Local Implementation Plans Yirrkala

Table of Contents

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Artist Acknowledgement

Artist: Nawurrapu Wunungmurra

This painting is about Yolngu of Yirrkala. Symbolic Clan Group who came together to form a nation of Clans from Dhuwa and Yirritja. The paintings on the sides are the Water Wave called Miyirri. The white lines with the dots represent the clouds (wangubini). With the stars above the clouds. The time when they laid down their spears, woomera and dillybag was when they all agreed to be one clan nation. Declared around the campfire.

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Introduction

Welcome to Country

Hello my name is Djuwalpi Marika and I am the senior Indigenous representative of Yirrkala who has worked closely with the Yirrkala Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group. I would like to begin by paying my respect to the Rirratjingu and Gumatj people, the traditional custodians of Yirrkala. On behalf of the traditional custodians, the Rirratjingu and Gumatj people, I welcome you all.

Yirrkala people have worked side by side with government to come up with this Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan and we will continue to engage with governments to improve the standard of living of the Yolgnu people of Yirrkala. We have had many meetings and negotiations, and have participated in training through a Visioning Forum to complete this plan. Through this plan, our people are part of a team working with government to create one community that is healthy to live in and that provides opportunities for our children.

We have spent a lot of time coming up with priorities to make our community a better place to live. We, the Yirrkala Gurrutu’mirri Mala Local Reference Group, fully commit to the details of this plan and will work hard to ensure we can all meet our commitments by living and sharing and being one voice and one people. The Yirrkala people are proud to sign this plan and to work together with government to make Yirrkala a better place to live.

Nhamirri bukmak

Ngarrantja Yaku Djuwalpi Marika, Ga Ngarrantja Ngurru-Dawalangu Yolngu Dhiyaku Yirrkala-wu, Nguni Ngarra Yukurran-nha Djama Galki Dhiyakala Walalungala Yirrkala Gurrutumirri Bapurru mitji -wala.

Ngarra-yurru Ngurruthuma buku-wikama, Rirratjingu-nha ga Gumatj-nha

Nhuni manda ngurru dhawalungu dhiyaku wanga-wu Yirrkala-wu.Yo Nganapurru

wanga-watangu walala Rirratjingu ga Gumatj gumurru-Ngamathina Numalungu bukumaku.

Yirrkala Yolngu yukurrana warathurruna Rrambangi walalangala Gov’t –gala,

Dhiyaku Yirrkala-wu, Rom dhukarri-mirriyangala djama-wu ga,bulu nhiyilimurru Bunguny biyakuna bili Rrambangi djama Gov’t gala, dhiyaku wanga latju-gunarawu

Marr Yirrkala-pungu Yolngu Lungungu Latju-mirr-nha Nhini. Nhiyilimurru dharrwa-mirri Wanganha Balakurru Djama-gurru Rom-gurru. Ga Biyakuna bili Nhiyilmurru Djama Rrambangi Gov’t - gala. Marr Yolngu - djamarrakuli bungungu Nhiniya latjumirrina Dhiyala Yirrkala.

Yo nhiyilimurru Yirrkala Gurrutumirri mala yukurrna dharrwamirri ngama-ngama yurruna dharuk ga gurrunara ngathil-yurruna, nhiyilimurr-gu dharuk, marr nhiyilimurru

Yurru ngama-ngama-yun latju walngamirri wanga, ga wangay Dharuk ga wangay Yolngu. Yo balakurru djama-gurru nhiyilimurru marngithina, ga dhawar-yun-mangala dhuwala malanya djama,

Yirrkala Yolngu marr-ngumathina dhiyaku marg-mirriyama dhuwala djama- nguni

Ngapurru Rrambangi warathurruna, marr bungungu Yirrkala-dja latjuna wanga Ninarawuy.

Closing the Gap in Yirrkala

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments are working together with Local Governments, through the Shire Councils, to reduce Indigenous disadvantage. In recognition that outcomes for Indigenous Australians remain below those of non-Indigenous Australians, the Council of Australian Governments has agreed to implement the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.

This agreement is a long term, generational commitment based on delivering coordinated, targeted and accelerated development in Indigenous communities, and it changes the way governments invest in remote areas.

The agreement takes a direct approach to improving conditions. This includes engaging directly with the communities on delivering improvements. It also involves clear accountability for who does what, where and by when, backed up by rigorous monitoring and reporting.

Yirrkala is one of the 29 remote Indigenous communities across Australia where this approach is being started through Local Implementation Plans. The Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan has been developed through close consultation between governments and the Yirrkala community through the Yirrkala Local Reference Group, known as the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group. It sets out the priorities for the Yirrkala community and includes targets, actions, success measures and timelines for achieving those priorities. Existing community and government plans and agreements in Yirrkala complement the Remote Service Delivery approach. All the signatories agree to work together to deliver the actions in the Plan.

Transforming Yirrkala will require a two-way commitment to change. This means: community members agree to take more personal responsibility and fully participate in the commitments of the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan, and governments agree to listen to the community and provide resources and planning to improve infrastructure, services and access to services.

Closing the Gap Building Blocks

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to six specific targets to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, outlined below. These targets are underpinned by seven building blocks—priority areas where action is required. Improvements in one area will affect results in other areas.

 
COAG Targets Building Blocks Achieving COAG Targets

Ensure all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years.

 

For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to high-quality early childhood education and care services—including preschool, child care and family support services such as parenting programs—is critical. Facilities and infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention. Action on maternal, antenatal and early childhood health will help close the gap in child mortality as well as in early childhood development.

Halve the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.  

Education is the key to future opportunity. Schooling that responds to Indigenous education priorities requires attention to infrastructure, teacher and school leader supply and quality, curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school-community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, and post-school education and training are also important. So are lifelong learning and the development of adult literacy and numeracy skills.

Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.  

Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving Indigenous Australians’ health and life expectancy and reducing excess mortality from chronic disease. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care. These services need to be responsive to government and community health priorities and accountable for achieving them. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires intense efforts in preventing, managing and treating chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to use programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.

Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.

 

A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (including design, availability and maintenance). Children need to live in houses that are free from overcrowding and provide the infrastructure they need for good hygiene and study.

Halve the gap in employment between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade  

Indigenous people and communities should be able to benefit from the mainstream economy. This includes real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Economic participation needs to extend to disadvantaged job seekers and those outside the labour market. Access to land and native title can be leveraged to secure practical benefits for Indigenous people. Economic participation also needs other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures, and infrastructure such as communications and transport. Through economic participation, adults can become good role models for their family and community. The design and delivery of welfare (transfer payments and services) needs to encourage active engagement, greater capability and positive social norms. Ensuring that communities have support to overcome barriers to engagement such as problem gambling is critical.

Halve the gap for Indigenous students in rates of Year 12 or equivalent attainment by 2020.  

