those living in rural and remote areas or on low incomes achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population
  • Indigenous people have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventive services
  • Indigenous people remain healthy and free of preventable disease
  • Improved quality and coverage of primary health services
  • Prevention, early detection and management of major chronic diseases
  • Address key behavioural chronic disease risk factors (e.g. smoking, risky drinking, poor diet and obesity)
  • Improved quality and coverage of primary health services
  • Address key behavioural chronic disease risk factors (e.g. smoking, risky drinking, poor diet and obesity)
  • Increased provision of antenatal care services targeted at young Indigenous women
  • Increased provision of sexual and reproductive health services for Indigenous teenagers
  • Increased provision of maternal and child health services for Indigenous children and their mothers
  • Reduction in alcohol use and smoking
  • More flexible models of service delivery and improved coordination of care
  • Reduction in alcohol use and smoking
  • Promotion of breastfeeding
  • Pre-school meals programs
  • Increased provision of maternal and child health services for Indigenous children and their mothers
  • Chronic disease management, including good health, fitness and nutrition


ACTION PLAN: Health
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee people are healthy, well and grow old with their families in community.
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • The community needs to have a better understanding of our health status, from an individual and community perspective, and how we can improve our own health.
  • Community needs to be involved in the design and delivery of health services to have a sense of ownership of services.
  • The local health service system needs to be able to be understood by community so that people can access with more confidence and ease.
  • There needs to be more regularity and consistency of Doctors visiting the community so that patients can develop a relationship with them.
  • Chronic and renal disease is one of our biggest concerns in community. We need to better understand this and how we can improve it, and we need to have better support services at the local level to do this.
  • Community wants to be able to look after family members with renal disease in the best possible way, preferably in community but also supporting them if they have to go away for treatment.
  • Doomadgee babies should be born healthy and grow up to be healthy, strong and confident.
  • Need to improve community capacity to support people with complex issues such as drug and alcohol use, mental health, and emotional and social wellbeing, so that they can get better and live a full positive life.
  • Need to improve our dental hygiene and care as it can lead to chronic disease.
  • Community want to be able to provide the best support they can for their people with health issues and needs, as carers, escorts, mentors, health workers and volunteers.
  • Need to improve the response times in cases of health emergencies.
  1. Gather information about prevalence of disease, hospital admissions and causative factors, to provide community with a clear picture of their current health status.

1.1 Data and information (such as health service use statistics) will be made available to the community. The data will be presented in an understandable and meaningful way.

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

  • Relevant current health data to be presented to community by December 2010.
  1. Community education regarding priority health issues and promotion of ways to reduce and prevent illness.

2.1 Comprehensive adult and child health checks (as per Early Childhood Action 1.4 – 1.6), are made available. All community members are encouraged to access through a range of service entry points.

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Comprehensive health check surge commenced by October 2010.

2.2 Develop local health promotion and health education resources and materials targeting particular health issues relevant to the community.

Q Health

DoHA

 
  • Local health promotion and health education resources, with input from community, developed by April 2011.
  1. Community and government will work together to design a more integrated and coordinated local health service that includes all providers, local and visiting.

3.1

  • analyse the available health status information;
  • Identify the full suite of health services required to respond to the local health status;
  • Determine what can be practically delivered locally;
  • develop local community based interventions; and
  • establish an organised and integrated health system.

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Integrated health service modelling will be completed by April 2011.

3.2 Establish a LIP Health Working Group to provide advice and guidance on existing service quality, program development and the re-design of the health system.

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • LIP Health Working Group established with full representation of cultural groups, organisations and service providers, with a clear understanding by members of purpose, function and operating guidelines by September 2010.
  • Q Health Senior Health Worker authorised to participate in this group.

3.3 Identify types of disability supports required in community and opportunities to improve on current local supports.

DoC

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoHA

DASC

Centrelink

  • Analysis of disability rates and types in community for gaps and opportunities, and identification of required disability supports by February 2011.
  1. Ensure all community members have up to date Medicare and appropriate Health Care cards.

4.1 Medicare registration checks and updates will be completed for community members as part of comprehensive health checks.

Q Health

DoHA

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Update of Medicare registrations for all individuals and families receiving a health check.

4.2 Centrelink will promote entitlements for Health Care Cards and assist eligible customers to claim, and will work with health providers to implement appropriate measures that will overcome access barriers resulting from misplaced Health Care Cards.

Centrelink

Q Health

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DASC

DoC

  • Promotion of Health Care card measure through all local service providers.
  1. Establish a local health workforce development strategy.

5.1Map all current and proposed health workforce positions in the community and positions with visiting service providers.

Q Health

DoHA

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

  • Doomadgee Health workforce mapping completed by November 2010.

5.2 Government and service providers will work with community to conduct a local skills audit and develop a workforce and capability development strategy.

Q Health

DoHA

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DEEDI

  • Local Health Workforce and Capability Development Strategy completed and implementation plan developed by June 2011.

5.3 Identify needs relating to staff housing to attract and retain a suitable workforce, including exploring:

  • potential locations
  • availability of land
  • associated costs.

Q Health

DoHA

RILIPO

DASC

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Staff housing needs and options identified by December 2010.
  1. Improved frequency of visiting services.

6.1Provide additional, regular and consistent services from visiting Doctors based in the Family Centred Primary Health Care Service in Normanton and from Q Health, with a chronic disease focus.

Q Health

DoHA

 
  • Increase in number of Doctors visiting on a consistent and regular basis since signing of the LIP.
  1. Implementation of Chronic Disease Medical Specialist Outreach Assistance Program (MSOAP).

7.1 Provide information to the community about the implementation of the Chronic Disease Medical Specialist Outreach Assistance Program (MSOAP) including potential new services and discuss how they might be delivered.

Q Health

DoHA

  • Chronic Disease MSOAP community information disseminated and discussion with LIP Health Working Group about types of service and potential delivery models by September 2010.
  1. Community focus on getting healthy through improved nutrition.

8.1 Community, service providers, roadhouse, bakery and retail store to work together to develop a local health nutrition promotion strategy, encouraging the sourcing and consumption of affordable, quality, and healthy food.

Q Health

DoHA

DASC

DoC

DET

FaHCSIA

  • Local Nutrition Health Promotion Strategy and relevant resource and promotional materials developed by April 2011.

