Working Together to Close the Gap in Walgett

Table of contents

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Artist's Acknowledgement

Warren Fernando

Warren FernandoI am 44 years of age. I come from the Gamilaraay people and was born in the town of Walgett. I grew up on Gingie Reserve with a family of seven which I am the oldest. I was raised by my grandmother Sylvia Fernando, who was also an artist, I used to watch her down the river painting with water colours. She was the main person who inspired me to start painting and become a local artist. I started painting when I was 24. Within the last decade I had been involved in painting the schools, police station and other local organisations. I also carve emu eggs and make leather wear such as key rings, wallets etc which I sell to local organisations and shops.

It is within my greatest pleasure to be involved in the artwork of the Local Implementation Plan for my community. I would like to thank you for the honour and privilege of allowing me to show my talent.

 

Artwork for the LIP

Walgett artwork

  • The painting represents the Walgett community where the two rivers meet. The two rivers are very significant to the Walgett community.
  • The three circles represent the three camps in Walgett which areTownship, Namoi Village and Gingie Reserve.
  • The hands represent the Walgett people living in the community.
  • The animals and colours that were used are the food we eat and the colours of the earth in which we live

NSW Closing the Gap Artwork

Eddy Harris

Eddy HarrisEddy Harris was born in Wilcannia and is a member of two tribes, the Bakandji, and the Wongaibon. Eddy comes from a family of eight children. Eddy is regularly sought out to provide advice on art, craft and educational involvements for Aboriginal people, as well as for primary and secondary schools.

Eddy’s work has been shown in a range of galleries throughout Australia, including the Australian Aboriginal Art Gallery. During July 2010, Eddy’s works were exhibited in Sydney, in a special NAIDOC exhibition of Wilcannia Arts. Eddy’s artwork has also been published in the book ‘Art of Broken Hill, Outback Australia’, where he is featured alongside many other prominent Australian artists.

Eddy’s most renowned art works include ‘Wiimpatji Hunting Birds’ and ‘Thunchly Hunting’.

As the Wilcannia representative of the Regional Arts Board, Eddy’s role is to promote other local artists to get their work seen beyond the region.

In addition to being an artist, Eddy is currently employed as the Project Support Worker for the Community Safety Research Project for Wilcannia, Broken Hill and Menindee. The project is a partnership between Maari Ma Primary Health Care Service and the University of New South Wales. Eddy is an active community member, where he enjoys mentoring new residents to Wilcannia.

Eddy thanks the ROC, especially the local ROC team, for giving him the opportunity to be involved in having a local Closing the Gap design.

'NSW Closing the Gap Artwork'

"NSW Closing the Gap Artwork"

 

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Glossary

AANSW
Aboriginal Affairs New South Wales
ADHC
Ageing, Disability, and Home Care
AECG
Aboriginal Education Consultative Group
AH & MRC
Aboriginal Health and Medical Research Council
AHL
Aboriginal Hostels Limited
AHO
Aboriginal Housing Office
AG
Attorney-General’s Department (Commonwealth)
AMIHS
Aboriginal Maternal and Infant Health Strategy
CDEP
Community Development Employment Projects
CGRIS
Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services
COAG
Council of Australian Governments
CWP
Community Working Party
DECCW
Department of Environment, Climate Change, and Water, NSW
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment, and Workplace Relations
DEG
Dharriwaa Elders Group
DET
Department of Education and Training, NSW
DET STS
DET State Training Services, NSW
DEWHA
Department of Environment, Water, Heritage, and the Arts
DITRDLG
Department of Infrastructure, Transport, Regional Development and Local Government
DJAG
Department of Justice and Attorney General’s (NSW)
DoHA
Department of Health and Ageing
DPC
Department of Premier and Cabinet, NSW
DPI
Department of Primary Industries, NSW
ESL
English as Second Language
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
GGGAC
Gamilaroi Giwirrgal Gunu Aboriginal Corporation (Walgett Men’s Group)
GWAHS
Greater Western Area Health Service
HACC
Home and Community Care (ADHC)
HASI
Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative
I and I
Industry and Investment NSW
IBA
Indigenous Business Australia
ILC
Indigenous Land Corporation
IPSS
Indigenous Parenting Support Service (FaHCSIA)
ISP
Intensive Supported Playgroups (FaHCSIA)
IYMP
Indigenous Youth Mobility Program (DEEWR)
JSA
Job Services Australia (DEEWR)
LAECG
Local Aboriginal Education Consultative Group
LALC
Local Aboriginal Land Council
MHDA
Mental Health Drug and Alcohol unit (GWAHS)
MHDAO
Mental Health and Drug and Alcohol Office (Health NSW)
MPDAN
Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network
MPREC
Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise Corporation
MPRHC
Murdi Paaki Regional Housing Corporation
NP
National Partnership
OATSIH
Office of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health (DoHA)
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations (ORIC)
ODGP
NSW Outback Division of General Practice Ltd
PACE
Parental and Community Engagement Program (DEEWR)
RARMS
Regional and Remote Medical Service
RFDS
Royal Flying Doctor Service
ROC
Regional Operations Centre (FaHCSIA)
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
WAMS
Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service
WGCWP
Walgett Gamilaraay Community Working Party
YOTS
Youth Off the Streets

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Foreword

A message from the members of the Walgett Gamilaraay Aboriginal Community Working Party

“Our ancestors fought hard through their lives for our people and our rights. We wish to acknowledge the strength, courage and wisdom of our ancestors who lived with this land and were nurtured by the spirit which kept them alive and well, living in harmony and unity.”

Yamma – (Hello) Walgett is a town within the Gamilaraay nation, located in north-western New South Wales.

The introduction of the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) has required a considerable amount of our time by attending meetings, reading documents, understanding the processes which can both benefit and impede our growth as a community. And it’s all been on government timeframes, not on community timeframes. It’s been difficult for us as members who are the nominated advocates to comprehend the overall impact of the RSD for individuals, families and our overall community.

We believe we have made these contributions in the best interests of our community. We hope our partner stakeholders in the Commonwealth, State and Non-Government Organisation (NGOs) equally match our contribution by appropriate financial resources to ensure that together we close the gap for our community.

It is envisaged that with a planned and measurable framework, with clear timeframes to achieve the strategies as identified in the Local Implementation Plan (LIP), we can realise the commitment that all governments and NGOs have made for the community.

The initial message in 2005 as identified in the Community Development and Strategic Plan 2004-2007 remains as the message of the people:

“We need to become a unified community of people, white and black, resting on values of what it is to be better human beings, creating a future for our children and grandchildren through careful custodianship of the resources of this land and through care and respect for all people.

We acknowledge our elders, and look to them for advice and direction drawn from the experience of their lives and from what they have learnt from those who have gone before.

We honour and support the adults in our community who are working hard to not only be good providers for their families but also who have taken on great commitments to the community through their mainly voluntary contributions to developing better governance and management capabilities in the organisations and future enterprises we establish to improve Walgett’s quality of life.

In particular we want to care, nurture and teach the young to ensure they build on what their ancestors, grandparents and parents have started so they can continue to create a healthy, responsible, caring, community in the future.

The Aboriginal community of Walgett aspire to bring together all the people of this place into a harmonious, peaceful, creative, healthy and constructive community which will lead the way as a model around the country.”

It is our hope that this Local Implementation Plan will provide real outcomes and positive change for our community. We need to ensure that Council of Australian Governments (COAG) maintains its commitment to achieve the short, medium and long term goals as targeted in this Plan.

We believe that the implementation of the Plan will enable our children and our future generations to commence a journey that will enable them to contribute to, and participate in, the Australian society with equal opportunities for their personal and professional lives.

George Fernando
Chairperson
Gamilaraay Community Working Party Walgett

A message from the Coordinator General of Remote Indigenous Services and NSW Coordinator General of Remote Service Delivery

As a key output of the Council of Australian Governments’ (COAG) Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement (RSD NPA), a Local Implementation Plan (LIP) for Walgett has been developed in full consultation with the communities. The purpose of the Local Implementation Plan (LIP) is to improve government services in Walgett, with the aim to contribute to Closing the Gap for Aboriginal people living in this remote town in NSW. Ambitious strategies and actions under the RSD building blocks have been identified and agreed to in this LIP by the Walgett Community, the Australian Government and the New South Wales Government.

We would like to acknowledge the hard work of the staff of the Dubbo Regional Operations Centre comprising of FaHCSIA and Aboriginal Affairs NSW staff, and the NSW RSD team of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. They have worked with the community and representatives of Australian and New South Wales Government agencies in a structured consultation process over the past six months in preparing the LIP, including translating community priorities into a comprehensive plan.

We also commend the support and commitment of Australian and New South Wales Government agencies that have been actively engaged in the process. The work of the NSW Remote Service Delivery State Management Committee also needs to be acknowledged, particularly in oversighting the implementation of the RSD NPA in NSW.

Most importantly, we would like to thank the Walgett Gamilaraay Community Working Party, who on behalf of their Community have engaged and challenged governments to respond by developing strategies and activities that address their community priorities, in partnership.

Brian Gleeson
Coordinator General
Remote Indigenous Services

James Christian
NSW Coordinator General
Remote Service Delivery

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Section 1: Overview of Closing the Gap and Remote Service Delivery

1.1 Closing the Gap

In December 2007, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to a partnership between all levels of government to work with Indigenous communities to close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage.

The National Indigenous Reform Agreement was established to frame the task of Closing the Gap in Indigenous disadvantage. It sets out the objectives, outcomes, outputs, performance indicators and performance benchmarks agreed by COAG. It also provides links to those National Agreements and National Partnership agreements across COAG which include elements aimed at Closing the Gap in Indigenous disadvantage.

The foundation of the Closing the Gap strategy is the identification of and commitment to targets addressing Indigenous disadvantage and associated building blocks – areas for action.

The six targets for Closing the Gap are:

  • To close the life-expectancy gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and other Australians within a generation.
  • To halve the mortality gap between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children and other children under age five within a decade.
  • To halve the gap in literacy and numeracy achievement between Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander students and other students within a decade.
  • To halve the gap in employment outcomes for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people within a decade.
  • To at least halve the gap in attainment at year 12 schooling (or equivalent) by 2020.
  • To provide all Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander four year olds in remote communities with access to a quality pre-school program in five years.

To achieve these targets, COAG agreed to focus on seven building blocks, in which investments would deliver an outcome in more than one target area.

The seven building blocks for Closing the Gap are:

The seven building blocks for Closing the Gap

The NSW RSD communities have developed their own set of building block symbols.

The NSW RSD communities have developed their own set of building block symbols.

The 7 Building Blocks – what are we aiming for?
Building Blocks COAG Indigenous Specific Outcomes COAG Policy and Reform Directions
1. Early Childhood

Indigenous children:

  • Are born healthy.
  • Acquire the basic skills for life and learning.
  • Benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage.
  • Acquire the basic skills for life and learning.
  • Have access to affordable, quality early childhood education.
  • Quality early childhood education and care supports parental workforce participation.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on TAFE Fee Waivers for Childcare Qualifications
  • COAG National Early Childhood Development Strategy - Investing in the Early Years
  • COAG Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan
2. Schooling
  • Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces educational disadvantage.
  • Indigenous youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving.
  • Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study.
  • COAG National Education Agreement.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities.
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Improving Teacher Quality.
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Literacy and Numeracy.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions.
  • COAG Building the Education Revolution.
  • COAG Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan.
3. Health

Indigenous people:

  • Achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.
  • Have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventative services.
  • Remain healthy and free of preventable disease.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes.
  • COAG National Healthcare Agreement.
  • COAG National Disability Agreement.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Hospital and Health Workforce Reform.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Preventative Health.
4. Economic Participation
  • The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills to enable effective educational, labour market and social participation.
  • Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors of the labour market.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation.
  • COAG National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Productivity Places Program.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access.
5. Healthy Homes
  • Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy.
  • Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities.
  • People have improved housing amenity and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities.
  • Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing.
  • COAG National Affordable Housing Agreement.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness.
6. Safe Communities
  • Alcohol and substance abuse among Indigenous people is addressed.
  • Indigenous children and parents are afforded basic protective security from violence and neglect.
  • COAG National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children.
  • COAG National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children.
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.
7. Governance and Leadership
  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation.
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms.
  • Governments work together effectively in remote areas.
COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.

As an important part of this commitment, the Commonwealth and the NSW State Government (the Governments) have signed up to a number of COAG agreements and will increase their investment in areas such as early childhood, health, housing, education and training. They have also agreed to wide ranging reforms to improve the way they deliver services to Aboriginal people.

1.2 The COAG Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement

The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery (the Agreement) seeks to improve access to government services for Indigenous Australians living in selected remote locations, throughout Australia. Through this Agreement, the Governments will work together with Indigenous people living in those locations to close the gap in disadvantage.

The Commonwealth and New South Wales Governments (the Governments) signed the Agreement in January 2009. In NSW, this Agreement will be implemented in the priority locations of Walgett and Wilcannia. Both Governments have also agreed to specific outputs against the Agreement which are described in a publicly available Bilateral Implementation Plan. One of those outputs, and potentially the most important, is the preparation of Local Implementation Plans for each priority location.

1.3 How Remote Service Delivery will be implemented in NSW

Both the Australian and State Governments are committed to delivering the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) National Partnership in Walgett and Wilcannia under a Single Government Interface (SGI) which has been established through a collaborative partnership between FaHCSIA and AANSW at the Regional Operations Centre (ROC) at Dubbo. An officer of AANSW is the ROC Director.

Under the Agreement, the ROC is defined as a location in which Commonwealth and state/territory staff work together, and co-locate if possible, to support the development and implementation of Local Implementation Plans. The ROC in NSW is already working towards a more connected and integrated service system in both RSD sites by putting in place mechanisms and processes to ensure improved service delivery. These include the sharing and mobilising of resources for efficiency, reducing duplication, identifying and engaging stakeholders as well as looking for and harnessing opportunities for partnership arrangements.

They do this through:

  • Community engagement to hear from communities about their priorities and to feed back to them about what is happening in response to these priorities
  • Data gathering including identification of service gaps
  • Co-ordination of the delivery of resources and activities which address agreed priorities identified in local implementation plans
  • Employment of Remote Service Delivery Co-ordinators and Partnership Community Project Officers to work locally with the two communities in developing and delivering the LIP’s
  • Employment of an Indigenous Engagement Officer (IEO) to work mainly with the Aboriginal community and liaise between community and government on issues raised by community people. The IEO’s are local Aboriginal people from each community
  • Liaison with the Australian Government, the NSW Government, local governments and other relevant stakeholders to achieve identified outcomes.

1.4 Remote Service Delivery in Walgett

In Walgett, Governments have agreed to work together with the community to:

  • Improve the access of Aboriginal families in Walgett to a full range of suitable and culturally inclusive services
  • Raise the standard and range of services delivered to Aboriginal families in Walgett to be broadly consistent with those provided to other Australians in communities of similar size, location and need Support the Walgett community and organisations in strengthening their exisiting governance and leadership
  • Provide simpler access and better coordinated government services for Aboriginal people in Walgett
  • Increase economic and social participation wherever possible
  • Promote respectful engagement and behaviours, personal responsibility, and a strong partnership approach to service delivery.

Aboriginal Affairs NSW and FaHCSIA have engaged staff to work with and in the community to provide a Single Government Interface. Aboriginal Affairs NSW had employed a Partnership Community Project Officer (PCPO) Walgett since August 2009 to build and strengthen the existing Community Working Party.

FaHCSIA has engaged a Remote Service Delivery Co-ordinator (RSDC) in Walgett since December 2009 and an Aboriginal Engagement Officer (AEO) since May 2010.

The RSDC and PCPO are the key liaison and consultation point for both the community and government agencies. They work collaboratively with government representatives and the non government/statutory bodies to assist with community planning and delivery making sure that services are coordinated on the ground. They are mandated to report on progress and on local issues and concerns to the Dubbo ROC and the RSD State Management Committee (RSD SMC).

The RSDC, PCPO and AEO form the local ROC Team and work in partnership with the Walgett Gamilaraay Community Working Party (WGACWP) to increase local knowledge and understanding of government business and increase the Governments knowledge and understanding of the community. Importantly they remain part of the NSW ROC based in Dubbo.

1.5 Addressing concerns

The local ROC team work closely with the WGACWP – identifying issues, monitoring progress and communicating to the broader community about what is happening in the Walgett RSD. Both the local ROC and the WGACWP will escalate issues and concerns as required to the ROC Director and/or the State Management Committee for resolution.

1.6 The relationship between Remote Service Delivery and existing frameworks and plans

The COAG Agreement on Remote Service Delivery builds on a range of initiatives that have been taken over the past decade to improve life outcomes for Indigenous people, particularly in remote areas. One of those was the COAG trials, announced in 2002, aimed at exploring new ways for governments to work together to achieve better outcomes. One of the trial sites was the Murdi Paaki region, comprising remote towns with Aboriginal communities across far western NSW. Walgett was included as one of the towns. The trial ultimately led to a number of agreements including a Regional Partnership Agreement signed in January 2009.

The Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement (MP RPA) is between the Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly of which Walgett along with 15 other Murdi Paaki communities are members, and the Australian and NSW Governments. It is designed to improve the coordination of government services in remote communities. Both governments have agreed for the Assembly to conduct its own review of the MP RPA to ensure it is consistent with the new focus from the Council of Australian Governments on remote service delivery.

Another important initiative is The Two Ways Together framework, the NSW Government’s ten year plan to improve the lives of Aboriginal people and their communities. It has provided the foundations for a model of community governance in 40 Partnership Communities including Walgett and is supported by the Partnership Community Project Officers (PCPO) positions. The strengthening of community governance under Two Ways Together has provided a strong foundation for RSD in Walgett.