Indigenous men, women and children need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Meeting this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection, and preventative measures. Addressing related problems such as alcohol and substance abuse is critical to improving community safety as well as improving health.

 

Strong Indigenous leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations, as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels, are essential for long-term sustainable results. Indigenous people need to engage in developing reforms that will affect them. They need greater opportunities to build capacity in governance and leadership in order to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

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Yirrkala’s Partnership with Government

The Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan enables the three tiers of government and the Yirrkala community to reset their relationship through a partnership aimed at improving conditions and services in Yirrkala. This page explains the structures for Yirrkala’s partnership with government.

Local Reference Group

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group is the main way Yirrkala consults and negotiates with government on the Local Implementation Plan. Its members are community people from across the different clans, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Yirrkala.

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group set the community priorities for the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan. To do this it consulted with clan groups, participated in capacity-building workshops and took advice from community members with experience in service delivery.

With support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager, the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group consulted traditional owners and sought their agreement on the various community issues in the Plan.

Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager

The Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager support the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group and the Local Implementation Plan process. They work with both the Northern Territory and Australian Governments, as well as having strong connections with the Shire Council. They both live and work in Yirrkala.

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is an Indigenous person from the local area whose job is to: support the community in its consultations and negotiations with government, ensure government engages with the community in a culturally appropriate way, and assist the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group to report on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Government.

The Government Business Manager is the contact person for liaison between the community and government and also: helps with community planning and agreement making, helps with service coordination and delivery on the ground, involves service providers such as non-governmental organisations in the Local Implementation Plan process, and reports on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Regional Operations Centre.

Together the Government Business Manager and the Indigenous Engagement Officer are a Single Government Interface for the community. They help community people understand government programs and services, and help government and the shires understand community issues and priorities.

Schedule C details which groups were consulted and engaged with to develop the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan.

Regional Operations Centre and Board of Management

The Regional Operations Centre supports the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager with the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan. It also helps government to coordinate effective and timely service delivery. Regional Operations Centre staff are both from the Australian and Northern Territory Governments.

Yirrkala's Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager are supported by the Regional Operations Centre staff in Darwin.

The Regional Operations Centre reports to the Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery Board of Management, which is a partnership consisting of senior officials from both governments and from the shires who are responsible for providing oversight and guidance on the implementation of Remote Service Delivery policy.

The Board of Management will: monitor and report on progress against the actions in the Local Implementation Plan, take a whole-of-government approach to supporting the work of the Regional Operations Centre, and solve any problems and seek to address any lack of progress on implementation.

Local Government

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments note the important role of Local Government through its elected representation and service provision to the Yirrkala community and are committed to working in partnership with the East Arnhem Shire Council to implement the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan.

Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan Process

How the plan developed

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group was established to set priorities to improve the quality of life in its community. The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group was introduced to Local Implementation Planning at a local Visioning Forum convened by the Regional Operations Centre. Following this workshop, the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block. To do this it took suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager.

Through regular meetings, the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group prioritised their top desired outcomes requiring immediate action in this first iteration of the Local Implementation Plan.

These top priorities were negotiated by the Regional Operations Centre with governments and service providers. Details of Yirrkala’s top priorities with strategies and actions being committed to this year by the community, governments and the shires are in Schedule A. The source document listing all of the desired community outcomes supplied by the Local Reference Group is available from the Government Business Manager and will be used to inform future versions of and updates to the Local Implementation Plan.

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments, with assistance from Shire Councils, surveyed conditions in Yirrkala to get baseline mapping data. This information identifies the Yirrkala community’s needs and is the starting point for measuring the results from the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan. A summary of the baseline mapping data for Yirrkala is in Schedule B.

Start and finish dates

This iteration of the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan commences upon the date of signing. Progress on Schedule A will be monitored regularly, and details of the plan will be reviewed, updated, amended and expanded annually throughout the lifetime of the plan until 30 June 2014.

Keeping the plan on track

The Regional Operations Centre will: assess progress against the actions in Schedule A through regular communication with government agencies and the shires, supported by the Board of Management, and work with the Gurrutu'mirri Mala Reference Group and ensure it has the information it needs to implement the plan. Government agencies and the shires will: report regularly to the Regional Operations Centre on progress against committed actions in the plan, and consult with the Regional Operations Centre on details of the plan's actions that evolve after the plan is agreed upon. Supported by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, the Yirrkala Local Reference Group will: check that the community is meeting its commitments in the plan, meet regularly and keep the community well informed, help raise awareness on agency progress on the ground, and agree on any new priorities or changes to the plan that are needed to meet targets.

Reviewing the plan

The Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan is a living, evolving document that can respond to the changing needs, gaps and priorities for Yirrkala. There will be opportunities to update, add to and improve it annually or more frequently if required.

This first version of the plan was created within tight time frames, and the details and actions of the plan are certain to evolve.

Reviewing progress

The Regional Operations Centre will receive regular reports from government agencies on the plan’s progress. The Regional Operations Centre will also receive regular reports from the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group through the Government Business Manager regarding progress on the ground. The Regional Operations Centre will provide a regular general report, based on the community and agency progress reports, to the Board of Management.

The Board of Management will oversee the implementation process and alert the responsible agencies to gaps, delays or needs for improvement to ensure they meet their commitments.

The Office of the Coordinator-General for Remote Indigenous Services and the Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services also oversee the implementation process, with the authority to work across agencies to cut through bureaucratic blockages and red tape, and to make sure services are delivered effectively.

The Regional Operations Centre will also provide an annual report to the community on how the commitments are being achieved. It will work closely with the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group, service providers, all levels of government and the shires to keep track of the commitments in Schedule A.

Addressing issues with plan progress

Any member of the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group may raise an issue on behalf of the people they represent.

The Regional Operations Centre and the Board of Management are there to make sure that issues are addressed and resolved.

Yirrkala’s Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager, with support from the Regional Operations Centre, are there to help the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group get its issues dealt with. This is the formal process for dealing with issues with plan progress:

A community member or group puts the issue in writing or tells it to a member of the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group, which discusses the issue as a priority.

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group raises the issue to the Regional Operations Centre through the Government Business Manager’s monthly progress report.

The Regional Operations Centre works with the relevant government agency to address the issue, and reports the issue to the Board of Management if necessary. The Regional Operations Centre will let the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group know what is being done.

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About Yirrkala

History

Aboriginal people have inhabited this region for more than 40,000 years. The Methodist Church of Australasia established a mission at Yirrkala in 1935. Over the following decades, members of the 13 clans that owned land in the surrounding area were gradually drawn into the mission. Friction between these different groups was an early problem.

The Yirrkala community became well known in 1963, when landowners sent a bark petition to the Australian Government to protest against the Prime Minister’s announcement that a section of their land would be sold for bauxite mining.