8.2 Community will identify and organise means of greater involvement of elders from the Aged Care facility in community life and special events.

DoHA

DASC

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Council to work with stakeholders and families to deliver a solution by September 2010.
  1. Develop a good practice model for community renal disease management.

9.1 Q Health will work with the community to investigate workable options for a quality renal service in the community, including:

  • Possible models of training in the community for self-dialysing patients and their carers;
  • Education about the opportunities and risks of home dialysis; and
  • Exploring other models of renal disease management in remote Indigenous communities.

Q Health

DoHA

DASC

  • Local Renal Disease Management Strategy developed by April 2011.

9.2 Provide specific training and education in community for potential carers.

Q Health

DoHA

DASC

FaHCSIA

  • Local training and education package for potential carers developed by December 2010.
  1. Develop and deliver improved services and local support systems that provide quality antenatal, child and maternal health care.

10.1Introduce a range of pre-parenting programs which will include teaching practical skills like good nutrition, developmental milestones, and child raising (expansion of Early Childhood Action 1.1).

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

DET

DEEWR

  • Scoping of child and maternal health services, including gap analysis and identification of opportunities to improve completed by March 2011.

10.2 Establish appropriate avenues for sharing information about baby care including practical advice and assistance with breastfeeding, nutrition, hygiene and parenting.

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

DET

DEEWR

  • Options for local promotion of ante-natal and post-natal care advice identified by December 2010.

10.3 Provide improved follow up care for mothers and babies returning from regional centres to their home through positive experiences eg Welcoming Babies Ceremonies.

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

DET

DEEWR

  • Scoping of pathways and support networks for mothers and babies returning to community, and identification of practical strategies to promote by December 2010.
  • Community Welcoming Babies Ceremony held by February 2011.
  1. Establish a community wide model of Wellbeing that ensures that there is “no wrong door” for individuals with complex needs, whether they stem from alcohol and drug issues, mental health, or long term disengagement.

11.1 Community will work with government and service providers to develop community driven strategies to tackle the critical issues of alcohol and drug use, and their impact on the health and wellbeing of children in the community.

Q Health

DoC

FaHCSIA

DoHA

DASC

  • LIP Health Working Group endorsement of community strategy re responsible drinking and anti-drugs by December 2010.

11.2 Ensure the Wellbeing service model for Doomadgee includes links to other services in the community and external to the community, through clear case coordination and case management frameworks.

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

DASC

  • Wellbeing Service model complete and presented to community by September 2010.

11.3 The model of the Wellbeing Service will include a focus on building community capacity to enable transition of the services to eventual community control.

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

  • Lower Gulf Regional Health Forum to explore processes and phases of capability development and transition of services to community control by June 2011.

11.4 Develop infrastructure for the Doomadgee Wellbeing Service in a manner that is culturally appropriate and supportive, and promotes access by community for positive reasons.

DoHA

DASC

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Community involvement in infrastructure modelling for Wellbeing Centre throughout development.
  • Wellbeing Centre infrastructure finalised by February 2011.

11.5 Introduce the Personal Helpers and Mentors Service (PHaMS) to grow the capacity of families and carers of people suffering from mental health issues to provide appropriate support.

FaHCSIA

DoHA

Q Health

  • PHaMS service commenced in community by September 2010.

11.6 Develop a culturally appropriate and supportive model and infrastructure for the Normanton Residential Rehabilitation Service that supports Doomadgee people to access for treatment, and links with the WBC

DoHA

Q Health

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Community involvement in service and infrastructure modelling for the Normanton Residential Rehabilitation Service.
  • Commencement of infrastructure works for Normanton Residential Rehabilitation Service by July 2011.
  1. Develop an improved Oral Health Care Plan for the community.

12.1Identify and implement strategies to increase frequency of dental service visits to community.

Q Health

DoHA

  • Increase of visiting dental services to monthly by January 2011.

12.2 Build on current teeth brushing health promotion campaign in the school.

Q Health

DSS

DET

DoHA

  • Enhancements to teeth brushing health promotion campaign identified by December 2010.
  1. Provide structured support for carers, escorts and mentors in the community.

13.1Introduce a register of volunteer carers and provide orientation and training.

Q Health

DoHA

FaHCSIA

DoC

DASC

  • Volunteer register and capability development plan in place by January 2011.
  1. Increase the involvement of community in the operations of the Qld Ambulance Services.

14.1 LIP Health Working Group to work with Qld Ambulance Service to identify practical strategies that will contribute to improved response times, such as:

  • Street signage and clear house numbering;
  • Local recruitment campaign and mentoring / development strategy to engage and retain local trainees;
  • Community assistance to find places / people during callouts.

FaHCSIA

Q Health

DASC

DoHA

DoC

DEEWR

  • Local strategies to improve responsiveness of ambulance services identified by February 2011 and implemented by June 2011.

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5.4 Healthy Homes

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Healthy Homes

The different circles in this painting represent the different homes and families in the community. The blue lines represent the linking of each home and family group through family groups, culture and sharing.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Healthy Homes Building Block
COAG Targets Indigenous Specific Healthy Homes Outcomes Healthy Homes Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • Halve the gap for indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade
  • At least halve the gap in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians within a decade.
  • Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy
  • Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities
  • Indigenous people have improved housing amenity and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities
  • Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people
  • Address overcrowding and environmental health through: maintenance and repair of existing housing
  • Improve environmental housing (sewerage and water quality) to combat communicable disease
  • Establishment of a minimum of 35 Children and Family Centres in urban, regional and remote areas with high Indigenous populations and high disadvantage *
  • Provision of early learning, child care and parent and family support services to Indigenous families at or through each of the Children and Family Centres
  • National Affordable Housing Agreement: Reduce housing overcrowding
  • Social Housing NP: Reduce housing overcrowding
  • Remote Indigenous Housing NP: Reduce housing overcrowding ***
  • National Affordable Housing Agreement: Reduce housing overcrowding
  • Social Housing NP: Reduce housing overcrowding
  • Local investment in construction – government procurement includes Indigenous participation

***Doomadgee is identified to benefit from implementation of the Remote Indigenous Housing National Partnership.

ACTION PLAN: Healthy Homes
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee people live in good homes, which are looked after and meet the needs of our growing communit
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • All houses are repaired and maintained to a high standard.
  • New houses, replacements and extensions are built to ensure a reduction in overcrowding and increase the life cycle of properties.
  • Comprehensive township and land use plans are in place to guide good decision making for future growth.
  • Leverage off infrastructure development to create employment and business opportunities.
  • The necessary infrastructure systems are in place to support population and capital growth and to support environmental health outcomes.
  • Households are encouraged to take more pride in their living space, be good tenants and look after their homes.
  1. Urgent and emergent repairs and maintenance are undertaken in a timely manner.