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Section 2: Overview of the Local Implementation Plan (LIP)

 

2.1 Introduction

The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) identifies the service delivery priorities for Walgett community, including targets, actions and timelines. The Governments and the Walgett community through the Walgett Gamilaraay Community Working Party, agree to work together to implement the LIP in partnership with one another.

2.2 How the LIP has been developed

Both Governments are committed to working with the Walgett community to develop a LIP that responds to the needs and issues that the community identified and to develop strategies to address these issues. To ensure this collaborative process took place a number of steps were taken:

  • A range of community consultations with the Walgett Community were held in August and October 2009 to inform a first draft of the Local Implementation Plan which was presented to the Community Working Party (CWP) in December 2009.
  • It was agreed that wider community consultations were required which led to a broader consultation process that included community members and government and non government agencies.
  • A series of workshops were held between March and May 2010 to discuss the Closing the Gap Building Blocks and gather information on priorities for the community. Members of the CWP that represent housing, education, health, men, women and youth issues attended, along with local service providers.
  • Draft priorities and activities were then developed based on the information gathered in the community consultations.
  • To ensure the Plan has been based on evidence, the Governments collected information on Walgett relating to:
    • Current government expenditure and investment
    • Current service delivery and supporting infrastructure
    • Existing community networks and decision making structures
    • General information about the community - its people, how healthy they are, how they are going at school and so on.
  • The collation of this information is known as Baseline Mapping. Baseline Mapping has allowed governments to identify service gaps and/or underperforming services.
  • Draft priorities and activities were then workshopped with a range of State and Commonwealth Government agencies in early June 2010 to identify commitments and lead agencies.
  • In mid June, a cross agency workshop was held in Walgett to workshop the drafted priorities and activities together with the objective of gaining in-principle support from all parties to the LIP. There were 40 participants in the workshop, including seven core Community Working Party members.
  • Agreement from the CWP was gained on 21 June once requested changes had been made to the LIP and on 30 June, in principle support was given by FaHCSIA and Aboriginal Affairs NSW.

Development of the LIP is a continually evolving process. The Walgett ROC Team will continue to engage with the community in order to identify barriers to improving access to government services for Aboriginal Australians living in Walgett and refine the Plan.

2.3 Principles of the LIP

The LIP recognises the critical need for collaboration and secures the commitment of all signatories to work together in partnership to achieve better outcomes for all residents of Walgett.

The Governments agree to implement the LIP in accordance with the COAG national principles for investments in remote locations. These are:

  • Remote Aboriginal communities and remote communities with significant Aboriginal populations are entitled to standards of services and infrastructure broadly comparable with that in non-Aboriginal communities of similar size, location and need elsewhere in Australia
  • Investment decisions should aim to: improve participation in education/training and the market economy on a sustainable basis; reduce dependence on welfare wherever possible; promote personal responsibility, engagement and behaviours consistent with positive social norms
  • Priority for enhanced infrastructure support and service provision should be to larger and more economically sustainable communities where secure land tenure exists, allowing for services outreach to and access by smaller surrounding communities, including:
  • Recognising Aboriginal peoples’ cultural connections to homelands (whether on a visiting or permanent basis) but avoiding expectations of major investment in service provision where there are few economic or educational opportunities
  • Facilitating voluntary mobility by individuals and families to areas where better education and job opportunities exist, with higher standards of services.

2.4 Duration of the LIP

The term of the LIP will be for the period July 2010 to 30 June 2014.

The Implementation Plan will be reviewed and updated on a six monthly basis for the first 18 months to ensure its continuing relevance to the service delivery needs of Aboriginal people in Walgett and the requirements of the Agreement.

2.5 Governance Arrangements for the LIP

The governance arrangements for the LIP in NSW commence at the community level and progress to a formal governance structure known as the RSD State Management Committee (RSD SMC). There are also the Commonwealth and NSW Co-ordinators-General for Remote Service Delivery who play a vital role in oversighting and reporting on the implementation of the Agreement.

Community level

The Walgett Gamilaraay Community Working Party (CWP) is the recognised Aboriginal community governance body for Walgett and is the primary mechanism for representation and consultation at the community level.

The Walgett Gamilaraay CWP, with the support of the local ROC Team, will be the governing body for the LIP at the community level.

The Walgett Shire Council is also a key stakeholder in Remote Service Delivery in Walgett and there are arrangements in place for the Shire to be represented at CWP meetings and to be regularly briefed and consulted by the ROC to ensure a whole of community approach in delivering the LIP.

Governance arrangements for Remote Service Delivery in NSW

Flow chart showing inter-relationship of local, regional, state and national government and community governance arrangements for implementation of Remote Service Delivery in NSW.

Flow chart showing inter-relationship of local, regional, state and national government and community governance arrangements for implementation of Remote Service Delivery in NSW.

Regional Level

A RSD Regional Strategic Delivery Group (RSDG) is being established to ensure collaboration, partnership and integrated planning occurs at a regional level. The RSG is chaired by the ROC and its members include Regional Directors, State Managers, and Department Liaison Officers of State and Commonwealth agencies identified in the Local Implementation Plan as Lead or Partner Agencies. The RSDG will report to the RSD SMC and the Regional Manager’s Network through the ROC.

State Level

An RSD State Management Committee (RSD SMC) has been established to oversee delivery of the Agreement. The RSD SMC will provide leadership and set the direction on issues of strategic importance to the achievement of remote service delivery outcomes at Walgett and Wilcannia. The RSD SMC, as a joint government body, will provide high level advice and make recommendations to advance community and government objectives.

The RSD SMC will be jointly chaired by the FaHCSIA NSW/ACT State Manager and the Chief Executive of Aboriginal Affairs (NSW), who is also the Coordinator General for the NSW RSD. RSD SMC members are the Commonwealth Departments of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations, Health and Ageing, and Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts and the NSW Department of Premier and Cabinet. The RSD SMC meets every month to oversee the implementation of the Bilateral Implementation Plan and the LIPs and seeks to resolve any outstanding issues.

2.6 Progress monitoring and reporting of the LIP

To enable a well coordinated approach to progress, monitor and report on the LIP, a number of reporting methods have been implemented and others are under development.

Methods already in place include the monthly Local Situation Reports considered by the NSW SMC, published six monthly reports of the Australian Government’s Coordinator-General reports for Remote Indigenous Services and the annual review of the NSW Bilateral Implementation Plan of the RSD National Partnership.

Local Situation Reports are provided monthly by the ROC to the Remote Service Delivery Branch and the NSW SMC. The purpose of this report is to monitor and identify issues relevant to the implementation of the RSD, against the priorities expressed in the LIP. The information is provided by the RSD Team, supported by the ROC. The report uses a traffic light rating that flags critical issues and is an early warning system based on how services are progressing overall. This report contains valuable information against the Closing the Gap Building Blocks including the current status of the services, any problems, what action has been taken, is being taken or needed to remedy the problem.

To ensure the monitoring of the LIP involves everyone, the ROC will develop a range of tools to support the CWP, the Remote Service Delivery Working Group and the RSD State Management Committee to monitor activities and their outcomes. The CWP have proposed the establishment of sub groups against the seven building blocks in order to support delivery and to monitor the LIP locally.

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Section 3: Walgett Community

Geography

The name Walgett comes from a Gamilaraay word meaning ‘the meeting of two waters’. Walgett is located in Gamilaraay country, in the central north of New South Wales, at the junction of the Namoi and Barwon Rivers. Walgett is 1.5 hrs drive south of the Queensland border, and nine hours drive north-west of Sydney. Lightning Ridge is the closest township to Walgett, situated 45 minutes drive from Walgett. To the west of Walgett is the Grawin/Glengarry/Sheepyards opal fields and the wetland and nature reserve, Narran Lakes. There are a number of sites sacred to local Aboriginal people in the Walgett area, although some have been desecrated.

Location of Walgett

People

The Aboriginal people of Walgett are mostly from the Gamilaraay, Yuwaalaraay and Ngayimbaa nations. They have a renowned cultural heritage of warrior weapon making and an active artists’ community. The Dharriwaa Elders Group (DEG) work to sustain Aboriginal culture in the community and publish a monthly magazine, ‘Yundiboo’, which promotes the literacy of the Yuwaalaraay and Gamilaraay languages and culture.

It is estimated that the population of Walgett is 60 per cent Aboriginal. The population of Walgett (including Namoi and Gingie Aboriginal communities) in 2006 was estimated to be 2,257 people, of whom 1,220 were Indigenous. Around 60 per cent of this Indigenous population were of working age (15 to 64 years).

The Indigenous population of Walgett is projected to grow by 43 per cent from 1,220 in 2006 to 1,748 in 2026. The number of Indigenous people aged under 20 is predicted to increase from 571 to 681 over this period (an increase of 19 per cent).

The changing size and age composition of the Indigenous population of Walgett will increase the need for housing, employment opportunities, and particularly aged care and health services (Data from the Baseline Mapping Report).

The Walgett region has one of the lowest socio-economic statuses in NSW. Under the ARIA Remoteness Index, Walgett is classified as Remote.

More demographic information is provided under each Building Block at Section four.

Township

Township History:

Captain Charles Sturt was the first European to see Barwon River in February 1829 while exploring western NSW. Two of the first non-Indigenous settlers in the area were Mrs. Ulambie and Mr. Henry Cox, who arrived in 1848. Mr. Cox was the owner of the “Wareena Run”, which later became the site of the town of Walgett. During early settlement Walgett was variously referred to as Walgett, Walchate, Wingate, Warrena, Warrana and Walget. The town of Walgett was officially proclaimed on 20 March 1885. Non-Indigenous people’s incursions onto land traditionally inhabited by Aboriginal people, and the inevitable competition over land and resources, resulted in violent conflicts between Aboriginal people and new settlers.

Namoi and Gingie:

Two Aboriginal communities are located close to Walgett on Aboriginal land; Gingie Village (171 ha) is situated 10 kms west of Walgett and Namoi Village (42.9 ha) is 3kms north of Walgett. Both of these communities are home to up to 100 Indigenous families in total.

Reserves were established under Aboriginal Protection Acts both in and out of New South Wales towns as early as the 1880s. Gingie (formerly Barwon) Mission was first gazetted in 1895. Namoi Reserve was established in 1952.

Gingi (Gingie) Station - the name taken from an Aboriginal word for a waterhole - was one of the largest pastoral stations in the state. In 1876, it occupied 250,000 acres (100,000 ha) and ran 95,000 sheep. Gingi also had the largest stockyard in Australia at the time, covering over six acres (2.5 ha) and equipped to process 10,000 head of cattle. Many Aboriginal people worked as stockmen, station hands and domestics on these stations.

By 1969, the NSW Housing Commission assumed responsibility for Indigenous rental housing in towns and on some reserves. With the reform to Aboriginal Affairs in the early 1970s and the Aboriginal Land Rights 1983 (NSW) Act, many town campers gained freehold tenure and funding to build conventional houses and install infrastructure on their old town camp sites. Title to Namoi and Gingie was transferred to the Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council after the passing of the NSW Aboriginal Land Rights Act in 1993. Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council also owns a large number of houses and blocks of land in Walgett township.

Industry:

Walgett’s primary industries include wool, wheat, cotton and meat products. Walgett is also the gateway to the NSW opal fields. The main crop farmed in the district is wheat. However, drought conditions have resulted in increased farming of lucerne and other hay crops. Harvest time brings an influx of contract harvesters into the shire who also contribute to the economy of the town.

Community facilities:

Sporting facilities in Walgett include a swimming pool, tennis courts, skating ramp and sporting facilities for football, cricket and basketball. Other community facilities include a hall/meeting area, shire office, arts and craft centre, church and a community store. Music and singing groups and a local disco are also available to Walgett residents. There is also a library, community BBQ area, women’s centre, men’s centre and a youth centre. Safe houses are also available in Walgett.

Governance:

Community Working Party (CWP):

In the Murdi Paaki Region of NSW, strong local and regional governance has enabled Aboriginal people to engage successfully with governments in delivering a range of initiatives over two decades. The Walgett community established an Aboriginal Community Working Party (CWP) in the late 1980s to enable them to function as the key point of contact with government. CWPs are in many cases viewed by their communities as legitimate and representative structures for identifying community priorities and liaising with government. CWP members (and especially CWP Chairs) have dedicated much time and energy to building community cohesion and governance capacity.

Their work includes preparing for and attending CWP meetings, attending regular Community Governance Workshops, and attending meetings of the Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly where engagement with government to improve services that close the gap are a priority for discussion and resolution.

Community Working Parties and the Assembly have acknowledged these gains, but have also noted that the engagement has been lacking with several government agencies - local, state and federal. In response, the NSW and Commonwealth Governments signed the Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement (MP RPA) that commits governments to working with the Assembly and the 16 CWPs in the region to make a difference for Aboriginal people in those communities. The MP RPA focuses on governance and leadership as a primary achievement. To this effect the NSW Government’s Partnership Community Program and the Australian Government’s Indigenous Leadership Programs work hand in hand with the Assembly and CWPs to formalise and strengthen the governance structures in the communities.

The CWP’s purpose was originally to provide community liaison relating to the planning and provision of housing under the NSW Government Aboriginal Community Development Program. Membership of the Working Parties was ‘refreshed’, at the commencement of the RSD and they now have responsibility for dealing with a wide range of issues affecting the community and its relationships with government bodies. In the present context, the role of CWPs centres on community governance rather than the day-to-day coordination of the delivery of services to each community. More young people are participating in both the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Group and the CWP, which is bringing a fresh view to community matters.

The Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly (MPRA) is made up of the Chairpersons of each of the 16 CWPs plus an elected independent Chairperson. The Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly and CWPs have recognised the importance of Aboriginal youth being involved in decisions made about the current and future needs of Aboriginal people. Many CWPs have specific positions on the CWP for Aboriginal youth, however only a few CWPs including Walgett have Aboriginal young members or actively promote their participation.

Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council (WLALC)

The Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council (WLALC) is established under NSW’s Aboriginal Land Rights Act 1983 like other Local Aboriginal Land Councils across NSW. The WLCALC holds title to former reserves which it is responsible for managing as Aboriginal land for the benefit of local Aboriginal people. The WLALC is an active member of the Community Working Party and has been able to play a significant and respected leadership role in the development of this LIP.

Walgett Shire Council

The Walgett Shire local government area comprises of a number of towns and villages spread throughout the shire, including Walgett, Lightning Ridge, Collarenebri and Burren Junction, Carinda, Cumborah, Rowena and Pokataroo. Each town has its own identity, through cultural expression, cultural diversity and economic structures and development. The Walgett Shire Council has shown a strong willingness to support and drive coordinated approaches to the delivery of programs and services in the community. They have an Aboriginal Liaison Officer on staff as well as being actively engaged in the RSD initiative.

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Section 4: Community Story for each Building Block


Section 4: Community Story for each Building Block

4.1 Early Childhood

Data
  • 12 percent of the Indigenous population is in the 0-4 year old age bracket. This is projected to decline to 8 percent by 2026. (Baseline Mapping)
  • 60 percent of all children in Walgett are Indigenous.
  • 59.5 percent of families have children; and 35 percent are one parent families (compared to 26 percent in NSW) (ABS 2006).
  • 21 percent of Indigenous children attend a licensed child care service (ABS 2006).
  • The Indigenous rate for live births to mothers aged 15-19 in the Walgett SLA (130.8 per 1,000 women) was more than three times the non-Indigenous rate in Walgett (40.0), and nearly eight times the total Australian population rate (16.4) (2003 to 2007).
  • The Indigenous rate of low birth weight babies in the Walgett SLA (126.7 per 1,000 live babies) was nearly twice the non-Indigenous rate in the Walgett SLA (73.4), and two and a half times the rate for the total Australian population (47.8) (2003 to 2007).
  • 21 percent of all indigenous 0-4 year old attended an educational institution (ABS 2006).
  • The proportion of Indigenous children in the Walgett LGA considered to be developmentally vulnerable in the Languages and Cognitive Skills domain of the Australian Early Development Index (AEDI) was 16 per cent. This compares to a rate for all Australian Indigenous children of 29 per cent, and for non- Indigenous children in Australia of eight per cent.

What’s working well in early childhood in Walgett?

Information in this section about what’s working well under each of the Building Blocks is taken from the Baseline Mapping Report and from information gathered during community consultations. Information in the Baseline Mapping Report is based on data collected during December 2009 to March 2010. Copies of Baseline Mapping Reports were circulated to both the Local Shire Council and the Community Working Party in mid June 2010.

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

  • FaHCSIA funded programs: Indigenous Parenting Support Service – MacKillop Catholic Rural Community Services and Locational Supported Playgroup – WAMS.
  • Birraleegal Goondi Preschool (DET preschool based at the Walgett Community School (WCS)) – 19 enrolments at November 2009.
  • Koolyangara Aboriginal Preschool (non-government preschool) – 28 enrolments in 2008.
  • Coolibah Kids (Mainstream long day care centre) – 50 places for 3-5 year olds.
  • Paint and Play Program (DET and MacKillop Catholic Rural Community Services) – offered once a week at WCS (Families NSW).
  • Library playgroup twice a week.
  • Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service (WAMS) – 2009 priorities included developing a regional approach to maternity service delivery, developing an electronic database to support a regional information system for maternal health, standardising documentation for antenatal care. “Yinneragali” (named in 2009).
  • WAMS: Goonimoo: 0 – five years (transition pre-school).
  • Walgett District Hospital.
  • Department of Health and Ageing (DoHA) funded services – Child Health Care, Sexual Health, Health for Life.
  • Walgett Community Services Centre (NSW Community Services).
  • Brighter Futures – Mission Australia.
  • Safe Families.
  • Barwon Cottage Women’s Safe House.
  • Namoi House Men’s Refuge.
  • Aboriginal Family Health Strategy.