In the 1970s several groups set up outstation communities on their own lands. By the 1980s there were about 10 outstations, with a total population around 200. Today all clans have at least one homeland centre, and many people live partly in Yirrkala and partly in their homelands. In the mid-1970s the church handed control of the mission to the Yirrkala Dhanbul Community Association, which consisted of representatives from the main clans.

In 2008, the Yirrkala Dhanbul Community Association became part of the East Arnhem Shire Council when Yirrkala became part of the East Arnhem Shire and the Shire took over local government.

Location

Yirrkala is on the east coast of the Gove peninsula in north-east Arnhem Land, 18 km south of Nhulunbuy. Many people live intermittently between Yirrkala and surrounding homelands.

Population

The population of Yirrkala and its surrounds in 2006 was approximately 1,697, of which 1,472 were Indigenous (87 per cent). In the same year, the Indigenous population was relatively young, with 44 per cent aged under 20 years (compared to 27 per cent in the total Australian population), and 11 per cent aged 50 years or more (compared to 31 per cent in the total Australian population).

The Indigenous population of Yirrkala and its surrounds is projected to increase from 1,472 in 2006 to 2,005 in 2026. The number of Indigenous people aged 15 to 64 (the working age) is projected to grow from 953 people in 2006 to 1,301 in 2026. The number of Indigenous people aged 65 years and over is expected to more than triple, from 33 in 2006 to 112 in 2026.

The increasing size and ageing population of Yirrkala will increase the need for housing, employment opportunities, aged care and health services.

These numbers are based on the 2006 census, adjusted using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates as the census under-counted Indigenous populations. It is recognised that this may not be an accurate assessment of the current population.

Languages

Yolngu Matha is the main language in Yirrkala, but there are different dialects. Yolngu(Aboriginal person) is the name of a group of intermarrying clans who live in the three main townships of Milingimbi, Yirrkala and Galiwin’ku and their surrounding homelands, and whose members speak a dialect of one of a number of closely related languages.

Clan groups

There are 13 clan groups in the community. Together these Yolngu clans formed a social system of religious organisation that differs from neighbouring systems. The Yolngu Matha are divided into two moieties, Yirritja and Dhuwa, and each person inherits membership of a group and its moiety from his or her father.

Traditional owners

The Rirratjingu Clan are the traditional owners of Yirrkala.

Traditional ownership of part of the Yirrkala community is being challenged, which may complicate future leasing negotiations. The area contested is where the present community and future new housing is located. There are limited opportunities to expand because of mining leases nearby.

Land Council

The Northern Land Council, based in Darwin and with a regional office in Nhulunbuy, is the land council to the community. It is responsible for matters under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. This includes:

  • checking, representing and responding to the wishes and opinions of local Indigenous people about legislation, tourism, development and commercial activities that affect traditional land, and
  • helping traditional landowners claim, manage and protect the land.

All of Arnhem Land was proclaimed as an Aboriginal reserve in 1931. The Yolngu people have been recognised as holding native title rights to parts of East Arnhem Land. This includes rights over the sea which co-exist with the rights of commercial and recreational fishers in one of the Northern Territory’s most abundant fishing grounds.

Local Government

The East Arnhem Shire Council provides local government in Yirrkala, which is in the Shire’s Gumurr Miwatj Ward. This is one of four wards in the Shire and elects three of the 12 council members. The Shire headquarters are in Nhulunbuy and Darwin (both outside the Shire area) and it has a service delivery centre in Yirrkala.

The Shire consults community members through the Local Board of 12 locally elected community members, the Yirrkala Mala Leaders Association.

Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group

The Local Reference Group in Yirrkala is the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group. It includes representatives from each of the 13 clan groups, including traditional owners. Members were nominated and approved by the three senior traditional owners, the Yolngu President and East Arnhem Shire councillors.

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group has strong links to other governance groups. These include the Health Committee, the Yirrkala Mala Leaders Association, the Yambirrpa School Council and the Laynhapuy Homelands Association.

The Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan was formed through a collaborative effort between the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group, the Indigenous Engagement Officer, the Government Business Manager and the Yirrkala community.

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Early Childhood Highlights

The protection of children is everybody’s responsibility. It is the duty of all government and non-government workers and community members to identify and report children they believe may be at risk of harm or neglect. The community is keen to help and support parents in raising their children.

Community strengths

Yirrkala has a childcare centre that offers long day care, after school care and vacation care.

Desired community outcomes

Assist and support parents in raising their children.

Yolngu health worker and registered nurse to have a permanent presence in Yirrkala School.

Another playground and a drop-in activity centre to occupy children and to be staffed appropriately.

Upgraded or new facility for women.

Activities, forums and workshops promoting healthy lifestyles.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • To enhance the protection of children the Northern Territory Department of Health and Families is developing minimum service standards for child protection and related services for Yirrkala that will include an agreed program to implement these standards.
  • Establish a ‘virtual’ early childhood integrated service hub, including Families as First Teachers and other programs in Yirrkala supported by establishment of an early childhood coordinator.
  • Raypirri families pull together and use internal family structures to educate and assist parents.

Details of Yirrkala’s early childhood priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Schooling Highlights

The Yirrkala School provides preschool, primary school and secondary school education, and the Laynhapuy Homelands School provides education for students living on the Yirrkala homelands. The Yambirrpa School Council governs both schools.

The community is keen to expand the facilities for youth development and trade training.

Community strengths

The Nutrition Program provides a healthy breakfast and lunch. It is supported by many parents contributing through income-managed funds.

A school boarding program is under way.

Desired community outcomes

Old preschool building to be refurbished for Yambirrpa Youth Development Unit with additional accommodation for visiting trainers, project officers and training rooms.

Establish a trade school teaching skills such as woodwork, metalwork, cooking, sewing and hairdressing.

Establish a multimedia centre at the school.

Establish a junior ranger program.

Establish a cadet program.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Upgrade the school trade training teaching area, dependent on gaining land tenure.
  • Parents and community encourage and support children to go to school.
  • School facilities will be made available from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community’s contact with the school and to help improve school attendance.

Details of Yirrkala’s schooling priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Health Highlights

The Yirrkala Community Health Centre provides medical and public health services and access to visiting doctors and specialists, through staff including Aboriginal health workers and a general practitioner.

The community is keen to get a new health centre or substantially improve the existing one.

Community strengths

The health centre has been extensively upgraded and is governed by a Health Committee.

Two Aboriginal community mental health workers are based in Yirrkala.

Desired community outcomes

New health centre building or increase capacity of existing facilities to accommodate cultural requirements such as a shared reception area but separate men’s health centre with its own waiting room.

Funding to develop health education programs. Visual health education programs developed locally.

