Planning together for Mimili's future

Table of Contents

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Artist Acknowledgement

Audrey Brumby

Audrey Brumby

DOB: 30 October 1967
Community: Pukatja (Ernabella)
Region: Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yunkunytjatjara Lands South Australia
Medium: Acrylic on canvas
Date: March 2010

Audrey is from Pukatja, an Aboriginal community on the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara lands in South Australia, about 350km SE of Uluru. Her medium is mainly canvas but she also works on red gum bark and wood. Her subjects include stories about the Dreaming, people traveling on the Lands and traditional foods.

Many of Audrey’s artworks feature the Walka mark. The Walka (a word in the Pitjantjatjara language for meaningful mark) is particular to the APY Lands area and has been said to be based on the desert bird wing.

Audrey has had work exhibited at the Education Development Centre, Hindmarsh, South Australia. She has also been published in, “Don’t ask for stories: The women from Ernabella and their art ‘tjukurpa tjapintja wiya...’ Minyma anapalanya ngurara tjutangku warka palyantja craftroomangka.” (Canberra Press, 1999).

In 2010 Audrey Brumby was employed by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs in linguistics (translations) from English to Pitjantjatjara. As a result of this work, Audrey grasped the concept of the Seven Building Blocks and went on to paint illustrative artworks in colours relating directly to the building blocks and their associated logos. These and other stunning artworks by Audrey feature throughout the Local Implementation Plans of both Amata and Mimili.

Audrey Brumby

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Abbreviations and Acronyms

AARD
Aboriginal Affairs & Reconciliation Division
AEO
Anangu Engagement Officer
AGD
Attorney-General’s Department
APY
Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara
CGRIS
Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services
COAG
Council of Australian Governments
DASSA
Drug and Alcohol Services South Australia
DECS
Department of Education and Children’s Services
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
DFC
Department of Families and Communities
DoHA
Department of Health and Ageing
DPC
Department of Premier and Cabinet
ESL
English as Second Language
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
GMB
Government Business Manager
ICSI
Indigenous Communities Strategic Investment
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
NP
National Partnership
NPYWC
Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Women’s Council
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
PY Ku
Rural Transaction Centre
RAS
Regional Anangu Services
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
SAID
Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk
SAPOL
SA Police

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Foreword

As a key output of the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership, a Local Implementation Plan for Mimili has been developed. Comprehensive and ambitious strategies and actions have been identified and committed to by the Mimili community and the Australian and South Australian Governments. In partnership, the Mimili community and the Australian and South Australian Governments are working together towards a better future for Aboriginal people in achieving the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) Closing the Gap targets.

We would like to acknowledge the staff of the Adelaide Regional Operations Centre who have worked with community, consultants, and representatives of Australian and South Australian Government agencies in an extensive consultation process to prepare this plan. We would also like to recognise the strategic leadership and support of the South Australian Board of Management in the implementation of the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership.

Most importantly, we would like to thank the Mimili community for their positive engagement with government. By sharing their aspirations and being committed to their community’s future, Mimili has reset its relationship with the Governments; and we are working together as partners.

It has been a privilege to oversee this very important work and we thank you for the opportunity. We commend the Local Implementation Plan to you and look forward to working with you in the years ahead implementing the agreed strategies and actions in Mimili.

Yours sincerely,

Brian Gleeson
Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services

Pauline Peel
South Australian Coordinator General for Remote Aboriginal Services

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Section 1: Remote Service Delivery

1.1 Introduction

In December 2007, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to a partnership between all levels of government to work with Indigenous communities to close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage. As an important part of this commitment, the Commonwealth and the South Australian Government (the Governments) have signed the Remote Service Delivery (RSD) National Partnership to increase and coordinate their investment in key areas including early childhood, health, housing, education and training. They have also agreed to wide ranging reforms to improve the way they deliver services to Indigenous people.

As a result of this commitment, the Governments have agreed to work together with the Mimili community to:

  1. improve the access of Mimili families to a full range of suitable and culturally inclusive services
  2. raise the standard and range of services delivered to Mimili families to be broadly consistent with those provided to other Australians in communities of similar size, location and need
  3. improve the level of governance and leadership within Mimili and Mimili community organisations
  4. provide simpler access and better coordinated government services for Mimili community members, and
  5. increase economic and social participation wherever possible, and promote personal responsibility, engagement and behaviours consistent with responsible social norms.

This Local Implementation Plan (LIP) identifies and articulates the service delivery priorities for the Mimili community, including targets, actions and associated performance measures. The Governments and Mimili community have agreed to work together to deliver the agreed actions in this Plan.

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1.2 Closing the GAP - the 'Building Blocks' to the future

Closing the Gap between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians is a national priority. COAG have set targets to prioritise efforts to reduce disadvantage in areas such as life expectancy, child mortality, access to early childhood education, educational attainment and employment outcomes. Governments recognise that new ways of doing things are essential.

The COAG targets are:

  • Closing 11.5 year life expectancy gap within a generation
  • Halving the gap in mortality rates for children under five within a decade
  • Halving the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievement within a decade
  • Halve the gap in unemployment outcomes and opportunities within a decade
  • Within 5 years all 4 year olds in remote Indigenous communities have access to a quality early childhood education program
  • At least halve the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 or equivalent attainment rates by 2020

To achieve these ambitious targets, governments across Australia agreed to focus their attention on seven interrelated ‘building blocks’.

The 7 Building Blocks – what are we aiming for?
Building Blocks Outcomes COAG Policy and Reforms Directions
Closing the Gap Early Childhood

Indigenous children:

  • are born healthy
  • acquire the basic skills for life and learning
  • benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage
  • have access to affordable, quality early childhood education
  • quality early childhood education and care supports parental workforce participation
  • Indigenous Early Childhood Development NP agreement
  • Early Childhood Education NP agreement
  • TAFE Fee Waivers for childcare Childcare Qualifications NP agreement
  • Investing in the Early Years – a National Early Childhood Development Strategy
Closing the Gap Schooling
  • Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces educational disadvantage
  • Indigenous youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving
  • Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/ or further study
  • National Education agreement;
  • Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities NP agreement
  • Smarter Schools – Improving Teacher Quality NP agreement
  • Smarter Schools – Literacy and Numeracy NP agreement
  • Building the Education Revolution
Closing the Gap Health

Indigenous people:

  • achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population
  • have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventative services
  • remain healthy and free of preventable disease
  • Closing the Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes NP agreement
  • National Healthcare Agreement
  • National Disability Agreement
  • Hospital and Health Workforce Reform NP agreement
  • Preventative Health NP agreement
Cloing the Gap Healthy Homes
  • Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy
  • Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities
  • People have improved housing amenities and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities
  • Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people
  • Remote Indigenous Housing NP agreement
  • National Affordable Housing Agreement
  • Homelessness NP agreement
  • Social Housing NP agreement
  • Social Housing
Closing the Gap Safe Communities
  • Alcohol and substance abuse among Indigenous people is addressed
  • Indigenous children and parents are afforded basic protective security from violence and neglect
  • National Framework for Protecting Australia’s Children
  • National Indigenous Law and Justice Framework
  • Time for Action: the National Council’s Plan to Reduce Violence Against Women and their children
Closing the Gap Economic Participation
  • The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills to enable effective educational, labour market and social participation
  • Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors of the labour market
  • Indigenous Economic Participation NP agreement
  • National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development
  • Productivity Places Program NP agreement
  • NP agreement on Youth Attainment and Transitions
  • Remote Indigenous Public Internet Access NP agreement
Closing the Gap Governanace and Leadership
  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms
  • Governments work together effectively in remote areas
  • Remote Service Delivery NP agreement

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1.3 New approaches to service delivery

There is strong evidence that Indigenous people in remote communities experience significant levels of social and economic disadvantage due to deficient services or the lack of accessible services. Historical approaches to service delivery for remote communities have resulted in a mixture of patchy service delivery, ad hoc and short-term programs, poor coordination, duplication of programs and services by Australian and state Governments and confusion over roles and responsibilities. Complications have been exacerbated by Indigenous-specific programs being included, often to replace missing mainstream services and/or without any relationship to community development priorities.

This lack of collaboration combined with inconsistent government policy on the funding and delivery of services has contributed to the disadvantage experienced by many communities. The RSD NP takes on a robust place-based system for joint planning and service delivery across the three levels of government. The NP involves clear accountabilities for who does what, where and by when, backed up by thorough monitoring procedures for escalating and resolving underperformance. Through the RSD NP, COAG has agreed a national approach to improving conditions in remote Indigenous communities to an acceptable standard.

Government investment through a range of national agreements and national partnerships already agreed by COAG will be prioritised to the 29 communities. The COAG agreements provide increased investment in areas such as housing, education and early childhood development to support achieving the Closing the Gap targets for Indigenous people in remote locations.

Joint Commonwealth – State planning and coordination mechanisms as well as the appointment of Government Business Managers and Indigenous Engagement Officers in the communities will ensure better coordinated service delivery. LIPs will guide planning and service delivery in each location and will be developed by all levels of government, the Indigenous community and other stakeholders. Access to services will also be improved through a focus on the way in which services are delivered, including improved cultural competence of services, and the utilisation of interpreters and translation services. Together these measures will ensure that all Indigenous Australians are able to engage effectively with government services.

Under the new arrangement, communities will more easily be able to negotiate the services that all levels of government provide, rather than the often complicated arrangements that exist in negotiating different arrangements with different agencies across all levels of government. Governments are working towards the Amata community having improved access to government services, including early childhood, health and welfare services, and user- friendly services that are delivered in a culturally-appropriate manner and in language that is easy to understand.

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Section 2: The big picture

2.1 Welcome to Mimili

Welcome to Mimili

Mimili is in the far north west of South Australia, at the base of the Everard Ranges, in the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands - approximately 70km west of the Stuart Highway. It is 645km south of Alice Springs which is the nearest large town. Mimili is approximately 1,270km from Adelaide. The roads in the APY Lands are partly sealed and unsealed and Mimili's internal roads are sealed.

Mimili is located in the far north west of South AustraliaMimili is 645km south of Alice Springs, which is the nearest town

Mimili community is located on land that was previously used for pastoral activities. The community was established in the early 1970s after the land was returned to the traditional owners and in the late 1970s the first school was established. It is part of the APY Lands which are incorporated by the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Land Rights Act in which the South Australian Parliament gave title to the APY Lands to Aboriginal people in 1981. The APY Land Rights Act, 1981, provided for the vesting of title of the APY Lands to the people known as Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara. The Executive Board of APY was constituted under this Act and oversees the activities of the various constituent groups serving the needs of the people on the APY Lands. The land which the community occupies was previously used as part of the Everard Park cattle station. Many of the older members of the community were employed on the station undertaking mustering, branding, droving and breaking horses in for gymkhanas and race meetings.

Mimili is one of 29 national RSD priority sites.

Demographics

Population
In the 2006 Census, the population of Mimili and the Mimili Homelands was 303. Approximately 91% of the population is Indigenous.

Languages
In the 2006 Census, 91% of the Indigenous population of the Mimili and the Mimili Homelands spoke a Western Desert Language fluently, with Yankunytjatjara being the most widely spoken language. Four percent of the Mimili population speak English only.

Average age
23 years – national average for non Indigenous people is 37 years. In the 2006 Census almost 53% were aged 24 years and under, and 43% were aged from 25 years to 64 years.

Educational levels
In the 2006 Census 33% of people aged 15 years and over, had completed Year 8 and 14% had completed Year 10.

Infrastructure

Nearest Airport
Mimili airstrip has a weekly service run by Chart Air. The service arrives at Mimili at 8:35am on Thursdays and goes to Fregon, Umuwa, Yunyarinyi (Kenmore Park), Ernabella and Alice Springs. The service is available for personal flights, freight and mail delivery. The airstrip has solar powered lighting for night landings in emergencies.

Roads
Roads within Mimili community town area are partly sealed and the road to the Stuart Highway is unsealed.

Health centre
Nganampa Health Council is an Aboriginal owned and controlled health organisation operating on the APY Lands. Across this area, Nganampa Health operates nine clinics, including the Mimili Health Clinic. Nganampa Health provides programs including aged care, sexual health, environmental health, health worker training, dental, women’s health, and children’s health.

School
Mimili Anangu School (up to Year 12) provides students with the opportunity to complete SACE or a school based traineeship. The school participates in sporting and dance competitions with other Anangu schools. The school has an operational swimming pool which is regularly used by the community and is open from November to April. There is a modern and well equipped TAFE facility providing a range of tertiary courses for the community.

Housing
In 2008, there were 45 houses in Mimili. There is an overcrowding problem in the community. The housing stock in Mimili will be increased by the construction of 28 new houses and refurbishment of 28 houses over three years to 2011/2012.

Community Facilities
Mimili has an administration building, sports ground with football and softball facilities, swimming pool, basketball court, store, playgroup, women’s centre, arts centre, church and a rural transaction centre (PYKu Centre).

Services

Sanitation
Rubbish is collected once a week by Regional Anangu Services (RAS) Aboriginal Corporation. Regional Anangu Services also provides a car removal and crushing service.

Power
Overhead supply from Umuwa Central Power House, run by ETSA.

Gas
No gas supply. Gas bottles are available.

Water
Town water supply, bore water and rain water tanks. Regular checks of bores are made by the Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Division (AARD), Department of Premier and Cabinet (DPC), to maintain water quality and sustainability.

Communications
Landlines in private homes, radio and free/pay television reception. Public internet is available at the PYKu Centre.

Police
A new police station has been completed with four officers stationed there. Previously the nearest police station was 130km away in Umuwa.

Mimili’s new police station opened in 2010

Centrelink
There are two local Anangu community officers based Mimili at the PYKu Centre as Centrelink agents who receive regular on ground service training.

Socio-Economic indicators

Employment
In the 2006 Census, 93.4% of the Indigenous Labour Force in community were employed. In December 2009, 73 people were registered with the Job Services Australia provider. CDEP has been a major provider of employment/training opportunities in Mimili with training provided and supported by the Regional TAFE of SA.

Households income
In the 2006 Census the median Indigenous individual income was $212.00 per week with the medium income of Indigenous household income being $966.00 per week.

Community cohesion
Mimili has an active and respected arts community. Sporting features, such as playing in the SA National Football League competition which includes football and softball, also actively engage the community, as well as being part of the wider APY Lands community.

Culture and language

Culture

Community members at Mimili have kinship ties over a large area of Central Australia. These ties cover three groups within the Northern Territory, Western Australia and South Australia; the Yankunytjatjara, Pitjantjatjara and Ngaanyatjarra peoples. Mimili is the site of the maku or witchetty grub dreaming.

Language

People from four language groups live in this Western Desert Language area. Yankuntjatjara, Ngaanyatjarra, Pitjantjatjara and Luritja are the Indigenous languages most widely spoken, with English being a second or third language.

Local issues

Governance

Mimili has recently experienced an acute and significant decline in functional governance across a number of key community organisations, owing to a range of factors. Negotiations are taking place between the SA Government and the APY Lands to determine whether a Regional Council incorporating all communities should be established. Ongoing Leadership training has been provided to the community. Mimili is in the process of incorporating as a new Community Council under the Office of the Indigenous Registrar and has a Community Council Support Officer.

Alcohol and drugs
All the APY Lands are dry communities under the statute of Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Land Rights Act 1981. The introduction of Opal fuel has helped to reduce the incidence of petrol sniffing. The permanent police presence assists in preventing alcohol and drugs being illegally brought into the community.

Land tenure
Mimili is one of 13 major communities on the APY Lands which are held under freehold title according to the terms of the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Land Rights Act (1981).

Housing
Housing is in poor condition and overcrowding is an issue. Mimili is to receive Government funding for new houses and refurbishment of current housing. The first new houses are expected to be completed by June 2010.

Health
The Nganampa Health Clinic provides primary health care for the community. The clinic is staffed by two Registered Nursing sisters and Aboriginal health workers who are required to deliver health services. There are two doctors on the APY Lands based outside of Mimili. There is a heavy workload on the health providers at the Mimili clinic and little opportunity for provision of preventative programs and health education. A Substance Abuse Information Desk (SAID) has been established in Marla and will provide support for the APY Lands on substance abuse issues.

Family violence
The community has significant issues around poverty, nutrition, substance abuse and domestic violence, exacerbated by the remoteness of the APY Lands and illegal alcohol being brought into the community. To address issues of family violence, mental health programs such as the Personal Helpers and Mentors Program (PHaMs), and Leadership Programs for groups in the community have been put in place. The Cross Border Remote Area Program also provides the Indigenous Family Violence Program conducted in Mimili and throughout the APY Lands.

Youth
There is currently a need for school holiday programs to be introduced and, importantly, be maintained to alleviate boredom.

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2.2 Baseline mapping data

Working together to improve the community

The completion of detailed baseline mapping of social and economic indicators, government investments, services and service gaps in each location is a key output through the RDS NP. Baseline mapping entails two broad concepts—social and economic indicators and government investments and service gaps. The baseline mapping data provides an information base for local planning and the systematic collection of baseline information can also assist with monitoring and evaluation.