1.1 Define a more efficient local system of reporting, assessing and undertaking repairs which requires QBuild and Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council (DASC) Works Dept to assist tenants.

DoC

Q Build

DASC

RILIPO

FaHCSIA

  • Improved local system of reporting, assessing and undertaking repairs and maintenance developed and promoted in community by December 2010.
  1. A rolling program of major repairs and upgrades is developed based on priority need.

2.1 Develop a detailed program of works for major repairs and upgrades, which includes a local training, employment and procurement strategy.

RILIPO

DASC

FaHCSIA

DoC

QBuild

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • Detailed program of works developed by November 2010.
  • Related training, employment and procurement strategy developed by December 2010.

2.2 Tenants will be fully informed and consulted in relation to works to be undertaken on their home.

DoC

Q Build

DASC

RILIPO

FaHCSIA

  • Strategy for informing and consulting with tenants about repairs and maintenance work established and implemented by September 2010.
  1. New houses, replacements and plug-ins are delivered to the community to reduce overcrowding stress.

3.1 Tenants will be given early notice in relation to the allocation of new or refurbished homes.

RILIPO

DASC

DoC

FaHCSIA

Q Build

  • Strategy for informing tenants about allocation and housing design established and implemented by September 2010.

3.2 Tenants will meet their obligations as tenants, pay rent, care for the property and report problems quickly.

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

Q Build

  • Local education and information resources on tenant obligations identified for use by October 2010.
  1. Complete all relevant land administration actions required to enable growth of housing and development.

4.1 Develop a town and land use plan compliant with Queensland legislation.

RILIPO

DASC

DERM

DIP

  • Draft town and land use plan completed by May 2011.

4.2 Full survey network to be completed.

RILIPO

DASC

DERM

DIP

  • Full survey network to be completed by December 2011.

4.3 Land Tenure actions coming out of the survey network project are undertaken to rectify issues with roads, reserves and lease boundaries to create a homogenous cadastral network to facilitate future lease opportunities for government and non government parties.

RILIPO

DASC

DERM

  • Roads, Reserves and other tenures will have surveyed and aligned boundaries by 2012.
  1. Develop a targeted workforce development capacity plan for all aspects of infrastructure development.

5.1 The Remote Indigenous Land and Infrastructure Program Office (RILIPO) will coordinate and sequence all government infrastructure works in order to maximise opportunities for local employment and business development.

RILIPO

DASC

DEEDI

  1. FaHCSIA
  2. DEEWR
  3. DET
  • Technical Working Group established and meeting regularly by August 2010.
  • Comprehensive land and infrastructure plan for Doomadgee developed by November 2010.

5.2 The DASC and other local Indigenous providers will be supported, as and if required, to grow capacity in order to have a better chance of securing business in delivering the housing program.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DASC

DEEDI

RILIPO

DoC

  • Model for local Indigenous business and workforce development in housing construction and maintenance and other associated fields developed by October 2010.

5.3 Resolve outstanding land tenure matters so progress on community and social housing infrastructure is not delayed and community can benefit through jobs and investment.

RILIPO

DASC

DIP

DERM

FaHCSIA

  • Identify outstanding land tenure matters and develop a resolution plan by January 2011.

5.4 CDEP, JSA, School & training providers will develop a specific construction industry program for secondary students and adults recognising existing skills and capabilities.

FaHCSIA

DET

DEEWR

RILIPO

DASC

DSS

DEEDI

  • Construction Industry Program for secondary students and adults developed by December 2010 for implementation in 2011.
  1. Environmental health infrastructure systems to be in place to support capital and population core requirements.

6.1 Government will deliver a range of essential infrastructure upgrades, including:

  • Upgrades to water supply with additional bulk water storage facility, replacement of reticulation system, water treatment plant upgrade, upgrade to pump stations and installation of a standby generator;
  • Rehabilitation of the former town landfill, illegal dump site and Little Century tip;
  • Little Century landfill consolidation and fencing; and
  • Development of a subdivision of approximately 20 lots.

DIP

DPW

DASC

RILIPO

FaHCSIA

Q Health

  • Essential infrastructure upgrades completed by Dec 2011.

6.2 Deliver a long term capacity building and sustainability strategy that includes support for infrastructure systems, service providers and communities, service standards, appropriate technology and water conservation under the Water for the Future initiative.

DIP

RILIPO

DASC

  • Water for the Future capacity building strategy developed by March 2011.
  1. Deliver to all households the “Pride in my Home” program that will include a starter kit and support program.

7.1 Develop and deliver a “Pride in my Home” program that offers education on tenant responsibilities, starter kits with basic household cleaning and replacement items, access to a small amount of funds per household to undertake home and/or yard clean up and beautification activities and tailored education and support in relation to home maker skills.

FaHCSIA

DoC

DASC

RILIPO

DEEWR

  • Roll out of “Pride in my Home” program commenced by February 2011.