Multipurpose recreational hall near oval to be used for all sport activities and to double as a cyclone shelter. Yirrkala would like to replace existing building near oval.

Sea baths at Front Beach.

Funding for regular suicide prevention and first-aid training programs to be run in Yirrkala, facilitated through Yirrkala Health Centre.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Coordinate monthly health and community service provider meetings to improve service coordination and reduce duplication. Services to include but not limited to youth, primary health care and aged care.
  • Implement regular suicide prevention and first-aid programs.
  • Community members will attend specialist appointments.

Details of Yirrkala’s health priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Healthy Homes Highlights

The community is keen for building and refurbishment of houses to get under way.

Community strengths

Housing maintenance is done by the locally run business Bunuwal Housing.

Under the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program the community will get new housing and refurbishment of existing housing.

Government will consult with the local Housing Reference Group to ensure local people have a say in decisions about housing in their community.

Desired community outcomes

Build and refurbish houses.

Locally-owned Indigenous businesses are major contractors in the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program.

Local Indigenous-owned resources are used for building of new houses.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Government to build new homes and to refurbish and rebuild existing houses, subject to appropriate leasing.
  • The Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program.
  • Alliance Partners will work with the community to maximise training and employment opportunities for community members.
  • The community will assist the process of securing leases for new housing.

Details of Yirrkala’s housing priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Economic Participation Highlights

The community is keen to increase Yolngu employment opportunities, particularly in government.

Community strengths

Community Development Employment Projects, Job Services Australia and Centrelink services are functioning in the community.

Bunuwal Housing plans to expand its local Yolngu workforce if it can get help with training.

Dhimurru Land Management provides training and employment for 10 Dhimurru rangers protecting sea and country.

Bunuwal Investments, part of the Rirratjingu Aboriginal Association Corporation, invests mining royalties to support present and future business.

Desired community outcomes

  • Opportunities for Yolngu to ‘shadow’ all government-funded positions.
  • Adult education and training available that is Yolngu friendly, such as the proposed Miyalk Transition to Work Program.
  • Government-funded ‘trainer’ positions in Indigenous-owned businesses to assist in developing capacity for more Yolngu workers.
  • Ongoing effective public transport for Yirrkala.
  • Establish and support Yirrkala Indigenous job, business and tourism hub.
  • Support establishment of Yolngu-owned businesses in Yirrkala.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Passenger bus trial to commence 2010.
  • Government will develop a proposal for a one-stop-shop for government services and other local businesses.
  • Business support and mentoring to be available to support business development.
  • Develop work experience activities that meet local needs.

Details of Yirrkala’s economic participation priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Safe Communities Highlights

The Nhulunbuy police patrol Yirrkala and a surrounding area of 80,000 km2, with assistance from an Aboriginal community police officer who lives in Yirrkala and a night patrol service.

The community is keen to have a permanent police presence in Yirrkala.

Community strengths

As well as the Shire-run night patrol, the Larrpan Community Patrol operates for several hours a night.

The Rirratjingu Aboriginal Association has committed resources to help the night patrol and the Larrpan Community Patrol.

The community has a well-maintained oval where sports events are often held.

The community has a youth worker and a part-time local Indigenous youth worker trainee.

Desired community outcomes

Permanent policing in Yirrkala.

Better community policing, including designated Aboriginal Community Police Officer positions (one male and one female) for Yirrkala.

Ongoing funding for Larrpan Community Patrol (to work midnight to 4am) in addition to the night patrol program.

Recognition of Yirrkala Community Safety Action Plan and assistance to bring in by-laws; for example, wardens, curfew and offensive weapons. Aboriginal Community Police Officers and wardens working together to enforce community by-laws.

Volatile substance abuse management plan to be signed off.

Community residents are able to respond to local emergencies and disasters.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Establish Community Safety Working Party to work with community members to develop place-based strategies and a plan that will address safety concerns, and recognise and build on the Yirrkala Community Safety Plan.
  • Increase number of police patrols at night.
  • Finalise the Volatile Substance Abuse Management Plan which will be monitored by the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group and the Yirrkala Community Board.

Details of Yirrkala’s safety priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Governance and Leadership Highlights

The community is keen to take responsibility for its future.

Community strengths

Yirrkala’s leadership structure is based on governance by traditional owners. All government consultation is through the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group, which represents the 13 clan groups living in Yirrkala, including the traditional owners, in developing and monitoring the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan.

The spokespeople for the Rirratjingu traditional owners, Bakamumu Marika and Djuwalpi Marika, work with the Rirratjingu traditional owners’ governance group, the Rirratjingu Aboriginal Association Corporation.

The Yirrkala Dhanbul Aboriginal Corporation, which is part of the Rirratjingu governance structure, runs programs such as the Larrpan Community Patrol.

The Yambirrpa School Council governs the Yirrkala Community Education School and the homelands schools.

Desired community outcomes

Youth forum is established to support new leaders and respond to youth needs.

Support for Local Reference Groups and community boards.

Establish a junior ranger program.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

  • Government will work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of men, women and youth of Yirrkala.
  • The Local Reference Group will guide the implementation and monitoring of the Local Implementation Plan.
  • The Yirrkala community will keep our culture strong by introducing a junior rangers program to teach young people how to manage country.

Details of Yirrkala’s governance and leadership priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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Schedule A: List of Acronyms