Key points

This section provides a summary of some key issues identified in this report. It incorporates some of Mimili's strengths as well as some of the major challenges the evidence suggests confront the community. It concludes with a consideration of government and non-government service provision including a summary of major projects under way.

Background community information

Population

  • In 2006, the population of Mimili was estimated to be 317 people, of whom 289 (92%) were Indigenous.
  • Mimili has a relatively young population. In 2006, 43% of Mimili’s Indigenous population were aged less than twenty compared to 27% of all Australians.
  • Mimili had lower proportions of children aged 5 to 9 years and significantly higher proportions of teens aged 15 to 19 years than the national Indigenous population.

Population projections

  • From its 2006 level, the Mimili Indigenous population is projected to increase to 393 (36%) by 2026.
  •  The working age Indigenous population is projected to grow by 71 people (39%), while the Indigenous population older than 50 is projected to grow by 38 people (105%) over this period.
  • The growing size and ageing of Mimili’s Indigenous population will increase the need for housing, employment opportunities, and particularly aged care and health services.

Geography and Land tenure

  • Mimili is a relatively isolated community situated within the APY Lands in the north west of South Australia approximately 400km from Alice Springs and 1,200 km north of Adelaide.
  • The APY Lands is held by the Aboriginal Lands Trust under inalienable freehold title resulting from the Pitjantjatjara Land Rights Act 1981.

Community Strengths

Language and Culture

  • Mimili has a strong Anangu culture, and the Anangu-owned and managed Mimili Maku Arts centre brings in income and provides a source of pride for the community.
  • In Mimili, about 60% of people said they spoke Pitjantjatjara at home, 35% said Ngaanyatjarra and the rest Luritja, Yankunytjatjara or English in the 2006 Census.
  • Maintaining language is regarded as a key community strength much assisted and promoted by the local Anangu Mimili School.

Improved community safety

  • Recorded offences in Mimili decreased incrementally each year from 2004 to 2008, from 112 in 2004 to 63 in 2008.
  • The decrease in offending is most notable for offences against public order. There were 36 such recorded offences in 2004 and only 11 such recorded offences in 2008.
  • Property offences decreased incrementally each year, from 30 in 2004 to 18 in 2008.
  • However, offences against the person increased from 25 in 2004 to 32 offences in 2008.
  • The rate of reoffending within 12 months of the first offence rate has fallen 77% between 2004 and 2008.
  • While the reduction in the level of offending in Mimili is a positive development it should be noted that offence rates still remain high compared to South Australia as a whole. For example there were 32 offences against the person recorded in Mimili in 2008. Per head of population this is around 5 times the rate for South Australia as a whole.

School attendance

  • In 2009, the average Mimili school attendance rates were 80% for primary school students and 71% for secondary school children.
  • These rates are substantially better than in many remote Indigenous communities, but are below the state and national averages.

Education initiatives

  • A swimming pool was recently built at the Mimili School, with a “no school – no pool” policy enforced. The careful monitoring of this policy has increased school attendance when the pool is operational.
  • Since the majority of students are English as Second Language (ESL) learners, ESL methodologies underpin all curriculum areas of Mimili Anangu School.
  • Participation in a pilot Tri-border Attendance Strategy project which seeks to lessen the disruption to schooling experienced by students with high levels of mobility through improving the sharing of student information across borders and sectors.

Mimili swimming pool: contributing to healthy outcomes

Early childhood health

  • According to the Nganampa Health Council, the establishment of the health service in 1983 has resulted in a substantial improvement in prenatal health. With the establishment of the health service, there have been substantial increases in antenatal care attendance in the first trimester.
  • Since the establishment of the health service, there has been a decrease of low birth weight babies and a reduction in perinatal mortality. There have also been reductions in the proportion of children with moderate or severe growth failure, acute respiratory illness and diarrheal disease in children.

Community store

  • The Mai Wiru community store in Mimili no longer stocks high sugar content/high energy cool drinks to promote healthy living.
  • Mai Wiru also provides in store cooking demonstrations to teach about healthy food on a budget.

Challenges facing the community

Education

  • In 2006, 71% of Indigenous 20 to 64 year olds people in Mimili had a Year 9 or below level of education.

NAPLAN results

  • For nearly all subjects, the majority of students in Year 7 and 9 at Mimili Anangu School were below national minimum standards in the National Assessment Program Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) tests. The sole exception was Year 7 numeracy.

Employment

  • In 2006, only 33% of Mimili’s Indigenous working age population (15 to 64) were employed.
  • The overwhelming majority of those who were employed were in Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) positions.
  • If the figure is adjusted so that CDEP positions are not considered as employment, Mimili’s Indigenous employment rate is 8%, approximately one-quarter of the national Indigenous rate.

Four students in Mimili work to complete Certificate 1 in Construction

Maternal health and young mothers

  • In Remote and Very Remote South Australia, the fertility rate for Indigenous women aged 15–19 years (79.1 per 1,000) was nearly 5 times the national rate for Australian teenage women (16.4 per 1,000).
  • According to data for the APY Lands from 2004 to 2008, 23% of births were to teenage mothers. This was 5 times the equivalent proportion for the Australian population as a whole in 2008 (4%).
  • From 2003 to 2007, Indigenous rates for low birth weight babies in Remote and Very Remote areas in SA (172.3 per 1,000 live births) were 1.25 times the SA Indigenous rate and nearly 1.5 times the national Indigenous rate. Further, they were 3.5 times the total South Australian population rates.
  • This is confirmed by data pertaining to the APY Lands. Over 2005 to 2008, 12% of all births in the APY Lands were low birth weight babies.

Health

  • High rates of tobacco use, lack of refrigerators and unhealthy eating habits are continuing community health challenges.
  • A reported shift from petrol and alcohol to marijuana by some has led to a reported increase in mental health issues across the APY Lands.
  • There is evidence that some children remain under-nourished, setting them up for long term health and educational challenges. Through its child nutrition program the NPY Women’s Council case-manages children who are registered on the community’s ‘failure to thrive’ program.
  • After adjusting for age, hospital separation rates for Indigenous Australians in Remote and Very Remote South Australia are 36 times higher for assault, 20 times higher for dialysis, than for Australians in general.
  • Data specific to APY Lands suggest the two most common principal diagnosis for hospitalisations are diseases and disorders of the respiratory system (44.6 per 1,000 people) and of the digestive system (32.8 per 1000). The APY Lands data also seems to confirm the high rate of assault, with a high rate of injuries, poisonings and toxic effects of drugs (26.5 per 1,000 people).
  • After adjusting for age, hospital separation rates for Indigenous Australians in Remote and Very Remote South Australia are 13 times high for diseases associated with poor environmental health, than for Australians in general.
  • Hospital separations data for Mimili confirm the high rate of diseases associated with poor environmental health. In 2008-09, 41 children (aged 0 to 5) in Mimili were hospitalised with diseases associated with poor environmental health.

Potential issues with service delivery

Municipal and essential services

  • The Municipal and Essential Services Audit found that Mimili has levels of infrastructure and municipal services that fail to meet most base level standard. The audit found:
    • inadequate quantity of staff accommodation to enable recruitment of required additional staff
    • inadequate animal management
    • there is no mobile phone coverage
    • lack of visitor accommodation
    • inadequate environmental health services and management
    • unreliability of sewerage system
    • landfill facility requires a major upgrade, and
    • unreliability and poor quality of the water supply.

Accessibility

  • Mimili’s access road is 70 km unsealed road to the Stuart Highway.
  • The Mimili aerodrome is located 4 km from the community and is accessible via an unsealed road. The runway is unsealed.
  • As the APY Lands are subject to flash flooding, the dirt roads are sometimes washed out and impassable, and can be left impassable until significant road maintenance is carried out after the waters have subsided.

Mimili Anangu School

  • In the Mimili Anangu School, the library, computer lab, administration area and staff room all have limited physical space.
  • None of the nine teachers have training in English as Second Language (ESL). The school adopts ESL methodologies but there is no external ESL support provided.
  • In addition, many students have hearing impairments which are catered for with the aid of special equipment in all classrooms but effectively supporting the education of hearing-impaired children continues to present significant challenges for teachers.

Significant new investments

Policing

  • A new Mimili Police Station opened in 2010. There is now a 24 hour a day permanent police presence in the community.

Housing

  • Under the National Partnership on Remote Indigenous Housing, 18 new dwellings have been approved and 15 have been refurbished during the 2009–10 financial year.

Education

  • Mimili Anangu School is expected to receive funding under the Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities National Partnership.
  • The National School Pride Program has provided funding for refurbishments in Mimili Anangu School.
  • Primary Schools for the 21st Century has provided funding for the construction of new classrooms at Mimili Anangu School.

Home Maker Centre

  • To accommodate a future Home Maker Centre, the community hall is to be refurbished. The hall will also continue to house indoor church services. A rural transaction centre is also to be developed north of the Mimili store.

Roads to Recovery

  • Over the period 2009-10 to 2013-14, APY is to receive $534,000 in Roads to Recovery grants from the Australian Government. It will receive $107,000 or $136 per kilometre of this amount in 2009-10.

Community infrastructure

  • As part of the Government’s Nation Building Economic Stimulus Plan, the APY Lands have been allocated $130,000 for community infrastructure projects, under the Regional and Local Community Infrastructure Program.

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Section 3: The Local Implementation Plan

3.1 Principles of the Local Implementation Plan

This LIP recognises the need for collaboration and demonstrates the commitment of all signatories to work together in partnership to achieve better outcomes for all residents of Mimili.

Children are happy living in a safe community

The Governments agree to implement this LIP in accordance with the COAG National principles for investments in remote locations:

  • remote Indigenous communities and remote communities with significant Indigenous populations are entitled to standards of services and infrastructure broadly comparable with that in non-Indigenous communities of similar size, location and need elsewhere in Australia;
  • investment decisions should aim to increase and have a close connection to vocational studies and practises and the market economy on a sustainable basis; and reduce dependence on welfare wherever possible; and promote personal responsibility, and engagement and behaviours consistent with positive social norms;
  • priority for enhanced infrastructure support and service provision should be to larger and more economically sustainable communities where secure land tenure exists, allowing for services outreach to and access by smaller surrounding communities, including:

    (i) recognising Indigenous peoples’ cultural connections to homelands (whether on a visiting or permanent basis) but avoiding expectations of major investment in service provision where there are few economic or educational opportunities; and

    (ii) facilitating voluntary mobility by individuals and families to areas where better education and job opportunities exist, with higher standards of services.

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3.2 How the Local Implementation Plan was developed

The State RSD Workshop on 24 March 2010 was attended by over 90 people

To ensure the LIP was based on evidence, the Governments collected information on Mimili relating to:

  • current government expenditure and investment;
  • current service delivery and supporting infrastructure;
  • existing community networks, decision making structures and previous community planning reports;
  • general information about the community – its people, how healthy they are, how they are going at school etc; and
  • the baseline community profile project.

The Governments recognised the importance in engaging the Mimili community and has facilitated, and will continue to do so, a comprehensive community engagement process, meeting with individual community members, community groups, agencies and relevant stakeholders. The gathering of this information facilitated the development of the LIP; ensuring that it was 'community' specific and engaged the community in all aspects associated with the Closing the Gap/ Building Block agenda.

The Regional Operations Centre (ROC) engaged a consultancy to help implement and develop the community engagement process. The consultants worked closely with the GBM and AEO in conducting a number of community based consultations to educate the community about Closing the Gap and the RSD NP as well as working with the community to ascertain community ideas and feedback to feed into the LIP document.

The ROC is working on an ongoing basis with the Australian and State Government agencies to provide a whole of government perspective on what current services and strategies are operational and what other services are required for the Mimili community.

Presentations to Government departments and community representatives to inform them about Closing the Gap, the Building Blocks and the LIP commenced with a State RSD Workshop on 24 March 2010. This workshop enabled Government agencies and other key stakeholders to network and provide feedback to each Building Block and value add to the LIP document. In conjunction with the above, the ROC has facilitated individual Building Block workshops with relevant Government agencies to provide further opportunities for agencies to provide feedback to the LIP. An electronic email feedback system was developed as a catalyst to promote on-going feedback to the LIP process as well as the distribution of a regular ROC newsletter that informed stakeholders in new developments associated with the LIP process.

The Mimili Community Council was actively involved throughout the process of developing the LIP, with assistance from the consultants and ROC staff and will continue to be consulted and engaged as the document progresses and the actions are implemented. In demonstrating the Mimili community’s commitment and inclusiveness to the LIP process, the Mimili Community Council, through the Council Chairperson on 3 February 2010, signed a Statement of Agreement to reflect the Community Council’s and community’s intention to work with the Governments in Closing the Gap. Furthermore, the Mimili Community Council signed in early June an additional agreement articulating their approval of the strategies and actions in the LIP and their willingness to sign the LIP and commence implementing the actions.

As a further demonstration of commitment, the Mimili Community Council signed, on behalf of the community, various interim LIP drafts as the plan progressed and various strategies and actions developed. These Community Council based actions demonstrated that the LIP process was inclusive and provided recognition that the community endorsed the contents in the LIP and approved the development of the LIP document.

The ROC instituted a Communications Team to ensure the community engagement process was as thorough and effective as possible. The Communications Team developed a suite of communication tools and products to promote Closing the Gap, RSD and help articulate the LIP process and document. Product design elements included English and Pitjantjatjara artwork by a local Anangu woman (representative of each Building Block), photos and illustrations. All products were developed in consultation with GBMs and AEOs to ensure they would be accepted by communities. Completed products include ‘meet your government staff’ posters and postcards, Closing the Gap wristbands (promoting indigenous.gov.au), and Closing the Gap stickers, factsheets, vehicle signs for government cars, community signs, brochures, swimming pool signs, vinyl banners, pull-up outdoor banners and storyboards to be placed around the football ovals. An A3 laminated flipchart was also developed as a visual guide for consultants and staff to use when discussing LIP priorities within the communities. Roll out of these products has been, and will continue to be, over the life of the RSD NP.

The process of developing the Local Implementation Plan

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3.3 Goverance arrangements for the Local Implementation Plan

Government Business Manager Mark Weaver, with Anangu Engagement Officer Debra Umula

The governance arrangements for the LIP commence at the community level and progress to a formal governance structure enunciated via the Board of Management (BoM). At the Government level there is a Coordinator General and State Coordinator General and various Australian and State Government forums supporting the RSD NP.

Governance arrangements for the Local Implementation Plan

The BoM is a jurisdictional management group co-chaired by the State Manager, Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs and the Executive Director, Aboriginal and Reconciliation Division, Department of Premier and Cabinet and comprises of representatives from the Australian Government and the South Australian Government.

The role of the BoM is to provide a whole of government strategic approach and support the work of the Coordinator Generals, the ROC, GBMs and AEOs. The BoM regularly meets and has the capacity to address strategic priorities as well as urgent issues as necessary. The Coordinator Generals attend these meetings and other agencies can be invited as required.

The Mimili Community Council is an official party to the agreement in conjunction with the Australian and South Australian Governments. The Council is the governing authority for the community and is the integral forum that provides the ‘community voice’ for the progress and the endorsement of the LIP. The Council has RSD and the LIP as a standing agenda item at all meetings. The Mimili Community Council is currently in a period of change and transition and is currently in liquidation. To address the liquidation issues the ROC has implemented an array of strategies and support mechanisms to improve the governance of the Mimili Community Council. With the assistance from the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations and through work being completed through consultants, the Mimili community are re-drafting a revised constitution and developing a suite of processes, procedures and documentation to assist with the administrative responsibilities associated in managing an effective Council. It is intended that further governance support for the Mimili Community Council will be provided in the immediate future by the State Government’s Aboriginal Affairs and Reconciliation Division.

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3.4 Duration of the Local Implementation Plan

The term of this LIP will be for the period 2010-2014. As the LIP is a ‘living’ document, there will be continuing discussion and negotiation with Mimili community about their vision for their community’s future and how to achieve it.

Formal sign off involving the community and the Governments is anticipated to occur by June 30 2010. As the LIP is a 5-year plan, amendments can occur throughout this period as priorities are met and or new priorities are identified. The LIP will be reviewed in 2011 and 2013, giving the Governments and the community an opportunity to renegotiate the LIP and make any agreed amendments to accommodate new priorities or arrangements.

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3.5 Addressing concerns

The Governments have placed a GBM and an AEO in Mimili to form a single government interface for the community. The GBM is the community’s direct link to the Governments and the key liaison and consultation point for both the community and government agencies. They work collaboratively with government representatives and the non government/statutory bodies to assist with community planning and agreement making to ensure that services are coordinated on the ground. They are mandated to report on progress and on local issues and concerns to the South Australian ROC and the BoM.

The role of the AEO is to provide a link between the community and the Governments. They are located within the community and are there to meet and talk with community members about how they want their community to develop and how to become more involved in government decision making. The GBM and AEO work in partnership to increase local knowledge and understanding of government business and increase the Governments' knowledge and understanding of the community. As an additional support to the GBM and Mimili community, Malpas are being employed as necessary to assist with interpreting and cultural understanding and training to ensure closer links are established between community, government and stakeholders.