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5.5 Safe Communities

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Safe Communities

The circles represent the Doomadgee community. The blue lines are pulling the community together and letting everyone know what’s happening in the community. The yellow and tanned colour represents the land and the changes in the land as you travel from one place to the next.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Safe Communities Building Block
COAG Targets Indigenous Specific Safe Communities Outcomes Safe Communities Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • Halve the gap for indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade
  • At least halve the gap in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-indigenous Australians within a decade.
  • Indigenous children and families are safe and protected from violence and neglect in their home and communities
  • Alcohol and other drug abuse among Indigenous people is overcome
  • Breaking cycles of criminal behaviour and violence normalisation
  • Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm through prevention, diversion and treatment services
  • Mental health treatment that is culturally sensitive, in liaison with substance abuse and criminal justice services
  • Healthy living programs focusing on harmful/hazardous consumption of alcohol and smoking cessation
  • Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm through prevention, diversion and treatment services
  • Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm through prevention, diversion and treatment services
  • Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes NP: Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm
  • Support youth at risk of contact with justice system
  • Preventive Health NP : Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm
  • Community Leadership Program
  • Mental health promotion programs (including coping skills)
  • Addressing alcohol / substance abuse and harm
  • Mental health promotion
  • Diversionary programs / skills learning within juvenile justice programs


ACTION PLAN: Safe Communities
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee community is safe, and people are healthy, active respectful of culture each other.
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • Community, government and other stakeholders contribute to the development of a community in which everyone feels safe.
  • Men, Women and Young people need to have their own spaces.
  • Organised and positive sport and recreational activities and spaces are in place for all community members.
  • .
  • Relationships between families, police and other service providers are constructive and respectful
  • There are a full range of responsive family services to support individuals and families.
  1. Development of a comprehensive Community Safety Strategy through a partnership with community, governments and other stakeholders that focuses on having the hard yarn and agree on the collective actions in relation to dealing with:
  • Alcohol (and other substance abuse);
  • Violence (family violence and child abuse);
  • Policing and understanding laws and legal rights;
  • Youth Detention;
  • Adult Offenders;
  • Local Crime Prevention Strategies; and
  • Gambling.

1.1 Community and stakeholders will work together to develop and implement actions in the Community Safety Strategy.

DoC

AGD

DASC

QPS

FaHCSIA

JAG

  • Comprehensive Community Safety Plan developed by February 2011.

1.2 Construction of a storage facility for OPAL fuel, to enable the roll-out of OPAL fuel across the Gulf region. Commence discussions and negotiations with fuel retailers and other stakeholders across the Gulf region.

DoHA

FaHCSIA

  • New OPAL storage facility completed by June 2011.

1.3 Continued funding and support of the Safe House initiative in Doomadgee.

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

  • Safe Communities Working Group will consider ways in which community can support the Safe House by December 2010.

1.4 Community members will nominate to be kinship and foster carers.

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

  • Options and models for foster and kinship care recruitment and support completed by October 2010.

1.5 Completion of additional police accommodation.

DPW

QPS

DASC

FaHCSIA

  • Solutions identified to resolve land tenure issues by January 2011.
  • New police accommodation to be complete by December 2011.

1.6 Maintain approved staffing strength of Police.

QPS

 
  • Zero reduction in police staffing strength since signing of the LIP.

1.7 Building on work to date of DASC, undertake an extensive audit of needs and costing of street lighting and lighting for ovals and parks, and seek necessary investment.

FaHCSIA

DoC

DASC

JAG

AGD

QPS

  • Scoping of options for improved street and public space lighting throughout community completed by September 2010.

1.8 Government and service providers will work with the Community to develop appropriate strategies that will provide proper rehabilitation services for offenders and strategies to ensure that support is provided to victims of crime.

JAG

AGD

DoC

QPS

DASC

  • Investigation of best practice type examples of strategies in remote communities identified by November 2010.

1.9 All streets are to have proper signage and houses to be numbered for emergency call outs.

DASC

DoC

DIP

FaHCSIA

QPS

  • Strategy for achieving comprehensive street signage and house numbering developed by November 2010.
  1. Create independent and safe places for Men, Women and young people to meet, participate in positive activities and access sensitive and targeted services.
2.1 Major redevelopment of the sport and rec hall and surrounding grounds to provide for a diverse range of sporting and social activities, operating as a PCYC.

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

Q Build

  • Sport & Rec precinct redevelopment complete by January 2011

2.2 Establishment of a PCYC with appropriate staffing of a Sergeant and two Police Liaison Officers to assist in the development and coordination of community based activities.

DoC

FaHCSIA

DASC

Q Build

  • Recruitment of PCYC staff commenced by August 2010.
  • PCYC operating by December 2010.

2.3 Establish a place where all men can meet, design and participate in a range of positive and productive activities and access services that are targeted toward men which may be sensitive.

FaHCSIA

DoC

Q Health

DoHA

DASC

  • Scoping of Men’s Space models completed by March 2011.
  • Men’s space developed and activities being delivered by August 2011.
  1. Develop new, as well as use existing facilities and recreational areas to undertake positive family and community based sporting, recreational and cultural activities.

3.1 Conduct a feasibility study into building a BMX track and skate park to cater for young peoples activities and provide a positive meeting place for young people.

DoHA

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

Q Health

  • BMX Track & Skate Park feasibility study conducted by June 2011.
3.2 Building on the success of the Doomadgee Dragons local rugby league team and their involvement in the “Say No to Violence” initiative in the Gulf, utilise PCYC sports officers and Police Liaison Officers, as well as grow community volunteers, to assist in the development and coordination of other community based sporting competitions for both men and women.

DoHA

DoC

QPS

AGD

JAG

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Increase in community based sporting events / competitions since signing of the LIP.

3.3 The community and other government, non-government and private sector partners will conduct working bees to tidy up and upgrade the community park areas in the different areas of the community.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

DEEWR

  • Community Working Bee program established and commenced by September 2010.

3.4 Investigate what is required to establish an Indigenous Rodeo School in the community.

DoHA

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

Q Health

  • Scoping for Indigenous Rodeo School completed by November 2010.
  1. Develop constructive and respectful relationships between families, with police and other Service Providers.

4.1 Establish a forum where the police, justice group and other interested community members can meet and have constructive dialogue in relation to emerging matters of law and order.

QPS

DoC

DASC

FaHCSIA

AGD

JAG

  • Community / Police / Justice forum established by September 2010 with clear understanding of purpose.

4.2 Increased youth justice conferencing services which provide a restorative justice process to which young offenders can be referred.

DoC

JAG

QPS

DET

AGD

FaHCSIA

  • Work with community and stakeholders to analyse youth justice conferencing / restorative justice opportunities to be completed by December 2010.
  1. Ensure a needs -based system of tailored family and human services is in place to assist community to meet the challenges of remote community life and build individual capacity and confidence to access services that ensure positive and productive outcomes.

5.1 Employ a local Youth Coordinator to work with the young people and the community to determine needs, design solutions, establish a Youth Council and lead the co-ordination and enhancement of necessary youth services.