This is what the community said:

  • The community understands that whilst there are good programs currently in place for early childhood development a lot more could be done to integrate service delivery.

Early childhood and preschool services on the ground and out in the reserves:

  • DEEWR
  • DET – Gingie 23 attending 0 – 5 Gingie Namoi; seven in town at the moment not accessing pre-school playgroups; town meeting with parents and preschools breakdown into morning and afternoon meetings.
  • Koolyangarra: 39 Indigenous kids to 10 hours; waiting list 8; 3-5year.
  • Coolibah Kids: 20 places 3-5; thirty five places 0 – 5; long day care – waiting list.
  • Birralegal: 20-4 yr olds will take three yr olds if four yr old not available.
  • Mary MacKillop: 3 – 5 years; three playgroups per week, Gingie, Namoi and church.
  • Mission Australia – Brighter Futures – three monthly.
  • Barwon Cottage – Playgroup.
  • Women’s Legal Service – mums and bubs every fortnight.
  • NSW Playgroup Association Community Playgroup.

What’s not working so well in Early Childhood in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

  • St Joseph’s School would like to be able to offer early childhood parenting programs. Access to cultural development programs would also be of value.
  • Support is required for ‘dysfunctional’ families.
  • Staffing shortages in Coolibah Kids – the centre operates below capacity.
  • There’s a need for a family day care scheme.
  • Midwives are needed as there is only one midwife.
  • Unfilled staffing positions at Walgett District Hospital – including a family and child health registered nurse position.
  • No child psychiatrist at Walgett District Hospital.
  • Need for security of funding including for SAAP services.
  • A safe house for children when there is violence in the home and there are no other family members to care for them.
  • Greater access to drug and alcohol, mental health and counselling services.
  • Caseworker position in MacKillop Rural Community Services is vacant.
  • Lack of vacant housing in both the private rental market and social housing in Walgett means that SAAP services have no exit housing and nowhere to place, broker and assist young people and families to access alternative housing.

This is what the community said:

  • Changing the delivery of playgroups because there is a duplication of services on the ground – move towards an integrated model.
  • There should be more educational opportunities for local people with an interest in Early Childhood.
  • Children at Namoi and Gingie are not accessing preschool or playgroups. Parents not understanding the importance of taking their babies and toddlers to playgroup and then to preschool.
  • Waiting lists for places in existing services.
  • Fee structure to support the operations of the preschool.
  • Very young mums needing help, advice, mentoring to become fully engaged with their kids.
  • Lack of transport facilities to get to centres.
  • Children being born off country.
  • Not all pregnant women in Walgett choose to access antenatal services.
  • Walgett Health Service is not a delivering hospital. It only provides emergency birthing services in the A and E Ward.
  • Not all children are being assessed for health problems. Need a health care centre that allows for an integrated health service for children and families that could include services such as OT, ENT, paediatrics, speech, early childhood, midwifery.

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4.2 Schooling

4.2 Schooling

Data

  • 75.6 percent of all 5-14 year olds in Walgett attend an educational institution. 75.3 percent of these children are Indigenous. By comparison, in NSW 88.5 percent of all 5-14 year olds attend an educational institution. 4.1 percent of these are Indigenous children.
  • 29.9 percent of all 15-19 year olds in Walgett attend an educational institution. 77.4 percent of these are Indigenous. By comparison, in NSW 69.9 percent of all 15-19 year olds attend an educational institution. 2.4 percent of these are Indigenous.
  • School attendance rates 2009: St Joseph’s School (K-6): 81 percent, Walgett Community School (Primary): 84 percent, Walgett Community School (High): 69 percent.
  • 26.1 percent of all people aged 15 years or over in Walgett have completed year 12 or its equivalent.
  • In addition, 27.3 percent of people in Walgett have gone on to complete further education certificates (TAFE or equivalent). • 95 percent of students at the Walgett Community School are Indigenous.
  • There are low levels of numeracy and literacy.

What’s working well in schooling in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Walgett Community School (Primary and Secondary)

  • Walgett Community School (WCS) offers a wide variety of programs, especially to its secondary students.
  • The T-VET Program is very successful and efforts are being made to expand it.
  • WCS runs Behavioural Disorder (BD) and Mild Intellectual Disability (IM) classes.
  • There is intensive support for language development funded under an education National Partnership.
  • The Youth Development Officer in WCS provides mentoring and support to encourage young people in education and training.
  • The Walgett Community Centre has established a training program with a volunteer coordinator who has a Certificate IV in Workplace Training and Assessment.
  • Certificate IV in childcare is well supported.
  • Nutrition Program.
  • WCS has taken a lead in youth – Youth Development Strategy.
  • WCS is participating in the Low Socio-economic Status School Communities National Partnership.
  • WCS – primary is also identified as a focus school under the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Education Action Plan.

St Joseph’s Primary School

  • St Joseph’s has a position on their Board for an Aboriginal community parent/ member.
  • St Joseph’s is expected to benefit from the Smarter Schools—Literacy and Numeracy National Partnership and the Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities National Partnership.
  • Both schools teach some local Aboriginal language as part of their curriculum.
  • Both schools have onsite literacy support workers.
  • Both schools maintain designated Aboriginal employment positions and support the career growth of their Indigenous employees.
  • Youth Connections provider has been working with the primary and secondary school and has received a number of student referrals for the Youth Connections program.

Walgett TAFE

  • Language, Literacy and Numeracy (LLN) program.
  • Both schools and the TAFE have a number of projects under ‘Building the Education Revolution’ collectively worth $4.7 million.

Youth

  • Walgett Youth Centre.
  • Walgett Youth Council.
  • Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program.
  • MRCS has a strong commitment to employment and training of Indigenous staff to be able to work locally in advising and facilitating youth activities.
  • Youth connections program (please see comments above under each school heading).
  • School Business Community Partnership Brokers program.
  • Reconnect program.
  • School to Work program.
  • Walgett Youth Group.

This is what the community said:

Education

  • Students are able to complete their schooling without leaving Walgett.
  • The Walgett Community School has two sites: Preschool-8 at Warrena Street and 9-12 at Arthur Street.
  • St Joseph’s is kindergarten to year six only.
  • Distance education (housed at Warrena Street and Bourke Public School kindergarten to year six only).
  • TAFE.

Programs

  • PaCE Program at Gingie and Namoi and Walgett where parents and students are interacting together to listen to story telling and local Aboriginal history. This program is bringing parents and children together.
  • ‘Adopt a School Project’ – work experience for years 10, 11 and 12 at local businesses. There are 16 participants of which there are 13 Indigenous students. The careers teacher is communicating with the kids and providing career path information and practical experience to the students so they are able to make informed decisions about their future. A number of students receive a small wage.
  • Fashion design course.
  • The Young Leaders program run through Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise Corporation (MPREC). This is continuous and fully supported by the community. A number of young leaders are emerging in the community from this program.
  • The Youth Connections provider for this region is currently developing a program for Walgett Community High. The program will be run once a fortnight and will be aimed around building up self esteem in students who are at risk of disengaging from education. The program should be operating by late July 2010. The Youth Connections provider is also developing an activity to find and engage young people in the community who have disengaged from education through a health and fitness program which will be run over a four week period, two days a week. The program consists of an hour of physical activities i.e. touch football/boxing, lunch and then an hour of awareness workshops i.e. conflict resolution etc. The program is due to commence on 13 July 2010.

Sports

  • Walgett Community School is competing in the State Lawn Bowling Championships.
  • Country Rugby League for children in kindergarten to year six is run by a local primary school teacher.
  • The sport and general teachers are encouraging students to participate in all sports. They rotate students through all sporting activities so that students find an activity they enjoy and/or excel at.

What’s not working so well in schooling in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Walgett Community School

  • A counsellor is available to the Walgett Community School (WCS) one and a half days per week. This is an area where the demand generated by the range and complexity of problems exceed the current capacity to respond. The issues that the school confronts every day relate to social and emotional wellbeing, anger management and personal resilience.
  • No creative arts program.
  • The needs of many students with disabilities of various kinds in the community are not being ascertained and responded to.
  • WCS’ formal partnership with NSW Aboriginal Education Consultative Group.

St Joseph’s

  • St Joseph’s Primary School has challenges in delivering support to dysfunctional families.

TAFE

  • 23 referrals to the Language, Literacy and Numeracy program, however, less than 20 people commenced. Possible reasons include transport, family commitments and ineligibility.
  • Very few Certificate III and IV courses are sought and therefore offered.
  • The proportion of relatively low level courses is high.
  • There are some training needs in Walgett – particularly in childcare and welfare – yet there are limited training options in Walgett. This is reported to relate partly to the TAFE minimum class size required to run courses.

Training

  • Very limited training and employment opportunities for young people is a critical issue, making it difficult for young people to get into the workforce.
  • Shortage of trade teachers. Demand for tradespeople in the community is high.
  • There is a need to focus on developing strategies to build local welfare workforce capacity to respond to current welfare service needs through supporting educational attainment, identifying flexible training pathways in identified areas plus mechanisms for mentoring and support.
  • Additional counselling and support services for school age children may help.
  • Additional health services needed for school age children.
  • Walgett youth have identified a gap in parental support for participation in sport.
  • Interest and take-up in health and allied health care is hard to generate for school age children.

This is what the community said:

Education

  • Children are not attending school and are roaming the streets and getting into trouble with drugs, alcohol and crime.
  • Children do not understand the importance of education.
  • What are the schools doing to assist the kids that attend school every day?
  • Intergenerational issues.
  • Students are not going home to the same home every night.
  • Children are going to school without lunch.
  • A high number of children are going to boarding school, which is not good for the community. • Not enough parental involvement in their children’s education.
  • Poor education levels of parents.
  • A number of parents are unaware of school policy changes.
  • Literacy and numeracy is too low.
  • Bullying and bad behaviour is a problem at all school sites.
  • School truancy and suspensions.
  • Supervision issues out of school.
  • Walgett Community School has two sites and the primary to secondary transition has year seven students still on the Primary school site.
  • Majority of parents value education but fall short when it comes to getting the kids ready for school (e.g. lunches, uniforms).
  • Year seven children swearing and fighting in front of kindergarten children.
  • Too many programs are perceived as rewarding bad behaviour.

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4.3 Economic Participation

4.3 Economic Participation

Data

  • Walgett has a 721 person strong labour force. Of these, 56 persons, or 8 percent are unemployed.
  • Of the 226 Indigenous persons in the labour force, 48 persons or 21 percent are unemployed.
  • December quarter 2009 DEEWR Small Area Labour Markets employment estimates suggest that the unemployment rate is currently 12 percent and is increasing more rapidly than the unemployment rate for NSW overall.
  • The overall labour force participation rate in Walgett is 55 percent. For Indigenous persons it is 41 percent.
  • Health care and social assistance is the largest employment sector for Indigenous persons in Walgett, with 47 or 27 percent of Indigenous workers employed.
  • Public administration and safety is the largest employment sector overall with 116 or 18 percent of all workers employed.
  • The overall median individual weekly income is $454. The Indigenous median weekly individual income is $284.
  • The overall median household weekly income is $1006. The Indigenous median household weekly income is $762.
  • CDEP participants receive $257.50 per week. Youth participants receive $197.80 per week.
  • In 2009, there were over 800 working-age recipients of Centrelink’s main income support payments living in Walgett. 731 income support recipients were living in the town of Walgett and around 80 more in its associated communities. Some 61 percent of the income support recipients in Walgett were Indigenous. About one third (31 percent) were on labour market payments—Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance—Other, and a quarter of recipients were on Age Pension.

What’s working well in Economic Participation in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Employment Services

  • Pathways to Education, Employment and Training – to assist long term unemployed offenders to enter the workforce and/or vocational area funded by Corrective Services.
  • Centrelink office in Walgett.
  • Four Job Services Australia services in Walgett.
  • Disability Employment Network.
  • Vocational Rehabilitation Services.
  • The Indigenous Employment Program is delivered by Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise Corporation and received $198,000 between February 2009 and February 2010.
  • Community Development Employment Projects.

Training

  • NSW Department of Education and Training (DET) funds a range of support services in the region to assist Aboriginal trainees and apprentices to finish their training and maintain employment.
  • New Careers for Aboriginal People (NCAP) – program that helps Aboriginal people find work or improve their current job situation.
  • Aboriginal Enterprise Development Officer (AEDO) – assists in the establishment of locally created and viable Aboriginal businesses.
  • The Youth Development Officer WSC provides mentoring and support to encourage young people in education and training. • Economic Development Officer – MPREC.

Community

  • Indigenous Economic Development Strategy will guide and inform future policy decisions in Indigenous economic development (in draft – seeking comments on submissions by Nov 2010).

This is what the community said:

  • Employment of Indigenous people within existing organisations: WAMS is the biggest Indigenous employer in Walgett.

What’s not working so well in Economic Participation in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Employment Services

  • The majority of jobs are in work programs created through housing and are not likely to be sustainable.
  • Under previous arrangements jobs were also created under CDEP.
  • There is limited movement in and out of jobs and few new jobs for which local people are qualified.
  • Many informants commented that having four JSA providers is excessive for the relatively small population and providers are competing unnecessarily to receive incentives to place people.
  • A comprehensive coordinated planning approach to future sustainable employment should be undertaken in collaboration with all relevant stakeholders in the Walgett district.

Training

  • Very limited training and employment opportunities for young people is a critical issue, making it difficult for young people to get into the workforce.
  • There is a lack of local staff with the relevant training and skills to provide a wide range of relevant welfare services.
  • There is a need to focus on developing strategies to build local welfare workforce capacity to respond to current welfare service needs through supporting educational attainment, identifying flexible training pathways in identified areas plus mechanisms for mentoring and support.
  • There is no overall comprehensive and coordinated approach to training and employment. There are opportunities in Walgett to build on the strength of the youth council and the emerging young leaders to develop strong and effective cultural and sporting initiatives linked to education and future employment prospects for instant fitness and recreation instruction, events management, tourism.
  • There are some training needs in Walgett – particularly in childcare and welfare – yet there are limited training options in Walgett. This is reported to relate partly to the TAFE minimum class size required to run courses.
  • Employment services commented that due to low levels of numeracy and literacy additional support is needed to supplement training.

Community

  • Some Aboriginal community members do not want to move away from home to other communities where stronger job opportunities may exist.
  • There will be a need for aged services to grow as the number of older people grows. This represents an employment opportunity for working age people in Walgett if training in aged care and community support work can be provided.
  • Community norms are not supportive of job-seeking and are compounded by social problems. The long-term intergenerational cycles of under-employment, family violence, low educational attainment, abuse of alcohol and other substances collectively contribute to family and individual reluctance to participate in seeking education and training.

This is what the community said:

Opportunities for Growth

  • Economic development required within existing organisations. Local organisations need to know where to access funding for capacity building.
  • There needs to be an improved relationship between government and with the Walgett Aboriginal Community to create economic growth and training and employment opportunities.
  • More local opportunities are required to increase sustainable employment outcomes, traineeships and apprenticeships for Aboriginal people. Workers need to be more motivated to build skills and the community need the capacity to provide leadership and capacity building of individuals.
  • Organisations in Walgett need to be established to manage funding: “we should be building the capacity here with existing organisation’s rather than reporting to Dubbo.” Existing organisation’s need to be economically developed to build capacity in order to create training and employment opportunities. A regional training, development and culture centre should be developed – an “Aboriginal Health College” was proposed. Fledgling businesses say the Walgett Shire should have a building so that interested organisations and individuals can access assistance in small business development.
  • More employment opportunities could be created if housing rental money came back into Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council, for example employment of a field officer and a finance person.

Training

  • TAFE courses need to be tailored to local industry demands. Courses need to be tailored to peoples’ needs and closely mentored. The local TAFE has no support unit on campus to closely mentor people in Walgett. People need to be given entry level skills to progress.
  • A traineeship position within existing organisations has not been offered by JSA’s in Walgett and there is a lack of information provided to existing organisations by JSA.
  • Inmate education and skills development.
  • Red Scheme in the 70’s was successful in training and developing for Aboriginal people.
  • Succession of Aboriginal staff within organisations like MacKillop House to build up employment of Aboriginal staff.
  • Barriers in numeracy and literacy need to be address.
  • Computer skill and access needs to be address.
  • Mentoring of both employed and unemployed people. External trainers from institutions cover many geographical areas so they arrive in Walgett for short visits and than leave: no sustainability.
  • Not just rely on Registered Training Organisations and Government; there are experts here in Walgett. Community
  • Community money is going out of the community and not coming back to create economic sustainability.
  • Working with children checks need to be required and the process for obtaining these needs to be simplified.

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4.4 Health

4.4 Health

Data

Natal

  • Between 2003 and 2007 the live birth rate for Indigenous women in Walgett was 99.5 per 1000 women. It was 84.5 per 1000 women for non-Indigenous women.
  • Between 2003-2007 the rate of low birth weight babies for Indigenous women in Walgett was 126.7 per 1000 live births. It was 73.4 per 1000 live births for non- Indigenous women.

Hospital Separations

  • The age-standardised rate of hospital separations for diabetes for Indigenous people in the Walgett SLA was over four times higher than the national rate.
  • Between 03-04 and 07-08 the most common principal diagnosis for hospital admissions of Indigenous persons in Walgett was symptoms, signs and abnormal findings with a rate of 59.9 per 1000 admissions. This was followed by diseases of the respiratory system (58.1 per 1000 admissions) and injury and poisoning (54.7 per 1000 admissions).
  • Between 03-04 and 07-08 the rate of hospitalisation for preventable conditions (hospitalisation for conditions that are thought to be avoidable with preventive care and early disease management) for Indigenous persons in Walgett was 109.9 per 1000 persons. For the total population the rate was 75.2 per 1000 persons.
  • Between 03/04 and 07/08 the Indigenous population in Walgett were hospitalised for diseases associated with poor environmental health at a rate of 25.2 per 1,000 compared to the rate for the total population of 10.5 per 1,000.
  • The age-standardised rate of assault-related hospital separations for Indigenous people in the Walgett SLA was 16 times higher than the national rate.
  • The age-standardised rate of hospital separation for mental and behavioural disorders for Indigenous people in the Walgett SLA is nearly four times the total national figure (2003-04 to 2007- 08).