To address priorities in a timely manner and expedite the development of the LIP a staged interim sign-off process is being employed with Building Blocks. This gives the Mimili Community Council an opportunity to discuss the proposed strategies in the Building Block, make suggestions or raise any concerns they may have. Once a balance between the communities’ aspirations and the goals of the Closing the Gap Building Blocks has been achieved by the proposed strategies the Mimili Community Council will provide interim-sign off for the LIP. In addition, the LIP will be a standing agenda item at all Mimili Community Council meetings and will enable council members to raise any concerns directly with the GBM in a more formal way and have this noted in the minutes of the meeting.

The ROC works with the GBMs and AEO to implement the new RSD arrangement in Mimili. The ROC supports government staff living and working in Mimili to ensure effective and timely service delivery. The ROC is the first point of call for the GBMs and AEOs in addressing any concerns or issues and if necessary, will escalate to the ROC Manager and/or the BoM.

The BoM comprises of many government agencies both Australian and State, and for this reason has the capacity to address concerns raised by the community, GBMs, service providers or the ROC Office. This will allow the agencies to work together in a more collaborative approach to work towards resolving any issues or investigate any concerns.

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3.6 Progress monitoring and reporting

To enable a well coordinated approach to progress, monitor and report on the LIP (actions and strategies) a number of reporting methods have been implemented.

  • The LIP is a standing agenda item at the Mimili Community Council meetings which ensures there is a forum for discussion about achievements, ways of improving strategies and gives feedback to the GBMs and the community. This also provides a direct approach in renegotiating the LIP with the community beyond 2010.
  • Situation Reports are provided monthly by each ROC to the Remote Service Delivery Branch and the BoM. The purpose of this report is to monitor and identify issues relevant to the implementation of the RSD, against the priorities expressed in the LIP. The information is provided by the GBM and AEO and is compiled by the ROC. The report uses a traffic light rating that flags critical issues and is an early warning system based on how the service/program/activity is progressing overall. This report contains valuable information against the Closing the Gap Building Blocks including the current status of the service/ program/activity, any problems, and what action has been taken, or being taken or needed to remedy the problem.
  • A reporting tool will be developed to monitor the progress of actions and strategies identified in the LIP by the Adelaide ROC.
  • Building Block working groups will be established and will meet regularly with Adelaide ROC staff to discuss progress and identify any issues to be resolved or escalated to the BoM.
  • The BoM will be monitoring the progress of the strategies implemented by the LIP. They will have direct access to the community through the GBMs and will be able to identify any issues or slippages in the strategies or program delivery throughout the course of the implementation of the LIP.
  • Good news stories will be identified by the GBMs, ROC, community and the BoM. These stories will be promoted throughout the various communication tools and mediums developed by the ROC’s Communications Team.
  • The Australian Government’s Coordinator General formally reports to the Minister for Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs twice a year on progress, and ensures that all Government service agencies are held accountable for their implementation responsibilities under the Remote Service Delivery partnership.
  • As per the Bilateral Implementation Plan, the LIPs will be required to provide a report card first after six months and then every twelve months to the Commonwealth against the performance indicators, as detailed in the Local Implementation Plans.
  • Through the community engagement process, various culturally appropriate communication tools are developed to inform the community about any new developments to the LIPs.

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Section 4: Outcomes, strategies and actions

  1. Early childhood
  2. Schooling
  3. Health
  4. Healthy Homes
  5. Safe Communities
  6. Economic Participation
  7. Governance and Leadership

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1. Early Childhood

Early Childhood illustration

What are we aiming for?

Indigenous children

  • are born healthy
    Tjitji pikawiya wirkankunytja
  • acquire the basic skills for life and learning
    Mantjila kutjupa-kutjupa tjuta wiru palyantjikitjangku
  • benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage
    Mauntalpa-mauntalpa wiya tjunguringkula uwankarangku tjungungku palyantjaku
  • have access to affordable, quality early childhood education
    Tjitji kulunypa tjuta childcare-ngka munu kuulangka tjarpatjunkunytjaku wantinytjawiyangku
  • quality early childhood education and care supports parental workforce participation
    Waakatjarangku uti tjitji kulunypa childcare-ngka munu kuulangka tjarpatjunkura waakaku anama

Early Childhood Building Block demonstrates:

Mimili community statement 2010

Our little children are our future. We want them to grow up strong and healthy so that they can look after our land and community.Our little children are our future. We want them to grow up strong and healthy so that they can look after our land and community. We want our young mothers and their families to learn how to look after their children properly and keep them healthy. We want to see proper childcare so that the children are safe and cared for while their parents are working out in the community. We also want to see a safe place for the women and children for the times when things get too dangerous at home.

 

  • According to the Nganampa Health Council, the establishment of the health service in 1983 has resulted in a substantial improvement in prenatal health.
  • There have been substantial increases in antenatal care attendance in the first trimester in Mimili.
  • Since the establishment of the health service, there has been a decrease of low birth weight babies and a reduction in perinatal mortality. There have also been reductions in the proportion of children with moderate or severe growth failure, acute respiratory illness and diarrheal diseases in children.
  • In remote communities in South Australia, the fertility rate for indigenous women aged 15-19 years (79.1 per 1,000) was nearly 5 times the national rate for Australian teenage women (16.4 per 1,000).
  • According to data for the APY Lands from 2004 to 2008, 23 percent of births were to teenage mothers. This was 5 times the equivalent proportion for the Australian population as a whole in 2008 (4 per cent).
  • Across the APY Lands, between 2005 and 2008, 12 percent of all births were low weight babies.
Outcomes, strategies and actions for Early Childhood Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
EC1. Mimili children are born healthy

Families will encourage young mothers to attend the Young Mothers Program

Families will encourage young mothers to attend antenatal care

We will support children attending health screenings

We will try and make sure our children wash regularly

We are prepared to assist with cultural awareness training for Health workers

  1. Provide a safe and healthy environment for newborns and new mothers.
  1. Continue to fund and support the Young Mothers Program, Ampe Akweke Place (supported accommodation for expecting mothers and new mothers) in Alice Springs.
FaHCSIA FaHCSIA SA State Office to monitor use by APY Lands residents in conjunction with the NT State Office.
  1. All new mothers are provided assistance in caring for their newborns through the Home Visiting Program, from antenatal care – 2 years of age.
SA Health A review of requirements is underway.
  1. Through education and community involvement encourage Anangu women to access antenatal care in the first trimester of pregnancy.
SA Health
DoHA
DoHA provided Healthy for Life agreed 2010/11 funding to Nganampa Health Council.
  1. Culturally based antenatal care sessions are held in Mimili to improve education and health, and are continued throughout the pregnancy.
SA Health
DoHA
DoHA provided Healthy for Life agreed 2010/2011 funding to Nganampa Health Council.
  1. Every child in Mimili undergoes targeted health screening, immunisations and growth monitoring between the ages of 0–5 years.
SA Health
DoHA
DoHA provided Healthy for Life agreed 2010/2011 funding to Nganampa Health Council.
  1. Conduct health checks for children before commencing primary school, in particular prioritising ear/hearing health and other factors affecting early learning.
SA Health
Australian Hearing
This is included in the draft Aboriginal Health Care Plan awaiting commitment for funding.
  1. Further consultation between Commonwealth and State Government that consideration be given to funding an expansion of an Indigenous maternity care program, based on a current successful model, within a research and evaluation framework.
SA Health
DoHA
Healthy for Life Evaluation completed and outcomes distributed.
  1. Continued funding and support for the Failure to Thrive Program to ensure at risk children are identified and their needs are treated..
DECS
DFC-APY Lands Community Programs

School gives support to Failure to Thrive Program.

DFC will continue to fund meals for children identified as Failure to Thrive until 30 June 2011.

  1. That all professional bodies involved in the care of Anangu women and children ensure that their workforce undertakes cultural awareness training as a core component of their curriculum.
SA Health Discussion with Nganampa Health Council to occur.
EC2. Mimili children have access to affordable, quality early childhood education.

We will continue to send our children to playgroup.

We are prepared to assist with cultural awareness training Early Childhood staff.

We will help make the Children’s Plan for the APY Lands.

We will continue to send representatives to PYEC Meetings.

  1. Implement the Early Childhood Education National Partnership and the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care National Partnership.
  1. Source and recruit 4 year qualified early childhood teachers.
DECS A suitable applicant for one scholarship for the early childhood educator position has been sought and supported to complete.
  1. Implement the Early Years Learning Framework.
DECS
DEEWR

Coordinated approach.

Activity Report – 6 monthly.

  1. Implement the National Quality Agenda for Early Childhood Education and Care National Partnership.
DECS
DEEWR
Coordinated approach.

Activity Report – 6 monthly.

  1. Improve the coordination and the delivery of regular early childhood playgroup activities.
  1. Deliver early childhood activities to Mimili.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Implementation of the Location Supported Playgroup in Mimili.
FaHCSIA
DECS
Funding agreement has been cleared and is awaiting sign-off from DECS .
  1. Deliver the Playtime program as part of the BeActive Initiative
ADG (State)-Office of Sport & Recreation Identify delivery avenues and local presenters. Facilitate Playtime Leader training Conduct one pilot program.
  1. Agencies agree to work in a coordinated manner for the delivery of early childhood development programs.
Aboriginal Operations Group Aboriginal Operations Group meet regularly. Mimili Principal links with local providers. Progress reports from Aboriginal Operations Group to SOG:EC .
  1. Development of a comprehensive children’s plan (0-5) across the APY Lands that provides for future needs.
Aboriginal Operations Group Aboriginal Operations Group meet regularly. Mimili Principal links with local providers. Progress reports from Aboriginal Operations Group to SOG:EC.
  1. Acknowledge the PYEC Statement of directions for Early Years.
  1. DECS to work with PYEC, the Mimili Community and families in delivering current programs and future planned services.
DECS Mimili Community and PYEC are regularly involved in Early Years implementation progress.
  1. To provide and maintain quality outdoor play areas for children (0-5 years).
  1. To erect a safe and engaging community playground designed and suitable for children from 0-5 years of age.
DECS Anangu Education Services work with Mimili school to develop Early Years playing areas.
  1. Provide a transition program for children in their final year of early childhood before beginning formal school education.
  1. Early childhood education curriculum to include a transition program.
DECS Mimili School Principal and Early Childhood staff ensures a suitable program is provided.
EC3. Mimili children acquire the basic life skills for life and learning and benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage.

Some of us will take part in the Home Living Skills program.

We are prepared to work with people to develop Anangu programs.

We will tell staff clinic when we are worried that a child is not developing properly.

  1. Deliver formal parenting programs to Anangu families that recognise and appreciates their language and culture.
  1. Provide training and education in nutrition, budgeting and healthy living through the Home Living Skills Program.
DFC-Housing SA Uniting Care Wesley contracted for 12 months to provide home living skills programs to new tenants.
  1. Indigenous Parental Support Services are delivered to Anangu families.
FaHCSIA Funding Agreement signed by Relationships Australia. Consultation process has commenced.
  1. Increase the proficiency of parents and grandparents in the use of English to enhance their skills in reading and storytelling to their children and grandchildren.
  1. Encourage parents, grandparents and the Mimili community to develop PaCE Projects relevant to their needs and provide an environment where parents and grandparents feel welcome and encouraged to be involved.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Cultural and linguistic appropriate programs are developed and implemented as a tool for parents, grandparents and AEWs to better engage with children.
DECS Mimili School Principal and Early Childhood staff ensure suitable programs.
  1. Early Intervention for children with disabilities affecting early learning.
  1. Provide early childhood education workers with the knowledge and skills to identify children with disabilities affecting early learning and refer appropriately.
DECS Merit principles are needed to appoint suitable qualified staff. AES officers provide quality support.
EC4. Quality early childhood education and care supports parental workforce participation.

We are happy to help with cultural awareness training for all workers.

We will encourage those who are interested will study for the Early Childhood Certificate.

We will encourage our young people to be involved in early childcare training.

We think all secondary students should do work experience in the community.

  1. Cultural awareness training is to be mandatory for all workers
  1. That all professional bodies involved in the delivery of early childhood education and care ensure that their workforce undertakes cultural awareness training as a core component of their induction.
DECS
FaHCSIA
Anangu Education Services and PYEC report on inclusion of cultural awareness in staff induction and professional development.
  1. Implementation of the Quality Framework for Early Childhood and Care.
  1. Provide opportunities for Anangu to undertake Certificate 3 in Childcare and Certificate 2, 3 &4 in Community Services work through TAFE.
DFEEST TAFE SA to discuss possible arrangements with DEE WR and DECS by end of June 2010.
  1. Provide avenues for secondary school students to undertake Vocational Educational Training (VET) in Early Childhood/Childcare stream or through the Indigenous Cadetship Program.
DECS
DFEEST
VET Courses are offered at the school site in conjunction with TAFE. TAFE SA to discuss possible arrangement s with DEE WR and DECS by end of June 2010.
  1. Provide Early Childhood Scholarships for teachers.
DECS A suitable applicant for one scholarship for the early childhood educator position has been sought and supported to complete.
  1. Early Childhood Education and Childcare offered as a part of work experience for secondary school students.
DECS Will continue to be offered in conjunction with TAFE.

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2. Schooling

Schooling illustration

What are we aiming for?

  • Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces educational disadvantage
    Kuulangka uti tjitji tjuta mauntalpa-mauntalpa wiyaku nintinma tjukaruru nyinanytjaku
  • Indigenous youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving
    Tjitji tjuta uti pulkara nintinma tjukarurungku riitamilantjaku, kauntamilantjaku
  • Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study
    Kungkawarangku munu yangupalangku uti kuula wiyaringkula tjukarurungku waaka palyanma

Schooling Building Block demonstrates:

  • Mimili community is serviced by Mimili Anangu School, a Reception – Year 12 school.
  • At the time of the school census in term 3, 2009 there were 67 students enrolled at Mimili. All were Aboriginal.
  • Twenty two, or one-third, of these 67 students were new enrolments after the beginning of the year.
  • The first language for the students is Pitjantjatjara and, especially, Yankunytjatjara.
  • Senior students are able to participate in the Wiltja program located within Woodville High School with a boarding facility in the north-eastern suburbs of Adelaide.
  • The DECS school census for the first semester of 2009 shows comparatively high attendance. The average of all year levels for school attendance was 75.8%.
  • Year 9 had the highest enrolments (12). There were 3 students undertaking year 12 studies and 4 children in reception. At the time of the review there were 3 students participating in the Wiltja program.
  • The education attainment rate for 20-24 year olds at Mimili in 2006 was 12%. The national Indigenous rate at the same time was 41%.
  • The engagement rate in 2006 (people aged 15-24 years engaged in full time employment and or education) is 22%. The National Indigenous rate was 44% compared to the total Australia rate of 73%.
  • 71% of adults aged 20-64 have a below year 10 education while 49% have a year 8 or below education – 19% of adults did not attend school.
  • The rate of people who have only completed minimal schooling is 71%. This is much higher than the rates for the region, State and Australia.
  • Mimili is a school with a very small enrolment and, as far as can be gathered from the available data, they did not all participate in NAPLAN testing in 2009.

Mimili community statement 2010

We are proud of our young children. When the children go to school, they learn and then they can get real jobs in the community. We are proud of our young children. Parents need to keep pushing them through school and the elders of the community should support this. When the children go to school, they learn and then they can get real jobs in the community. We want them to be able to run our community and to look after the old people when they can’t understand what is going on. They should be able to get proper jobs with a proper salary. We want our children to be like the rest of the country and for them to get jobs like mechanic or nurse or teacher.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Schooling Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
S1. Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces educational disadvantage.

We will help develop family trees and a student information book.

We will attend meetings about our children’s progress.

Parents are happy to be involved in school decisions and develop PaCE projects.

PYEC minutes will be tabled and discussed if necessary at every Council meeting.

Traditional learning will be supported in schools.

Parents will volunteer to help on cultural days.

We support the development of any activities to help our kids learn.

AEWs in schools will talk to community members about the importance in parent decision making.