FaHCSIA

AGD

DoC

DASC

  • Youth Coordinator position established by March 2011.
  • Youth Council established by June 2011.

5.2 Continue to deliver the Ending Offending and Ending Family Violence programs to offenders and other interested members of the community.

JAG

DoC

DASC

  • Safe Communities Working Group will consider ways in which community can better support these initiatives by December 2010.

5.3 Develop and deliver other programs that address offending within the community, including driver’s licence training.

JAG

DoC

DoT

DASC

  • Identify options by October 2010 for targeted driver’s licence training aimed at young drivers and people engaged in pre-employment training and activities in the first instance.

5.4 A community transport system to be organised between existing service providers in possession of buses.

FaHCSIA

DoC

DASC

DoHA

Q Health

  • Community transport system organised and promoted by September 2010.

5.5 Provide access to emergency relief support and financial literacy services.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

  • Scoping of financial wellbeing model, including identification of quantum of need for emergency relief, and links to other financial literacy supports, completed by October 2010.
  • Establishment of comprehensive financial wellbeing service by January 2011.

5.6 Build and deliver a coordinated system of family and children care and protection that is easily accessible and tailored to needs and sensitivities.

DoC

FaHCSIA

DET

DoHA

Q Health

  • Modelling of family and children care and protection system completed by October 2010.

5.7 Develop a Shared Services Hub within the community and construct residential accommodation for service providers.

JAG

DoC

DASC

  • Scope model and design options for Shared Services Hub and service provider residential accommodation by July 2011.

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5.6 Economic Participation

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Economic Participation

The circle in the middle of this painting represents the Doomadgee community and the lines stemming from the circles are about the community people reaching to try new things and challenges. The different colours in the painting represent the different ideas that people have and the many different ways in which they can pursue them. The community is so isolated, so when the children reach a certain age it’s about them looking for new things and challenges.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Economic Participation Building Block
COAG Targets Indigenous Specific Economic Participation Outcomes Economic Participation Outputs
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
  • The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills and capabilities required for the 21st Century labour market
  • Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors and at all levels of the labour market
  • Increased employment participation impacts positively on life expectancy
  • National Healthcare Agreement: Increase number and quality of training of Indigenous health workforce
  • Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes NP: Increase number and quality of training of Indigenous health workforce
  • Focus on industry sectors with jobs growth potential (e.g. health, education, construction and government services)
  • Increase access to employment and training services (extend intensive assistance program to Indigenous job seekers, wage assistance programs, and continue and extend to STEP program)
  • Increase access to employment and training services – extend intensive assistance program to Indigenous job seekers
  • Build aspirations and foundation skills of unemployed and those outside the labour force
  • Focus on industry sectors with jobs growth potential (e.g. education)
  • Build professional pathways for Indigenous people and Indigenous education workers who with to progress to teaching assistance program to Indigenous job seekers

** Doomadgee community is identified to benefit from the National Job Conversion Package under the Indigenous Economic Participation National Partnership Agreement (IEP NPA).



ACTION PLAN: Economic Participation
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee people are in the local jobs and running businesses
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • That the community of Doomadgee have the skills and motivation to take up jobs in our community and do them well.
  • All our children are educated and get jobs. We need to create the pathways that encourage young people to go to school, get educated and aspire to getting qualifications that lead to meaningful employment.
  • Employers are working together to create the demand and commitment to employ and support successful gains of Doomadgee people in the workforce.
  • Doomadgee people are part of the economic footprint of our communities and beyond. We own and operate our own successful businesses.
  • Governments proactively commit to improving employment outcomes for Doomadgee and use all policy and program opportunities to do so.
  1. Work with the community to develop them as the point of local labour supply for existing and emerging services.

1.1Establish a Community Participation & Capacity Building program to provide a soft entry point on a pathway towards pre-employment, training and employment. This program will focus on building the work condition of people through engagement in community activities of interest to them, and will support them through a holistic case managed approach to overcome their personal barriers to greater civic engagement and eventual employment.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

Q Health

DoHA

DASC

  • Provider established and program scoping and modelling undertaken by September 2010.
  • Referral pathways and service provider partnerships established by October 2010.
  • Service fully operational by October 2010.

1.2 Employ local people as employment and training mentors who will provide individual support to jobseekers to both participate and complete the required training and/or to retain their employment.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

DASC

  • Two (2) Employment & Training Mentors to be employed by CDEP by October 2010.

1.3 Employ a CDEP Employment and Training Manager to improve CDEP training and employment outcomes by assisting to deliver credible skills of potential employees based on employer and job requirements.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

DASC

  • Employment and Training Manager to be employed by CDEP by October 2010.

1.4 Employ an Adult Literacy & Numeracy Teacher to develop minimum literacy and numeracy skill sets of individuals engaged in pre-employment activities and employment., targeting training at the skills necessary to do the jobs that are available.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

DET

DASC

  • Literacy & Numeracy Teacher to be employed by CDEP by October 2010.
  • Partnership arrangements with other related service providers (eg DSS, JSAs) established by November 2010
  • Single generic base level training package identified by November 2010.

1.5 Develop an “Employer Capability Support Package”, to inform employers on how best to achieve local recruitment outcomes.

DEEWR

DEEDI

FaHCSIA

DASC

Centrelink

  • Local Employer Capability Support Package developed by March 2011.

1.6 Deliver a financial wellbeing program that will be available to all community members to provide support and tools to manage their own money and make good financial decisions (see related Safe Communities Action 5.5)

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Commencement of My Moola budgeting training program by October 2010.
  • Scoping of comprehensive financial wellbeing model completed by October 2010.
  • Establishment of broader comprehensive financial wellbeing service by January 2011.
  1. Strengthen the transitions from school to work to raise the aspirations of students.

2.1 Investigate a minimum literacy and numeracy skill set for early school leavers to be set at competence in VET Vocational Literacy 3 (39153QLD) and competence in VET Vocational Numeracy 3 (39163QLD).

Also see related Schooling Actions (6.1 – 6.5).

DET

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • In conjunction with the CDEP Literacy and Numeracy Teacher investigate the feasibility of prioritising a minimum skill set by 30 December 2010.
  1. Grow the demand for local Indigenous labour.