Alcohol related issues

  • The age standardised rate of alcohol-related hospital separations for Indigenous people in the Walgett SLA was over three times higher than the total national rate (2003-04 to 2007-08).
  • Alcohol-related offences made up over a third (37 percent) of all recorded offences in Walgett from 2004-05 to 2008-09.
  • In 2009, Walgett had the second highest rate of assault related to domestic violence of all local government areas in NSW. Alcohol was identified as a factor in 71 per cent of all domestic violence offences (2004-05 to 2008- 09).

What’s working well in Health in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

General Services

  • Walgett has a district hospital (multi-purpose service facility) and an Aboriginal medical centre (Walgett Aboriginal Medical Service WAMS).
  • The Department of Health and Ageing provide funding for a number of programs and initiatives for Walgett including the following:
    • Primary care – adult immunisation, child health care, alternative birthing services, bring them home, sexual health, Health for Life;
    • Visiting Optometrists Program;
    • Medical Allied Specialist Outreach Program – cardiologist, NSW Rural Doctors Network, Respiratory Physician, Addictions Medicine;
    • Indigenous Specialist Outreach Program – dermatologist, orthopaedic surgeon;
    • Regional Health Service program.

Aged and Disability Services

  • Ballayarta Day Care Centre provides weekday care for older people. The centre also provides an outreach service to Collarenebri and Burren Junction.
  • The Yarrabin Outreach/Walgett Respite Service provides respite care for the frail, aged and people with a disability from Mondays to Thursdays.
  • WAMS (Euragai Goondi) and the Walgett Aged Accommodation Committee at Kookaburra Court provide aged care services in the community.
  • The Walgett District Hospital contains a nursing home/ locked bed dementia unit. The eight bed nursing facility is currently full.
  • Dementia support advisor and a caring for elders coordinator.

Substance Abuse

  • WAMS employs an alcohol and drug worker.

Mental Health

  • Safe assessment room in the hospital for mental health, drugs and alcohol admissions.
  • Trained mental health nurse.
  • Psychiatrist visits WAMS once per month.

This is what the community said:

General Health Services

  • Primary health care services are open to all community members; WAMS present as a community business for the whole community and community services are free except for dental. This works well because Memorandums of Understanding between WAMS and other agencies have been signed or are currently in draft form.
  • WAMS - A Healthy For Life program runs three times a week.
  • A dietician is available in Brewarrina and Bourke.
  • A dental health program is in progress. This program is well equipped and maintained and involves promotions in school, communities and an outreach service.
  • A visiting renal disease specialist (Nephrologist) visits RARMS clinic and Walgett hospital.
  • WAMS offer free transport services to clients in many outreach communities for doctors’ appointments outside of Walgett; Officers dedicate their time after working hours to transport the clients.

Substance Abuse

  • WAMS drug and alcohol clinic offers programs for those suffering with substance abuse.
  • Men’s Pit Stop service offers support with taking clients to rehabilitation programs.

Mental Health

  • Psychologist at RARMS surgery; psychologists and counsellors for the community were identified as important, including a Link Up service, as per the Bringing them Home Report.
  • Mental health team outreach is funded by Greater Western Area Health Service (GWAHS). This includes monthly psychologist services to Lightning Ridge and Walgett.
  • A social and emotional well being team provides outreach services for family violence.

General Issues

  • Health promotion in the form of going out and providing education about specific diseases and what can be done to prevent them, for example at schools, in the community and within services.

What’s not working so well in Health in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

General Health Services

  • The hospital has only one midwife, which is not sufficient to meet current need, particularly in cases of high risk pregnancy.
  • There are currently unfilled staffing positions including a family and child health registered nurse position and a diabetes educator.
  • The WAMS clinic buildings are only a few years old and already have structural damage due to movement in concrete base slabs.
  • There are no regular dental health facilities and in an emergency the patient must travel to Lightning Ridge.
  • There is no operating theatre.
  • Eye operations need to be undertaken in Sydney and patients have to travel by bus or train.

Aged and Disability Services

  • More aged care facilities are required.
  • Further analysis is needed for health, aged care and disability services.

Substance Abuse

  • Several JSA providers reported that many clients have mental health and trauma issues, alcohol and drug addictions that clearly affect their job readiness. The relevant services in WAMS are overloaded.

Mental Health

  • Walgett District Hospital does not have the resources to look after long term mental health patients.
  • No child psychiatrist at Walgett District Hospital.

General Issues

  • Preventable and avoidable illness rates are high. The reason for the adverse acute and chronic conditions rates are complex and include aspects such as public health awareness and poor environmental health conditions.
  • Effective youth health promotion programs are required.

This is what the community said:

Government

  • Poor communication between government agencies, lack of government coordination and shifting of responsibilities between different levels of government.
  • There have been numerous reports by the state Aboriginal health body and the development of a national Aboriginal health strategy, including numerous recommendations, but these are yet to be actioned.
  • More involvement by the government was requested by the community to help improve primary health care.

General Health Services

  • WAMS is covering the expenses associated with additional services, including 24 hour monitoring by a cardiologist.
  • Travelling doctors often don’t understand the funding arrangements and refer non-Indigenous persons to Indigenous services.
  • More general practitioners are required for chronic disease treatment.
  • The remuneration for a locum dentist is not an employment incentive in comparison with alternative NSW locations.
  • Aboriginal health workers/nurses ought to be providing programs for people with renal disease.
  • Patient transport is an issue in that it costs patients to access the service and is consequently restrictive of patient access to a larger range of health service providers. WAMS transport staff have to travel after hours because most patients require travel to Dubbo for doctors’ appointments.
  • Women are not able to give birth in Walgett and Public Transport/Country Link will not allow pregnant women on their bus service. Early discharging of women who have recently given birth was reported by the community as insulting.

Aged and Disability Services

  • Concerns were expressed about elderly abuse and the dumping of children.
  • Concerns were also expressed about the fee for service arrangement at Kookaburra Court aged care service.

Substance Abuse

  • Substance abuse related family violence, child abuse and childhood neglect were identified as issues of concern.
  • Not enough services are available to assist substance abuse affected people to rehabilitate.
  • Safe houses are required for offenders who are released from jail and have no where to go after being in domestic violence relationships.

Mental Health

  • Psychologist at WAMS is unfunded by Commonwealth/State governments; WAMS pay for two days per fortnight, relying on Royal Flying Doctor flights. Funding does not reflect the community’s needs.
  • No specialist is available for children’s needs.
  • Limited after hours services.
  • Services, including a family violence service, are based in Lightening Ridge.
  • Stronger ties are required with community services and police. Greater case coordination is also required between service providers with regard to case management, including greater agreement on client confidentiality and a designated team leader/facilitator.

General Issues

  • There are issues around the availability of safe and healthy food – there is a lack of fresh food available, and food is often sold past its use-by date.
  • Insufficient or poor infrastructure including housing, heating, cooling, water, and sewage.
  • Lack of quality animal care: de-sexing and disease management programs are required.

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4.5 Healthy Homes

4.5 Healthy Homes

Data

  • ABS 2006 census data indicates there are 578 houses in Walgett. Of these 93 (16.0 percent) are rented from a state housing authority. This represents a much higher concentration of social housing than can be found across NSW where only 4.7 percent of houses fall into this category.
  • In Walgett and Namoi Reserve, 28.1 percent of all households are one family households (couple with children). 13.8 percent are one family households (one parent families). 22.4 percent of all Indigenous households are one family households (one parent families).
  • The median rent for Indigenous persons in Walgett is $100 per week. For other persons in Walgett, it is $59 per week. These median rents represent 13.1 percent of the median household income for Indigenous households in Walgett and 5.4 percent of the median household income for non-Indigenous households.
  • 16.7 percent of all dwellings in Walgett are being purchased (mortgage holders). 10.1 percent of Indigenous dwellings are being purchased. The overall median housing loan repayment in Walgett is $650 a month, which represents 15.1 percent of median household incomes. For Indigenous mortgage holders it is $520 per month, which represents 16 percent of median household incomes.
  • 30.5 percent of Indigenous homes in Walgett are overcrowded - defined here as having two or more usually resident persons more than the number of bedrooms. Indigenous household overcrowding is more prevalent in Walgett than in NSW overall, where the rate of overcrowding is 14.6 percent.
  • Despite problems with overcrowding, between 07-08 and 08-09 the number of new houses that were built in Walgett dropped from 35 to nine, which is a decrease of 74.3 percent.
  • All town houses are connected to town water and sewerage systems provided by Walgett Shire Council. Namoi Reserve is connected to town water. Estimated annual maintenance cost is $20,900.
  • The existing sewerage system at Namoi comprises individual envirocycle treatment systems with surface irrigation of the treated sewerage effluent. These systems were installed in the 1980’s and are maintained by the CDEP. The total annual maintenance cost of this system is estimated at $167,000 per annum.
  • Gingie, situated a few kilometres west of Walgett, has its drinking and domestic water needs met from reticulated treated bore water. Gingie has a septic tank system within each housing lot, with effluent pumped to maturation ponds outside the levee. Total annual cost of maintaining the septic system is $111,600 per annum.

What’s working well in Healthy Homes in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Housing

  • Between 1998 and 2003, ATSIC spent $2,428,711 under the NAHS program to renovate houses, spot purchase seven houses and develop a Housing and Environmental Health Plan.
  • Between 2001 and 2008, the NSW Department of Aboriginal Affairs spent $7,350,000 to construct two and purchase 10 houses and renovate 43 homes. Funds were also spent on water, sewerage and road repair, rainwater tanks and construction of parks and associated landscaping. A detailed budget is on the DAA website.
  • Houses on both reserves are owned and managed by the Walgett LALC.
  • In June 2008 FaHCSIA funded the NSW Aboriginal Land Council (NSWALC) $2.1M (excl. GST) to undertake repairs and maintenance on the Local Aboriginal Land Council’s housing stock on the two reserves and in town. NSWALC advised 68 houses were in need of repairs and maintenance. This funding was boosted by an additional $2.21M in 2009 when a detailed scope of works found the original allocation was insufficient. The works include electrical and plumbing repairs, fencing and provision of appropriate shading.
  • Air cooling has been approved by FaHCSIA, WALC have to contribute $100,000 out of R&M, and FaHCSIA negotiated that with NSWALC. Air cooling units will be installed in 60 Walgett LALC owned properties. The remaining seven properties already have air cooling installed. The repairs and maintenance component of the project is due for completion by 30 June 2010 with the air cooling installation completed by end July 2010.
  • Under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing a total of seven new houses are planned, of which two will be transition / exit houses constructed under the Orana Far West Safe Houses project.

Infrastructure

  • Under the National Water Security Plan for Cities and Towns program Walgett will receive $4.2 million which will provide filtered water upgrade for Walgett; improve capacity and pressure problems with raw water supply to Namoi; upgrade Walgett sewage treatment plant; and install pump to pump Namoi sewage to Walgett for treatment.

This is what the community said:

Housing

  • Repairs and maintenance have commenced and are improving the housing stock with ongoing programs to bring homes up to a reasonable standard.

Infrastructure

  • A promise by the NSW Government to upgrade water and sewerage at Gingie reserve.

Other sources say:

  • Air-cooling has noticeably improved comfort levels in the houses that have had it installed.
  • Many homes have now been insulated and are now noticeably cooler in the summer months.

What’s not working so well in Healthy Homes in Walgett?

This is what the community said:

Housing

  • Climate control in the homes as well as the need for repairs and maintenance are a big concern.
  • Tenants want to know why they can’t have wood heaters in homes.
  • Increases in electricity and the installation of water meters which will also increase costs.
  • Overcrowding and homelessness in the community.
  • More home ownership is needed.
  • Lack of housing stock and the different ownership of the stock with different rules around air cooling.
  • Housing NSW policy of not supplying air cooling in any of their houses.

Infrastructure

  • Problems with council and the rising costs and implementing water charges.
  • Problems with basic utilities – sewerage, water, electricity, garbage collection on the reserves.
  • Lack of local skilled tradesman.
  • Lack of transport and public phone.
  • Road at Gingie needs repairs.
  • Kids swim in the dirty water when it rains.
  • No mail service as the mail is held at the post office or put in other PO boxes.

Other sources say:

  • The document Walgett Futures 2018 Operational Plan, obtained from the Dubbo ICC details the results of a survey undertaken at Namoi and Gingie reserves in March 2008. This survey shows a need for an additional eight houses at both Namoi and Gingie reserves and single men’s accommodation for five persons.

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4.6 Safe Communities

4.6 Safe Communities

Data

  • The number of offences in Walgett recorded by police shows a downward trend over the last five financial years; between 2004-05 and 2008-09 the number has decreased by 16 percent.
  • The number of offences recorded as acts intended to cause injury has fallen every financial year, and in 2008-09 was 42 percent lower than in 2004-05.
  • Over the same period, public order offences have increased by 68 percent, 66 percent of these being alcohol-related.
  • 51 percent of offences in Walgett were committed by young people aged 10-24 years.
  • In 2009, Walgett had the second highest rate of assault related to domestic violence of all local government areas in NSW.
  • Alcohol was identified as a factor in 71 percent of all domestic violence offences (2004-05 to 2008- 09).
  • Alcohol-related offences made up over a third (37 percent) of all recorded offences in Walgett from 2004-05 to 2008-09.
  • 23 suicide and self-harm attempts in last five years.
  • Initial inspection of child protection data presented by Childs Residence reveals that for Walgett there were five substantiated notifications for Indigenous children aged 0-16 years in 2004-05. This number increased substantially to 23 and then 24 in the following two years, then decreased to 14 in 2007-08.

What’s working well in Safe Communities in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Policing

  • Police Station: 34 police officers and three admin staff. Two positions for Aboriginal Liaison Officers.
  • Targeted police operations: state-wide traffic operations; drug traffic operations; drug operations; and ‘Youth off the Streets’ operations.
  • Crime Prevention Officer at Walgett is attached to the Castlereagh local area command (covering a very large geographical area not just Walgett).
  • Community Patrols undertaken by Murdi Paaki Enterprise Corporation.
  • Walgett Aboriginal Night Patrol – which has a focus on youth crime prevention.

Substance Abuse

  • A number of rehabilitation programs – Sober Driver Program, Probation and Parole facilitated group programs, Domestic Abuse Program, a visiting psychologist (once a month).
  • Namoi House – provides crisis accommodation, early intervention and postcrisis case management for men aged over 18 years who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Legal Services

  • Aboriginal Legal Aid position operates in Walgett as well as two other solicitors who service the community on a visiting basis.
  • Aboriginal Legal Aid service has a 24 hour help line.
  • Local circuit based court operates in Walgett. Circle Sentencing is conducted.

Domestic Violence

  • Family Violence Prevention Legal Services (FVPLS) team to provide support to the victims of violence and sexual assault and to work with the families and communities. This is funded by the Commonwealth’s Attorney-General’s Department.
  • Barwon Cottage Women’s Safe House – Women’s Refuge. This is funded by the Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (SAAP). The Safe House provides emergency and crisis accommodation for women and children escaping domestic violence.
  • Walgett has been identified as a Safe Families community but the program has not yet been implemented in this community. Safe houses are key partners in the Safe Families program. Safe Families is a whole-of-government program funded and co-ordinated jointly with Aboriginal Affairs, Community Services and NSW Health to address abuse in identified Aboriginal communities across NSW.
  • A staying home leaving violence pilot is being run in Walgett involving the development of a local model. The model is based on case management, referral pathways, brokerage of services, accommodation for men, liaison with police, and a home safety audit followed by repairs and maintenance of homes damaged in family violence incidents. The pilot is being supported by an interagency group. Once developed, it is expected that the model will receive recurrent funding through NSW whole-of-government initiatives.

Youth

  • The Walgett Youth Centre caters for five- to 17-year-olds and provides a range of youth activities including an eight-week vacation care program and afterschool care, school-to-work programs, youth workshops and mentoring. A Friday evening youth venue and entertainment program is supported with a NSW Transport and Infrastructure grant to Youth Off the Streets to transport young people home. Community Services contributes funds to the youth development officer position at Walgett Shire Council to provide youth services across three youth centres (Walgett, Collarenebri and Lightning Ridge).

This is what the community said:

Substance Abuse

  • Aboriginal Medical Services have just recently appointed a drug and alcohol counsellor.

What’s not working so well in Safe Communities in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

Policing

  • One Police Aboriginal Liaison Officer position is not filled.

Substance Abuse/Mental Abuse

  • Walgett has some restrictions on alcohol. Nevertheless alcohol and substance abuse remains a problem in the community with associated family stresses and mental health issues.
  • Need for greater access to drug and alcohol, mental health and counselling services.
  • No drug and alcohol service (although some of the health services address some of these issues).
  • Mental health services are not available in Walgett but in Lightning Ridge.

Legal Services

  • There are currently no arrangements in place for offenders to be supervised by community members in Walgett to undertake Community Service Orders. All supervision is undertaken by probation and parole officers.
  • Lack of effective juvenile justice services and diversionary programs for young people who return home to Walgett after a period of detention
  • There are limited accommodation options and inadequate services for rehabilitation to prevent recidivism.

Domestic Violence

  • A safe house for children when there is violence in the home and there are no other family members to care for them.