  1. Increase attendance rates at school and promote social inclusion.
  1. Development of an evidence based attendance strategy.
DECS DECS to provide progress report by January 2011.
  1. Develop and maintain family trees and student information books as a resource for teachers to better engage with families.
DECS Ongoing and in place / updated regularly. Mimili School Anangu staff and AES staff develop a suitable resource.
  1. Training is provided to teachers and AEWs on bilingual processes and joint programming and planning, and second language learning practices.
DECS Ongoing through AES Support Team.
  1. Schools to inform parents/carers of their child’s progress and involve them in the development of individual learning plans.
DECS Ongoing and in place. All schools meet Commonwealth reporting. Regular school reports are provided.
  1. Continued support for the Youth Multi Sports Program with the recognition of linkages between school attendance and participation in the program.
FaHCSIA DoHA
AGD
Ongoing.
  1. The Mimili Community School to be resourced to meet the needs of ear health problems and identified learning disabilities.
DECS Sound Field systems and relevant training are provided. Regular screening with 67% of students screened since 2009.
  1. To build parental capacity, ability, skills and knowledge to participate in educational decision making.
  1. Mimili Community Council and Mimili Community School to identify and develop PaCE projects to enable parents to be active members of the school community and decision making processes.
DECS
DEEWR
GBM to advise process for engaging the community.
  1. PYEC information and educational material to be made available to families, community, the Mimili Community Council, and agencies working in Mimili.
  1. Minutes and actions from PYEC to be sent to the Anangu School Coordinator for discussion at Mimili Community Council meetings.
DECS Ongoing: Anangu Coordinator and Principal ensure that information is promulgated.
  1. PYEC to share plans and strategies with agencies with an intention of encouraging links to learning.
DECS Ongoing: Anangu Coordinator and Principal ensure that information is promulgated.
  1. Adopt measures to recognise and strengthen Anangu culture in schools.
  1. AEWs and community to develop Anangu based educational materials and products to be recognised as part of the school curriculum.
DECS Normal school practise.
  1. Culture days are held regularly within the school calendar.
DECS Ongoing as part of the School Strategic Plan.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan
  1. Recommendation 25: That as a matter of urgency DECS continues to assess ways and means of ensuring that all children on the Lands of compulsory school age attend school and that adequate resources are provided for that assessment.

    That DECS and DFC with the support of Anangu leaders in communities engage parents and carers as well as children, in activities to enable the provision of information to the communities about the value and importance of school for children including as a way of reducing the incidence of child sexual abuse.
DECS

ISSS Attendance data is regularly used to follow up student absence with families.

The ‘Keeping Them Safe” Curriculum materials are regularly used in all classes, parent open days and Governing Council meetings; to better inform all members of the community and provide strategies for reducing the incidence of child sexual abuse.

  1. Recommendation 26: That DECS assess extending the school curriculum on the Lands to include increased study of information technology and appropriate computer based courses which can be accessed by children and young persons on the Lands to develop computer skills.

    That consideration of the teaching of numeracy and literacy in a manner suitable to Anangu children continue to be assessed and implemented.

    That DECS assess whether appropriate pre-vocational training for trade, home and family management skills should be introduced into the curriculum of the schools on the Lands.

    That the principals and teachers at the schools on the Lands consult withSenior Anangu and consider whether traditional Anangu skills and law should be introduced into the curriculum.

    That adequate resources be provided to DECS for all of these purposes.
DECS

School Multi-campus initiative provides ICT support at all school sites.

Regularly monitored, reviewed and implemented across the school sites on the APY Lands.

Male members of PYEC are considering the question. While traditional skills are considered an acceptable part of student learning – traditional law continues to be placed in the sacred/traditional sphere of life.

  1. Recommendation 27: That priority be given to remedial teaching at schools on the Lands for Anangu who have missed education as children.

    That the benchmark testing of years 3, 5, 7 and 9 be monitored closely and that sufficient funding be provided to achieve the goal of bringing the results of children on the Lands up to the respective averages of mainstream South Australian schools.

    That making education more relevant to Anangu students, and recognising the importance of Anangu culture continues to be assessed.
DECS

Availability of suitably qualified tutors with accommodation to meet the student needs continues to be problematic. TAFE Lecturers implement aspects of this area already.

This is a core function of the schools: on-going efforts are being made.

Ongoing: School Governing Council, School Staff Leadership and PYEC links continue to be strengthened.

  1. Recommendation 29: That a program to educate members of the communities on the Lands as to what is inappropriate sexual conduct, and its consequences, and the supports which are available for victims of sexual abuse (including children) be designed and implemented.
DECS
DFC

The Anangu Education Services Support team will support DFC where appropriate.

Agencies are raising awareness among clients and their families about the primacy of keeping children safe.

Child Safe Environment training has been provided.

Families SA and DEC s are reviewing Child Safe Environments training for Anangu.

NPYWC has developed an initiative to create awareness-‘Speak up: Speak Against Child Sexual Abuse’ which provides educative information about child sexual abuse and avenues for reporting abuse.

  1. Recommendation 30: That more resources be focused on education measures to better advise children, their parents and carers and the community on appropriate sexual behaviours, the law and their rights.
DECS
DFC

Ongoing.

The South Australian Government is continuing to create awareness amongst children, their parents and carers and the broader community about preventing child abuse and neglect, the law and children’s rights through a range of services, including hose provided by Families SA Outreach Services, school based social workers, DECS counsellors, Youth programs, CAMHS services and the Community Safety Committees established by SAPOL.

The importance of community education regarding sexual behaviours, the law and legal rights are included as a standing item at the community safety meetings.

  1. Recommendation 35: That appropriate health, mentoring and counselling services be established for teaching and other education staff resident on the Lands.

    That DECS arrange and resource adequate respite for teachers and other school staff resident on the Lands.

    That principals of the schools on the Lands consider and report to DECS as to what is needed to enhance recruitment of teaching staff and retention rates.
DECS Appropriate Merit Selection procedures: Induction procedures, Training and Development and Staff support is provided.
  1. Implementation of the MCEECDYA Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Education Action Plan 2010 – 2014.
  1. Agencies to work together to introduce and implement recommendations and actions as outlined in the final plan. (Final plan pending after formal review process.)
DECS
DEEWR
Funding applications will be made subject to DEEWR approval. Activity Report – 6 monthly.
S2. Indigenous Youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards, and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving. We will make sure our children go to school and are tested.
  1. To implement the Bilateral Agreement between the Australian Government and the South Australian Government for the National Partnerships and Agreements for: Literacy and Numeracy, Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities and Improving Teacher Quality.
  1. Implementation of the Bilateral Agreement through the Key Reform Areas and Indicative Actions agreed to by the Australian and South Australian Governments.
DECS
DEEWR
Funding will be applied to wherever possible. Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Applications to be made to receive funding from the additional $25m offered as part of the Closing the Gap: Expansion of intensive literacy and numeracy program for underachieving Indigenous students.
DECS Funding obtained. Literacy programs are further developing. National Curriculum will be implemented.
  1. NAPLAN Testing to be completed by the Mimili Community School.
  1. Teachers and the Mimili Community work together to ensure every enrolled student undertakes NAPLAN Testing.
DECS Completed for 2010.
  1. Teachers and communities to use NAPLAN results to assist in setting curriculum to improve overall literacy and numeracy in Mimili.
DECS This is in the Schools core business.
S3. Indigenous Young People successfully transition from school to work and/or further study.

We support a separate class for school age young people who have been through ‘men’s business’.

School Council or community meeting will identify students for the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program.

  1. Implementation of the Youth Attainment and Transitions National Partnership.
  1. Youth Connections Program to be delivered in Mimili to work with young people that have disengaged from school to attain Year 12 or equivalent.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. School Business Community Partnership Brokers deliver opportunities for young people.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Provide facilities and resources for young people for career mapping and training.
  1. Application to DEEWR for funding the construction on a Training Centre under the Trade Training Centres in Schools Program.
DECS Pending resubmission will occur on June 4 2010: this is subject to recurrent funding: Student and Manager accommodation.
  1. Vocational Education Training (VET ) to be made available and part of the school curriculum through TAFE
DECS
DFEEST

Already part of the school curriculum offering.

TAFE currently providing Certificate 2 in Business and Certificate 2 in Community Services being – ongoing.

  1. Direct access to DES services for school leavers to enable successful transition from school to work.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Provide avenues for further education and training.
  1. Utilising the Indigenous Youth Mobility Program (IYMP) to support young people aged 16 – 24 years to relocate to, or make the transition to an IYMP location to undertake post-secondary education or training.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Promote the Indigenous Youth Leadership Program.
DEEWR Wiltja Secondary Program has been well utilised by the secondary students.
  1. Continued implementation of the Aboriginal Education and Employment Strategy (2005-2010).
DECS Ongoing: Mimili School will continue to employ and train as many Anangu staff as possible.

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3. Health

Health illustration

What are we aiming for?

Indigenous people:

  • achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population
    Palupurunypatu tjungu ngaranytjaku pikawiya pukulpa
  • have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventative services
    Uti clinic-a palya ngarama pikatjara tjutaku — ngangkari tjuta kulu-kulu
  • remain healthy and free of preventable disease
    Pikawiya kunpu pukulpa nyinama

Health Building Block demonstrates:

  • The local Nganampa Health Council provides a range of health services to Mimili residents and visitors. Two registered nurses and three Aboriginal Health Workers see approximately 30 patients per day and a GP from a nearby clinic in Indulkana visits the clinic twice a week.
  • A variety of health specialists (audiologists, paediatricians, optometrist and dentist) visit the clinic throughout the year.
  • Mimili does not have X-ray or dialysis equipment and have recently introduced an electronic patient information management system
  • An Indigenous male born today is likely to die at just 67 years of age, and an indigenous female at 73 years.
  • Compared to non-Indigenous infants, the Indigenous infant mortality rate in 1991 was 4 times the non-Indigenous rate. By 2008, the rate was three times as high. The gap in child mortality indicates that Indigenous children are twice more likely to die before the age of five than non-Indigenous children.
  • In the period 2002–2006, the overall (age standardised) mortality rate for Indigenous people was around twice the non-Indigenous rate. The gap in rates between Indigenous and non-Indigenous people is greatest in age group 25–64, where the mortality rate for Indigenous people are 4–6 times higher than for non- Indigenous Australians.
  • In Anangu Pitjantjatjara SLA (Mimili constitutes 13.7% of the wider Anangu Pitjantjatjara SLA Indigenous figure), the most common principal diagnosis for hospital separations (an episode of care) were dialysis (39.8 per 1,000), injury and poisoning(5.9 per 1,000) and diseases of the respiratory system (5.4 per 1,000).
  • Anangu Pitjantjatjara SLA were hospitalised for diseases associated with poor environmental health at a rate of 1.5 per 1,000.
  • Nganampa Health Clinic reported that dogs were a health risk in the community. The excessive number of dogs, their poor malnourished condition, and volume of faeces are a particular risk to children in relation to skin disease and worm infestations.
  • The prevalence of alcohol and drug problems in the community is a major complaint among community members. The reduction in the rate of petrol sniffing has been correlated with an increase of marijuana use.
  • Activities for older people and frail aged people are currently not available.
  • The high rate of hospitalisation for assault and alcohol-related conditions would indicate that, along with many remote Indigenous communities, mental health issues are important in Mimili.
  • Public health initiatives appear to be not having the desired effect with high rates of tobacco use and unhealthy eating habits as continuing problems affecting community health.

Mimili community statement 2010

We want them to be healthy and to live long lives like other people.We are tired of our people getting sick. We want them to be healthy and to live long lives like other people. We worry for the older sick people who have to move away from the community to get treatment. They are not happy and want to be back in their own place where their family can be with them and care for them. It would be good to be able to treat the dialysis patients in the community and not send them away where they get homesick. We want to see regular programs in the school and the community teaching about health so that people can learn what to do. We want to see a mid-wife working in the clinic so that we can have our babies in Mimili where they belong.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Health Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
H1. Indigenous people achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.

Families will work with Clinic Staff to help address mental health in the community.

We will continue to discourage young people from smoking marijuana.

  1. Develop partnerships for protocols in obtaining better health service delivery.
  1. Promote existing health services throughout the community.
SA Health Discussion with Nganampa Health Councilto occur.
  1. Improve systems such as leadership development, development of best practice guidelines for Aboriginal health interventions and improving use of new information technologies to disseminate best practice and enhance information sharing
DoHA
SA Health

Best practice on accreditation guidelines already developed and distributed.

DoHA to provide funds to Nganampa Health Council to improve and upgrade information technology for improved networking, both within and between services and better access to the internet; more reliable systems and better equipment until 2013.

  1. Increase inter-sectoral collaboration such as sustainable consultative mechanisms, participatory structures, working groups, data collection and sharing strategic alliances to enable effective partnerships with key health sectors, organisations and community.
DoHA
SA Health

DoHA attends and participates in SA Aboriginal Health Partnership meetings.

SA Health and DoHA to investigate support for Anangu Remote Health Alliance or equivalent community engagement mechanism.

  1. Develop a cross agency/cross border and community response that recognises the need for people to receive dialysis as close as possible to their community.
  1. Develop and implement a plan for managing dialysis patients.
DoHA
SA Health

Central Australian Renal Study is due to be completed end of 2010.

Consider the recommendations that will emanate from the May 2010 joint study (commissioned by the Federal Minister Health, Rural and Regional Health Services Delivery) into the delivery of treatment for kidney disease among Indigenous people who live in remote communities in Central Australia.

Through the Tri-State Agreement (South Australian, Northern Territory and Western Australian Governments) apply the recommendations for the short and long term management of renal patients (including patient and family movements, increasing services and considering the merits of co-locating renal services with health clinics).

  1. Implement a framework to better address mental health and substance abuse within the community.
  1. Develop a mental health plan that will set out strategies to assist those with mental health issues and better coordinate psychiatric services to the community.
SA Health

Country Health has completed a model of care for Mental Health Services that will be developed for the community.

Discussion need to occur with service providers.

  1. Establish a cross agency working group to case manage identified clients with mental health issues who require assistance and support.
SA Health To be discussed with Nganampa Health Council to implement.
  1. Increase psychiatric and mental health nurse visits for the community.
DoHA
SA Health
DoHA provides 6 monthly reporting indicating visits by psychiatric provider through Medical Specialist Outreach Program.
  1. NGO partnership developed to provide psycho-social rehabilitation support services to APY lands consumers.
DoHA

Installation of audio-visual conferencing infrastructure to give access for tele-psychiatry services.

Implementation of MH Act – training and education.

  1. Develop treatment and responses for the increase use of marijuana.
SA Health-DASSA Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Provide further resources to ensure that counselling services for traumatic events (i.e. youth suicide) are well coordinated and implemented.
SA Health A plan to be developed for community trauma response.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the agreed recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan
  1. Recommendation 17: Alter the protocols of the Amata Substance Misuse Centre to allow children access to the drug and rehabilitation program and that the Centre be adequately funded in the long-term so as to allow appropriate services for children who require rehabilitation.
SA Health-DASS A Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Development of a chronic disease management plan.
  1. Information about chronic disease management and individuals responsibilities to be made available to the Mimili community.
SA Health Discussion with Nganampa Health Council to occur.
  1. Agencies involved in chronic disease management regularly meet to improve coordination of services being improved.
SA Health
DoHA
The South Australian Aboriginal Health Partnership (SAAHP) meet quarterly to discuss.
  1. Provide adequate aged and palliative care.
  1. Consider the availability of community aged care packages, home and community care programs and respite care allocations.
DoHA Next funding round date to be set.
  1. Dental services are available on a regular basis in Mimili.
  1. Consider developing a program where community members are able to access an annual dental check up.
SA Health SA Health has developed a draft Aboriginal Plan that includes a review of Dental care.
  1. Consider developing a program for follow up services, minor dental procedures and referrals are made for major dental procedures.
SA Health SA Health has developed a draft Aboriginal Plan that includes a review of Dental care
H2. Indigenous people have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary health and preventative services. We will participate in programs in teaching about health so people will learn what to do.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan.
  1. Recommendation 15: Nganampa Health receives increased funding so that the number of general medical practitioners based on the Lands can meet the professionally accepted ratio of doctors to patients*.

    That the increased funding to Nganampa enables medical practitioners and nurses to receive salary and financial incentives sufficient to recruit such staff and retain them in service on the Lands.
DoHA

Nganampa Health Council funded for an additional GP by August 2010.

Funding of this recommendation does not include endorsement of the ratio of doctors to patients referred to.

  1. Provide appropriate resources to the health sector
  1. Increase visits from medical specialists and services.
DoHA

Medical Specialist Outreach Assistance program implementation plan due 15/6/2010.

6 monthly reports on occasions of services for General Practice after hours.

  1. Provide additional resources and recognise the importance of traditional medicine approaches.
SA Health Guidelines are being developed by SA Health.
  1. Build IT capacity of Aboriginal Community Controlled Health Organisation.
DoHA DoHA to provide funds to Nganampa Health Council to improve and upgrade information technology for improved networking, both within and between services and better access to the internet; more reliable systems and better equipment until 2013.
  1. Improve the coordination and flexibility in supplying health services to the community.
  1. Investigate the feasibility in operating a mobile health service to provide health and medical services (including dialysis) to surrounding homeland communities.
DoHA
SA Health

DoHA provides funding for existing service model, Emergency medical support available through the Flying Doctor service.

Consider the recommendations that will emanate from the May 2010 joint study (commissioned by the Federal Minister Health, Rural and Regional Health Services Delivery) into the delivery of treatment for kidney disease among Indigenous people who live in remote communities in Central Australia

  1. Reconsider current aged care services and programs in the community and develop more productive ways to engage with the Tjilpiku Pampaku Ngura Centre in Pukatja.
DoHA 6 – monthly reports from the Tjilpiku Panpaku Ngura Centre.
  1. Improve access to health services outside of Amata, arranging transport to specialist services.
SA Health Review of Patient Assistance Transport Scheme (PATS) across Country Health.
  1. Consider case management plans and approaches for patients moving between local and regional services.
SA Health Discussion to be held with Nganampa Health Council regarding this approach.
H3. Indigenous people remain healthy and free of preventable disease.

