Local Implementation Plan - Ngukurr

Signatory Page

We will all work together to Close the Gap.

Through respect and collaboration we will create a better future for all of our children.

This Local Implementation Plan is our commitment to create a long lasting partnership between the people of Ngukurr and governments.


Introduction

Welcome to Country
Closing the Gap in Ngukurr
Closing the Gap Building Blocks


Ngukurr's Partnership with Government

Local Implementation Plan Process


About Ngukurr

History
Location
Population
Languages
Clan Groups
Traditional Owners
Land Council
Local Government
Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Coporation as Local Reference Group
Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan


Early Childhood Highlights

Schooling Highlights

Health Highlights

Healthy Homes Highlights

Economic Participation Highlights

Safe Communities Highlights

Governance and Leadership Highlights

List of Acronyms
Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions
Schedule B: Baseline Mapping Report Snapshot
Schedule C: Summary of Community Engagement

Welcome to Country

We are the Yugul Mangi leaders, Traditional Owners and Custodians of the Yugul Mangi lands in Ngukurr and the surrounding area. We speak for the Yugul Mangi people who have worked with governments and others to develop this joint agreement-our Local Implementation Plan. We developed this with our community vision always in our minds-

To create one Community that fosters unity, leadership, ownership - and participation by all - while contributing to the social, cultural and economic activities of the wider Northern Territory Community.

The Local Implementation Plan grew from our Community Development Plan into an action plan which sets out what will happen and when. Our community priorities are set out in the Local Implementation Plan- to help governments understand our needs and work with us to develop our community.

We have worked hard with government to come up with this Local Implementation Plan. We have had many meetings and negotiations along the way to agree on what our priorities are. Through this plan, our people want to work with government to create one community that is healthy to live in and that provides opportunities for our children and our school leavers and workers.

We have done enough talking and planning now. We need to get on with the job of making our community a stronger and better place for our people to live as we grow into a town.

We, the Yugul Mangi people, are proud of our community and the journey we have taken so far. We want to continue that journey into a strong future.

On behalf of our people, we have agreed to this plan of action. We agree to do our part in closing the gap, and for our Yugul Mangi Local Reference Group to manage our side of the agreement. We ask that governments and the Shire commit with us to deliver on the things we have agreed in the plan. We want to work together, respectfully and with pride in our people and our future.



Yugul Mangi Leaders
Ritharrngu Daphne Daniels Jerry Ashley David Daniels
Nunggubuyu Bobby Nunggumajbarr Davis Daniels Olga Daniels
Ngandi Lindsay Hall Derek Thompson Sophia Tapau
Alawa Gwen Rami Jacob Lansen Stella Roberts
Mara Grace Daniels Theresa John-Forrest Glen Blitner
Wandarrang Kevin Rogers Robin Rogers Raina Rogers
Ngalakan John Graham Rogers Roger Thompson Alison Bush

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Closing the Gap in Closing the gap in Ngukurr

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments are working together with Local Governments, through the Shire Councils, to reduce Indigenous disadvantage. In recognition that outcomes for Indigenous Australians remain below those of non-Indigenous Australians, the Council of Australian Governments has agreed to implement the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.

This agreement is a long-term, generational commitment based on delivering coordinated, targeted and accelerated development in Indigenous communities, and it changes the way governments invest in remote areas.

The agreement takes a direct approach to improving conditions. This includes engaging directly with the communities on delivering improvements. It also involves clear accountability for who does what, where and by when, backed up by rigorous monitoring and reporting.

Ngukurr is one of the 29 remote Indigenous communities across Australia where this approach is being started through Local Implementation Plans. The Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan has been developed through close consultation between governments and the Ngukurr community through the Ngukurr Local Reference Group, a role filled by the Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation. It sets out the priorities for the Ngukurr community and includes targets, actions, success measures and timelines for achieving those priorities. Existing community and government plans and agreements in Ngukurr complement the Remote Service Delivery approach. All the signatories agree to work together to deliver the actions in the plan.

Transforming Ngukurr will require a two-way commitment to change. This means:

  • community members agree to take more personal responsibility and fully participate in the commitments of the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan, and
  • governments agree to listen to the community and provide resources and planning to improve infrastructure, services and access to services.