Other

  • Walgett reports lack of recreation and entertainment, limited activities for children and young people after 6pm on weeknights, lack of structured weekend sports competitions, and lack of parental support for sports and recreational facilities.

This is what the community said:

Policing

  • Kids on street when picked up by police and returned home ignore their parents/grandparents and return to the streets: big issue and not sure how to progress this change.
  • Not enough enforcement from the law and unsure as to how to progress this change.
  • Legislation does not support parents disciplining kids, as adolescents ring police and AVO is taken out.

Substance Abuse

  • Anti-drinking advertisements have had the opposite effect on all people including youth.
  • Limited services for alcohol and substance abuse education – some funded through DET for Public School, no service at St Joseph’s. Extra services provided by WAMS that they are not funded to provide.
  • Incident at school witnessed where a teacher goes outside school grounds to have a cigarette, and a student goes out and has one with the teacher.
  • No safe place for men to recover when they come out of jail, or have been drinking too much and they take it out on their family.
  • Liquor accord legislation need to be addressed with the pubs and clubs.

Services

  • A lot of mob go into jail from Walgett, but when they come out there are no opportunities to get them back into the workforce, as there is no program funded – GGGAC (men’s group) could build on this. Probation and patrol do not do anything for those clients that come out of jail.
  • Need local professional counsellors who can get to the heart of the problems, especially for the youth of the community.
  • Outsiders providing services – would like to see own mob being skilled up and providing services.
  • No special place in Walgett for “healing” trauma held in for many years.
  • Gap in programs for women and men to address issues such as parenting, substance abuse, gambling, grief and trauma – also need to involve whole of family.

Other

  • There has been a lot of community grief in the Walgett community over the past few years, particularly in suicides. The community has not had time to heal.
  • Outside people come into Walgett and are employed. We want the whole community to create jobs for our mob here in Walgett.
  • We have a Community Working Party, and we need to make it strong, get the people from the community to attend, not just service providers. We know there is more work that has to be done to strengthen the governance, but it’s better than what we had a few years ago.
  • We know many of the pastoralists. Our mob have worked with them through Grain Corp and others and have done labouring work over many years. Today they employ young blokes and they are running them down in the pubs and clubs, this needs to be addressed and in the hope that relationships can be rebuilt from this.

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4.7 Governance and Leadership

4.7 Governance and Leadership

Data

  • Indicators on governance and leadership are not provided as there is no reliable data available to measure this building block at a community level.

What’s working well in Governance and Leadership in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

  • Walgett Shire Council takes a strong lead in youth affairs and auspices an all- Aboriginal Walgett Shire Youth Council, whose members are part of the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program - funded by FaHCSIA over three years (2008-11) with initial funding from DEEWR and DAA, auspiced by the Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise Corporation. Funding is for the 16 Murdi Paaki communities including Walgett.
  • There is a positive and proactive approach to the employment of local Aboriginal people in the cultural and environmental programs of NSW Department of Environment, Climate Change, and Water (DECCW) and the involvement of cultural custodians in place management.
  • Indigenous Women’s Program is developing strong leadership among Aboriginal women in the 16 communities of the Murdi Paaki region of New South Wales, so that they can effectively deal with the issues that arise around families in their communities such as domestic violence and parenting.

What’s not working so well in Governance and Leadership in Walgett?

This is what it said in the Baseline Mapping Report:

  • Elders have expressed concern that they are not adequately consulted in cultural matters related to cultural sites and broader cultural knowledge. Consideration should be given to introducing more cultural programs for different sections of the community.

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Section 5: Outputs and Activity Table


5.1 Early Childhood

COAG targets

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation.
  • Halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.
  • Ensuring all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years.
  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous children are born and remain healthy.
  • Indigenous children have the same health outcomes as other Australian children.
  • Children benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage, especially Indigenous children.
  • Quality early childhood education and care supports the workforce participation choices of parents in the years before formal schooling.
  • Indigenous children acquire the basic skills for life and learning.
  • Indigenous children have access to affordable, quality early childhood education in the year before formal schooling as a minimum.

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Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

Commonwealth

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on TAFE Fee Waivers for Childcare Qualifications
  • COAG National Early Childhood Development Strategy - Investing in the Early Years
  • COAG Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Early Childhood Education
  • COAG National Early Childhood
  • Development Strategy
  • NSW State Plan
  • Clever State
  • School readiness
  • Stronger Communities
  • Strengthen Aboriginal Communities

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:
    • Education forum outcomes
    • Literacy and numeracy
    • Valuing education
    • PACE programs
  • Murdi Paaki Health Project
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

Local

  • Murdi Paaki Health Project
  • Yinneragali
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

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Closing the Gap outputs

  • Increased provision of antenatal care services targeted at young Indigenous women.
  • Increased provision of sexual and reproductive health services for Indigenous teenagers.
  • Increased provision of maternal and child health services for Indigenous children and their mothers.
  • Provision of early learning, childcare and parent and family support services to Indigenous families.

Walgett priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  • Healthy young families.
  • Supporting families and parents.
  • Early learning and care.
  • Integration of the early childhood service system.

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Early Childhood
Priority 1: Healthy young families
  Activities Agencies Involved (lead agencies in bold) Timeframe
1.1 Output: Families have access to and use culturally appropriate antenatal and postnatal care

1.1a

Undertake review of the current antenatal and postnatal care services, mapping all services from birth to school age. The purpose of the review is to provide the basis for identifying gaps and issues in the service system from birth to school age, in order to identify where and what to invest.

The review will be based on existing data, service mapping and will also identify funding sources. This may include, but not be limited to, the Walgett Baseline Mapping Report, WAMS report to deliver a local response to maternal health, recommendations of the systems assessment, National Partnership of Indigenous Early Childhood Development National Partnership.

The review will use the Murdi Paaki Health Project information, Families NSW and GWAHS data.

Data can also be provided by DOHA from the

Child and Maternal Health Sub Committee.

  • Families NSW
  • GWAHS / Bila Muji
  • Greater Western Aboriginal Health Forum
  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • Outback Division
  • RARMS
  • AMIHS

By December 2010

1.1b

Implement recommendations of the review as appropriate, to increase accessibility and uptake of culturally appropriate antenatal and postnatal services.

  • DoHA
  • GWAHS

By January 2011

1.1c

Establish accommodation for pregnant mothers and their families in Dubbo.

  • GWAHS
  • AHL
  • Bilamuuji
  • Housing NSW

By March 2011

1.1d

Investigate ways of strengthening discharge planning from Dubbo Base Hospital.

  • GWAHS
  • AHL

By February 2011

1.2 Output: Families have access to and use culturally appropriate birthing settings

1.2a

Feasibility study into birthing centre / alternative birthing services. The study should be about provision of the service and what is required- e.g. training more midwives etc. Seek to implement recommendations.

In the interim, implement changes to the placement of beds away from other patients to enable women the opportunity to return to Walgett for their postnatal period.

  • NSW Health
  • AH and MRC
  • GWAHS

By June 2011

1.2b

Sustainable training and support for health workers to increase their capacity to contribute to antenatal care (such as in health promotion and as a cultural guide).

Link to Economic Participation Priority 1: Walgett

Training and Learning Centre.

  • WAMS
  • DET – State Training Services (STS)
  • AH and MRC

By December 2010

1.2c

Increase number of midwives in Walgett by skilling locals as well as encouraging external midwives

to come to Walgett.

Increase the skills for current staffing in the area of antenatal support and postnatal care.

  • GWAHS
  • DoHA
  • WAMS

By June 2011 commence.

1.3

Output: All children have access to and utilise culturally appropriate health assessments and follow up allied health treatments, including NSW Personal Health Record Child Health Checks for 0-4 years and StEPS 4 year vision screen

1.3a

Investigate options of delivering integrated allied health service for children and families that could include services such as OT, ENT, paediatrics, speech, early childhood, midwifery.

One model is an early childhood health care centre.

  • NSW Health
  • GWAHS

By March 2011

1.3b

Integrated allied health follow-up post health checks. Options include Kids Pit Stop; Health Surge; re-introducing School Nurses model (as appropriate).

Schools provide facility for allied health follow-ups. Encourage use of Blue Book.

Link to the Murdi Paaki Family Wellbeing component of the health strategy.

  • NSW Health
  • GPs
  • WAMS
  • AECG
  • DET – school to provide site

By October 2011

1.4 Output: All children have access to early intervention social and emotional wellbeing services

1.4a

Investigate participating in pilot sites for Kidsmatter – Australian Early Childhood Mental Health Initiative which would enable preschool and long day care services to plan and implement evidence based mental health promotion, prevention and early intervention strategies that aim to:

  • Improve the social and emotional wellbeing of children from birth to school age
  • Reduce mental health problems among children
  • Achieve greater support for children experiencing mental health difficulties and their families.
  • DET Preschool
  • Early Childhood Australia
  • AECG

By December 2010 investigation completed

1.4b

Early childhood services have access to SNAICC’s training and culturally appropriate resources and training materials to support the social and emotional wellbeing of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander children in their care.

  • All early childhood services
  • ATSI Early Childhood Sector Advisory Group
  • Aboriginal Knowledge and Practice Centre

Ongoing

Priority 2: Supporting families and parents/caregivers
2.1 Output: All families have access to information on the importance of early childhood development

2.1a

Coordinate the engagement and support of Aboriginal families in reviewing available early childhood development resources. If needed, developing localised, culturally relevant, universal early childhood (development and education) and parenting resources and activities and disseminate, including linking to service providers.

Target:

  • Specific focus on young parents/caregivers and dads:
  • Universal messages.
  • FaHCSIA - through Indigenous IPSS/LSP
  • Preschools
  • AECG
  • DEEWR
  • Families NSW
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • CCSA Inc
  • GWAHS
  • WAMS
  • Outback Division
  • RARMS
  • Sporting organisations – CRL, Netball NSW etc

Current

2.2 Output: Parents and caregivers have access to and use parenting support services when needed

2.2a

Implementation of new parenting services are developed in response to community need.

Ensure service is child centred and family focussed.

Explore options of offering parenting support in school settings.

Targeting – at risk families and young parents.

Link to Country Rugby League Young Dads as an engagement strategy for dads.

  • FaHCSIA through IPSS and LSP
  • DEEWR – PaCE
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • NSW Health
  • Safe Families
  • Families NSW
  • Communities and Early Years
  • Other similar programs

Current

2.2b

Implement PPP Parenting in innovative ways (for example all participants in CDEP could undertake PPP).

Example – Goodooga.

  • Families NSW
  • Service Providers

Commence September 2010 and ongoing

2.2c

More intensive strategies to engage parents/ caregivers that are not accessing services and link to existing parenting services.

  • FaHCSIA through IPSS
  • All stakeholders: government, NGOs, community.

Ongoing

2.2d

Develop a whole of government response to explore using schools as a hub for early childhood activities and to become more family friendly in school ground.

Draw on the experiences of the Integrated Child and Family Centre in Lightning Ridge and Brewarrina.

  • DET - School
  • DEEWR
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • GWAHS
  • WAMS

From Term 1 in 2011

Priority 3: Early learning and care
3.1 Output: Families with children 0-5 years know of and attend preschools/long day centre and playgroups

3.1a

Develop a two tiered information strategy on early learning services available linking to PaCE activities and/or additional early learning options.

Tier 1: targeting services

Tier 2: targeting parents

Include the engagement of parents/caregivers in discussions with preschool in developing sustainable creative options for parental contribution to assist in the delivery of a quality service e.g. parents/caregivers doing gardening, assisting in delivering language, music and art activities possibly in lieu of financial contribution.

  • DEEWR
  • Community Services NSW
  • AECG
  • Parent/caregivers
  • Community

Ongoing

3.2 Output: High quality trained staff in early childhood settings, including preschools and playgroups, have access to sustainable training and skill development

3.2a

Explore options for TAFE or universities to deliver innovative child care courses responsive to Walgett in partnership with FaHCSIA funded IPSS

Identify potential options of linking with Charles Sturt University, Western TAFE. The Early Childhood Education Bachelor Degree already has Early Childhood Workforce Capacity Building Project.

  • DET – STS
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA
  • AHL

Commence September 2010

3.2b

Identify innovative ways to build the capacity of community members to engage effectively with young children in early childhood settings.

Engage families in developing these innovative approaches.

  • Walgett Shire Council Community Development Team
  • Families NSW
  • Early childhood networks

Ongoing

3.3 Output: Options for additional learning settings explored
3.3a

Implement recommendation of the current Scoping Study of existing services (all early learning services) – which includes recommendations for individual services, options for different business models (such as community management models) as well as expansion of new services.

  • DEEWR
  • Community Services NSW

Consultant employed and scoping study is being undertaken.

3.3b

Develop a strategy that ensures universal access to early childhood education for children in the year before school by 2013 is achievable and early childhood services are of high quality.

Link to Early Childhood:

2.1 Culturally relevant early childhood development messages.

3.1 An information strategy on early learning services.

3.3a Implementation of recommendation of Scoping Study; and Economic Participation 1: Walgett Community Learning Centre.

  • DEEWR
  • Community Services NSW
  • AECG

Complete by December 2010

3.3c

Engage with the Child and Family Centre in Lightning Ridge and Brewarrina to identify relevant models that could be implemented in Walgett.

  • DEEWR
  • Community Services NSW

Ongoing

Priority 4: Integration of the Early Childhood Development and Education Service System
4.1 Output: A range of quality early childhood services (playgroups, preschool, long day care, health services, family support services) are coordinated to be delivered in a number of locations, at different times, targeting a range of high risk groups
4.1a

Develop a community early childhood education and development action plan that clearly identifies roles of health and education in early childhood.

As part of the plan, within the first six months, develop referral pathways between adult- focussed services and early childhood services.

The action plan will be informed by an analysis of the data available from the Australian Early Development Index and, as appropriate, in conjunction with ESL/D (English as a Second Language or Dialect) specific assessment tools to identify priorities for community-based early childhood development.

  • Families NSW
  • DEEWR
  • DET / Schools
  • AECG
  • FaHCSIA through IPSS and ISP
  • GWAHS
  • WAMS

By June 2011

4.1b

Strengthen and support the Child and Family Interagency to identify when and where services are being delivered to prevent duplication and identify gaps of locations and times, as well as ensure services are universal, however also targeted to high risk groups (for example teenage parents and dads).

  • Early Childhood Reference Group
  • CWP
  • DET
  • AECG
  • GWAHS
  • WAMS

By September 2010, establish the Early Childhood

Reference Group to drive this strategy

4.1c

Use all early childhood settings as a soft entry point for maternal and child health and family support services ensuring a no-wrong door philosophy.

  • All agencies

Ongoing

4.1d

Targeted training to all agencies on supported referrals.

  • Early Childhood Reference Group
  • All agencies

Ongoing

4.2 Output: Early learning services (playgroups, preschool, long day care) are linked to maternal and child health and family support services
4.2a

Use all early childhood settings as a soft entry point for maternal, child and family health and family support services ensuring a no-wrong door philosophy.

For example, Child and Family Health Nurse providing a talk at playgroup.

  • Early Childhood Reference Group
  • All agencies

Ongoing

4.3 Output: Adult-focussed services (for example, mental health and substance abuse) need to be child-centred
4.3a

Deliver awareness training to existing adult services on child centred – family focussed approaches, in order to increase understanding and capacity of staff to ‘think of the children’.

  • Families NSW
  • DET
  • AECG
  • All agencies

Ongoing

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5.2 Schooling

COAG targets

  • Ensuring all Indigenous four year olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years time.
  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.
  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Schooling promotes the social inclusion and reduces the educational disadvantage of children, especially Indigenous children.
  • Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving.
  • Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Improve school retention and completion rates from year nine up.
  • Support for parents/carers to actively participate in children’s education.
  • Professional development in quality and culturally appropriate teaching methods.
  • Early intervention and specialist teachers for low achievers.
  • Holistic services offered through school hubs.
  • School meals programs.
  • Provision of innovative and tailored learning opportunities and external partnerships with parents/caregivers, other schools, businesses and communities.

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Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

Commonwealth

  • COAG National Education Agreement
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Low Socio- Economic Status School Communities
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Improving Teacher Quality
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Literacy and Numeracy
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions
  • COAG Building the Education Revolution
  • COAG Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

State

  • COAG National Education Agreement
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Improving Teacher Quality
  • COAG National Smarter Schools Partnerships – Literacy and Numeracy
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions
  • COAG Building the Education Revolution
  • COAG Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan
  • NSW State Plan
    • Clever State
    • Literacy and numeracy skills
    • Year 12 achievement
    • Access to higher education
    • Improved access to jobs and training
    • Stronger communities
    • Strengthening Aboriginal communities

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:
    • Education forum outcomes
    • Literacy and numeracy
    • Valuing education
  • DET Western NSW Region Plan
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

Local

  • 2009-2011 Walgett Community School Management Plan
  • PACE programs
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan

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Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. A child, family, community centred approach to schooling in primary school.
  2. A child, family, community centred approach to schooling in high school.
  3. vocational education and training.
Schooling
  Activities Agencies Involved(lead agencies in bold) Timeframe
Priority 1: A child, family, community centred approach to schooling in primary school
1.1 Output: Activities and supports within the school that enhance our children’s overall wellbeing and readiness to learn

1.1a

Report from DET on the recommendations of education forums held in Walgett in the last five years.

  • DET – Regional Office
  • AECG

By September 2010

1.1b

Continue to implement evidence-based transition programs including focussed, evidence-based early childhood programs for 0-8 year olds.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • Families NSW
  • Community Services NSW
  • DEEWR

Ongoing

1.1c

Develop a Community, Early Childhood Education and Development Plan focussing on transition points: 0-2 to kindergarten, kindergarten to year one, year one to year two.