3.1 Expanding on existing local structures establish a local Education, Employment and Training Working Group to discuss ways to better plan, coordinate and deliver programs that transition local people into sustained employment, through a client focussed case management approach.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DET

DEEDI

DASC

  • Doomadgee Education, Employment and Training Working Group established by August 2010.
  • Development of an employment case management model to support employees to retain employment and to improve their employment prospects by February 2011.

3.2 Develop a comprehensive workforce strategy linked into existing service provider roles and training programs. It will build and strengthen relationships and networks within the community to improve people’s access to the range of support services available and develop new ways for the community and service providers to work together. Particular focus will be given to new and expanding workforce requirements in the local and regional sectors, including:

  • Childcare
  • Education
  • Health
  • Family & social services
  • Building & construction
  • Mining & related industry

DEEWR

DEEDI

FaHCSIA

Q Health

DoHA

DET

DASC

RILIPO

DoC

  • Labour market mapping to identify the size and type of existing and potential growth opportunities to be completed by October 2010.
  • Skills mapping against existing and new employment opportunities to be completed by November 2010.
  • Identification of off-community prevocational training and employment opportunities by December 2010 and quarterly thereafter.
  • Identification and prioritisation of community wide training needs and opportunities into a plan by December 2010.
  • Government to set targets for local employment, traineeships and cadetships by March 2011.

3.3 Government agencies to identify opportunities for local people to move into roles that are currently serviced on a fly in fly out basis, including management and supervisory positions.

DEEWR

DEEDI

All other Agencies

  • Government agencies to identify local labour requirements by October 2010.
  • Government to set targets for local employment, traineeships and cadetships by March 2011.
  • Government to work with service providers to include transition provisions in new contracts for services.

3.4 Develop and promote a Role Model campaign that features Doomadgee people who have succeeded in education, work and business

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DASC

DEEDI

Centrelink

DET

Q Health

  • Design and marketing of a Doomadgee Role Model campaign completed by January 2011.
  1. Business Development support provided locally in an ongoing and consistent manner to ensure capacity building and sustainability.

4.1 Government agencies to promote and encourage local Indigenous contractors (where this is possible) to access Government business either in supply or delivery services.

DEEWR

DEEDI

DASC

All other agencies

  • Government agencies to identify and promote potential contract opportunities to local Indigenous business owners by December 2010 and quarterly thereafter.

4.2 Government agencies are to identify where programs or service contracting is proving to be a barrier to increased Indigenous enterprise.

DEEWR

DEEDI

DASC

All other agencies

  • Government agencies to identify where existing programs and service contracting are causing barriers to increased enterprise and determine solutions by December 2010.

4.3 Introduce model of consistent and sustained small business development support through the Aboriginal Development Benefits Trust (ADBT) building on successful program in other areas of the Gulf.

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Commencement of small business development support in Doomadgee by September 2010.
  1. Utilise Government investment to leverage capital development and service delivery investments emanating from the COAG reform agenda to drive employment outcomes.

5.1 Investigate the feasibility of establishing a Gulf Indigenous supplier network with an immediate focus on an Indigenous Construction entity.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • Feasibility of the establishment of a Gulf Indigenous Construction Company completed by January 2011.

5.2 Develop a Local Industry Capability Package that will define and promote the requirements to be fulfilled by local providers who wish to tender for and win government contracts.

DEEWR

DEEDI

FaHCSIA

DASC

  • Local Industry Capability Package developed and being promoted by April 2011.

5.3 Construct and establish a fully operational Workers Accommodation Precinct that will provide opportunities for local training and employment through the period of construction and ongoing operations.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DEEWR

DEEDI

  • Project Manager to be engaged by October 2010.
  • Scope and design work, including recommendations of an operating model to be completed by January 2011.

5.4 Deliver a Community Training Centre that provides required space and resources to undertake a fuller range of pre-employment and vocational training in the community.

FaHCSIA

DEEWR

DEEDI

DET

DASC

  • Project Manager to be engaged by September 2010.
  • Scope and design work to be completed by January 2011.

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5.7 Governance & Leadership

 

The Story of this Painting

Doomadgee Representation of Governance & Leadership

The green and blue circles in this painting represent the people in the Community.  The red, orange and yellow circles represent the leaders in the Community – our elders, our community leaders, our service providers – and the middle circle represents the strong core of our elected leaders through our Mayor and Councillors.  The brown is the land from which we get our strength.

Targets, outcomes, outputs and action plan for Governance and Leadership Building Block
COAG Targets Indigenous Specific Governance & Leadership Outcomes
  • Close the life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade
  • Ensure all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years
  • Halve the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade
  • At least halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020
  • Halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/governance mechanism
  • Connecting the way government agencies work in remote areas (the governance of governments) and developing community capacity

N.B. The Governance & Leadership building block under the Remote Service Delivery Strategy is recognized in it’s significance as an enabling plank that sets the basic foundation for achievement against all of the other building blocks.



ACTION PLAN: Governance & Leadership
Doomadgee Outcome: Doomadgee produces strong, respectful leaders that will guide us to a better future for our children.
Agreed Goals / Rationales for Action Strategies Action Responsible Agencies Progress Reporting / Key Milestones Year 1
Lead Other
  • Local elders provide the cultural awareness and mentoring to people visiting and living in our community.
  • Deliver an ongoing system of respectful and honest communication between community and governments that acknowledges the need for all of us to take on and meet our responsibilities and accountabilities so we achieve positive and good outcomes for Doomadgee.
  • Strengthen community relationships and Leadership capacity.
  • Build a cohesive, responsive and proactive service system
  • Grow the capacity of local Indigenous providers
  • We have a strong, reliable and sustainable local government that is accountable and engaged with community, and complies with the requirements of the Local Government Act 2009.
  • Develop a comprehensive system of communication.
  1. Develop and deliver a localised cultural awareness and mentoring program.

1.1 Deliver a local program of cultural awareness and provide mentoring support for outside visitors and those relocating to our community.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

DEWHA

All other agencies

  • Cultural Awareness program developed with critical input from local elders by December 2010 ready for uptake by new providers and government staff commencing in 2011.

1.2 All government agencies will require their staff who are locally based or regular visitors, to undertake the local cultural awareness program.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

DEWHA

All other agencies

  • Policy introduced by Government agencies and their funded service providers requiring staff visiting and living in Doomadgee to undertake this training, which will be in place by December 2010.
  1. Provide structures and mechanisms for community members to contribute to actions and decisions that effect their lives.