ABA
Aboriginal Benefits Account
ACPO
Aboriginal Community Police Officer
ACW
Aboriginal Community Worker
AFL
Australian Football League
AG
Australian Government
AGD
Attorney Generals Department
AIS
Australian Interpreter Services
ALC
Anindilyakwa Land Council
ALPA
Arnhem Land Progress Association
ALRA
Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976
AMRRIC
Animal management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities
AMS
Aboriginal Medical Services
AMSANT
Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory
AODP
Alcohol and Other Drugs Project
ASC
Australian Sports Commission
ASM
Area Services Manager
BoM
Board of Management
BOOT/ BOOTS
Build, Own, Operate, Transfer and Support
BRACS
Broadcasting for Remote Aboriginal Communities Scheme
CA
Central Australia
CAALAS
Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service
CARH
Central Australian Remote Health
CASA
Civil Aviation Safety Authority
CAYLUS
Central Australian Youth Link Up Service
CDSC
Central Desert Shire Council
CDEP
Community Development Employment Projects
CDS
Central Desert Shire
CDU
Charles Darwin University
CEC
Community Education Centre
CEO
Catholic Education Office
CFC
Child and Families Centre
CLC
Central Land Council
CSP
Community Safety Plan
CWG
Capital Working Group
DBCDE
Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
DBE
Department of Business and Employment
DCI
Department of Construction and Infrastructure
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
DET
Department of Education and Training
DHF
Department of Health and Families
DLP
Department of Lands and Planning
DoHA
Department of Health and Aging
DoJ
Department of Justice
DPI
Department of Planning and Infrastructure
DSEWPAC
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
DVD
Digital Versatile Disc
EA
East Arnhem
EASC
East Arnhem Shire Council
EBA
Enterprise Bargaining Agreement
EDO
Economic Development Officer
FaFT
Families as First Teachers
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
FTE
Full Time Equivalent
GBM
Government Business Manager
GEBIE
Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises
GEH
Government Employee Housing
GEMCO
Groote Eylandt Mining Company
GPNNT
General Practice Network Northern Territory
HACC
Home and Community Care
HLGRS- (RD)
Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services - Regional Development
HLGRS/ DHLGRS
Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services
HOIL
Home Ownership Indigenous Land
HRG
Housing Reference Group
HSDA
Health Service Delivery Area
IBA
Indigenous Business Association
ICT
Information and Communications Technology
IEO
Indigenous Engagement Officer
ILC
Independent Land Corporation
IPSS
Indigenous Parenting Support Service
IPWG
Infrastructure and Planning Working Group
IRSD
Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account
IT
Information Technology
JSA
Job Services Australia
KWHB
Katherine West Health Board
LAB
Local Advisory Board
LGANT
Local Government Association of the Northern Territory
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
LHA
Laynhapuy Homelands Association
LHRG
Local Housing Reference Group
LLNP
Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program
LRG
Local reference group
LSP
Locational Supported Playgroups
Malabam
Malabam Health Board
MCS
Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School
MES
Municipal Essential Services
MH
Mental Health
MJD FOUNDATION
Machado Joseph Disease Foundation


MOU
Memorandum of Understanding
MSC
McDonnell Shire Council
MSOAP
Medical Specialists Outreach Assistance Program
N/A
Not Applicable
NGO
Non Government Organisation
NLC
Northern Land Council
NPA
National Partnership Agreement
NRETAS
Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport
NRT
Nicotine Replacement Therapy
NT
Northern Territory
NTCET
Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training
NTFC
Northern Territory Families and Children
NTG
Northern Territory Government
NTIEC
Northern Territory Indigenous Education Council
NTPFES
Northern Territory Police Fire and Emergency Services
NTPOL
Northern Territory Police
OATSIH
Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
OCPE
Office of the Commissioner of Public Employment
OLSH TCS
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic School
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
OTL
Office of Township Leasing
PaCE
Parents and Community Engagement
PAW
Media Pintubi, Anmatjerre, Warlpiri Media
PATS
Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
PHC
Primary Health Care
PHCM
Primary Health Care Manager
PWC/ P&W
Power Water Corporation
RAFCW
Remote Area Family and Community Workers
RGSC
Roper Gulf Shire Council
RH
Remote Housing
RHNT
Remote Housing Northern Territory
RIBS
Regional Indigenous Broadcasting Services
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
RTEED
Remote Training, Employment and Economic Development
SDCU
Service Delivery Coordination Unit
SEAM
School Enrolment and Attendance Measure
SIHIP
Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program
SNP
School Nutrition Program
STEP
Structured Training and Employment Projects
SWSBSC
Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture
TBA
To Be Advised
TDC
Thamarrurr Development Corporation
TIE
Transforming Indigenous Education
TISC
Tiwi Islands Shire Council
TO
Traditional Owners
TOR
Terms Of Reference
TRPA
Tanami Regional Partnership Agreement
UNICEF
United Nations Children’s Fund
VET/ VETiS
Vocational Education and Training in Schools
WAHAC BOARD
Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation Board
WASC
West Arnhem Shire Council
WG
Working Group
WETT
Warlpiri Education and Training Trust
WHO
World Health Organisation
WoG
Whole of Government
WYN BOARD
Willowra, Yuendumu, Nyirripi Health Board
YMAC
Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation

Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Early Childhood
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number and proportion of low, normal, and high birth weight Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade
Timing of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade


Priority 1: All children to have access to high quality early childhood education and care services.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Assist and support parents to raise their children and understand the value of early childhood education for their children.
       
1.1.1 Establish an Early Childhood Coordinator to lead the integration of family services tailored to the Yirrkala community and its surrounding service delivery area. This will be achieved through a whole of government approach across all levels of government, non-government organisations and the community to develop and implement the integrated service model. All program content will be inclusive of culture and links to elders. Lead - DET
Support: EASC, Government Service Providers, DHF, NGOs, community, LRG
Started Review Jun-11
1.1.2 Establish the FaFT- IPSS. This place-based integrated universal services program includes early learning and parenting support strategies. Lead - DET
Supporting – DHF, EASC, FaHCSIA
Started Dec-12
1.1.3 Deliver Certificate III Community Services in the workplace through FaFT-IPSS to enable more Yolngu to be involved in and running programs and activities. Lead - DET
Supporting - FaHCSIA
Started Review Jun-11
1.1.4 Use own internal family structures to educate and assist parents ('Raypirri' families pull together). Lead - Community From date of agreement Review Oct-11
1.1.5 Monitor the OSHC Program to ensure it is meeting the needs of Yirrkala. Lead - DEEWR with Community and Service Providers Started Jun-11
1.1.6 Provide universal access to preschool for every child in the year before full-time school. By 2013 the preschool program is to be delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year by a four-year, university qualified early childhood teacher. The program will be accessible across a diversity of settings and in a form that meets the needs of parents. Lead - DET
Supporting - DEEWR
Started Dec-13
Strategy 1.2: Plan infrastructure to meet service needs.
1.2.1 Plan future early childhood infrastructure ensuring any proposal is comprehensive and meets service delivery requirements. Planning to include operational funding, staff housing requirements, employment opportunities for local people and coordination and staging of other local infrastructure projects. Initial Lead – DEEWR
Supporting – Capital Working Group, FaHCSIA, DET, DLP, DCI, DHLGRS, EASC
Started Review Oct-11
Priority 2: Yirrkala children are born healthy and stay healthy.
Strategy 2.1: New mothers are healthy and receive quality support before, during and after childbirth.
2.1.1 Deliver education and support programs to reduce smoking, drinking and poor nutrition during pregnancy. Lead - DHF
Supporting - DoHA
Started Jun-11
2.1.2 Pregnant women attend regular antenatal checks. Lead - Community From date of agreement Review Jun-11
2.1.3 Deliver culturally appropriate antenatal, birth and post natal education and programs. Lead - DHF
Supporting - DoHA
Started Dec-10
2.1.4 Minimum service standards for child protection and related services will be developed for Yirrkala including an agreed program to implement these standards. Lead - DHF Supporting - Community Started Feb-11

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Schooling
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Schooling enrolment and attendance Halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for Indigenous children within a decade
NAPLAN participation and attainment Halve the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 equivalent attainment by 2020