Link to Early Childhood: 4.1b Community Early Childhood Education and Development Action Plan.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Families NSW
  • Community Services NSW
  • DEEWR

By January 2011

1.1d

Continue to implement activities and programs that engage children within the school, such as breakfast clubs, homework centres, lunch programs etc.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • ADHC
  • DEEWR
  • WAMS
  • GWAHS

Ongoing

1.1e

Continue the delivery of a holistic model that aims to fully engage students in active learning and remain in the school environment using different strategies for boys and girls.

Identify programs targeting 8–11 year olds.

  • DET - School
  • DEEWR
  • AECG
  • Parents/caregivers
  • Community
  • Community Services NSW

Ongoing

1.1f

Social and Emotional Wellbeing Strategy in primary schools.

Commence participating in and accessing resources available under Kidsmatter Primary to implement a comprehensive approach to addressing students’ mental health which is tailored to local needs in the school.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

For 2011

1.1g

As part of core business, implement the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan and the NSW Aboriginal Education Plan.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • DEEWR

Various

1.2 Output: Parents/caregivers have access to support that will empower their children to engage and be happy at school

1.2a

Implement Parental and Community Engagement Program (PaCE) in a cooperative way.

  • DEEWR
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Parents/caregivers
  • Community

Commence June 2010 and ongoing

1.2b

Work with community to understand school suspension policy and develop strategies to continue education outside of school to support the students return to school, using counselling, homework classes, GGAC, DEG, youth centre, community centre and other facilities and organisations to keep suspended children engaged.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • CWP

Ongoing

1.3 Output: School and its environment welcomes and celebrates diversity of culture and abilities

1.3a

Staff to complete the Aboriginal Knowledge and Practice Centre programs in relation to Aboriginal pedagogy (8Ways), Aboriginal Education, Early Childhood, Middle Years and Senior Program.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

Ongoing

1.3b

Welcoming Project. Including for new staff – use local resources and Regional Aboriginal Education Team and Regional Aboriginal Cultural Course, including cultural immersion programs.

  • DET – School
  • WAMS
  • AECG
  • CWP

Ongoing

1.3c

Audit of supports and services within the primary and high school for students with a disability, including mental illness and development of an application for additional investment if required. Report to the CWP on audit findings and responses.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • ADHC
  • CS NSW
  • GWAHS

End 2010

1.3d

Develop a plan that identifies a preferred model of delivering Allied Health Services in primary and secondary schools.

Link to Health Strategy. Implement Plan.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • WAMS
  • ADHC
  • GWAHS

Beginning 2011

1.3e

Implement 8 Ways in School Curriculum P-12.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

Ongoing

Priority 2: A child, family, community centred approach to schooling in high school
2.1 Output: Activities and supports within the school that enhance our children’s overall wellbeing and readiness to learn

2.1a

Report from DET on the recommendations of education forums held in Walgett in the last five years.

  • DET – Regional Office

By September 2010

2.1b

Continue to implement and strengthen evidence-based school transition programs.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • Families NSW
  • Community Services NSW
  • DEEWR

Ongoing

2.1c

Continue to implement activities and programs that engage children within the school, such as breakfast clubs, homework centres, lunch programs etc.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • ADHC
  • DEEWR
  • GWAHS
 

2.1d

Continue the delivery of a holistic model that aims to fully engage students in active learning and remain in the school environment using different strategies for boys and girls.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • DEEWR -PACE
  • Parent/caregivers
  • Community

Ongoing

2.1e

Investigate the implementation of a social and emotional wellbeing strategy in high schools.

  • Accessing support from project officer in Mindmatters to develop a whole of school approach to social and emotional wellbeing that includes promotion, prevention and early intervention strategies to support high school students experiencing mental health difficulties.
  • Accessing professional development training and resources provided through Mindmatters to enhance capacity of staff to respond to students presenting with social and emotional wellbeing matters.
  • DET – School
  • AECG

Ongoing

2.1f

As part of core business, implement the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Action Plan and the NSW Aboriginal Education Plan.

  • DET – School
  • DEEWR
  • AECG

Various

2.2 Output: Parent/caregivers have access to support that will empower children to engage and be happy at school

2.2a

Implement Parental and Community Engagement Program (PaCE) in a collaborative way.

  • DEEWR
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Parents/caregivers
  • Community

Commence June 2010

2.2b

Work with community to understand school suspension policy and develop strategies

to continue education outside of school to support the students to return to school, using counselling, homework classes, GGAC, DEG, Youth Centre, community centre and other facilities and organisations to keep suspended children engaged.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • CWP

Ongoing

2.3 Output: Parent/caregivers have access to support that will empower children to engage and be happy at school

2.3a

Staff to complete the Aboriginal Knowledge and Practice Centre programs in relation to Aboriginal pedagogy (8 Ways), Aboriginal Education, Early Childhood, Middle Years and Senior Program.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • CWP

Ongoing

2.3b

Implement 8 Ways in School Curriculum P-12.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

Ongoing

2.3c

Welcoming Project.

Including for new staff – use local resources and Regional Aboriginal Education Team and Regional Aboriginal Cultural Course.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

Ongoing

2.3d

Audit of supports and services within primary and high schools for students with a disability, including mental illness and development of an application for additional investment if required, with regular reports to the CWP.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • ADHC
  • Community Services NSW
  • GWAHS

End 2010

2.3e

Develop a plan that identifies a preferred model of delivering Allied Health Services in primary and secondary schools.

Link to Health Strategy.

Implement Plan.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • WAMS
  • ADHC
  • GWAHS

Beginning 2011

2.3f

Consider and report to the community policy and procedure that allows years seven and years eight to be successfully located with kindergarten to year six in consideration with the Middle School Strategy.

  • DET – School
  • AECG

End 2010

2.4 Output: Community embraces education and the local schools

2.4a

Develop a sports oriented after school and vacation care program.

Consider organisations such as National Aboriginal Sporting Chance Academy (NASCA) and other similar groups, also noting that the Commonwealth supports structured after-school hours physical activities through the Australian Sports Commission’s Active After Schools Communities program.

  • ROC
  • Walgett Shire Council - Youth Development Team
  • Sporting organisations

2011

2.4b

Develop other structured after school and vacation care program offered at the school.

Link to Early Childhood Strategy 3.3a Scoping Study of existing services.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

2.4c

Communicate procedures to the community for utilising the school for community events including youth activities, training and adult education.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • All agencies
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

2.4d

Work with students to identify ways of sharing good news stories about children and the schools.

  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • CWP
  • Local paper

Ongoing

2.5 Output: Young people have access to programs that provide education on pregnancy choices and build life skills

2.5a

Implement sexual and reproductive health education in schools and other settings.

Identify different approaches for parents/caregivers and for children.

  • GWAHS
  • DET - School
  • AECG
  • Safe Houses

Ongoing

2.5b

Implement Core of Life and provide Train the Trainer for local service providers and their staff.

  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

2.5c

Implement Protective Behaviours Strategy for people with a disability.

  • ADHC
  • AECG
  • Community Services NSW
  • NSW Sport and Recreation

Ongoing

Priority 3: Vocational education and training
3.1 Output: Access to supports and services for kids to remain in schools and then transition to work or further study

3.1a

The School Business Community Partnership Brokers Program will support and develop partnerships to implement evidence based transition activities such as Learning for Life.

  • DEEWR(Partnership Brokers provider - Centacare)
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Centacare

Ongoing

3.1b

The Youth Connections program can identify at risk young people who require support to remain engaged in school and provide case management for those individuals.

  • DEEWR
    (Youth Connections Provider – Mission Australia)
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Mission Australia

Ongoing

3.1c

Actively encourage young people to access and participate in the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program, the Australian Indigenous Education Foundation, and access the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program.

  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • DEEWR
 
3.2 Output: Children have access to courses and training that meets their interests and enhances their skills

3.2a

Delivery of a Walgett Economic Participation Expo.

Link to Economic Participation 2.1a.

  • DEEWR
  • DET – School
  • DET – STS
  • AECG
  • FaHCSIA

2011

3.2b

Undertake an ‘audit of interest’ of professions and courses (what do kids actually want to study?).

  • DET - School
  • SRC / Youth Council
  • AECG

2011

3.2c

Courses are offered on the school site, by TAFE or other Registered Training. Organisations (and once established, by the Walgett Community Learning Centre).

  • DET - School
  • DET – STS
  • DEEWR
 

3.2d

Continue and expand training opportunities established under the Economic Participation building block.

  • DEEWR
  • DET – School
  • AECG
 

3.2e

Respond to the needs of transient students.

  • DET - School
  • All other agencies
  • AECG
  • Community
 

3.2f

Explore and develop learning community concept.

  • TAFE
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • CWP
  • AECG
  • ROC

By End 2010

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5.3 Economic Participation

COAG targets

  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills and capabilities required for the twenty first century labour market.
  • Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors and at all levels of the labour market.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Increased employment participation impacts positively on life expectancy.

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Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

National

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation
  • National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development
  • National Partnership Agreement on Productivity Places Program
  • National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions
  • National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Economic Participation
  • COAG National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Productivity Places Program
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access
  • State Plan:
    • Supporting Business and Jobs
    • Job Compact Strategy (Murdi Paaki mining Job Compact)

Regional

Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:

  • Economic Development Strategy
  • Charter of Engagement with local government – Aboriginal employment strategy in each shire
  • Murdi Paaki Mining Job Compact

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Community has access to training that meets their interest and job opportunities.
  2. Innovative economic participation opportunities are developed.
  3. Enhance the contribution of the Community Development Employment Projects program to increase economic participation.
  4. Government agencies provide employment opportunities to the community.

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Economic Participation
Priority 1: Community has access to training that meets their interest
  Activities Agencies Involved(lead agencies in bold) Timeframe
1.1 Output: Provide opportunities to identify training and job interest and needs of community

1.1a

Implement an Aboriginal Employment Strategy by undertaking:

  • Skills sudit (including the identification of skills gaps with local employers)
  • Interest audit
  • Existing training positions within local services and JSA Clients Audit.
  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA
  • DET
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • CWP

By September 2010

1.1b

Investigate the development of a learning centre for Walgett.

  • Work in collaboration with other agencies.
  • Integrated service delivery model.
  • Courses offered dependent on Interest audits undertaken in schools and community.
  • Pool the training.

Link to Skills Centre Program and VET work with universities to establish innovative courses and delivery options.

Implement LLNP for adults.

  • DEEWR
  • DET – State Training Services (STS)
  • DET – School
  • AECG
  • Universities

By June 2011

1.2 Output: Provide access to training that meets their interest and job opportunities

1.2a

Review and respond to existing plans and feasibility studies to identify options for economic development such as community land and business plans.

  • DEEWR
  • DET - School
  • Walgett LALC
  • CDEP
  • FaHCSIA
  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW

By December 2010

1.2b

Promote the engagement of local people in employment for the Water and Sewerage Infrastructure Upgrade Program.

  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW
  • Walgett LALC

Ongoing

1.2c

Business aspirants attend expo (see 2.1a below).

  • ROC
  • Community

2.1a below

Priority 2: Innovative economic participation opportunities are established
2.1 Output: Opportunities are provided to the community to increase awareness of available economic participation options

2.1a

Hold an innovative Walgett Economic Participation Expo:

  • Establish working group, including community members.
  • Two tiered approach – schools and community (base expo on economic participation 1.1b and schooling 3).
  • Different tiers of business (existing businesses and range of supports.
  • Demonstration projects.
  • Develop follow up strategies which would include:
    • Shadowing/mentoring programs.
  • Use birth certificate program to increase participation.
  • ROC
  • DEEWR (will fund)
  • DET – STS
  • FaHCSIA
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • LALC
  • AECG

By December 2010

2.1b

Encourage IGA Supermarket to employ local people.

  • ROC
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • Chamber of Commerce

Commence Immediately

2.2 Output: Economic participation opportunities are established

2.2a

Review and respond to existing plans and feasibility studies to identify options for economic development, such as community land and business plans.

  • DEEWR / DET – School – Co-lead
  • LALC
  • IBA

By December 2010

2.2b

Explore the enterprises:

  • Bread shop
  • Coffee shop
  • Laundromat
  • Internet café
  • Real estate
  • Rent collection
  • Carpentry.

Review options for partnering up with a proponent; grants for business; no start-up costs.

Where appropriate, ensure engagement with CDEP and JSA, and linkage to the Indigenous Employment Program initiatives such as preparing for work training and mentoring.

  • DEEWR
  • State and Regional Development
  • Industry and Investment NSW
  • DET – STS
  • NSW AA
  • Indigenous Land Corporation
  • Chamber of Commerce
  • FaHCSIA

By December 2010

2.2c

Ensure Brewarrina Shearing School is accessed by Walgett community and develop ways of linking youth to the Shearing School.

  • ROC
  • Indigenous Land Corporation
  • DET – STS
  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA

By December 2010

2.2d

Enhance tourism to Walgett:

  • Complete final editing of the Welcome to Walgett CD and link to existing initiatives (such as Community Garden)
  • WLALC promotion of reserves
  • Capture history of Walgett, Namoi and Gingie
  • Work with the Walgett Shire Tourism strategies.
  • ROC
  • CWP
  • Industry and Investment NSW
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • Tourism NSW

Ongoing

2.2e

Support Men’s Group to establish commercial arts and craft opportunities including the leasing of premises.

Where appropriate, ensure engagement with CDEP and JSA, and linkage to the Indigenous Employment Program initiatives such as preparing for work training and mentoring.

  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR
  • Premiers and Cabinet

By December 2010

2.2f

Support the establishment of the Community Garden to ensure it is a cohesive initiative.

  • ROC
  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR
  • DoHA
  • WAMS
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

2.2g

Review options of Walgett CUZ FM Relay from Bourke and/or a retransmission licence for Yarma FM. Any radio station needs local Walgett content.

Where appropriate, ensure engagement with CDEP and JSA, and linkage to the Indigenous Employment Program initiatives such as preparing for work training and mentoring.

  • DEWHA
  • Industry and Investment
  • FaHCSIA

Underway

2.2h

Identify opportunities for Indigenous Employment Program projects with Graincorp.

Where appropriate, ensure engagement with JSA, and linkage to the Indigenous Employment Program initiatives such as preparing for work training and mentoring.

  • DEEWR

Commence by September 2010

2.2i

Participants from Indigenous Youth Mobility Program are supported to enter into the workforce.

  • DEEWR

Ongoing

Priority 3: Enhance the contribution of the Community Development Employment Projects program to increase economic participation
3.1 Output: Employment services are integrated

3.1a

Review the service level agreement between JSAs and CDEP providers.

  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR

Immediately

3.1b

FAHCSIA / DEEWR joint meetings with JSAs, CWPs, local Aboriginal organisations and councils to increase participation rates and extend training opportunities linked to local business activities. There is a drive to increase private sector work experience.

  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR
  • CWP
  • Local Aboriginal organisations

Immediately

3.2 Output: Implement CDEP Community Action Plans

3.2a

Implement Community Garden / Nursery. Link to Health.

  • FaHCSIA

By June 2011

3.2b

Implement Tracker Walford Walkway re-development.

  • FaHCSIA

By June 2011

3.2c

Implement street / park beautification. Link to Safe Communities.

  • Walgett Shire Council
  • CWP

By June 2011

3.2d

Implement yard maintenance. Link to Healthy Homes.

  • FaHCSIA
  • LALC

By June 2011

3.2e

Implement driver’s licence training.

  • FaHCSIA

By June 2011

Priority 4: Government agencies provide employment opportunities to the community
4.1 Output: Government agencies provide employment opportunities to the community

4.1a

Government agencies introduce traineeships and apprenticeships (already agreed to in the Indigenous Economic Participation NP).

  • All agencies
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

4.1b

When implementing services, government agencies to include within funding agreement that service providers are to have local trainees working alongside skilled workers.

  • All agencies
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

4.1c

Include in government contract clauses with building and trade sector the requirement to employ local Aboriginal workers with a ratio of 20:1 FTE target where appropriate.

  • All agencies
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

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5.4 Health

COAG targets

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation.
  • Halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous Australians, particularly those living in rural and remote areas or on low incomes achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.
  • Indigenous people have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventive services.
  • Indigenous people remain healthy and free of preventable disease.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Improved quality, coverage and access to primary health services.
  • Prevention, early detection and management of major chronic diseases.
  • Address key behavioural chronic disease risk factors (e.g. smoking, misuse / excess use of alcohol and other drugs, poor diet and obesity).

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

National

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes
  • COAG National Healthcare Agreement
  • COAG National Disability Agreement
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Hospital and Health Workforce Reform
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Preventative Health

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes
  • COAG National Healthcare Agreement
  • COAG National Disability Agreement
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Hospital and Health Workforce Reform
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Preventative Health
  • State Plan:
    • Healthy Communities
    • Stronger Communities

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:
    • Murdi Paaki Health Project
    • Strong Women’s Project
    • Murdi Paaki Aboriginal Young Leaders Project
  • Families NSW
  • Aboriginal Maternal Infant Health Strategy

The National Health and Hospitals Network Agreement

On 20 April 2010, the Commonwealth and all State and Territory Governments (with the exception of Western Australia) agreed to fundamental reforms to restructure and improve the way that health services are funded, operated and delivered. These reforms include the establishment of Local Hospital Networks to run hospitals across the country on a day-to-day basis, and the consolidation of policy and funding responsibility for primary health care and aged care services under the Commonwealth Government.

The implications of the reforms for local and regional services are not yet clear. Over the next twelve months, NSW will work with the Commonwealth to resolve the boundaries of Local Hospital Networks (LHNs) and Medicare Locals (primary health care organisations), determine the final scope of primary health and aged care services to be transferred to the Commonwealth, and how these will operate alongside LHNs.