This Agreement is a long-term, generational commitment based on delivering coordinated, targeted and accelerated development in Indigenous communities, and it changes the way governments invest in remote areas


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Closing the Gap Building Blocks

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to six specific targets to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, outlined below. These targets are underpinned by seven building blocks- priority areas where action is required. Improvements in one area will affect results in other areas.

COAG Targets

Building Blocks

Achieving COAG Targets

Ensure all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years.



Halve the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.



Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.

Early Childhood For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to high-quality early childhood education and care services—including preschool, child care and family support services such as parenting programs—is critical. Facilities and infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention. Action on maternal, antenatal and early childhood health will help close the gap in child mortality as well as in early childhood development.
Schooling Education is the key to future opportunity. Schooling that responds to Indigenous education priorities requires attention to infrastructure, teacher and school leader supply and quality, curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school–community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, and post-school education and training are also important. So are lifelong learning and the development of adult literacy and numeracy skills.
Health Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving Indigenous Australians’ health and life expectancy and reducing excess mortality from chronic disease. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care. These services need to be responsive to government and community health priorities and accountable for achieving them. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires intense efforts in preventing, managing and treating chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to use programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.

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COAG Targets

Building Blocks

Achieving COAG Targets

Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.



Halve the gap in employment between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.



Halve the gap for Indigenous students in rates of Year 12 or equivalent attainment by 2020.

Health Homes A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (including design, availability and maintenance). Children need to live in houses that are free from overcrowding and provide the infrastructure they need for good hygiene and study.
Economic Participation Indigenous people and communities should be able to benefit from the mainstream economy. This includes real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Economic participation needs to extend to disadvantaged job seekers and those outside the labour market. Access to land and native title can be leveraged to secure practical benefits for Indigenous people. Economic participation also needs other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures, and infrastructure such as communications and transport. Through economic participation, adults can become good role models for their family and community. The design and delivery of welfare (transfer payments and services) needs to encourage active engagement, greater capability and positive social norms. Ensuring that communities have support to overcome barriers to engagement such as problem gambling is critical.
Safe Communities Indigenous men, women and children need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Meeting this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection, and preventative measures. Addressing related problems such as alcohol and substance abuse is critical to improving community safety as well as improving health.
Governance and Leadership Strong Indigenous leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations, as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels, are essential for long-term sustainable results. Indigenous people need to engage in developing reforms that will affect them. They need greater opportunities to build capacity in governance and leadership in order to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

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Ngukurr's Partnership with Government

The Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan enables the three tiers of government and the Ngukurr community to reset their relationship through a partnership aimed at improving conditions and services in Ngukurr. This page explains the structures for Ngukurr’s partnership with government.

Local Reference Group

The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation is the main way Ngukurr consults and negotiates with government on the Local Implementation Plan. Its members are community people from across the different clans, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Ngukurr.

Yugul Mangi set the community priorities for the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan. To do this it consulted with clan groups, participated in capacity-building workshops and took advice from community members with experience in service delivery.

With support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager, Yugul Mangi consulted traditional owners and sought their agreement on the various community issues in the plan.

Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager

The Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager support Yugul Mangi and the Local Implementation Plan process. They work with both the Northern Territory and Australian Governments, as well as having strong connections with the Shire Council. They both live and work in Ngukurr.

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is an Indigenous person from the local area whose job is to:

  • support the community in its consultations and negotiations with government,
  • ensure government engages with the community in a culturally appropriate way, and
  • assist Yugul Mangi to report on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Government Business Manager.

The Government Business Manager is the contact person for liaison between the community and government and also:

  • helps with community planning and agreement making,
  • helps with service coordination and delivery on the ground,
  • involves service providers such as non-governmental organisations in the Local Implementation Plan process, and
  • reports on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Regional Operations Centre.

    Together the Government Business Manager and the Indigenous Engagement Officer are a Single Government Interface for the community. They help community people understand government programs and services, and help government and the shires understand community issues and priorities.

    Schedule C details which groups were consulted and engaged with to develop the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan.


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    Regional Operations Centre and Board of Management

    The Regional Operations Centre supports the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager with the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan. It also helps government to coordinate effective and timely service delivery. Regional Operations Centre staff are from both the Australian and Northern Territory Governments.

    Ngukurr’s Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager are supported by the Regional Operations Centre staff in Darwin and Alice Springs.

    The Regional Operations Centre reports to the Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery Board of Management, which is a partnership consisting of senior officials from both governments and from the shires who are responsible for providing oversight and guidance on the implementation of Remote Service Delivery policy.