Priority 1: All community members value and promote education as the key to future opportunity.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Students transition from school to work or further study.
1.1.1 Use the refurbished old pre-school building for youth development. Lead - FaHCSIA
Support - DET, DEEWR, NRETAS
From date of agreement Review Jun-11
1.1.2 Communities are encouraged to use school facilities from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community's contact with the school and to help improve school attendance. After hours access can be for local language courses and activities, as well as trade training, adult literacy, IT, parenting skills, music, sport and the arts. Lead - DET
Supporting - EASC, Community, NRETAS
Started Review Oct-11
1.1.3 Provide an annual career pathways information day for all senior students. Lead - DET
Supporting - EASC, DEEWR, Community
Jan-11 Review Oct-11
Strategy 1.2: Plan infrastructure to meet service needs.
1.2.1 Upgrade the school trade training teaching area. Work progressing is dependent on gaining land tenure. Lead – DET
Supporting - DCI, Capital Working Group
Jul-11 Jun-12
1.2.2 VET trade training centre submission to be completed for 2011/2012. DEEWR to consult with community on needs. Lead - DET
Supporting - DEEWR, Community
Jun-11 Jun-11
1.2.3 Upgrade Multi-media studio/R1BS/ Library/IT facility at the Yirrkala Buku Larrngay Mulka Centre. Lead - EASC
Supporting - NRETAS, Capital Working Group, Buku Larrngay Mulka Centre
From date of agreement Review Jun-11
Strategy 1.3: Increase school attendance so that no child has more than three unexplained absences in a row.
1.3.1 Develop and implement strategies, based on best practice and localised solutions, to encourage children to attend and remain at school on a regular basis and to pursue further education opportunities. Lead - DET
Supporting - NRETAS, Government Service Providers, EASC
Started Review Jun-11
1.3.2 Deliver the Parent and Community Engagement Program “Literacy and Numeracy in the Home for Parents” which will publish and produce a set of resources for parents of Indigenous student’s aged five to 11 years old in Yirrkala and a number of other communities. Lead - DET Started Aug-12
1.3.3 Parents and community encourage and support children to go to school. Lead - Parents and local organisations.
Supporting - DET
From date of agreement Review Jun-11
Priority 2: Education services in Yirrkala provide a rich learning environment.
Strategy 2.1: Our school responds to student, teacher and community priorities.
2.1.1 Train and support local people into accredited teacher and teacher’s aid positions. Lead - DET Started Review Jun-11
2.1.2 EASC to link the level of access to after school, vacation and youth, sport and recreation activities to achool attendance. Lead - EASC
Supporting - DET, Community
Feb-11 Review Feb-12

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Health
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number of health care episodes Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Number of episodes of health care and client contacts Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Child oral health disease profile for 7-to-12-year-olds Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation


Priority 1: The people of Yirrkala have access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Our health service meets community needs.
1.1.1 Agree on timelines with the community to implement regular suicide assist and first aid programs. Lead - DHF
Supporting - DoHA
Started Jun-11
1.1.2 Coordinate monthly health and community service provider meetings to improve service coordination and reduce duplication. Services to include, but not limited to, youth, primary health care, aged care. Lead - DHF
Supporting-DoHA
Started Jun-11
1.1.3 Develop health education programs that include healthy lifestyle, nutrition and cooking. Lead - DHF
Supporting - Community
Started Jun-11
1.1.4 Community members will attend specialists’ appointments. Lead - Community Started Review Oct-11
Strategy 1.2: Plan infrastructure to meet health, sport and recreation needs.
1.2.1 Develop a simpler streamlined and integrated approach to youth, sport, recreation and related services, including an assessment of infrastructure. The approach will enable a range of activities that addresses gender and age group requirements. Lead- NRETAS
Supporting – EASC, FaHCSIA
Jan-11 Jun-11
1.2.2 Governments to work together in consultation with the community, to review and improve health service delivery and infrastructure in the community. Lead - DHF
Supporting - DoHA, Community
Started Complete
Priority 2: Elders are cared for in the community.
Strategy 2.1: Plan infrastructure to meet aged care service delivery needs.
2.1.1 DoHA will conduct a service review that will inform further aged care and disability service and facility development. Lead - DoHA Started Dec-10
Priority 3: The people of Yirrkala will actively encourage and support family members to stop smoking.
Strategy 3.1: Develop local strategies that will reduce the levels of smoking.
3.1.1 The LRG supported by the wider community: Encourage local shops to make nicotine abatement products available; Encourage community members to stop smoking inside cars, homes and around non-smokers (including children, the elderly and the sick); Provide support and encouragement to family members who are trying to quit smoking; and Support the declaration of smoke free areas including playgrounds, buildings and other public areas. Lead - Community
Supporting - DHF, DoHA, EASC
From date of agreement Review Oct-11

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Healthy Homes
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Condition of current housing stock  
Overall crowding rates: average per bedroom density and number houses overcrowded  


Priority 1: We have enough homes for Yirrkala people to reduce overcrowding.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Progress the Strategic Indigenous Housing Infrastructure Program.
1.1.1 The Alliance partners will work with community to maximise training and employment opportunities for community members. Lead - DHLGRS/FaHCSIA
Supporting - Community
Started Dec-13
1.1.2 Secure leases for new housing. Lead - Community, NLC
Supporting - DHLGRS
Started Review Jun-11
1.1.3 Where appropriate local Indigenous owned resources such as concrete are used for the building of new houses. Lead - DHLGRS/FaHCSIA
Supporting - Community
Jan-11 Jun-11
1.1.4 Indigenous businesses engage with government to ensure training is available for Indigenous apprenticeships and traineeships. Lead - Bunuwal Investments
Supporting - DBE, DHLGRS
Started Jun-11
Priority 2: Yirrkala people living in public housing look after their homes.
Strategy 2.1: Deliver a range of tools and support services for Yirrkala people that assists them to maintain their home at required standard.
2.1.1 Provide training and support to Yirrkala people to assist with maintaining their homes including home budgeting, home care (cleaning, minor repairs), life skills (cooking, nutrition, safe food storage). Lead - DHLGRS
Supporting - Community, Centrelink, DHF, DET, PWC
Jan-11 Review Jun-11