Council will help identify a site for a landfill.

We will place rubbish in bins not on the ground.

Families will advise of which cars to remove.

We will support cleaning up our yards and in each of our houses.

  • Each family will help with community clean up day activities.
  • Community Council will discuss a Community Health Plan with government.
  • We will keep our dogs healthy and keep their numbers down.
  • Young men and women will continue to be involved in the SANFL Multi Sports Program.
  • We would like each family to have access to a first aid kit in their house.
  • We will encourage people to improve their fitness.
  • Families encourage the Store Board to reduce the cost of vegetables and fruit.
  • Anangu will work in the community bush garden.
  1. Address environmental health problems in the community; in particular manage waste in a sustainable way for the benefit of current and future generations.
  1. Ensure that the Mimili landfill site is licensed in accordance with regulations as set out in the Environmental Protection Act and that a Landfill Environment Management Plan is developed. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)

DPC-AARD
EPA

Regional waste management strategies have been developed. Implementation of the strategies requires funding. AARD is currently discussing this issue with State and Australian Government agencies.

APC consultants (through Zero Waste SA) are completing a Regional Waste Management Implementation Strategy and Implementation Plan for APY Lands. This report will be completed at the end of June 2010 with actions addressed in the following months in consultation with relevant agencies.

  1. Ban burning landfill sites and construct new landfill cells. Ensure that the landfill is fenced appropriately and source separations are provided. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)

DPC-AARD
EPA

To be actioned through the Regional Waste Management Strategy. This will include the development of sound waste management principles.
  1. Identify, in consultation with the Mimili Community Council appropriate locations for new landfill management areas.
DPC-AARD Assessments are being undertaken for suitable sites in consultation with EPA, health agencies, DWLBC and the community.
  1. Encourage residents to be more responsible and aware of waste management principles.
  1. Improve the management of waste within the community by supplying each house at least two mobile garbage bins for waste collection. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)
DPC-AARD
FaHCSIA

Current program through FaHCSIA – service provider Regional Anangu Services (RAS).

Trial currently being undertaken to improve waste management. These trials include disposal of car bodies, containers, car stripping and recycling waste material.

The success of the trials undertaken in other communities is to be recorded in the final Regional Waste Management Strategy and Implementation Plan and will be actioned by the current contractor (RAS).

  1. Develop a monthly ‘big rubbish’ collection scheme each month with adequate publicity and promotion. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)
FaHCSIA In current contract with Regional Anangu Services.
  1. Ensure that all premises in the community including households, school, clinic, store, art centre and family centre be included in the regular scheduled rubbish collection. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)
FaHCSIA
DPC-AARD

Through FaHCSIA contract with Regional Anangu Services waste is collected from households.

The waste management trial is also considering ‘big rubbish’ collection.

  1. Develop a community waste management plan that identifies waste collection procedures, training needs for waste collection, landfill management and resource recovery and recycling initiatives. (APC Environmental Management Report interim recommendations)
DPC-AARD
Zero Waste SA
A Regional Waste Management and Implementation Plan has been developed.
  1. Provide bin stands to all bins in public areas and schools to reduce the likelihood of the bins being knocked over and thus distributing rubbish throughout the community.
DPC-AARD
Zero Waste SA
The success of the trials undertaken in other communities is to be recorded in the final Regional Waste Management Strategy and Implementation Plan and will be actioned by the current contractor (RAS).
  1. Explore the feasibility in developing a removal of old, abandoned and disused cars program in conjunction with scrap and metal agents in Alice Springs.
FaHCSIA Ongoing program in place for the regular removal of old, abandoned and disused cars by RAS.
  1. Encourage residents to clean up yards and remove oversize materials to the landfill on a regular basis.
FaHCSIA Ongoing hard waste removal program established through Regional Anangu Services.
  1. Implement a resource recovery and separation program through the introduction of a deposit scheme to control beverage container litter problem.
DPC-AARD
Zero Waste SA
DPC-AARD to provide progress report by January 2011.
  1. Develop an education strategy to inform school students in the importance in recycling.
DPC-AARD
Zero Waste SA
DPC-AARD to provide progress report by January 2011.
  1. Implement a community awareness and education program with the community to coordinate regular community clean-up days to pick up litter and rubbish in public areas.
FaHCSIA Currently negotiating with RAS for the regular removal of rubbish in public areas.
  1. Ensure that other environmental health issues are adequately addressed in the community.
  1. Employ an Environmental Health and Waste Management Officer to work with the community to address issues and develop a framework for managing environmental health issues and concerns.
SA Health Currently recruiting an Environmental Health Officer.
  1. Develop a comprehensive Community Environmental Management Health Plan.
SA Health This will occur once Environmental Health Officer has been employed.
  1. Initiate an animal management and pest control strategy to address health and environmental issues associated with the overpopulation of dogs, feral horses, camels, donkeys and vermin.
SA Health Discussion with Nganampa Health Council to occur.
  1. Improve landscaping throughout public areas and implement regular dust control measures.
FaHCSIA Each community to be provided with landscaping budget for projects to be decided and prioritised by the community.
  1. Explore water system deficiencies including the salty taste of water, bore casing issues, volume and pressure to meet peak demands and the overuse of water by the community.
DPC-AARD
SA Water
A contract for bore drilling has been let and work will commence in June 2010. This will include pump testing and water sampling to determine improvements of water supply including possible pre-treatment.
  1. Review the water quality, including microbiological and chemical analysis quarterly and annually.
SA Water Monitoring and review is regularly undertaken by SA Water Corporation to ensure water quality meets drinking and aesthetic guidelines.
  1. Undertake a proactive maintenance plan for the reticulation of sewerage.
SA Water Monitoring and review is regularly undertaken by SA Water Corporation to ensure that the systems meet the required standards.
  1. Ensure that washing machines are incorporated in the new homes that are being built as per the Remote Housing NP.
DFC-Housing SA
FaHCSIA
Housing SA is awaiting confirmation of funding availability from FaHCSIA for washing machines. If funding is available, milestones will be in accordance with the completion of new houses.
  1. Consider the establishment of a community laundromat so those who do not have a washing machine have access to one. Ensure that the facility has commercial washing machines in order to wash heavier materials such as blankets.
FaHCSIA
DoHA
FaHCSIA are funding DFC to undertake a scoping study regarding the establishment of a laundry facility adjacent to the family centre.
  1. Provide further support to the South Australian National Football League’s multi-sport initiative to encourage community members to be active and involved in sport.
FaHCSIA
DoHA
DoHA undertakes an assessment of Indigenous sport and recreation program applications, DoHA notify applicants of the results in June 2010.
  1. Develop and implement preventative health campaigns and education on smoking, diabetes, substance abuse, nutrition and healthy living, healthy lifestyles and maintaining a healthy home.
SA Health

DoHA report on allocations of Indigenous Chronic Disease Resources by December 2010.

DoHA to continue to fund a nutritionist on APY Lands.

Discussion with Nganampa Health Council to occur.

  1. Encourage community members to undertake instruction in a First Aid certificate.
SA Health Discussion with Nganampa Health Council to occur. Discussions with Red Cross to occur.
  1. Provide regular opportunities for the community to undertake health checks.
DoHA Funding from DoHA to Nganampa Health to provide regular health checks.
  1. Provide fitness programs geared around the swimming pool; including aqua aerobics and swimming to improve fitness.
DoHA Organisation submits an Indigenous Sport and Recreation round application to DoHA held in December each year.
  1. Install heating to the Mimili Swimming Pool to extend opening hours and days.
FaHCSIA-ICIS Proposal
DECS
Funding Agreement issues and signed. Work to be completed by late December 2010.
  1. Rejuvenation of the Bushfoods garden to provide alternative source of fresh fruit and vegetables to the community.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal
ROC
Funding Agreement issues and signed. Project has commenced.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan
  1. Recommendation 24: Policies and guidelines are developed that address mandatory reporting of any activity that may indicate sexual activity of children, including STIs, requests for contraception, injuries as well as underage pregnancy.
DoHA

Biannual report to South Australian Government Cabinet – Mullighan Taskforce.

Annual report to South Australian Parliament – Mullighan Taskforce.

  1. Provide and encourage healthy eating alternatives for the community.
  1. Improve access to a healthy food supply and establish and improve standards for the purchase of food in the store as per the Remote Indigenous Stores and Takeaways Project and Mai Wiru Regional Stores policy.
DoHA A new regional body is being formed to manage Stores that are signed up to the Mai Wiru program.
  1. Mimili Community Store to adhere to the Mai Wiru Regional Stores policy, including the promotion of healthy eating and food preparation in the home, grocery management and the adoption of the Food Card.
DoHA DoHA to continue to provide funding for a nutritionist and provide 6 monthly reports.
  1. Develop and provide adequate coordination of a community bush garden incorporating bush tucker, fruit trees and vegetables.
ROC GBM has coordinated community support to reinvigorate garden on an on-going basis.

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4. Healthy Homes

Healthy Homes illustration

What are we aiming for?

  • Indigenous children's living environments are healthy
    Tjitji tjutaku ngura wiru kanyinma
  • Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities
    Uti walytjapiti wali wirungka winkitjara nyinama
  • People have improved housing amenity and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities
    Uti nyuntu wali kutjungka-kutjungka mankurpa nyinama
  • Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people
    Palupurunypatu uti kaamantangku wali kutju-kutju ungama ananguku ngurangka

Healthy Homes Building Block demonstrates:

  • 65% of dwellings were identified in the census data as being overcrowded.
  • The forecast completion of new dwellings for Mimili in 2009-10 is a total of 18 new houses and 26 refurbishments.
  • Mimili has a Family and Home Maker Centre. The Homemaker program aims at improving the safety and well-being of Anangu children and youth by helping parents create a safe and healthy home environment. The program includes training in skills relating to cleaning and maintaining a safe healthy environment and the preparation of nutritious meals, and maintaining the family centre as a clean, safe place for families.
  • There are significant problems with dogs in the community that adversely affects the health and wellbeing of the residents.
  • House hold garbage collection is satisfactory; however the landfill facility is significantly inferior and requires a major upgrade.
  • House yards and public areas are poorly maintained with extreme litter and no landscaping, gardens or public amenities.
  • The available quantity of water is limited at Mimili and the water has a salty taste.
  • There is currently no dedicated Housing Officer to assist with the coordination of repairs and maintenance to homes.
  • There is no ongoing program of Fixing Houses for Better Health in Mimili; these tend to be one off.

Mimili community statement 2010

We need more houses and we are pleased to see them coming.We need more houses and we are pleased to see them coming. Some families have 19 or 20 people living in the house and that makes it too hard. Some time there are young men sharing the house with family but that can cause problems for everyone. They need a place of their own where they won’t bother the rest of the family. We need to look after our houses to keep them clean and tidy so that we don’t get sick. We need to think about keeping the dust down and getting rid of germs if we want to live in a healthy home.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Healthy Homes Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
HH1. Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy. We will encourage the community to attend the Living Skills Program
  1. Agencies to work collaboratively with the community to improve living environments..
  1. Mimili Community members that receive refurbished and new houses to undertake the Living Skills Program
DFC-Housing SA Program to commence July 2010. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. The Home Living Skills Program to develop and implement programs aided at maintaining a healthy home.
DFC-Housing SA Program to commence July 2010. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Regular and scheduled collection and removal of household waste.
FaHCSIA Ongoing.
  1. Development of an educational program for children around healthy home practices.
DECS DECS to provide progress report by January 2011.
HH2. Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic utilities, and people have improved amenity and reduced overcrowding, particularly in remote areas and discrete communities.

Council will assist in preparing a Land Use plan

Strict rules should be developed with all community for the use of the Single Men’s Housing.

We will support the introduction of an enforced management system with proper rules for tenancy.

Community will help to establish a community housing group.

We will use the maintenance reporting scheme when we have a problem.

  1. Implementation of the Remote Indigenous Housing National Partnership.
  1. Build 28 new houses over 3 years to 2011–12.
DFC-Housing SA Works to follow 3 year capital works plan. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Refurbish 28 existing houses over 3 years to 2011–2012.
DFC-Housing SA Works to follow 3 year capital works plan. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Improve regulatory framework for utilities being provided.
  1. Apply the regulatory framework for basic utilities of water, sewage, electricity and telephone including formal methods of cost recovery.
DTEI
SA WATER
DPC to initiate discussions with DTEI and SA Water to discuss this action.
  1. Plan for future housing and utility needs of the community.
  1. Develop a Land Use Plan in conjunction with APY Executive and Traditional Owners that recognises and identifies the future land use and housing and infrastructure requirements for the APY Lands.
Planning SA
DPC-AARD
Community Structure Plan was completed in 2007 with programs being developed for surveyed allotments and infrastructure requirements.
  1. Reduce overcrowding in communities by the development of a management plan and utilisation of portable facilities for visitor camps.
  1. Portable resources and facilities, including cooking, showers and toilets to be made available to communities when need arises.
ROC ROC to initiate a process to develop discussions with key agencies prior to 2011.
  1. Increase housing stock through the Single Men’s Housing: Mimili Community Tawara Watiku Student Design and Construction Project.
  1. Complete construction of the Mimili Community Tawara Watiku Student Design and Construction Project (Single Men’s Housing)
FaHCSIA Commencement of Management upon completion and handover by Uni SA. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Develop and implement a Property and Tenancy Management plan for the Single Men’s Housing project.
DFC-Housing SA Commencement of Management upon completion and handover by Uni SA. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
HH3. Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people.

We will work with Governments to plan and build the best new housing for Mimili.

We will follow and apply Amata’s housing allocation policy.

  1. Develop and implement new tenancy agreements.
  1. All tenants for new and upgraded properties will be required to enter into tenancy agreements based on a standard Housing SA agreement.
DFC-Housing SA Tenants will be signed onto tenancy agreements upon allocation. Progress report monthly to RIH NP
Joint Steering Committee.
  1. A Housing Officer is employed to assist all communities in property tenancy and management on the APY Lands. This position will provide a direct link between the community and the agencies.
DFC-Housing SA Housing Officer will be recruited upon confirmation by FaHCSIA of funding for construction of employee accommodation.
  1. Introduce rent collection arrangements.
  1. Establish a rental system set and based on household income.
DFC-Housing SA Tenants will have rent set based on income upon allocation. Progress report monthly to RIH NP
Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Implement an equitable housing allocation process and ensure that housing is well maintained.
  1. Allocate new properties according to agreed allocation policy and appropriate community consultation.
DFC-Housing SA Tenants will be allocated new houses upon completion. Progress report monthly to RIH NP
Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Establish recurrent maintenance services and standards (including response timeframe standards), which will incorporate:
    - Occupational Health & Safety Issues
    - ‘9 Healthy Living Practices’ guidelines
    - National Indigenous Housing Guide (3rd Edition)
DFC-Housing SA Ongoing – procedures in place. Progress report monthly to RIH NP. Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Develop, implement and monitor a property maintenance schedule and reporting process for work required.
DFC-Housing SA Ongoing – procedures in place. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Implement post occupancy inspections for new builds and prevacancy inspections to identify maintenance issues.
DFC-Housing SA Upon completion of new builds. Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Establish maintenance complaint process and encourage tenants to report maintenance requests in a timely manner.
DFC-Housing SA Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.
  1. Provide tenancy support services.
  1. Living Skills training will be provided through the Homes Living Skills Program which aims to assist families to create a safe and healthy home environment by providing skills in house cleaning, reporting maintenance, personal hygiene and access to budgeting and money management.
DFC-Housing SA Program to commence July 2010. Progress report monthly to RIH NP
Joint Steering Committee.

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5. Safe Communities

Safe Communities illustrations

What are we aiming for?