2.1 Establish a number of LIP Building Block Working Groups who have a clear and legitimate role in informing, finding solutions, monitoring and evaluating the actions of stakeholders in delivering on commitments and their impact. Working Groups will be:

  • Early Childhood and Schooling
  • Economic Participation
  • Health
  • Safer Communities
  • Healthy Homes
  • Governance and Leadership

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies
  • All Building Block Working Groups to be established by October 2010.
  • Monthly meetings of Building Block Working Groups held up until April 2011.

2.2 LIP Building Block Working Groups come together for a bi-annual reflection to discuss progress, check cross linkages between Building Blocks and reconfirm LIP implementation priorities and direction.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Bi-annual reflection Summit held in December 2010.

2.3 Develop and deliver an Evaluation and Research Program for community members to participate in LIP implementation and monitoring.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Theory of Change (Logic Model) for each Building Block Working Group established by December 2010.
  1. Develop tailored programs that target leadership development for Men, Women and Young People.

3.1 Through the establishment of Men’s and Women’s Leadership Groups and Youth Council, identify development opportunities that strengthen individual, family and community relationships and leadership confidence.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • A comprehensive local leadership program based on positive relationships and leadership development will be established for Men, Women and Youth by December 2010.

3.2 Conduct tailored leadership programs on country that focus on cultural preservation and relationships for men and their sons and women and their daughters.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

DEWHA

All other agencies

  • Increase in number of tailored leadership programs on country since signing of the LIP.

3.3 Establish leadership support and mentoring networks within and external to the community.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Parameters and opportunities for leadership support and mentoring networks scoped by November 2010.
  1. Re-organise existing service system to be more coordinated and integrated and require any new services enter via this approach.

4.1 A local service provider network to be established to ensure information sharing and joined up effort.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Local service provider network established by September 2010.

4.2 Service delivery and funding agencies to adhere to the principles set by COAG in relation to the Remote Service Delivery NPA.

FaHCSIA

DoC

All other agencies

  • Monthly meetings of ROC Regional Leadership Group held with the principles of RSD as a key focus.

4.3 Service providers will model good and effective practices that reduce the burden on clients to navigate the complex suite of services.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Local service provider network to develop Principles of Practice charter by December 2010.

4.4 A system of case coordination and case management will be established where needed.

FaHCSIA

DoC

Q Health

DoHA

DET

DEEWR

  • Principles and practice for implementation of case coordination and case management scoped out and agreed with the local service providers network by January 2011
  1. Provide the necessary support and development for local Indigenous providers to enable a growth in their capacity to deliver quality services within an accountability framework.

5.1 ORIC and other Regulatory bodies provide governance training to their organisations.

ORIC

 
  • Organisational governance training delivered for Doomadgee by May 2011.

5.2 External service organisations delivering in, or to Doomadgee, are to commit to providing capacity building support to local Indigenous organisations and individuals.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Government agencies to identify appropriate mechanisms to require this of service providers through contractual or other arrangements, by December 2010.
  1. Our Councillors show strong and positive leadership. The Council delivers its services in a timely, accountable, ethical and transparent manner.

6.1 Council and staff undertake necessary training to ensure an understanding of and compliance with the Local Government Act 2009.

DIP

DASC

FaHCSIA

DoC

  • Councillors and staff to attend all Local Government scheduled training.
  • Local Government training development plan schedule agreed between DASC and DIP by October 2010.
  • Improved audit results from Queensland Audit Office for 2010.

6.2 Conduct an education campaign in the community about the role of the Council and also promote running for office.

DIP

DASC

  • Civic education campaign developed by January 2011.
  1. Design a communication strategy that ensures consistent and accurate information is shared in the community and beyond.

7.1 Produce a monthly newsletter

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • n Monthly newsletter commenced by September 2010.

7.2 Use the community radio to deliver messages and information

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Regular radio segment established for ROC staff to deliver local messages.

7.3 Use forums such as Working Groups and Negotiation Tables to share and receive information.

FaHCSIA

DASC

DoC

All other agencies

  • Working Groups and Negotiation Tables held as required.

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ATTACHMENT A

National Principles for investments in remote locations:

  • remote Indigenous communities and remote communities with significant Indigenous populations are entitled to standards of services and infrastructure broadly comparable with that in non-Indigenous communities of similar size, location and need elsewhere in Australia
  • investment decisions should aim to:
    • improve participation in education/training and the market economy on a sustainable basis; and
    • reduce dependence on welfare wherever possible; and
    • promote personal responsibility; and
    • ensure consistent engagement and behaviour with positive social norms.
  • Priority for enhanced infrastructure support and service provision should be to larger and more economically sustainable communities where secure land tenure exists, allowing for outreach services and accessibility by smaller surrounding communities, including:
    • recognising Indigenous people’s cultural connections to homelands (whether on a visiting or permanent basis) but avoiding expectations of major investment in service provision where there are few economic or educational opportunities; and
    • facilitating voluntary mobility by individuals and families to areas where better education and job opportunities exist, with higher standards of services.

Principles taken into account in deciding sequencing:

  • areas where government has already applied significant reform effort that can be readily built upon (see below):
    • that is, locations where communities have demonstrated a willingness to actively participate in the change process, supported by strong leadership;
  • preparedness to participate in steps to rebuild social norms – for example, welfare reform and alcohol management;
  • labour market opportunities and potential for corporate investment / partnerships and business development;
  • capacity to be developed and utilised as a service hub (including transport) with linkages to smaller communities / homelands; and
  • capacity of service supply needs to be met – including consideration of capacity of existing local service providers and capacity of the location to support incoming services (for example, availability of built facilities and staff housing for staff).

Service delivery principles for programs and services for Indigenous Australians:

These principles are to guide COAG in the:

  1. design and delivery of Indigenous specific and mainstream government programs and services provided to Indigenous people; and
  2. development and negotiation of National Partnership agreements, National Agreements and reform proposals.

Principles

Priority principle: Programs and services should contribute to Closing the Gap by meeting the targets endorsed by COAG while being appropriate to local community needs.

Indigenous engagement principle: Engagement with Indigenous men, women and children and communities should be central to the design and delivery of programs and services.