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Comprehensive health strategy.
  2. Workforce support.
  3. Drug and alcohol, mental health and renal services.
  4. Health across the building blocks.
Health
Priority 1: Comprehensive Health Strategy
  Activities Agencies Involved
(lead agencies in bold)
Timeframe
1.1 Output: Planned approach, collaboration and coordination across the Walgett Health Service System

1.1a

Revise mechanism for enhanced collaboration between all government agencies and health service providers in Walgett in order to identify gaps, reduce competitions, share resources and enhance collaboration.

Include facilitated service planning.

Funding agreements state the requirement to participate in this collaboration.

James Christian and Brian Stacey to initiate first meeting.

  • ROC to drive
  • DoHA
  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • RARMS
  • ODGP

By December 2010

1.1b

Undertake a survey of the community to identify health status, access to health services, service provision gaps in Walgett etc, include Namoi and Gingie in the survey.

  • ROC
  • DoHA

By June 2011

1.1c

Establish cross agency networks to develop responses to key (priority) health issues in Walgett including strategies to address gaps in service provision:

  • Chronic disease
  • Men’s health
  • Women’s health
  • Youth health
  • Elder’s health
  • Sexual health
  • Support for mums (ante natal, birthing and post-natal care and support)
  • Access to birthing accommodation in Dubbo
  • Social and emotional wellbeing
  • Substance Abuse Strategy
  • Child and adolescent mental health
  • Improved health literacy to reduce avoidable hospitalisations and chronic illness
  • Discharge planning
  • Aged care
  • Environmental health – food storage – domestic and commercial, animal health management plan, housing repair
  • Food security strategy (including education, access to fresh and affordable produce)
  • Quality animal care/disease management linked to Healthy Homes Strategy.

Draw on the Murdi Paaki Health project to build on the work that has been done over the last four years with respect to chronic disease, social and emotional wellbeing and family wellbeing.

Partners and stakeholders relevant to priority issues:

Sexual health – GWAHS, WAMS, Safe Families.

Ante-natal, birthing, post-natal – GWAHS – Walgett, Dubbo Base Hospital, AMIHS; WAMS, Brighter Futures, ODGP.

Birthing in Dubbo – GWAHS, Housing NSW, OATSIH, FaHCSIA.

Social and emotional wellbeing and substance misuse, child and adolescent MH – GWAHS MHDA, NSW Health MHDAO; WAMS, Murdi Paaki Drug and Alcohol Network, NGOs; Safe Families.

Improved health literacy – WAMS GWAHS, ODGP RFDS.

Discharge planning – GWAHS – Dubbo Hospital, Bloomfield, WAMS, RARMS.

Aged Care – Housing, Walgett Shire, HACC, GWAHS.

Environmental health – Walgett Shire, Murdi Paaki Regional Enterprise/Housing, GWAHS, ODGP, Housing.

Food security – GWAHS, NSW Food Authority, Walgett Shire.

  • ROC as driver to bring agencies together:
    • DoHA
    • WAMS
    • GWAHS
    • GP Service
    • Outback Division

By June 2011

1.1c

Strengthen the referral pathways and discharge planning.

ROC to convene interagency around this strategy, including:

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS
  • ODGP
  • RARMS

Convene by August 2010 and ongoing

1.2 Output: Allied health services identified

1.2a

Identify allied health service gaps.

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS

By December 2010

1.3 Output: WAMS has access to additional funds to respond to internal capacity building

1.3a

Support WAMS to increase uptake and use of PIP (Practice Incentive Payments) and other funding streams and the Indigenous Chronic Disease program to enhance health service capacity in Walgett.

  • DoHA
  • AH and MRC
  • ODGP

Commence July 2010 and ongoing

1.3b

Funding bodies recognise that WAMS provides services to outlying communities - not only to Walgett and the impact this has on service delivery to Walgett.

  • All agencies – through the WG established in 1.1a

Ongoing

1.4 Output: Medical health buildings are structurally sound and safe

1.4a

Engage engineering services to investigate structural damage at WAMS due to movement in concrete base.

  • ROC

July 2010

Priority 2: Workforce Support
2.1 Output: Workforce is supported and given professional development opportunities resulting in retention of staff

2.1a

Provide support and access to professional development and training to health staff, e.g:

  • Community health nurses and community health workers to train together
  • Release of health workers to work in / through other services (eg mental health workers to work in housing)
  • Shared clinical forums in Walgett e.g. case presentations
  • Coordinated case management (managed by the prime responsibility holder for the client).

ROC to drive working group:

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS
  • Housing NSW
  • NSW Police
  • DET - school (as appropriate)

Commence by August 2010

2.1b

Further develop existing workforce strategies to increase sustainability by:

  • Including housing for staff
  • Availability of flights to Walgett
  • Building existing staff
  • Acknowledging Aboriginal health workers.
  • ROC
  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • Housing NSW

Commence August 2010

2.1c

Ensure the Walgett Learning Centre has a focus on increasing local skills in health.

  • ROC

As the centre is established

2.1d

Identify needs for existing staff such as in Otitis Media screening.

  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • ROC

By September 2010

Priority 3: Drug and alcohol, mental health and renal services
3.1 Output: Increased access to drug and alcohol detox and rehabilitation

3.1a

Investigate and resolve assessment process of drug and alcohol service in Dubbo. e.g. GPs to administer methadone treatment.

  • GWAHS
  • MP D and A Network
  • DA specialist

By August 2010

3.1b

Support the implementation of the MP D and A network including its staff.

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS
  • ODGP

Ongoing

3.2 Output: Increased access to mental health services

3.2a

Increase social and emotional wellbeing services to address identified gaps.

  • GWAHS
  • NSW Health
  • Outback Division of General Practice
  • DOHA

Ongoing

3.2b

Identify different options of delivering social and emotional wellbeing services to children, families, elders.

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS
  • RARMS
  • ODGP

Ongoing

3.3 Output: Increased access to renal services

3.3a

Implementation of the Hemo-Dialysis Service in Walgett Hospital.

  • GWAHS

By August 2010

Priority 4: Health across the building blocks
4.1 Output: That health strategies are incorporated into Early Childhood

4.1a

Early Childhood Priorities: 1; 2; 4

Early Childhood Activities: 1.1a – 1.4b; 2.2a, 2.2b, 2.2d, 4.1a – 4.3a

As identified in the respective strategies

As identified in the respective strategies

4.2 Output: That health strategies are incorporated into Schooling

4.2a

Schooling Priorities: 1; 2

Schooling Activities: 1.1d, 1.1e; 1.3b; 1.3c; 1.3d; 2.1c, 2.1d; 2.3d; 2.3e

As identified in the respective strategies

As identified in the respective strategies

4.3 Output: That health strategies are incorporated into Economic Participation

4.3a

Economic Participation Priorities: 1; 2; 4

Economic Participation Activities: 1.1a;1.1b; 2.1a; 2.2f; 4.1a – 4.1c

As identified in the respective strategies

As identified in the respective strategies

4.4 Output: That health strategies are incorporated into Safe Communities

4.4a

Safe Communities Priorities: 1; 2; 3; 4; 5; 6; 7

Safe Communities Activities: 1.1a – 1.1c; 2.1b; 2.1c; 3.1c, 3.1d, 4.1b, 5.1a, 5.1b, 6.1b, 6.1c, 6.3a, 6.4a, 7.3c

As identified in the respective strategies

As identified in the respective strategies

4.5 Output: That health strategies are incorporated into Healthy Homes

4.5a

Healthy Homes Priorities: 1; 3

Healthy Homes Activities: 1.1a, 1.1c, 1.1d ,1.1e, 1.3a, 1.4a; 3.2c

As identified in the respective strategies

As identified in the respective strategies

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5.5 Healthy Homes

COAG targets

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation.
  • Halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous children’s living environment is healthy.
  • Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities.
  • Indigenous people have improved housing amenity and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities.
  • Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people.

COAG outputs

  • Address overcrowding and environmental health through maintenance and repair of existing housing.
  • Increased stock of social housing and private rentals.
  • Home ownership assistance.

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

National

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing
  • COAG National Affordable Housing Agreement
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing
  • COAG National Affordable Housing Agreement
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness
  • State Plan:
    • Healthy Communities
    • Green State
    • Stronger Aboriginal Communities
  • AHO Build and Grow
  • NSW Housing, Social and Community Housing

Regional

Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:

  • Murdi Paaki Housing Strategy

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Healthy homes.
  2. Suitable homes.
  3. Serviced community.
Healthy Homes
Priority 1: Healthy Homes
  Activities Agencies Involved
(lead agencies in bold)
Timeframe
1.1 Output: Individuals and community have capacity for ongoing maintenance of a healthy home

1.1a

Deliver a home maintenance (covering safe maintenance tasks) skills program (Health for Housing strategies).

Under the Tenant Participation Resource Service Program (support for Public and Social Housing tenants), work with Centacare Wilcannia-Forbes to develop and deliver a basic course in minor maintenance in Walgett. Identify options of brokering to a local provider.

Identify options of delivering maintenance training in Juvenile Justice/Corrective Services centres.

  • GWAHS
  • DET - School
  • DET - TAFE
  • Housing NSW
  • IYMP
  • NSW Juvenile Justice
  • Corrective Services NSW

Ongoing

1.1b

Deliver a tenant support and education program in Walgett

  • AHO

Ongoing

1.1c

Review Healthy for Life baselines to focus on health and hygiene, property care and basic living skills.

Identify funding options to deliver a healthy living practice skills program.

LALC – Minor Maintenance Repair Kit HACC – Train the Trainer Model McKillop Rural Services

Brighter Futures - Mission Australia

  • ROC
  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • Housing NSW
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • LALC
  • ADHC
  • Community Services NSW
  • Families NSW

Ongoing

1.1d

Implement community financial well-being services including emergency relief and financial literacy training.

  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

1.1e

Establish and deliver healthy home environment services on a fee for service basis targeting elderly and people with a disability – ie. Build capacity for local people to be skilled in gardening / cleaning / handyperson.

Identify options of linking activity to:

  • CDEP
  • JSA
  • Corrective Services Programs (Parole).
  • Western Institute of TAFE (and providers)
  • ADHC
  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR
  • GWAHS

Commence July 2010

1.1f

Identify need for, as well as existing, skills of local trades people and deliver training in innovative ways in response to needs identified.

Engage CDEP and Job Services Australia.

Link to Economic Participation: Skills and Interest Audit.

  • DEEWR
  • DET - School
  • Industry and Investment
  • FaHCSIA
  • Walgett Shire Council

Ongoing

1.2 Output: Individuals have access to home ownership options

1.2a

Encourage interested families and individuals to purchase social or land council housing stock that is available on the Walgett market. Respond positively to Walgett Local Aboriginal Land Council’s offer to sell over 10 refurbished homes to Walgett families in Walgett township using IBA’s Home Ownership Program. Include Gingie and Namoi in a project being funded by FaHCSIA and NSW ALC which seeks to subdivide the land to assist with private home ownership.

  • ROC
  • Housing NSW
  • IBA
  • LALC

Ongoing

1.3 Output: Women and children have access to safe homes

1.3a

Ongoing implementation of the Staying Home Leaving Violence Project.

Ensure model is linked to Safe Communities strategy.

  • Community Services NSW
  • WAMS
  • NSW Police
  • Walgett Shire Council (as auspice for safe house)

Ongoing

1.3b

Implementation of Safe Families program.

  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW

Ongoing

1.4 Output: People living with mental illness are supported in their home

1.4a

Investigate extension of Bourke Housing and Accommodation Support Initiative (HASI) model to Walgett for families affected by mental illness.

Link to Health: mental illness.

  • NSW Health
  • GWAHS
  • Housing NSW

By December 2010

Priority 2: Suitable homes (in response to overcrowding)
2.1 Output: Access to appropriate and accurate housing information

2.1a

Under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH), build five new houses in 2010-2011 and six new houses in

2011-2012.

  • Housing NSW
  • FaHCSIA

5 June 2011 - 6 June 2012

2.1b

Under the NPARIH, refurbish eight houses.

  • Housing NSW
  • FaHCSIA

By June 2011

2.1c

Streamline social housing policy and service delivery in Walgett in consultation with the housing providers.

  • AHO
  • LALC
  • Community housing providers

Ongoing

2.1d

Develop and implement policies and a tenant education strategy on housing, rights and responsibilities in relation to rent and tenancies consistent with the Build and Grow Aboriginal Community Housing Strategy.

  • AHO
  • Walgett LALC

By December 2010

2.1e

Identify repair and maintenance needs and undertake appropriate repairs once the housing providers have met requirements under the

Build and Grow Aboriginal Community Housing

Strategy.

  • AHO
  • Housing NSW
  • Walgett LALC

By December 2010

2.2 Output: Access to appropriate housing, including climate control

2.2a

Air-cooling implemented in Walgett LALC houses.

  • Walgett LALC
  • FaHCSIA
  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW

By Summer of 2010

2.2b

Identify other climate control models and implement.

  • NSW Housing
  • LALC
  • AHO
  • DECCW

Ongoing

2.3 Output: Strategies to reduce overcrowding

2.3a

Investigate in detail housing need in relation to overcrowding and develop actions to address needs for different population groups; young people, elderly, those affected by domestic violence.

Investigate and incorporate best practice methodology being developed under the Overcrowding Project for Bourke and Coonamble (developed under the Homelessness National Partnership).

The competitive bids process for capital funding under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH) for 2011-11 and 2011-12 requires jurisdictions to include provision for RSD communities in their bids. The outcome of this process will be announced shortly, at which time further information will be available on housing investment strategies for Walgett under the NPARIH.

  • Walgett LALC
  • NSW Housing (Policy and Strategy and Homelessness Unit)
  • AHO
  • Community Services NSW

Completed by March 2011

Priority 3: Serviced community
3.1 Output: Access to air service

3.1a

Seek to reinstate air services.

Conduct a viability study and identify different options for providing an air service in Walgett.

  • Dept of Premier and Cabinet
  • Transport NSW
  • ROC

Ongoing

3.2 Output: Access to essential services

3.2a

Examine the findings of the MES Audit report and develop options for implementing appropriate responses where required.

  • DPC
  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

3.2b

Undertake feasibility study of a postal service, including different models of postal services to Walgett, Namoi and Gingie reserves. Seek to implement recommendations.

Link to Economic Participation Strategies.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • Australia Post
  • Local Postal Service
  • Walgett Shire Council

Commence September 2010

3.2c

Establish community transport system using existing resources, for example, school buses available for hire during the hours they are not being used for school purposes.

All buses would need to be identified and their availability mapped.

  • Transport NSW
  • NSW Sport and Recreation
  • ROC
  • All agencies who fund transport

Ongoing

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5.6 Safe Communities

COAG targets

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation.
  • Halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.
  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous children and families are safe and protected from violence and neglect in their home and communities.
  • Alcohol and other drug abuse among Indigenous people is overcome.
  • Breaking cycles of criminal behaviour and violence normalisation.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Addressing alcohol/substance abuse and harm through prevention, diversion and treatment services.
  • Mental health treatment that is culturally sensitive, in liaison with substance abuse and criminal justice services.
  • Healthy living programs focusing on harmful/hazardous consumption of alcohol and smoking cessation.
  • Support youth at risk of contact with justice system.
  • Personal responsibility, engagement and behaviours consistent with positive social norms.

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We need to work within the following policy and strategic frameworks

National

  • COAG National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children
  • COAG National Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their Children
  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery

State

  • COAG National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children
  • Keep Them Safe
  • Regional Violence Prevention Strategy
  • NSW Attorney General’s:
    • Aboriginal Justice groups
    • Youth conferencing
    • Circle Sentencing
  • Corrections NSW
    • probation and parole services to reduce recidivism

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement:
    • Law and Justice sub group
    • Men’s Yarn Ups
    • Strong Women’s Group
    • Murdi Paaki Aboriginal Young Leaders

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Coordinated approach to addressing community safety:
    • Policing
    • Night patrols
    • Youth (both juvenile offenders and chronic re-offenders)
    • Drug and alcohol reduction strategies and management
    • Adult offenders (focus on rehab and re-integration into the community)
    • Family violence
    • Child protection
    • Whole of community education and awareness campaign.
  2. Community policing.
  3. Children.
  4. Youth.
  5. Families.
  6. Healing - women.
  7. Healing - men.
  8. Reconciliation.
Safe Communities
Priority 1: Coordinated approach to addressing community safety
  Activities Agencies Involved
(lead agencies in bold)
Timeframe
1.1 Output: Develop a plan which includes a coordinated approach to addressing community safety by building on the Walgett Shire Council's Safety Precinct Plan as well as national, state, regional and local frameworks and plans to develop a coordinated, whole of community, Walgett Community Safety Plan

1.1a

Establish a working group to drive the development of the Walgett Community Safety Plan that would include:

  • Community Working Party
  • Safe Families Local Aboriginal Reference Group
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • Police
  • Department of Justice and Attorney General(NSW)
  • Commonwealth Attorney General's Department
  • Communities NSW
  • ADHC
  • Department of Juvenile Justice;
  • Department of Health
  • Department of Corrective Services
  • Department of Education and Training (including principals)
  • Department of Health and Ageing
  • FaHCSIA (in relation to national frameworks on Violence Against Woman and Children and Protecting Australia's Children)
  • Community Services NSW
  • Social Housing Providers
  • Department of Premiers and Cabinet.
  • ROC

By October 2010

1.1b

Key Issues to be addressed in the Community Safety Plan include the following as raised by the Community:

  • Policing (community policing that is visible, regular and responsive)
  • Safe house project
  • Night patrols
  • Young people

 

  • Substance abuse reduction strategies and Management (including addressing cooling- down accommodation for men)
    • Adult offenders (focus on rehab and re- integration into the community)
    • Family violence
  • Child Protection (Brighter Futures, Keeping Them Safe Program, Safe Families, development of a specific Child Sexual Assault Prevention Plan)
    • Integrated Service System
    • Safety audit
    • Whole of community education and awareness campaign.
  • ROC

Ongoing from August 2010

1.1c

Implement Community Safety Plan – update the LIP accordingly.