  • Alcohol and substance abuse among Indigenous people is addressed
    Uwankara pukulpa nyinama, wama wiya, ukiri wiya, kutjupa- kutjupa kura wiya
  • Indigenous children and parents are afforded basic protective security from violence and neglect
    Mama-ngunytjungku, or wamatjangku, pika pungkunyangka alpamilanma wantinytjawiyangku

Safer communities Building Block demonstrates:

  • A new police complex is now operational with 4 (permanent fulltime) staff; with two on call 24 hours a day at anytime.
  • Mimili has access to a Community Safety Project Officer and has a community safety committee that is supported by a dedicated police officer.
  • Mimili has access to the Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Family Violence Service that provides a family violence prevention service.
  • The Department of Families and Communities (DFC) funds youth programs in Mimili to divert youth from crime issues. A Youth Worker is stationed in Mimili to engage youth in youth base programmes, including school holiday initiatives to discourage young people from anti-social behaviour.
  • The total number of offences in Mimili has steadily decreased over the past 5 years, from 112 recorded incidents in 2004 to63 in 2008. This represents a 44% reduction in the total recorded offences.
  • Public order offences have reduced by 42% over the past 5 years.
  • Offences against property have reduced by 40% over the past 5 years.
  • The most frequent types of offences in Mimili each year (from 2004 – 2008) were offences against the person, offences against property and offences against public order.
  • During the period 2004 to 2008, there were a total of 22 breaches of domestic violence restraining orders.
  • Whilst there was a slight upward trend in total reoffending between 2004 and 2006, from 2006 there was a notable decrease of 77%.
  • Child protection data reveals that there were less than 5 substantiated notifications for Indigenous children aged 0-16 years between 2003-04 and 2004-05. In 2005-06 there were 9 and in 2006-07 there were less than 5. In 2007-08 this increased to 7.
  • The prevalence of alcohol and drugs were a major complaint among community residents. The problem is associated with the availability and easy access to alcohol and drugs, with Mintabie identified as a source of drug dealing.
  • The reduction in the rate of petrol sniffing has been correlated with an increase in marijuana use. The use of marijuana has become a prominent substance abuse problem, particularly among the young.
  • There are no emergency services preparedness for fire (building or bushfire), rescue or flood, or for planning and preparation for any emergency.
  • Vandalism is a problem to street lighting. Advice from residents suggested that around 90% of the streetlights were working at the time of the audit.
  • There is no mobile phone coverage at Mimili.

Mimili community statement 2010

We want to live in a safe place. A safe place is a happy place.We want to live in a safe place. A safe place is a happy place. We know that sometimes things get out of hand and we need a safe house for the women, girls and young children so that they can feel protected and not get hurt. It is the community and parents’ responsibility to look after their children and get them home at night.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Safe Communities Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
SC1. Alcohol and substance abuse among Indigenous people is addressed.

Individual families will report instances of substance abuse in the community.

Individual Anangu will be involved in training programs for SES and CFS.

Council will coordinate controlled burning and fire break lines with the CFS.

We will talk community being involved with a crash rescue unit.

We support safety programs to educate our community.

  1. That a range of treatment and rehabilitation programs for those experiencing problems caused by substance misuse are available.
  1. Outreach services continue to assess, treat and rehabilitate people who misuse petrol, alcohol, cannabis and other substances.
SA Health-DASSA Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Encourage the residents of Mimili to access prevention, diversion and treatment programs to address substance abuse matters.
SA Health-DASSA Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan.
  1. Recommendation 17: That the Amata Substance Misuse centre be adequately funded in the longterm so as to allow appropriate services for children who require rehabilitation.
SA Health Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Support initiatives and programs that decrease the impacts of alcohol and substance abuse in the community.
  1. Implement the recommendations relevant to alcohol related violence as articulated by the Indigenous Community Safety National Roundtable 2009.
Attorney-General’s State Department and other relevant justice agencies. Roundtable held November 2009, with the development of detailed proposals occurring between November 2009 – April 2010. Endorsement of proposals by the Standing Committee of Attorney- General (SCAG) in May 2010. The endorsement of proposals by the Ministerial Council for Police& Emergency Management (MCPEMP) and the Ministerial Council for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Affairs (MCATS A) second half of 2010. Implementation of proposals will be subject to, and following, endorsement by SCAG, MCPEMP and MCATSIA.
  1. Develop partnership arrangements with the Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk (SAID) to help coordinate covert and overt operations in Amata to disrupt drug supplies and increase apprehensions in the community.
FaHCSIA On-going.

Partnership arrangement is in place.

The SAID desk has been funded for another 12 months and will provide valuable intelligence and liaison in relation to this matter for the next 12 months.

  1. Develop a comprehensive strategy to increase the apprehension of the growing use of marijuana in the community.
SA Health-DASSA
SAPOL

SAPOL has increased the number of police officers in the Mimili community to four full time positions since 20/2/10. These officers will be supported by Community Constables and other police resources on a needs basis to detect the use of marijuana in the community.

A detection strategy to detect drug and alcohol has been operating under the Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk (SAID) since 2009. Prior to that it was conducted under Operation Midrealm.

The SAID desk has been funded for another 12 months and will provide valuable intelligence and liaison in relation to this matter for the next 12 months.

Specific operations with specialist resources will continue to identify drug growers and supplies to the APY lands in general and the Amata Community. These operations will be ongoing.

Legislation introduced in 2009 now provides SAPOL with the ability to authorise an area as a drug transit route. This enables the Officer in Charge of the Local Service Area to declare an area under the Controlled Substances Act, which enables police to stop vehicles.

This strategy will be considered to address the problems of cannabis use in Mimili.

No completion date as this is an ongoing action.

  1. Develop a collaborative approach with a range of agencies in developing a suite of programs to address emerging substance abuse problems.
SA Health-DASSA Joint Review of the Substance Misuse Centre with consideration for its use as a Wellbeing Centre.
  1. Encourage agencies and community members to report outbreaks of petrol sniffing and other solvent abuse to the Central Australian Petrol Sniffing Strategy Unit (CAPSSU).
FaHCSIA
CAPSSU
CAPSSU have developed a reporting mechanism for GBMs and agencies to report substance abuse.
  1. Ensure that the APY Land Rights Act bylaw that articulates that alcohol is banned from the community is enforced by agencies and the community.
SAPOL
DPC-AARD

A strategy to detect alcohol and drugs has been operating under the Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk (SAID) since 2009. This strategy will continue to provide intelligence on alcohol and drug suppliers. Federal funding has been provided for a further 12 months. This will lead to greater sharing of intelligence between the community and local police.

A licensing accord has been established for licenses premises on the Stuart Highway.

All licensed premises have signed the accord and now keep a register of bulk alcohol purchases, and have undertaken to advise police if they think that the alcohol is bound for the APY Lands.

A review of enforcement strategies, particularly at Coober Pedy, has occurred and referred to Licensing Enforcement Branch. They have been asked to consider existing and other strategies to prevent alcohol entering the Lands.

No completion date as this matter is ongoing.

  1. Develop a comprehensive emergency management plan that involves consultation with the community and emergency service agencies.
  1. Investigate funding opportunities to implement an emergency management procedure as per the National Emergency Management Strategy for Remote Indigenous Communities.
Attorney-Generals Department– Australian Government ROC in consultation with staff from AGD to ascertain details of National Emergency Management Funding for Mimili in 2011.
  1. In consultation with the community and relevant agencies develop an emergency management plan and an associated communication strategy to educate the community about the plan.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Develop a trained SES and CFS Emergency Unit in the community
SAFECOM

Plan to commence discussing the action and engaging with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.

Meetings with SES and CFS planned to occur in July 2010.

  1. Undertake an audit and asset register of emergency service equipment.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Educate the community about fire safety and develop a communication campaign concerning fire prevention and safety hazards.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Enforce fire break lines and controlled burning around community boundaries.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Ensure that fire mitigation and equipment is suffice; including reviewing water pressure for fire fighting purposes, the condition of fire hose reels and safety latch systems on all windows and door frames.
SAFECOM Undertake action after community engagement process in August 2010.
  1. Develop and implement an emergency management education curriculum for the school that incorporates bushfire, smoke alarm and flood safe programs.
SAFECOM

Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.

Develop curriculum in late 2010 with roll-out to occur in 2011.

  1. Implement a flood and evacuation mitigation program for the community.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Review lifeguard qualifications for those associated with the community swimming pool.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Develop protocols for the community when contacting emergency services; in particular police and ambulance services.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Investigate the feasibility in adopting the government radio network made available to emergency services and other relevant government agencies on the APY Lands.
SAPOL to raise with SAGRN Board Action to be re-examined before December 2010.
  1. Purchase an Exportable PA Unit to be used by the PYKu Centre and Community Safety Officer.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal Funding submission has been completed and signed. The equipment will be purchased in July 2010.
  1. Improve road safety measures and conditions of the access roads to Mimili including all weather access to the airstrip.
  1. Undertake regular road audits to ascertain the state of the roads as a way to improve access to the community by emergency services.
DPC-AARD

Memorandum of Understanding (MoU) between DPC, AARD and DTEI is in place. The MoU stipulates for regular audits to be undertaken.

Road conditions are regularly monitored and construction of maintenance work is undertaken by DTEI .

  1. Ensure that the roads are adequately maintained to ensure that emergency vehicle access is not impinged.
DPC-AARD in liaison with DTEI

Road conditions are regularly monitored and construction of maintenance work is undertaken by DTEI.

DTEI works under the MoU for DPCAARD to manage the ‘main’ road network, some 2000km.

DTEI has established a road maintenance contract on behalf of DPC-AARD (the Principle) to maintain the road network over three years.

DTEI is aware of the issues regarding emergency access and the needs to ensure the road from community to airstrips are maintained to a higher standard.

  1. Seek community advice around the cultural sensitivities associated for the potential to recruit community volunteers in the development of a road accident crash rescue unit.
SAFECOM Plan to commence community engagement process with the community and relevant agencies in August 2010.
  1. Explore funding streams to improve road safety such as the ‘Roads to Recovery’ and ‘Black Spot’ programs.
DPC-AARD in liaison with DTEI

AARD is actively seeking opportunities for additional funding to improve roads.

DTEI has assisted in seeking Black Spot funding to undertake road safety initiatives.

  1. Erect road signage and traffic calming devices (speed humps etc) in identified built up areas within the community. Source appropriate funding in order for these measures to be implemented.
DPC-AARD in liaison with DTEI

DTEI works under the MoU for DPC-AARD.

DTEI has installed traffic control devices within communities and on the main road.

DTEI has assisted the APY Executive seek Australian Government Roads to Recovery funding.

  1. Erect bollards around community facilities to control access, parking and improve pedestrian safety.
DPC-AARD in liaison with DTEI DTEI can arrange to install bollards around community facilities if requested by DPC-AARD.
  1. Establish an education campaign and implement regular police road safety blitzes concerning vehicle safety, including, but not limited to unregistered cars, unlicensed drivers, poor child restraints, seat belts and vehicle maintenance.
SAPOL

Road safety is everyone’s responsibility.

SAPOL will continue to target poor or dangerous driving, and road related legislation breaches.

Operation Macadam, which commenced in 2009, is a police road traffic policing strategy aimed at improving the wellbeing of inhabitants by reducing road crashes. Six main risks were identified as contributing factors to road trauma. They include: non compliance with seat belt legislation, alcohol and drugs, driver fatigue, road conditions and speed. As a result, SAPOL is working with DETI, Services SA, TAFE SA, Red Cross, Indigenous Fines Enforcement Section of the Courts Department and communities to improve driving behaviour. Through community consultation it was found that the best way to ensure good driving behaviour was through positive enforcement and education.

No completion date as this is an ongoing action.

  1. Continue to support driving school education programs, safe driving initiatives and driver licence schemes.
DFEEST

TAFE SA provides a range of programs to communities across the APY Lands including driver education to schools and the broader Aboriginal community.

These programs are demand driven and provided (depending on resources, human and financial and availability of appropriate vehicles) to Anangu on an ongoing basis.

The volume of driver education delivered is routinely reported by TAFE SA to the wider department according to existing program reporting arrangements.

SC2. Indigenous children and parents are afforded basic protective security from violence and neglect.

We will encourage our children to participate in youth programs.

We need to be strong about reporting abuse.

Parents should take responsibility for their own children and what they see, no pornography.

All family groups support a night patrol program.

  1. Develop community based crime prevention and community safety initiatives that make the community feel safer and empower Anangu to participate in the solutions.
  1. Continue to support the development and implementation of identified strategies by the Mimili Community Safety Committee.
SAPOL SAPOL is committed to work with the Mimili Community Safety Committee.
  1. Police to work with the community in developing a stronger rapport and visual presence to encourage the reporting of crime.
SAPOL

SAPOL has taken possession of three new police stations on the APY Lands. These include Mimili (18/12/09), Amata (20/2/10) and Ernabella (30/3/10).

SAPOL has stationed four officers in Mimili, a Sergeant and three Constable/Senior Constables.

There are a total of 19 sworn officers on the APY Lands including a Detective and 2 Child and Family Violence/Crime Prevention Officers Police on the APY Lands are supported by 6 officers and an ASO stationed at Marla.

This will lead to a stronger rapport, visual presence and increased crime reporting.

  1. Police to appoint Community Constables and dedicated Community Liaison Officers to work with the community to address community safety issues deriving from the Community Safety Committee.
SAPOL

There are 10 Community Constable positions on the APY lands, a number are currently vacant.

Key Milestone
Interviews are scheduled for July 2010 with applications and registrations of interest exceeding vacancies.

  1. Develop a range of Crime Prevention through Environmental Design (CPTED) initiatives to help prevent crime in the community. This may include the increase use of security lights in homes and public facilities and the redesign of public space areas to increase community safety and prevent crime.
SAPOL

Crime prevention through environment design is a specialist role conducted by the State Crime Prevention Branch. The first step in the process is to have SCPB members trained in CPTED to attend the community and scope the issues, conduct an audit before developing the strategies.

Key Milestone
This is expected to be conducted in September/October due to other scheduled matters.

  1. Provide CPTED training to community members so they are empowered to undertake community safety site assessments
SAPOL

State Crime Prevention Branch is responsible for CPTED training and conducting audits within SAPOL. The training can be provided after the initial scoping is conducted as outlined in Action 4.

  1. Conduct a street light audit and ensure that a regular routine street light maintenance program occurs to increase and maintain a sense of community safety.
DPC-AARD

Contractors provide a regular audit and maintenance program for street lighting and report on a weekly basis to AARD.

Lighting audits occur weekly and include community input to identify lighting needs.

  1. Improve telecommunication services, in particular mobile phone coverage and the installation of a public phone in the community to increase opportunities for the community to seek emergency assistance or report crime.
TELSTRA ROC to initiate discussions with Telstra to explore mobile phone coverage.
  1. Encourage agencies and community groups to apply for community safety based grants. In particular the State Attorney- General’s Crime Prevention Grants Programs and the Commonwealth Attorney-General’s Indigenous Justice and Proceeds of Crime Act funds.
State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments.

Launch and promotion of 2011 program, second half of 2010.

Funding released to successful applicants, first quarter of 2011.

  1. Develop appropriate resources and implement programs to support and empower victims of crime.
Commissioner for Victims’ Rights

Program commenced in March 2009.

Formal launch of programs anticipated in August/September 2010.

Ongoing – no completion date as police will distribute victims’ rights information whenever an Aboriginal victim reports an offence.

  1. Finalise and implement the recommendations from the APY Lands Youth Engagement– Intervention Methodology.
DPC-AARD The finalisation of the APY Lands Youth Engagement – Intervention Methodology has been superseded by the development of the Youth Action Plan (YAP).
  1. Develop a well coordinated after school activities program for young people (especially girls) to enrich their learning experiences.
DFC-APY Lands Community Programs
DECS
DFC APY Lands Community programs Youth Workers will provide ongoing support to ‘after school activities’ for youth aged 12–24 years.
  1. Develop and deliver a well coordinated school holiday activities program to keep youth occupied in non-school time.
DFC-APY Lands Community Programs

NPYWC reports quarterly on School Holiday Program.

NPYWC contracted to deliver school holiday program 2010/11.

  1. Provide additional resources to the Mimili Youth Shed in order for the youth to have a more comprehensive suite of activities and programs at their disposal.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal
DFC

Funding submission has been issued to DFC for signing.

Additional resources to be purchased in late 2010.

  1. Recruit Youth Worker to coordinate youth shed activities.
DFC-APY Lands Community Programs DFC to employ worker by August 2010.
  1. Develop and implement ‘Blue Light’ programs and activities for youth, especially during weekends and school holiday periods – Blue Light Disco Unit being purchased.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal
SAPOL

Blue Light equipment is currently held at Amata and Ernabella. This equipment is provided and used in all APY communities on a needs basis.

The transportation on the poor roads, the dust and the heat regularly damages the equipment.

Purchase of two sound and light systems plus one PA system (for use of the Public Safety Officer). One system will be for use within the Mimili Aboriginal Community and the other at Amata Aboriginal Community. The purchase of these systems will greatly enhance the ability for Blue Light events to be held on the APY Lands. Blue Light SA will own the equipment and oversee the care and maintenance of the equipment.

No completion date. This matter is ongoing.

Key Milestone
The aim is to provide at least one Blue Light disco per month within the community commencing in June.

  1. Develop and implement a whole of government APY Lands Youth Strategy that articulates service provision requirements, coordinated approaches and identifies lead agency responsibility for the delivery of youth services.
DPC-AARD The whole of government APY Lands Youth Strategy has been superseded by the Youth Action Plan.
  1. Implement the Crime Prevention in Schools curriculum as a resource to educate young people about crime, its consequences and prevention.
DECS
SAPOL

State Crime Prevention Branch is responsible for the Crime Prevention Education curriculum document. APY Lands police should participate in the delivery of these programs.

Key Milestone
Training to commence within schools by July 2010.

  1. Ensure that security lighting is installed on houses.
DFC-Housing SA

New houses have external lights fitted as part of the new build program. Progress is in line with 3 year capital works plan.

Progress report monthly to RIH NP Joint Steering Committee.