Sustainability principle: Programs and services should be directed and resourced over an adequate period of time to meet the COAG targets.

Access Principle: Programs and services should be physically and culturally accessible to Indigenous people recognising the diversity of urban, regional and remote needs.

Integration principle: There should be collaboration between and within Governments at all levels and their agencies to effectively coordinate programs and services.

Accountability principle: Programs and services should have regular and transparent performance monitoring, review and evaluation.

Principles in Detail

Priority principle: Programs and services should contribute to Closing the Gap by meeting the targets endorsed by COAG while being appropriate to local community needs. The COAG targets are:

  1. close the 17 year life expectancy gap within a generation;
  2. halve the gap in mortality rates for children under five within a decade;
  3. halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade;
  4. halve the gap in employment outcomes and opportunities within a decade;
  5. at least halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 or equivalent attainment rates by 2020; and
  6. within five years provide access to a quality early childhood education program to all Indigenous four year olds in remote Indigenous communities.

Indigenous engagement principle: Engagement with Indigenous men, women and children and communities should be central to the design and delivery of programs and services. In particular, attention is to be given to:

  1. recognising that strong relationships/partnerships between government, community and service providers increase the capacity to achieve identified outcomes and work towards building these relationships;
  2. engaging and empowering Indigenous people who use Government services, and the broader Indigenous community in the design and delivery of programs and services as appropriate;
  3. recognising local circumstances;
  4. ensuring Indigenous representation is appropriate, having regard to local representation as required;
  5. being transparent regarding the role and level of Indigenous engagement along a continuum from information sharing to decision-making; and
  6. recognising Indigenous culture, language and identity.

Sustainability principle: Programs and services should be directed and resourced over an adequate period of time to meet the COAG targets. In particular, attention is to be given to:

  1. service system orientation, particularly:
    • using evidence to develop and redesign programs, services and set priorities;
    • recognising the importance of early intervention; and
    • including strategies that increase independence, empowerment and self management;
  2. ensuring adequate and appropriate resources, particularly:
    • setting time-frames for meeting short, medium and longer-term targets and outcomes;
    • considering flexibility in program design to meet local needs;
    • considering workforce supply and future planning;
    • considering sustaining or redesigning services to best use existing resources, as well as the need for programs and services to meet the COAG targets;
    • minimising administrative red tape to enable greater integration of program and service delivery;
    • ensuring that programs and services are efficient and fiscally sustainable; and
    • ensuring that infrastructure is appropriate and adequately maintained;
  3. building the capacity of both Indigenous people and of services to meet the needs of Indigenous people, particularly:
    • developing the skills, knowledge and competencies, including independence and empowerment of Indigenous people, communities and organisations;
    • supporting Indigenous communities to harness the engagement of corporate, non-government and philanthropic sectors;
    • building governments’ and service delivery organisations’ capacity to develop and implement policies, procedures, and protocols that recognise Indigenous people’s culture, needs and aspirations;
    • ensuring that programs and services foster and do not erode capacity or capability of clients; and
    • recognising when Indigenous delivery is an important contributor to outcomes (direct and indirect), and in those instances fostering opportunities for Indigenous service delivery.

Access Principle: Programs and services should be physically and culturally accessible to Indigenous people recognising the diversity of urban, regional and remote needs. In particular, attention is to be given to:

  1. considering appropriate and adequate infrastructure and placement of services (including transport, IT, telecommunications and use of interpreter services);
  2. minimising administrative red tape that may be a barrier to access; and
  3. providing adequate information regarding available programs and services.

Integration principle: There should be collaboration between and within Governments at all levels, their agencies and funded service providers to effectively coordinate programs and services. In particular, attention is to be given to:

  1. articulating responsibilities between all levels of government;
  2. identifying and addressing gaps and overlaps in the continuum of service delivery;
  3. ensuring services and programs are provided in an integrated and collaborative manner both between all levels of governments and between services;
  4. ensuring services and programs do not set incentives that negatively affect outcomes of other programs and services; and
  5. recognising that a centrally agreed strategic focus should not inhibit service delivery responses that are sensitive to local contexts.

Accountability principle: Programs and services should have regular and transparent performance monitoring, review and evaluation. In particular, attention is to be given to:

  1. choosing performance measures based on contribution to the COAG targets and report them publicly;
  2. ensuring mainstream service delivery agencies have strategies in place to achieve Indigenous outcomes and meet Indigenous needs;
  3. clearly articulating the service level to be delivered;
  4. ensuring accountability of organisations for the government funds that they administer on behalf of Indigenous people;
  5. periodically measuring/reviewing to assess the contribution of programs and services to the above, and adapting programs and services as appropriate;
  6. clearly defining and agreeing responsibilities of government and communities;
  7. supporting the capacity of the Indigenous service sector and communities to play a role in delivering services and influencing service delivery systems/organisations to ensure their responsiveness, access and appropriateness to Indigenous people; and
  8. evaluating programs and services from multiple perspectives including from the client, Indigenous communities and government perspectives and incorporating lessons into future program and services design.

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ATTACHMENT B: Abbreviations & Acronyms

ADBT
Aboriginal Development Benefits Trust
AGD
Attorney General’s Department
BOM
Board of Management
COAG
Council of Australian Governments
CDEP
Community Development Employment Projects
CGRIS
Co-ordinator General Remote Indigenous Services
DASC
Doomadgee Aboriginal Shire Council
DEEDI
Department of Employment, Economic Development and Innovation
DEEWR
Department of Employment, Education and Workplace Relations
DERM
Department of Environment and Resource Management
DET
Department of Education and Training
DEWHA
Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts
DIP
Department of Infrastructure and Planning
DoC
Department of Communities
DoHA
Department of Health and Ageing
DPW
Department of Public Works
DSS
Doomadgee State School
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
GECO
Government Engagement and Coordination Officer
IEO
Indigenous Engagement Officer
JAG
Department of Justice & Attorney General
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
NP
National Partnership
NPA
National Partnership Agreement
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
PaCE
Parental and Community Engagement
PHaMs
Personal Helpers and Mentors
QHealth
Queensland Health
QPS
Queensland Police Service
RILIPO
Remote Indigenous Land and Infrastructure Program Office
RLG
Regional Leadership Group
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
VET
Vocational Education and Training

 

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