    The Board of Management will:

    • monitor and report on progress against the actions in the Local Implementation Plan,
    • take a whole-of-government approach to supporting the work of the Regional Operations Centre, and
    • solve any problems and seek to address any lack of progress on implementation.

    Local Government

    The Australian and Northern Territory Governments note the important role of local government through its elected representation and service provision to the Ngukurr community and are committed to working in partnership with the Roper Gulf Shire Council to implement the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan.


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    Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan Process

    How the plan developed

    The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation set priorities for improving the quality of life in their community. To do this they took suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders to develop the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan.

    Then they had support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager to turn that plan into the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan. Yugul Mangi was introduced to Local Implementation Planning at a local Visioning Forum convened by the Regional Operations Centre. Following this workshop, Yugul Mangi established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block.

    Through regular meetings, Yugul Mangi prioritised their desired outcomes requiring immediate action in this first iteration of the Local Implementation Plan.

    These top priorities were negotiated by the Regional Operations Centre with governments and service providers. Details of Ngukurr’s top priorities with strategies and actions being committed to this year by the community, governments and the shires are in Schedule A. The source document listing all of the desired community outcomes supplied by the Local Reference Group is available from the Government Business Manager and will be used to inform future versions of and updates to the Local Implementation Plan.

    The Australian and Northern Territory Governments, with assistance from Shire Councils, surveyed conditions in Ngukurr to get baseline mapping data. This information identifies the Ngukurr community’s needs and is the starting point for measuring the results from the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan. A summary of the baseline mapping data for Ngukurr is in Schedule B.

    Start and finish dates

    This iteration of the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan commences upon the date of signing. Progress on Schedule A will be monitored regularly, and details of the plan will be reviewed, updated, amended and expanded annually throughout the lifetime of the plan until 30 June 2014.

    Keeping the plan on track

    The Regional Operations Centre will:

    • assess progress against the actions in Schedule A through regular communication with government agencies and the shires, supported by the Board of Management, and
    • work with Yugul Mangi and ensure it has the information it needs to implement the plan.

    Government agencies and the shires will:

    • report regularly to the Regional Operations Centre on progress against committed actions in the plan, and
    • consult with the Regional Operations Centre on details of the plan’s actions that evolve after the plan is agreed upon.

    Supported by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, Yugul Mangi will:

    • check that the community is meeting its commitments in the plan,
    • meet regularly and keep the community well informed,
    • help raise awareness on agency progress on the ground, and
    • agree on any new priorities or changes to the plan that are needed to meet targets.

    Reviewing the plan

    The Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan is a living, evolving document that can respond to the changing needs, gaps and priorities for Ngukurr. There will be opportunities to update, add to and improve it annually or more frequently if required.

    This first version of the plan was created within tight time frames, and the details and actions of the plan are certain to evolve.


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    Reviewing the progress

    The Regional Operations Centre will receive monthly reports from government agencies on the plan’s progress. The Regional Operations Centre will also receive monthly reports from Yugul Mangi through the Government Business Manager regarding progress on the ground. The Regional Operations Centre will provide a regular general report, based on the community and agency progress reports, to the Board of Management.

    The Board of Management will oversee the implementation process and alert the responsible agencies to gaps, delays or needs for improvement to ensure they meet their commitments.

    The Office of the Coordinator-General for Remote Indigenous Services and the Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services also oversee the implementation process, with the authority to work across agencies to cut through bureaucratic blockages and red tape, and to make sure services are delivered effectively.

    The Regional Operations Centre will also provide an annual report to the community on how the commitments are being achieved. It will work closely with Yugul Mangi, service providers, all levels of government and the shires to keep track of the commitments in Schedule A.

    Addressing issues with plan progress

    Any member of Yugul Mangi may raise an issue on behalf of the people they represent.

    The Regional Operations Centre and the Board of Management are there to make sure that issues are addressed and resolved.

    Ngukurr’s Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager, with support from the Regional Operations Centre, are there to help Yugul Mangi get its issues dealt with.

    This is the formal process for dealing with issues with plan progress:

    • A community member or group puts the issue in writing or tells it to a member of Yugul Mangi, which discusses the issue as a priority.
    • Yugul Mangi raises it to the Regional Operations Centre through the Government Business Manager’s monthly progress report.
    • The Regional Operations Centre works with the relevant government agency to address the issue, and reports the issue to the Board of Management if necessary. The Regional Operations Centre will let Yugul Mangi know what is being done.