  1. Community Landscaping of church grounds to create a safe environment.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal Funding Agreement signed. Work to commence mid 2010.
  1. Prevent and respond to child sexual abuse by implementing the recommendations from the Children on Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara (APY) Lands Commission of Inquiry– Hon.E.P.Mullighan.
  1. Recommendation 3: The programs of Families SA to prevent child sexual abuse on the Lands continue to receive sufficient funding and, where possible, those programs be expanded.
DFC-Families SA Funding re-directed to employ 2 child protection workers and 6 social workers in schools.
  1. Recommendation 4: Child protection staff be placed on the Lands to receive, access and respond promptly to mandatory reports concerning Anangu children.
DFC-Families SA Funding re-directed to employ 2 child protection workers and 6 social workers in schools.
  1. Recommendation 5: Mimili school has a dedicated social worker involved in early prevention strategies/training to help prevent child sexual abuse and to minimise its effects in the community.
DFC-Families SA

Recruitment and housing worker is underway.

 

  1. Recommendation 7: That necessary funding is provided to the required therapeutic services to children and young people in Mimili who have been sexually abused.
CAMHS
SA Health
CWHS have developed a proposal to assist children of sexual abuse currently being reviewed by SA Health.
  1. Recommendation 12: Relationships with elder men in the communities are developed to exercise their cultural authority in condemning the sexual abuse of children in Mimili.
DPC-AARD The issues being addressed are complex and require sensitive treatment and the building of relationships of trust and open communication. While discussions with the senior men’s Law and Culture Committee have not proceeded as planned, there are a number of other forums and programs through which men are engaged in discussions about their sexual conduct involving children, domestic violence, and the role of men in families and community, and the consequences of their conduct. An example of such is program is the Cross-border Offenders’ Program which conducts its programs in APY communities and provides men with opportunities to discuss the impact of violence and inappropriate behaviour on their families, children and themselves.
  1. Recommendation 20: Nganampa develop guidelines and procedures to ensure that all indicators of child sexual abuse are reported and that their health workers receive regular training regarding their mandatory obligations.
DoHA This recommendation is being monitored by the Mullighan Task force and Child Protection on the APY Lands Working Group.
  1. Recommendation 28: Regular meetings of all staff of Nganampa, DFC, DECS and SA Police working on the Lands receive continuing education about child care and protection.
DPC-AARD This recommendation is being monitored by the Mullighan Task force and inter-departmental working group.
  1. Develop and implement a program to educate members of the Amata community as to what are inappropriate sexual conduct, and its consequences, and the supports which are available for victims of sexual abuse be designed and implemented.
DFC-Families SA

Agencies are raising awareness among clients and their families about the primacy of keeping children safe.

Child Safe Environment training has been provided.

Families SA and DECs are reviewing Child Safe Environments training for Anangu.

NPYWC has developed an initiative to create awareness – ‘Speak up: Speak Against Child Sexual Abuse’ which provides educative information about child sexual abuse and avenues for reporting abuse.

  1. Recommendation 30: Resources are focused on education measures to better advise children, their parents and carers and the community on appropriate sexual behaviours, the law and their rights.
DFC-Families SA
SAPOL
Health

The South Australian Government is continuing to create awareness amongst children, their parents and carers and the broader community about preventing child abuse and neglect, the law and childrens rights through a range of services, including hose provided by Families SA Outreach Services, school based social workers, DECS counsellors, Youth programs, CAMHS services and the Community Safety Committees established by SAPOL.

The importance of community education regarding sexual behaviours, the law and legal rights are included as a standing item at the community safety meetings.

  1. Recommendation 32: Organise meetings with men and boys in Mimili with male Anangu elders and men from relevant agencies regarding sexual conduct of men involving children and the consequences of such conduct.
DPC-AARD The issues being addressed are complex and require sensitive treatment and the building of relationships of trust and open communication. While discussions with the senior men’s Law and Culture Committee have not proceeded as planned, there are a number of other forums and programs through which men are engaged in discussions about their sexual conduct involving children, domestic violence, and the role of men in families and community, and the consequences of their conduct. An example of such is program is the Cross-border Offenders’ Program which conducts its programs in APY communities and provides men with opportunities to discuss the impact of violence and inappropriate behaviour on their families, children and themselves.
  1. Develop a community education campaign on the dangers of exposing children to pornography and identify strategies to restrict access to such material, by children in particular.
SAPOL

This recommendation is being addressed as part of the Mullighan Inquiry. SAPOL has developed a number of strategies that include Operation Flint, designed to locate pornographic material on the APY Lands.

Advising all government departments to ensure that there are appropriate filters on their computer systems to stop pornographic material being downloaded.

Key Milestone
Confirmation from government departments that filters have been fitted. Due date end of August 2010.

  1. Recommendation 36: Implement a community assisted and police supported night patrol that will have people with cultural authority, sworn police and community professionals assist in the training of people to participate in the patrols as appropriate.
SAPOL

Night Patrols were established on the APY Lands, as a community based initiative.

In October 2004, the Aboriginal (formerly APY) Lands Task Force approved a funding application made by SAPOL, on behalf of the APY communities, for an amount of $163,000, to top up Commonwealth funding provided for Night Patrols.

This funding allowed continuation of the program in Indulkana and Ernabella and the establishment of a new program in Mimili.

The patrols were staffed by community members who received initial training from SAPOL.

Community members were paid for their time and a vehicle was supplied to the community.

SAPOL took the initial role of lead agency to establish the program; however it was handed back to individual community councils through the APY Council.

Unfortunately the programs were not maintained by the communities, interest waned and vehicles supplied were misused and not maintained Night patrols were considered a failure at the time.

SAPOL’s position is that night patrols should be owned and driven by the community.

SAPOL is not in a position to fund this initiative from within existing finances.

There needs to be further discussion in relation the funding, training, roles and responsibilities, prior to considering night patrols further.

Key Milestone
A strategic meeting to discuss the issues outlined above to be arranged by end of August 2010.

  1. Provide programs and services that respond to violence and sexual assault in the community.
  1. Consider the recommendations (in particular those focused around the concept of a safe house) from NPY Women’s Council feasibility study (Oct 2009) entitled Proposed Preferred Models for Safe Accommodation Services for Women and Children from the APY Lands.
DPC-AARD

DFC has committed additional funding to:

  • increase the level of support services for women and children on the APY Lands experiencing family violence;
  • improve access to transport for women and children having to leave the Lands because of family violence;
  • improve the services available at the Coober Pedy Safe House to meet the needs of women and children from the Lands escaping family violence.

These services will be operational by 1st December 2010. Direct allocations of funding for these services will begin from 20th July 2010. Between July and December work will be done with the agencies to prepare them to deliver the services by the deadline of 1st December.

  1. Provide and facilitate community education with community, police, justice, health and other relevant agencies and workers.
State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Develop operational guidelines with relevant organisations and services to improve responses to domestic violence and sexual assault for women and children.
State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Ensure that assistance and advocacy for individual victims of domestic violence and sexual assault that priorities their safety within a case management framework is supplied.
State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Ensure that perpetrator programs that address family violence, anger management and substance misuse are resourced appropriately and delivered in a culturally and linguistically appropriate way are delivered when required.
State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments State and Commonwealth Attorney- General’s Departments to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Develop a ‘Worker Safety’ program that is led by the community for agencies and departments who employ people in Mimili.
DPC-AARD DPC-AARD to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Develop responses to help mitigate ‘burn out’ amongst program staff through regularly dealing with stress inducing occurrences of violence in the community.
DPC-AARD DPC-AARD to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Implement compulsory mandatory reporting training (agencies have responsibility under the legislation to ensure their staff have received child safe training) for people who work with children in the community.
All agencies DPC and ROC to initiate a forum for further discussion.
  1. Provide child safe environment training for agencies and staff.
All agencies DPC and ROC to initiate a forum for further discussion.
  1. Develop and implement a youth suicide prevention strategy across the APY Lands.
SA Health-CAMHS SA Health – CAMHS to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Implement programs including mediation and conflict resolution, counselling, group therapy and social and emotional well-being programs as measures to help address and cope with violence.
FaHCSIA Cross Borders Program has been funded for 2010/2011.
  1. Implement proactive programs including education methods targeting all age groups about violence, communal promotion of definitions of acceptable and non-acceptable behaviours and the training of local violence counsellors to counter any prospects of violence.
DPC
ROC
DPC and ROC to initiate a forum for further discussion.
  1. Encourage the community to take a lead in developing culturally appropriate child protection services and initiatives.
DFC-Families SA DFC-Families SA to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Implement the recommendations relevant to family violence as articulated by the Indigenous Community Safety National Roundtable 2009.
Attorney-General’s department and relevant justice agencies Roundtable held November 2009, with the development of detailed proposals occurring between November 2009 – April 2010. Endorsement of proposals by the Standing Committee of Attorney- General (SCAG) in May 2010. The endorsement of proposals by the Ministerial Council for Police& Emergency Management (MCPEMP) and the Ministerial Council for Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islanders Affairs (MATSIA) second half of 2010. Implementation of proposals will be subject to, and following, endorsement by SCAG, MCPEMP and MCATSIA.
  1. Monitor the impact of the demand upon services and programs following the implementation of the Intervention Orders (Prevention of Abuse) Act 2009.
SAPOL

In 2009 the Attorney‑General’s Department (AGD) in consultation with other government agencies, including SAPOL, drafted the Intervention Orders (Prevention of Abuse) Act 2009 (the Act). The Act was assented on 10 December 2009, and while a date for proclamation has yet to be declared, it is anticipated the legislation will commence November 2010.

SAPOL is currently preparing for the implementation of the new legislation state wide.

Key Milestones
SAPOL and CAA are working through the issues. They are travelling to the APY lands on the court circuit for 8, 9 & 10 June to examine current practices and discuss how this legislation, particularly the Police Interim Intervention Order (PIIO ) could be utilised.

A working party has been formed to specifically examine this process upon their return.

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6. Economic Participation

Economic Participation illustration

What are we aiming for?

  • The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills to enable effective educational, labour market and social participation
    Uti anangungku waakarira payamilanma kutjupa tjuta purunytju
  • Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors of the labour market
    Tjunguringkula uwankara pukulpa waakarima

Economic participation Building Block demonstrates:

  • Mimili labour force data from the 2006 Census identified 42 of the 56 employed people as CDEP participants.
  • Including CDEP participants as employed gives an employment rate for 15-64 year olds of 33%. Adjusting for CDE P (counting them as not employed), the community rate (8%) is about a quarter of the national indigenous rate (42%).
  • There is a lack of diversity in employment options. There are few Indigenous people employed in the public administration and safety area and none employed in the education and training sector. The majority of those employed work in the health care and social assistance area.
  • The occupations of employed Aboriginal people in Mimili are typical of many communities across Australia with under representation (compared to the non-indigenous population) in management and over representation in the labour occupations.
  • There are no Aboriginal people employed as managers, technicians and trade workers or machinery operators and drivers in Mimili. There are no male Aboriginals employed in the community and personal service sectors.

Mimili community statement 2010

We want our community and children to have real jobs where they are employed and getting paid proper salaries.All the time Anangu are asking about jobs. We want our community and children to have real jobs where they are employed and getting paid proper salaries. When they are working they feel good about themselves and they can buy food and things for their family. We should also be thinking about other things like the Tourism business and the Bush Food garden. These enterprises can make money for the community and give jobs to people working for them. We want all families to benefit not just one group.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Economic Participation Building Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
EP1. The Indigenous working age population has the depth and breadth of skills to enable effective educational, labour market and social participations.

Individuals will work all different jobs for a salary.

  1. Support existing and new approaches to provide the community with the relevant skills to participate effectively in the employment/training sphere.
  1. Provide IT and internet training for community members of a working age.
DFEEST
  1. Implementation plan for public internet access submitted for DBCDE approval by August 2010. Program on-going to June 2013.
  2. Provision of free public access to computers and the internet.
  3. Development of targeted digital program for Aboriginal people as part of public internet access program by June 2011.
  4. Access to Outback Connect online community training program – ongoing.
  1. Develop and implement training programs for community members on interacting with financial institutions.
DFEEST Support provided through access to e-banking facilities through Public Internet Program, commenced by Dec 2010.
  1. Develop and implement community business training programs to raise overall awareness and build a sense of pride in local businesses.
DTED ROC to initiate discussions with DTED to explore this action.
  1. Develop and implement financial literacy programs for secondary based school students and those people of a working age.
DECS
DFEEST
Once DECS has developed the financial literacy program Recognition of Prior Learning will be undertaken as part of the Certificate 2 in Business.
  1. Conduct regular culturally appropriate ‘Basic Introduction to Business’ courses in Amata in response to requests by community members.
DFEEST TAFE SA regional provides Certificate 2 in Business across all locations.
  1. Conduct business start up workshops according to community needs.
IBA
DEEWR
Conduct workshop within 3 months of community individual request. Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Continue to deliver culturally appropriate work readiness programs.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Invest in programs that improve the education and training pathways for community members.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Implement a community based promotional campaign to create a positive image of what work is and the benefits of work (to promote individual achievement).
DEEWR Project to commence by December 2010. Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Ensure that Anangu of working age with literacy and numeracy barriers have the opportunity to access targeted services.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Encourage agencies to work together in identifying training and employment opportunities.
  1. Undertake a process to engage with community to scope possible employment and training opportunities. These may include employment and training opportunities in hairdressing, mechanics, tourism, consulting, cultural heritage and child care.
DEEWR

Engage an Economic Development Officer to service the APY Lands by March 2011.

Activity Report – 6 Monthly.

  1. Coordinate and support a locally based forum with those agencies and services involved in employment and training that meets regularly to exchange information on economic participation matters.
DEEWR
FaHCSIA
ROC
GBM to advise on process.
  1. Ensure that existing employment and training activities are supported and that opportunities are maximised to create further sustainable employment/ training prospects.
DFEEST DFEEST responses through TAFE SA Regional where appropriate and able (given resources) to support opportunities for Anangu to transition into further training or employment.
  1. Offer better targeted and personalised assistance and services to job seeker requirements.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Ensure that the promotion of the Aboriginal workforce participation in construction and refurbishment in Amata is maximised and upheld as per the Remote Indigenous Housing NP.
DFC-Housing SA

DFEEST provides support in the development of the training and employment strategy.

Creation of workforce participation opportunities is ongoing in line with capital works.

Commenced July 2009 and scheduled for completion in June 2012.

Progress report monthly to RIH NP
Joint Steering Committee.

20% employment in capital works is the target.

  1. Lever business opportunities resulting from the numerous National Partnerships and the installation of broadband.
DPC-AARD Chief Executive Group Aboriginal Affairs to commence actioning economic participation strategies from 16 June 2010. The Senior Officers Group Aboriginal Affairs will be responsible for implementing this and other related priorities for Amata through an integrated service development and implementation plan to commence 24 June 2010.
  1. Engage a construction based trainer/lecturer to work with identified agencies, service providers and community to help local building and small scale infrastructure programs.
DFEEST
FaHCSIA
Certificate 1 Construction activity currently operational.
  1. Provide tourism accreditation business mentoring, product development and marketing support for tourism operators and potential tourism businesses.
Tourism SA ROC to initiate discussions with Tourism SA to explore this action.
  1. Support culture based enterprises such as the Tjala Arts Centre, individual artists, musicians, tourism and natural resource management.
DEWHA DE WHA to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Support interested Anangu in developing and delivering a cultural awareness training program specifically targeting people working with Anangu and/ or travelling to the APY Lands as a business venture.
FaHCSIA ROC to develop a project proposal in consultation with the Community Council prior to December 2010.
  1. Develop strategies with agencies affiliated with the community service sector (eg. health, education, police) to encourage, support and increase Anangu employment and traineeship placements in this area.
DEEWR

DEEWR to convene a forum with relevant agencies.

First meeting to take place by 30 September 2010.

Activity Report – 6 Monthly.

  1. Continue to deliver personalised assistance and services to job seeker requirements.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 Monthly.
  1. Investigate opportunities for the uptake of apprentices and trainees.
DEEWR
DFEEST

Activity Report – 6 Monthly.

Meeting with DFEEST to discuss reporting framework and process by 31 August 2010.

DFEEST can provide (with appropriate resourcing) support to apprentices and trainees when there opportunities are created.

  1. Undertake an audit of jobs and skills in the housing and construction industry to help identify opportunities in the community.
DEEWR

As part of the APY Lands Housing initiative C.E.G will commence a skills audit by September 2010.

Activity Report – 6 Monthly.

  1. Continue to deliver appropriate training and work readiness programs for Anangu workers as identified in their Employment Pathway Plan.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 Monthly
EP2. Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors of the labour market.

Individuals are happy to undertake any required training for a job.

We will stay in a job, come to work on time if we are respected and trusted in that job.