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Economic Participation
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Total employment (Indigenous/non-Indigenous) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.
Total employment (private/public) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
Number of participants on Newstart, Youth Allowance and CDEP To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
Priority 1: The town of Yirrkala becomes a hub for the region.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Improve transport arrangements for the Yirrkala region.
1.1.1 Facilitate workshops in partnership with the EASC to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships. This work will include economic viability, business opportunities and potential support through joint ventures and organisations such as IBA. This work will need to link to the area plan and Town Centre Urban Design Plan and promote walkability and the use of bicycles. Lead - DLP
Supporting - EASC
Feb-11 Jul-11
1.1.2 Commence passenger bus trial. Lead - DLP with YBE
Supporting - Rio Tinto Alcan, FAHCSIA, EASC, Community
Started Late 2012
1.1.3 Complete a detailed road survey and prepare funding submission to upgrade roads. Lead - DHLGRS (Submission)
Supporting - DLP (Survey), EASC
Started Dec-10
Strategy 1.2: Identify and create opportunities for small business development.
1.2.1 Develop a proposal for a Government Business Centre in Yirrkala where possible.
A range of services will be provided from this building and consider options for local organisations to build and own the shopfront with long-term tenancy. EASC is willing to transfer the delivery of Centrelink and Australia Post services to Bunuwal Investments, as part of its operation of the Government Business Centre in Yirrkala.
Lead - DBE
Supporting - RTEED, Bunuwal Investments
Started Dec-10
1.2.2 Provide business support and mentoring to individuals and groups wanting to start a viable business. Lead – DHLGRS, Tourism NT (for tourism specific businesses)
Supporting - RTEED,
Started Review Jun-11
1.2.3 Government will work with financial institutions to assist with removing barriers to accessing finance for investment on ALRA land. Support will be provided to joint ventures and other partnership vehicles which enable local people to access capital and expertise. Lead - DBE/ DHLGRS
Supporting – RTEED, Tourism NT
Started Review Oct-11
1.2.4 Undertake economic profiling and development of an investment and opportunities prospectus. Lead - DHLGRS
Supporting - RTEED
Started Jun-11
1.2.5 In partnership with community champions hold Futures Forums that provide information on employment options and business development services available to community members. Provide information on opportunities arising from potential private sector involvement. Lead - DHLGRS
Supporting -
All government agencies, EASC
Started Jun-13
1.2.6 In close coordination with the current rollout of E-health and on-line education initiatives, develop an integrated ICT strategy that covers: infrastructure requirements; deployment of equipment; use of new technologies by government agencies and; access to ICT services by businesses, NGOs and local people. Lead – DBE
Supporting – RTEED
Oct–10 Ongoing
1.2.7 Explore partnership opportunities in the private sector, with a particular emphasis on building formal links with industries operating in the region. These partnerships could include (but not be limited to) training, employment, infrastructure and community development. Lead – DBE
Supporting – RTEED
Oct–10 Apr-11
1.2.8 Shire to complete business modelling for the introduction of a personal Identification Service. EASC, AG and NTG to explore options for funding and coordination processes with Births, Deaths and Marriages, Centrelink and other relevant agencies. Lead - EASC
Supporting - Births, Deaths and Marriages, Centrelink
Started Jun-11
Strategy 1.3: Identify opportunities for Yolngu people to gain government employment.
1.3.1 Work Readiness: Government will ensure that Job Services Australia and CDEP providers develop work experience activities that meet local needs, including accredited and non-accredited training and in work readiness activities, which lead to employment outcomes. Lead - DEEWR, FaHCSIA
Supporting - JSA (ITEC Employment), CDEP
(EASC, LHA)
Started Jun-13
1.3.2 With consideration of existing infrastructure, provide assistance to develop an expression of interest for the next round for a Trade Training Centre. Lead- DET/DEEWR Started Review Jun-11
1.3.3 Newstart Allowance recipients meet their allowance obligations, measured by an increase in the number of people taking up job-readiness programs. Lead - Community From date of agreement Review Jun-11
1.3.4 All training and development activities paid for by government achieve minimum participation for training courses. Lead - Community From date of agreement Review Jun-11
1.3.5 Government Contracts: All procurement processes undertaken in remote areas will optimise opportunities in Indigenous employment and enterprise development. Lead - DBE
Supporting - RTEED,
Started Review Oct-11
1.3.6 Jobs, training or further education offers guarantee for all NTCET graduates living in Yirrkala, through an organised transition to work program. Lead - DBE , DET
Supporting – All Agencies, RTEED, EASC
Started Review Oct-11
Priority 2: Town develops in an orderly manner with appropriate process.
2.1 Strategy: Develop a town plan.
2.1.1 Complete and gazette a town plan (area plan and zoning map). Lead - DLP
Supporting - EASC
Started 2011
2.1.2 Develop Town Centre Urban Design plan including community transport strategies. Lead - DLP
Supporting - DCI, EASC
Started 2011

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Safe Communities
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
As a proportion of all offences:
(i) alcohol related offences
(ii) drug and substance abuse related offences
(iii) offences against the person
 


Priority 1: Yirrkala community is a safe place to live.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: More street lights and traffic management.
1.1.1 Install speed signs and restrictors at important community locations (eg. school, health centre, store, sporting facilities). Shire to apply for funds to conduct Traffic Management Plan and seek necessary funding to carry out required work. Lead - EASC
Supporting - DLP
Started Review Oct-11
Strategy 1.2: Policing meets community needs.
1.2.1 Increase the number of police patrols at night: Police to provide a schedule for the Mobile Police Station. Lead - NTPFES Started Review Mar-11
1.2.2 Maintain the ACPO at Yirrkala and review feasibility of increasing the ACPOs to two positions; one male and one female. Lead - NTPFES   Review Mar-11
1.2.3 Finalise the Volatile Substance Abuse Management Plan. The plan will be monitored by Gurrutu'mirri Mala Reference Group and Yirrkala Community Board. Lead - NTPFES   Review Mar-11

1.2.4 Establish Community Safety Working Party to work with community members to develop place-based strategies and a plan that will address safety concerns, and recognise and build on the Yirrkala Community Safety Plan. Early priorities identified that need to be addressed include:

a) child protection and welfare

b) reducing public card games - implement and enforce a local by-law

c) establishment of a Law and Justice Committee

d) development of an animal welfare program

e) review of night patrol funding and operation

f) ability to respond to local emergencies and disasters.