  • Safe Communities Working Group
  • ROC

On completion and acceptance of Plan

Priority 2: Community policing
2.1 Output: Increase positive relationship between community and police

2.1a

Build stronger links between police and community:

  • Community policing
  • Police – Young People Touch Footy.
  • NSW Police
  • CWP

Commence September 2010

2.1b

Establish a Police and Citizens Youth Club (PCYC)-style mobile.

Agencies to fund the establishment costs. Police to fund the ongoing operational costs.

  • ROC
  • Police
  • Commonwealth Attorney General
  • State Attorney General
  • FaHCSIA
  • DoHA
  • DEEWR
  • Sport and Recreation NSW
  • Tourism NSW
  • PCYC

Commence planning by 31 July 2010. ROC to drive

2.1c

Investigate the establishment of a permanent PCYC.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • PCYC
  • Police
  • Commonwealth Attorney General
  • State Attorney General
  • FaHCSIA
  • DoHA
  • DEEWR
  • Sport and Recreation NSW
  • Walgett Shire Council

Commence investigation by September 2010

Priority 3: Children
3.1 Output: Access to services and supports that prevent child sexual assault and for victims of child sexual assault

3.1a

Keep Them Safe Program – ensure linkages are made to other programs / services.

  • Premiers and Cabinet Coordinator
  • Keep Them Safe Regional Implementation Group
  • ROC

Ongoing

3.1b

Safe Families Program – implement and ensure linkages are made to other programs / services.

  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW

Ongoing

3.1c

Establishing community driven strategies to raise awareness of preventing child abuse and neglect.

Link to Early Childhood: Parenting Strategy.

  • Safe Families
  • Community Services NSW
  • DET
  • DoHA
  • FaHCSIA
  • YOTS

Ongoing

3.1d

Deliver counselling for victims and for perpetrators of child sexual assault.

  • GWAHS
  • WAMS

Ongoing

3.1e

Improve access to forensic medical services and training to existing workers.

  • Western Regional Manager's network
  • NSW Health
  • GWAHS

Ongoing

3.1f

Make Walgett a Purple Ribbon community.

  • ROC
  • CWP

Commence July 2010

Priority 4: Youth
4.1 Output: Youth diversionary activities

4.1a

Review current youth service and re-design existing resources to deliver better services for young people.

  • Walgett Shire Council
  • CWP
  • ROC

Commence July 2010

4.1b

Coordinate sport and recreational activities and identify options for additional sports competition.

  • ROC
  • Sport and Recreation NSW
  • DoHA (Indigenous Sport and Recreation Program)

Ongoing

4.1c

Strengthen regional sports competition including a focus on parental participation – Support the Parenting Through Sport program delivered by Netball NSW and CRL.

  • Sport and Recreation NSW
  • CWP

Ongoing

4.1d

Investigate and implement Midnight Basketball as appropriate.

  • ROC
  • FaHCSIA
  • Police
  • Midnight Basketball

Commence September 2010

4.1e

Actively engage Youth Off The Streets (YOTS) into Walgett Interagency.

  • ROC
  • DPC

Immediately

4.1f

Actively engage youth in men and women healing activities, and develop evidence-based models of activities such as the Giyaali Project and implement as appropriate.

  • ROC
  • Police
  • Community Services NSW
  • FaHCSIA

Commence through Interagency in September 2010

4.1g

Diversionary activities under different building blocks:

  • Horticultural strategy (Economic Participation Building Block)
  • After schools activities that leverage health, sport and recreation funding and Schools National Partnership funding and that are tied to school attendance (Schooling Building Block).
  • DET
  • DEEWR
  • NSW Corrective services
  • NSW Juvenile Justice

Ongoing

4.2 Output: Address youth substance abuse

4.2a

Ensure that the Walgett Community Safety Plan addresses substance abuse strategies for youth.

  • ROC
  • Murdi Paaki D and A Network
  • GWAHS

Ongoing

4.3 Output: Address supports to juvenile offenders

4.3a

Invite Law Access in to offer training in appropriate legal advice for youth.

  • NSW Juvenile Justice
  • Aboriginal Legal Service

ROC to organise with lead agencies by

September 2010

4.3b

Provide information / education on Youth Justice Conferencing to CWP and Police, under the Young Offender's Act.

  • NSW Juvenile Justice
  • Aboriginal Legal Service

By December 2010

4.3c

Investigate the establishment of a wrap around service for young offenders.

  • FaHCSIA
  • NSW Juvenile Justice
  • CWP
  • ROC (to convene)
  • Walgett Interagency

By March 2011

4.3d

Establish a Post Release Support Program for Walgett.

  • NSW Corrective Services

Ongoing

4.4 Output: Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program is supported

4.4a

Actively engage young people in the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program.

  • ROC
  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR

Ongoing

Priority 5: Families
5.1 Output: Families are strong

5.1a

Implement wrap-around services for families affected by family violence through the Staying Home Leaving Violence pilot.

  • Community Services NSW

Commence September 2010

5.1b

Make Walgett a White Ribbon community.

  • ROC
  • CWP

Ongoing

5.1c

Actively engage families to participate in parenting activities developed in the Early Childhood Building Block.

  • As per Early Childhood Building Block

As per Early Childhood Building Block

5.1d

Support Domestic Violence Liaison Officers.

  • NSW Police
  • CWP
  • Service Providers

Ongoing

Priority 6: Healing – Women
6.1 Output: Women have access to Women's Gatherings and Yarn-Ups

6.1a

Deliver a comprehensive healing strategy for women.

  • Community Services NSW & FaHCSIA - MP Strong Women's Project

Commenced and ongoing

6.1b

Plan and provide access to Women's Gatherings and Yarn-Ups in bush settings.

MP Strong Women's Project contributions from:

  • ADHC
  • DoHA
  • LALC
  • Commonwealth Attorney General
  • DECCW

By September 2010

6.1c

Specific assistance that supports Elders to be involved in delivery of LIP strategies across the board.

  • ROC
  • DEG
  • ADHC
  • DoHA
  • Walgett Shire Council
  • Community Housing Provider

Ongoing

6.2 Output: Women are provided opportunities to tell their story

6.2a

Develop and implement a history project that gathers the oral and visual histories of the women of Walgett in partnership with the school to support the children to be involved in the history project.

  • DECCW
  • DEWHA
  • DET

Commenced by December 2010

6.3 Output: Provide opportunities to strengthen the bond between mothers and daughters

6.3a

Develop and deliver programs that build strong bonds between mothers and daughters - discussion in supportive environment about sexual health and reproduction and personal care (self-esteem).

Link to Early Childhood: 2.3 Supporting Families and parent/caregivers strategies to reduce teenage pregnancy.

  • WAMS
  • GWAHS
  • Safe Families

Commence September 2010

6.3b

Build on healing therapy through arts and crafts, massage and pampering days.

  • ROC
  • CWP

Ongoing

6.4 Output: Elders are provided opportunities to increase their capacity to work with their community

6.4a

Identify different options for Elders accommodation and undertake feasibility study into preferred options. Options may include: demountable granny flats; hostel unit. Seek to implement recommendations.

Link to Healthy Homes: 2.4.

  • ADHC
  • GWAHS
  • Housing NSW

By June 2011

Priority 7: Healing – Men
7.1 Output: Structure for men's gathering is established

7.1a

Deliver healing strategies for men.

  • ROC

By September 2010

7.2 Output: Men are provided opportunities to get back to land

7.2a

Opportunities are provided including bush tucker, story telling, learning survival tactics in bush settings.

  • GGGAC
  • FaHCSIA
  • Aboriginal Affairs NSW
  • DECCW
  • DEWHA

Ongoing

7.2b

Specific assistance is provided for Elders to be involved and lead the men forward.

  • ROC
  • GGGAC
  • DEG

Ongoing

7.3 Output: Elders are provided opportunities to increase their capacity to work with their community

7.3a

Bring in positive role models from other countries (cultural) to work with and support Elders in Walgett.

Build on transition pilot under the Homelessness Action Plan.

  • NSW Police – Aboriginal Community Liaison Officer
  • NSW Corrective Services
  • NSW Juvenile Justice (Journey to Respect)

Ongoing

7.3b

Access and visits to successful healing programs (such as Tribal Warrior) to develop ideas that support the Elders in working with their community.

  • ROC

Ongoing

7.3c

Identify different options for Elders' accommodation and undertake feasibility study into preferred options. Seek to implement recommendations.

Link to Safe Communities 1.4; Healthy Homes: 2.4

  • ADHC
  • GWAHS
  • Housing NSW

By December 2010 options paper to be presented to CWP

7.3d

Activities that increase community awareness (including a range of agencies, such as police) of the role of Elders.

  • ROC

Ongoing

7.4 Output: Opportunities are provided for men and women to get together to move forward with regards to domestic violence

7.4a

Men invite women and young people to get together to move forward with regards to domestic violence.

Build on Journey to Respect Initiative.

  • NSW Police: Regional Violence Specialist
  • Safe Families

Ongoing

7.4b

Addressing alcohol management (Refer to Safe Communities Building Block strategies).

Review the structure of Bourke's Alcohol Working Group.

  • NSW Office of Liquor Gaming and Racing
  • CWP
  • Murdi Paaki D&A Network
  • NSW Police
  • NSW Juvenile Justice
  • McKillop

By December 2010

Priority 8: Reconciliation
8.1 Output: A healthy, strong community

8.1a

Establish a reconciliation group.

  • ROC

By September 2010

8.1b

Implement a community driven Reconciliation Action Plan.

  • ROC

Ongoing from then

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

5.7 Governance and Leadership

COAG targets

  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation.
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/governance mechanism.
  • Connecting the way government agencies work in remote areas (the governance of governments) and developing community capacity.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Strong community governance which through engagement with governments makes a difference for the Aboriginal people of Walgett.

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

National

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on remote service delivery

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery
  • State Plan:
    • Stronger communities
    • NSW Partnership Community Program Project Officers
    • Western Institute of TAFE Governance Training

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement
    • Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly
    • Community Working Parties
    • Strong Women's Group
    • Murdi Paaki Aboriginal young Leaders

Local

  • Walgett Shire Council Social Plan 2007-10

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Governance.
  2. Leadership.
Governance and Leadership
  Activities Agencies Involved
(lead agencies in bold)
Timeframe
1.1 Output: Community Working Party is recognised and functions as the local community representative body

1.1a

Provide support and capacity building opportunities to the CWP as required.

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.1b

Governance and leadership training for CWP and community members to occur regularly with a review conducted by the CWP annually

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.1c

CWP is formally recognised as the Community Governance Body under the Partnership Community Program.

  • CWP
  • All Agencies

By June 30th 2010

1.2 Output: Government agencies and service providers recognise the Community Working Party, its structures and protocols

1.2a

Development of clear structure and robust protocols for the CWP and disseminate to government agencies and service providers.

  • ROC

By June 30th 2010

1.2b

All government employees and service provider employees complete cultural competency training specific to Walgett. There will be local cultural trainers employed to do the training by TAFE/RTO.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • DET STS
  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

1.2c

All government funding agreements include a deliverable that service providers must work within the structures of Remote Service Delivery, including participating in working groups and referral systems as established by the CWP.

  • ROC
  • All agencies
  • CWP

Ongoing

1.3 Output: Aboriginal agencies have access to supports to increase their capacity to operate efficiently and effectively

1.3a

Provide sustainable governance training to Aboriginal organisations. Link to 1.1b above.

  • ORIC
  • FaHCSIA
  • DET STS

Ongoing

1.4 Output: Interagency group is a strong cohesive group with a strong relationship with the Community Working Party

1.4a

Provide support and capacity building opportunities to the Interagency Group as required.

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.4b

Develop engagement and collaboration between Interagency and CWP.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • Interagency
  • DPC

Ongoing

1.4c

Develop a strong program that supports service providers in Walgett to understand and support Aboriginal community.

  • ROC
  • Interagency
  • Regional RSD Strategic Group

Commence by January 2011

Priority 2: Leadership
2.1 Output: Support the critical role of Elders in the community

2.1a

Specific assistance that supports Elders to be involved in healing activities.

Link to Safe Communities.

  • ROC

Commence 1 July 2010

2.1b

Activities that increase the profile and awareness of all Elders in the Walgett community enabling increased participation of all Elders in community.

Link to Safe Communities.

  • ROC
  • ADHC
  • DoHA

Commence 1 July 2010 and ongoing

2.1c

Support Elders to network in the region, strengthening connections across the communities in the region - based on advice from the Elders.

  • ROC
  • ADHC

Commence 1 July 2010 and ongoing

2.2 Output: Young people have access to leadership capacity building opportunities

2.2a

Actively engage young people in the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program and the Walgett Youth Group.

Link to Schooling and Safe Communities.

  • ROC
  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA
  • DET

Ongoing

2.2b

Actively engage young people to participate in the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program and the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

  • DEEWR
  • ROC
  • DET - School
 
2.3 Output: Support targeted community groups

2.3a

Support targeted community groups for example Men’s Group, Women’s Group, Elders Group and Young Leaders.

  • ROC
  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

2.4 Output: Celebrate good news stories

2.4a

Establish a column in the Walgett Spectator - celebrating successes and engaging with services to make a difference in Walgett.

  • ROC
  • CWP
 

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]


5.7 Governance and Leadership

COAG targets

  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

What are we trying to achieve (Closing the Gap outcomes)

  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation.
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/governance mechanism.
  • Connecting the way government agencies work in remote areas (the governance of governments) and developing community capacity.

Closing the Gap outputs

  • Strong community governance which through engagement with governments makes a difference for the Aboriginal people of Walgett.

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Our work needs links to the following frameworks and policy

National

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on remote service delivery

State

  • COAG National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery
  • State Plan:
    • Stronger communities
    • NSW Partnership Community Program Project Officers
    • Western Institute of TAFE Governance Training

Regional

  • Murdi Paaki Regional Partnership Agreement
    • Murdi Paaki Regional Assembly
    • Community Working Parties
    • Strong Women's Group
    • Murdi Paaki Aboriginal young Leaders

Local

  • Walgett Shire Council Social Plan 2007-10

Priorities – what are we going to focus on?

  1. Governance.
  2. Leadership.
Governance and Leadership
  Activities Agencies Involved
(lead agencies in bold)
Timeframe
1.1 Output: Community Working Party is recognised and functions as the local community representative body

1.1a

Provide support and capacity building opportunities to the CWP as required.

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.1b

Governance and leadership training for CWP and community members to occur regularly with a review conducted by the CWP annually

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.1c

CWP is formally recognised as the Community Governance Body under the Partnership Community Program.

  • CWP
  • All Agencies

By June 30th 2010

1.2 Output: Government agencies and service providers recognise the Community Working Party, its structures and protocols

1.2a

Development of clear structure and robust protocols for the CWP and disseminate to government agencies and service providers.

  • ROC

By June 30th 2010

1.2b

All government employees and service provider employees complete cultural competency training specific to Walgett. There will be local cultural trainers employed to do the training by TAFE/RTO.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • DET STS
  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

1.2c

All government funding agreements include a deliverable that service providers must work within the structures of Remote Service Delivery, including participating in working groups and referral systems as established by the CWP.

  • ROC
  • All agencies
  • CWP

Ongoing

1.3 Output: Aboriginal agencies have access to supports to increase their capacity to operate efficiently and effectively

1.3a

Provide sustainable governance training to Aboriginal organisations. Link to 1.1b above.

  • ORIC
  • FaHCSIA
  • DET STS

Ongoing

1.4 Output: Interagency group is a strong cohesive group with a strong relationship with the Community Working Party

1.4a

Provide support and capacity building opportunities to the Interagency Group as required.

  • ROC

Ongoing

1.4b

Develop engagement and collaboration between Interagency and CWP.

  • ROC
  • CWP
  • Interagency
  • DPC

Ongoing

1.4c

Develop a strong program that supports service providers in Walgett to understand and support Aboriginal community.

  • ROC
  • Interagency
  • Regional RSD Strategic Group

Commence by January 2011

Priority 2: Leadership
2.1 Output: Support the critical role of Elders in the community

2.1a

Specific assistance that supports Elders to be involved in healing activities.

Link to Safe Communities.

  • ROC

Commence 1 July 2010

2.1b

Activities that increase the profile and awareness of all Elders in the Walgett community enabling increased participation of all Elders in community.

Link to Safe Communities.

  • ROC
  • ADHC
  • DoHA

Commence 1 July 2010 and ongoing

2.1c

Support Elders to network in the region, strengthening connections across the communities in the region - based on advice from the Elders.

  • ROC
  • ADHC

Commence 1 July 2010 and ongoing

2.2 Output: Young people have access to leadership capacity building opportunities

2.2a

Actively engage young people in the Murdi Paaki Young Leaders Program and the Walgett Youth Group.

Link to Schooling and Safe Communities.

  • ROC
  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA
  • DET

Ongoing

2.2b

Actively engage young people to participate in the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program and the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program

  • DEEWR
  • ROC
  • DET - School
 
2.3 Output: Support targeted community groups

2.3a

Support targeted community groups for example Men’s Group, Women’s Group, Elders Group and Young Leaders.

  • ROC
  • FaHCSIA

Ongoing

2.4 Output: Celebrate good news stories

2.4a

Establish a column in the Walgett Spectator - celebrating successes and engaging with services to make a difference in Walgett.

  • ROC
  • CWP

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

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