  1. Encourage Anangu to engage and facilitate discussion with the corporate and private sector to ascertain possible employment/ training and professional development opportunities.
  1. Develop and implement a mentoring program that promotes Indigenous role models who are actively engaged in employment and business ownership.
DTED ROC to initiate discussions with DTED to explore this action.
  1. Promote the concepts of partnership and joint ventures with the private and corporate sectors.
DTED ROC to initiate discussions with DTED to explore this action.
  1. Promote mining opportunities in response to the desire of the Traditional Owners.
DTED ROC to initiate discussions with DTED to explore this action.
  1. Increase the availability of internet connections throughout the community and encourage people to access the internet to access further training, employment and support in the private/corporate sector.
DFEEST Provide input to the roll out of the National Broadband Network in the APY Lands through national broadband and communication working groups and Departments liaison. Ongoing.
  1. Provide opportunities for the private/corporate sector to have individuals work with the Anangu community to provide business/ enterprise ideas and provide a unique professional development opportunity for the individual.
Business SA DFEEST will support where appropriate.
  1. Engage the ‘Thinkers in Residence’ initiative to work with the Amata community to explore economic participation challenges and opportunities.
DPC DPC to provide progress report by January 2011.
  1. Explore opportunities for existing business enterprises in the community to participate in the Enterprise Connect Business Review process to identify strengths and opportunities and potential areas for growth and improvement.
DIISR

Milestone 1.
Agreement by community (Mimili) that action is wanted and supported by community (to be co-ordinated by SA Govt.

Milestone 2
DIISR to receive advice from Mimili (Via SA Govt) as to when Enterprise Connect Business Adviser should travel to Community (for a coordinated approach to officers from different departments/governments travelling to these communities).

Milestone 3
Enterprise Connect – Remote Enterprise Centre Business Adviser works with Community Council to identify possible business reviews for existing organisations within the community.

Milestone 4
Business Reviews conducted and completed with recommendations for improvement/innovation.

  1. Engage a Business Advisor from the Remote Enterprise Centre to visit the community to provide advice and share personal experiences and insights as a small business operator.
DIISR

Milestone 1
Agreement by community (Mimili) that action is wanted and supported by community (to be co-ordinated by SA Govt.

Milestone 2
DIISR to receive advice from Mimili (Via SA Govt) as to when Enteprise Connect Business Adviser should travel to Community (for a coordinated approach to officers from different departments/governments travelling to these communities).

Milestone 3
Enterprise Connect Remote Enterprise Centre Business Adviser meets with interested community members to share personal experience of running a small business in remote Australia.

  1. Engage an Indigenous Economic Development Officer to work with emerging and existing Anangu owned businesses and individuals with a focus on capacity building.
DEEWR

Engage an Economic Development Officer to service the APY Lands by March 2011.

Activity Report – 6 Monthly.

  1. Continue to develop the emerging pastoral and land management industries.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 Monthly.
  1. Support existing and new initiatives that maximise transition and retention opportunities for people of a working age.
  1. Agencies to commit to the measures identified in the APY Lands Recruitment and Retention strategy.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 Monthly
  1. Resource Officers are employed to support CDEP participants and their families in Mimili.
FaHCSIA Funding has been approved and officers are engaged.
  1. Youth targeted programs continue to promote the successful transition from school to work and apprenticeships.
DEEWR
DECS
Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Examine ways to improve Centrelink transactional and case management services.
Centrelink ROC to initiate discussions with Centrelink to explore this action.
  1. All DEEWR funded activities in communities should utilise DASSA services to assist with drug and alcohol issues.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Explore options with Fair Work Australia to work with employers of Anangu workers to adopt and implement flexible work principles and practices.
DEEWR
Fair Work Australia
Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Ensure Anangu with disabilities are able to access appropriate medical information to support a job capacity assessment to ensure correct employment program streaming.
DEEWR DEEWR to consult with DoHA by 31 August 2010.
  1. Provide skills training and further education opportunities for 15-19 year olds including support from the Youth Connections program.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly
  1. Employers and funding bodies to commit to the measures identified in the APY Lands Recruitment and Retention Strategy.

    DEEWR to ensure that IE P contracts commit employers to take part in the retention strategy.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Work experience opportunities are developed and offered to school students and people of a working age.
  1. Government agencies provide opportunities for school students to undertake work experience.
DECS DECS to provide a progress report by January 2011.
  1. Agencies that have an investment in Mimili provide opportunities for people of a working age to undertake work experience.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Government agencies based in Adelaide mentor on a regular basis Wiltja students to increase their employment and career pathway.
BoM BoM to place this action on the agenda for discussion in August 2010.
  1. GBM and AEOs in Mimili provide an opportunity to mentor local people of a working age.
ROC ROC to develop support mechanisms and a project brief late in 2010 for the GBMs and AEOs as a means to help meet the action.
  1. Utilising the JSA and Youth Connections Programs provide training and education opportunities through individualised case management to those Anangu youth who have not yet achieved Year 12 or equivalent.
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Government departments to provide new employment opportunities by utilising the participation clauses in Government contracts and building the capability of Anangu to take up these opportunities.
All Agencies Housing SA is providing opportunities via the RIH NP.
  1. Consultations with employers regarding work experience for people of a working age to undertake work experience.
DEEWR
FaHCSIA
DECS
Work experience opportunities workshop facilitated by DEEWR to be held in 2011.
  1. Provide opportunities for Anangu ages between 17 and 24 to participate in National Green Job Corp activities
DEEWR Activity Report – 6 monthly.
  1. Support existing and new business opportunities.
  1. Improve community infrastructure to facilitate improved business practices (i.e. banking and postal services) to ensure that the community has access to adequate financial transaction capacity, postal services, licensing and bill paying facilities to support the increase of economic and social participation.
DoHA DoHA to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Improve road maintenance to encourage new private enterprise involvement.
DPC-AARD

DTEI works under a MoU for AARD to manage the road network.

DTEI has called a contract for road maintenance in the APY Lands, over three years, for DPC-AARD.

Ceduna Bulk Hauliers has won the contract and established in the Lands, previously not involved in the Lands.

DTEI has undertaken this work on behalf of AARD.

  1. Engage local agents to provide the community with access to high demand State Government information and services through the PY KU Centre.
DTEI DTEI to provide progress report on behalf of Services SA by January 2011.
  1. Enrol the Mimili Community Council to work in partnership with the Indigenous Community Volunteers (ICV) program to design and implement community development based projects.
ROC ROC to initiate discussions with ICV before 2011.
  1. Fund a local Anangu Employment Officer to build community awareness in training, employment and compliance activities. This role will also assist with the coordination, promotion, preparation ands placement of Anangu in jobs.
DEEWR

Anangu Employment Officer to commence in employment by March 2011.

Activity Report – 6 monthly.

  1. Undertake a comprehensive audit of Commonwealth, State, private and community sector job opportunities, both current and future; and identify gaps and training opportunities.
  1. Review current and future contractual arrangements in housing contracts on the Lands to achieve training and employment outcomes for Aboriginal workers.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Develop a clear policy and guidelines for Aboriginal employment through building and construction projects.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Seek support from industry (mining companies, building contractors, government agencies) for Trade Training Centre at Umuwa.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Develop a whole-of- government process for the employment of Aboriginal interpreters.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by October 2010.
  1. Provide increased training in the APY Lands that is closely aligned in areas of industry demand, including:
    - Mining
    - Aged Care
    - Tourism/Hospitality
    - Construction
    - Business
    - Shop Attendants
DFEEST Ongoing.
  1. Facilitate a forum for mining companies, including those with tenements on the Lands, to promote the training TAFE SA has delivered for OzMinerals with the aim to expand the program.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Tailor Interactive Ochre for the APY lands and offer through TAFE to all State Government departments and contractors with an interest on the Lands.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by October 2010.
  1. Reintroduce Tourism Training in Mimili. Develop a business case for tourism operation based around sites, cultural awareness and bush tucker. Liaise with the Commonwealth in relation to infrastructure funding with TAFE SA providing training.
DFEEST DEFEEST to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by October 2010.

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7. Governance and Leadership

Governance and Leadership illustration

What are we aiming for?

  • Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation
    Uti community-ngku tjunguringkula wiru palyanma, wiru ngaranytjaku
  • Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms
    Uti community-ngku tjukarurungku tjapinma anangungka mitingingka tjukaruru palyantjikitjangku
  • Governments work together effectively in remote areas
    Uti kaamanta tjutangku tjunguringkula palyanma ngura wiru ngaranytjaku

Governance and Leadership Building Block demonstrates:

  • The Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytatjara (APY executive), incorporated under the Anangu Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Land Rights Act 1981 (SA), represents all Anangu people within the Lands on land tenure issues and is recognised as a council under the Local Government (Financial Assistance) Act 1995.
  • The community is governed by the Mimili Community Council, which is currently being reincorporated.
  • As the Mimili Council is currently being reincorporated, there are understood to be no staff currently employed by the Council office.

Mimili community statement 2010

We want our community to be strong.We want our community to be strong. The elders look after this land but we want our young people to be able to take over and look after it too. We want our council to be strong to run our community properly. It has to look after all the families and make decisions that support everyone in the community. These decisions should be made properly so that everyone can see that things are being done the right way. Our young people should learn how to run meetings, how to take the minutes and how to solve the problems along the way. When they can do this properly, then we can truly run our own community.

 

Outcomes, strategies and actions for Governance and Leadership Buidling Block
COAG Outcome Desired Community Outcome
& Community Commitment
Strategy Action Lead Agency Progress Reporting
/ Key Milestones
GL1. Indigenous communities are empowered to participate in policy making and program implementation.

We will encourage young people in leadership programs and learning to run meetings

  1. Provide opportunities for community members to be involved in the leadership and governance of their community, whilst recognising traditional cultural authority and existing leaders in the community.
  1. Mimili Community School to investigate the possibility of a student representative body.
DECS DECS to provide progress report by January 2011.
  1. Development of a youth representative forum to provide ideas and represent the youth of Mimili to the Mimili Community Council.
DPC-AARD A Mimili Youth Advisory Council will be developed as part of the proposed Mimili Youth Action Plan (MYAP). The MYAP will follow on from the establishment of the Amata Youth Action Plan.
  1. Explore financial support for the One and All – Youth Development Program
DECS
ROC
Project brief to be drafted by ROC by August 2010.
  1. Initiate a dedicated women’s forum in Mimili to work alongside and with the NPY Women’s Council and the Mimili Community Council.
FaHCSIA
ROC
2010/2011 Leadership Program in development.
  1. Financial and administrative support for representatives from Mimili with the possibility of other representation from communities in the APY Lands to attend the 9th World Indigenous Women and Wellness Conference in Darwin, August 2010.
ROC ROC has received project brief and will progress in July 2010.
  1. AEOs to work with community members to encourage community support and involvement in committees and forums.
ROC ROC to provide professional development opportunities on an ongoing basis as part of FaHCSIA’s training and development curriculum to AEOs to help them improve their skills in working with community.
  1. Radio and PYKU Centres to be used to promote discussion of new ideas and information pertaining to community events and council decisions.
DoHA DoHA to provide progress report on behalf of PY Media by January 2011.
  1. Councils, service providers and government agencies to involve Art Centre artists and Anangu translators in presenting news and issues for debate in ways that reinforce culture and language.
DEWHA ROC to initiate discussion with DEWHA to progress this action in late 2010.
  1. Aboriginal Leadership Register to support initiatives contributing to achieving greater participation of Anangu on Boards and Committees.
DFEEST Outcomes for SASP targets.
T5.7 Aboriginal Leadership.
T5.1 Boards and Committees.
  1. Identifying existing community strengths that can be further resourced to create community development projects.
  1. Mimili Community Council to work with the community in developing community projects.
ROC Ongoing.
  1. Mimili Community Council to work with the Mimili Blues Support Group in developing and implementing community projects.
ROC Mimili Community Blues Support Group is chaired by the GBM and meets regularly to discuss community projects.
  1. A community development agency is engaged to develop a profile of the strengths of the APY Land communities from a traditional and newer practices perspective, and the opportunities these strengths can generate.
ROC ROC to initiate a process to develop discussions with key agencies prior to 2011.
GL2. Indigenous Communities are represented through credible consultation/governance mechanisms.

We need a Council that is strong to run our community properly.

  1. To shape governance arrangements that strengthens Anangu language and culture and support the role of the Mimili Community Council.
  1. Where appropriate for Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara language to be used in community meetings and by government exchanges utilising interpreters and offering language courses to government employees.
DPC-AARD AARD is currently undertaking a review of interpreting services in SA. It is anticipated that part of this process will include the development of a ‘best practice’ model that will be due for completion the end of December 2010.
  1. Mimili Community Council to exercise the right to conduct meetings and forums with government agencies and service providers in Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara language with accredited translators in attendance.
DPC-AARD AARD is currently undertaking a review of interpreting services in SA. It is anticipated that part of this process will include the development of a ‘best practice’ model that will be due for completion the end of December 2010.
  1. Government agencies and service providers take steps to hire Anangu interpreters and translators as needed and to have staff trained in Pitjantjatjara and Yankunytjatjara language.
DPC-AARD AARD is currently undertaking a review of interpreting services in SA. It is anticipated that part of this process will include the development of a ‘best practice’ model that will be due for completion the end of December 2010.
  1. Refurbishment of the Community Office.
FaHCSIA-ICSI Proposal
DPC-AARD
Funding Agreement to be signed by DPC AARD before June 30, 2010.
  1. Ensure community governance is prepared for the future.
  1. Mimili Community Council to recognise the importance of succession planning and develop an action plan in identifying, mentoring upcoming leaders in the community and complete a handover of roles and induction completed when there is a changeover in membership.
FaHCSIA
ORIC
Ongoing.
  1. Supporting training for the Mimili Community Council to improve structure and transparency.
  1. Mimili Community Council to be re-established with a new constitution and become reincorporated under ORIC
ORIC
FaHCSIA
Ongoing.
  1. Mimili Community Council business practices to have anti-fraud and anti-corruption mechanisms and processes in place.
ORIC Ongoing.
  1. Training for Anangu in traditional western governance structures and practices.
ORIC Ongoing.
  1. Training to be offered to Mimili Community Council in the obligations and responsibilities of a governing body, best practice approaches and establishing protocols for resolving inter-family based tensions and conflict.
ORIC Ongoing.
GL3. Governments to work together more effectively in remote areas. We will work with governments and speak up about our ideas.
  1. Government agencies work together on community development projects and policy.
  1. Local intelligence and community knowledge to be shared between agencies.
FaHCSIA
DPC-AARD
AARD and FaHCSIA has a coordinated management structure through the ROC and BoM to share information as well as strategic development.
  1. Networks for government employees and service providers working on the APY Lands to be established.
ROC Development of government networks and services to be implemented prior to July 2010. The information will be inserted into the ROC Face in August 2010 for access to government agencies and service providers.
  1. Agencies utilise the ROC for information and the BoM to avoid duplications of services and programs.
ROC ROC to implement the ROC Face tool as a mechanism to share and distribute information by end of July 2010.
  1. Investigate and develop a range of options for more effective town planning and streamlining of infrastructure investment, including developing a single, whole of government contracting entity to plan and manage construction
DPC DPC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies of DLGP and DTEI to discuss this action.
  1. Improve coordination and conduct of visits by agencies and NGOs to Mimili.
  1. Agencies to utilise the APY Calendar for coordination.
ROC

APY calendar has been implemented and continues to be maintained by ROC staff on a monthly basis.

ROC intends to upload the calendar into the ROC Face site to increase external access.

  1. Mimili Community Council in conjunction with the BoM to develop protocols for agency visits to Mimili.
ROC

ROC staff have discussed with the GBM protocols and processes to improve the single government interface.

ROC in conjunction with the GBM will develop and document a protocol procedure to be inserted in the ROC Face by end of July 2010.

  1. Improved training for government and service provider employees visiting and living in Mimili.
  1. Mandatory cultural awareness training by Anangu for all employees visiting or living on the APY Lands.
ROC ROC to draft a scoping paper for the BoM’s consideration to ascertain a viable approach to provide cultural awareness training before end August 2010. The paper will include recommendations for the delivery of the program and the preferred supplier.
  1. Induction training for employees that will be living on the APY Lands in social and emotional wellbeing, cultural isolation and shock.
ROC ROC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies.
  1. Staff of service providers and government agencies to be given formal orientation to the principles and methods of internationally successful community development and capacity building.
ROC ROC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies.
  1. Ensure adequate staff housing available to agencies and service providers.
  1. Conduct a review of additional staffing needs to enable the implementation of the LIP and determine the need for staff housing in Mimili.
DPC DPC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies of DFC-Housing SA and DTEI to discuss this action.
  1. Construction of additional visitor accommodation in order to reduce fly-in fly-out day visits and improve service delivery.
DPC DPC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies of DFC-Housing SA and DTEI to discuss this action.
  1. Identification of government and non government service provider housing needs is provided to support services; and incorporated short, medium and long term strategies are developed to ensure sufficient staff housing is provided to support local services.
DPC DPC to initiate forum in late 2010 with key agencies of DFC-Housing SA and DTEI to discuss this action.
  1. Ensure that current Government housing is used to its optimal benefits.
DPC DPC to initiate forum in July 2010 with key agencies of DFC-Housing SA and DTEI to discuss this action.

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