Lead- DoJ
Supporting - NTPFES, DHF, FaHCSIA, AGD, DLP, LGANT working with the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group
Oct-10 Review Jun-11
1.2.5 Establish and support NT Emergency Service volunteer units capable of reacting to known hazards for the community. Lead – NTPFES
Supporting - EASC
ASAP Review Oct-11
1.2.6 Maintain an all hazard response plan for Yirrkala and review or establish specific hazard response plans for the community (e.g. cyclone plan) as necessary. This will include ensuring adequate community education and preparedness (including where necessary, public shelters) for known hazards. Lead – NTPFES
Supporting - EASC
ASAP Review Oct-11
Strategy 1.3: Maintain an effective animal management program.
1.3.1 Develop a regional Animal Management Welfare and Control/Environmental Health (AWCEH) Program, including the funding of employment of local Indigenous people as AWCEH Officers, operational costs, and regional coordination. Lead - EASC
Supporting - AMRRIC, FaHCSIA
Started Review Jun-11

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Progress Output Indicators, COAG Target, Priorities, Strategies and Actions for Governance and Leadership
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number of registered organisations under ORIC and NT Associations Act  


Priority 1: Mala leaders and elected council members have the skills to govern effectively.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
Strategy 1.1: Enhance and improve local people’s decision-making practices and capabilities.
1.1.1 Elected members of EASC will receive professional development to allow them to better understand and undertake their roles. Lead – EASC
Supporting - FaHCSIA, DHLGRS
Started Ongoing
1.1.2 Work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of men, women and youth of Yirrkala. Lead – FaHCSIA Started Review Jun-11

1.1.3 Gurrutu'mirri Mala LRG and EASC LAB support coherent and coordinated consultation with the community.

1.1.3.1 All levels of Government recognise the important roles of the GBLRG and LAB in coordinated consultation.

Lead – ROC
Supporting - EASC, AG and NTG Agencies
Oct-10 Review Jun-11
1.1.4 Work with and support the Local Reference Groups and community organisations and boards to ensure meetings are held on appropriate days and times. Lead - ROC Started Review Jun-11
Strategy 1.2: Develop governance and leadership capacity for the next generation of Yolngu leaders.
1.2.1 Undertake a research project which will map the community governance arrangements and community engagement for Yirrkala. Lead – DHLGRS
Supporting – ROC
Oct-10 Mar-11
1.2.2 Keep our culture strong by introducing a junior rangers program to teach young people how to manage country. Lead - Laynhapuy Homelands Association Incorporated (via Yirralka Rangers) Dhimurru Land Management Aboriginal Corporation (via Dhimurru Rangers)
Supporting - DSEWPAC, DET, DEEWR, Gurrutu’mirri Mala Reference Group
Jun-11 Review Jun-11
1.2.3 Develop and implement a system through which meetings and consultations are coordinated, streamlined and encourage community input. Lead - ROC, LRG Started Review Jun-11

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Schedule B: Baseline Mapping Summary

Detailed baseline mapping of social, economic and service delivery indicators for Yirrkala will be included in this Local Implementation Plan as Schedule B when further consultation on this data has been completed.

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Schedule C: Summary of Community Engagement

The Yirrkala Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager worked with community groups and individuals, as well as key stakeholders, service providers and non-government organisations to guide the Yirrkala Local Implementation Plan process. This page outlines the kinds of consultation, engagement and capacity-building that occurred.

Consultation with the Local Reference Group

The Yirrkala Local Reference Group is the key community group for engagement on the Local Implementation Plan process. The Local Reference Group in Yirrkala is known as the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group. The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group consists of representation from each of the thirteen clan groups, including Traditional Owners. The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group members were nominated and endorsed by the three Senior Traditional Owners and by the Chair and councillors of the East Arnhem Shire Council.

Reference Group meeting regularity varied between a weekly and fortnightly schedule. In total, 19 in-community meetings were held with the Group, including 13 with the Group as a whole and six specific Building Block meetings with subgroup representation.

Meeting attendance has been regular, and has been supported by a nominated proxy system. A number of Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group members also serve on the Shire Local Board, which provides another venue for the community members to stay updated on the Local Implementation Plan process.

Signatories for the nomination of Local Reference Group members

The names below are the signatories on the letters of nomination for the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group:

Banuminy Marika - Senior Traditional Owner;

Djuwalpi Marika - Senior Traditional Owner;

Bakamumu Marika - Senior Traditional Owner;

Banambi Wunungmurra - EASC President;

Yananymul Mununggurr - EASC Councillor;

Barayuwa Mununggurr - EASC Councillor

Local Reference Group members

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group members are: Timmy Burarrwanga, Djapirri Mununggurritj, Waninya Marika, Wayilu Wunungmurra, Marrpalawuy Gumana, Dijali Ganambarr, Nalwarri Ngurruwuthun, Gundimulk Wanambi, Dennis Wukun Wanambi, Rarriwuy Marika, Banbapuy Ganambarr, Banguli Ngurruwuthun, Diplilnga Bukulatjpi, Dhangal Gurruwiwi, Wukar Marawili, Nora Dhamarrandji, Rrawun Maymuru.

Consultations with community members

The Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager held regular consultations with many individual community members who contributed to the Local Implementation Plan.

Consultations with service providers and governance structures

Over 24 consultation meetings have been held with service providers and stakeholders since March 2010 through until 2 June 2010 regarding the Local Implementation Plan. These included six forums attended by seven service providers who operate in Yirrkala (with the Youth Interagency Network, Family Interagency Network and Justice—Interagency Task Coordination Group). Additionally, there were two meetings with the Shire Local Board and two meetings with Rirratjingu Aboriginal Corporation.

Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group also included representation from across the full spectrum of service providers and stakeholders, spanning the interests of each of the seven building blocks.

Engagement

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is the key engagement officer on a local level, responsible for meeting with families and individuals on a regular basis to keep the community well informed about the Local Implementation Plan and other government projects.

Additionally, a range of tools have been created to support an informed engagement process:

The source document listing all of the desired community outcomes supplied by the Local Reference Group is available from the Government Business Manager and will be used to inform future versions of and updates to the Local Implementation Plan.

Community posters and fact sheets about Closing the Gap, Remote Service Delivery and the Local Implementation Plan have been developed and presented to the Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group during the visioning forum and subsequent meetings.

A community notice board has been sent to the Government Business Manager to display information to the broader community about Closing the Gap.

A DVD was produced in Yirrkala profiling the success of the local arts centre and how this and other community initiatives contribute to Closing the Gap.

Another DVD is currently being developed by the local production company, the Mulka Project about youth engagement and capturing the youth voice for the future of the Yirrkala community.

A photographer visited Yirrkala in June 2010 and the photographs will be used by the Regional Operations Centre to create distinctive Yirrkala engagement materials.

Local Remote Indigenous Broadcasting television and radio messages are currently in development.

Capacity-building

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group has been supported in its capacity-building by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre. On 19 February 2010, the Regional Operations Centre convened an in-community Visioning Forum for The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group facilitated by an experienced Indigenous facilitator. The Visioning Forum explored government’s vision in Closing the Gap and Remote Service Delivery, and achieving the Yirrkala community’s vision through a Local Implementation Plan. The community’s desired outcomes were presented for prioritisation. Over a series of five in-community meetings between the Yirrkala Local Reference Group, the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, priorities under each building block were finalised and negotiated with government.

The Gurrutu’mirri Mala Leaders Reference Group members also participated in a regional Remote Service Delivery Governance and Leadership Workshop held in Nhulunbuy 11-12 May 2010. The workshop focused on building the capacity of current and emerging local leadership in the areas of: Western concepts of visions and goal setting; how to work with governments; the local implementation process; community accountability; sharing stories of local leadership; and democratic governance.

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