    Through regular meetings, Yugul Mangi prioritised their top desired outcomes requiring immediate action in this first iteration of the Local Implementation Plan


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    About Ngukurr

    History

    Aboriginal people have inhabited this region for more than 40,000 years. The Yugul Mangi people have various different languages and cultures but they share a common history.

    In 1908 the Church of England started the Roper River Mission. In 1940 the mission moved to the present site of Ngukurr because of flooding. This was the first missionary-managed settlement of East Arnhem Land. The Australian Government took over the mission in 1968.

    In 1988 the Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation was registered and began to provide local government. In 2008 Ngukurr became part of the Roper Gulf Shire Council and the shire took over local government.

    Location

    Ngukurr is located near the Roper River in south-east Arnhem Land, about 330 km south-east of Katherine on the Roper Highway.

    Population

    The population of Ngukurr and its surrounds in 2006 was approximately 1,137, of which 1,055 were Indigenous (93 per cent). Nearly half of the Indigenous population of Ngukurr is aged under 20 (47 per cent).

    The Indigenous population of Ngukurr and its surrounds is projected to increase from 1,055 in 2006 to 1,446 in 2026, an increase of 37 per cent.

    The number of Indigenous people of working age (15 to 64 years) is projected to increase from 634 in 2006 to 931 in 2026. The greatest proportional increase is expected to be in the older Indigenous population of 50 years and above, which is expected to double over the next 20 years from 108 in 2006, to 240 in 2026.

    The changing size and age composition of the Indigenous population of Ngukurr will increase the need for housing and employment opportunities, as well as aged care and health services.

    These numbers are based on the 2006 census, adjusted using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates as the census under-counted Indigenous populations. It is recognised that this may not be an accurate assessment of the current population.

    Languages

    The major language spoken by Indigenous people in Ngukurr is Kriol (84 per cent). English and other Indigenous languages are spoken by a small number of people. Yugul Mangi (we together as one) are the people belonging to the Indigenous language groups of the lower Roper River and Gulf of Carpentaria regions of southeast Arnhem Land. The language groups are Mara, Ngandi, Alawa, Nunggubuyu, Rittarangu, Wandarang and Ngalakan. Each language or clan group consists of several family groups and has its own totems, land and ceremonial responsibilities.

    Clan groups

    The main groups in the area before contact with Europeans included the Alawa, the Binbingka, the Mara, the Ngarnji, the Wilangarra and the Yanyuwa.

    Traditional owners

    The main traditional owners are members of the Ponto family and the Manbilila clan.

    Land Council

    The Northern Land Council, based in Darwin with offices in Ngukurr and Katherine, is the land council to the community. It is responsible for matters under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. This includes:

    • checking, representing and responding to the wishes and opinions of local Indigenous people about legislation, tourism, development and commercial activities that affect traditional land, and
    • helping traditional landowners claim, manage and protect the land.

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    Local Government

    The Roper Gulf Shire Council provides local government in Ngukurr, which is the largest township in the Shire’s Yugul Mangi Ward. The Yugul Mangi Ward is one of five wards in the Shire and elects two of the 12 council members. The Shire Council meets every other month. The Shire headquarters are in Katherine and it has a service delivery centre in Ngukurr.

    The Shire consults community members through the Shire Local Board. The Local Board (originally two members) has combined with the Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation (Yugul Mangi).

    In Yugul Mangi each of the seven clans is represented by two directors and a reserve director (an elder, a woman and a young leader). The Yugul Mangi directors meet fortnightly to discuss community issues, and then report back to their clan groups. They hold a monthly meeting with key service providers which also incorporates a Shire Local Board meeting. Community members can attend any Yugul Mangi meeting and contribute to discussions.

    Yugul Mangi oversees other registered Aboriginal corporations in Ngukurr. These include the Ngukurr Progress Aboriginal Corporation (the community store committee), the Yugul Mangi Land and Sea Rangers Corporation and the Ngukurr Arts Aboriginal Corporation.

    Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation as Local Reference Group

    Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation (including the Shire Local Board) serves as Ngukurr’s Local Reference Group.

    The Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan was formed through a collaborative effort between Yugul Mangi, the Indigenous Engagement Officer, the Government Business Manager and the Ngukurr community. It builds on the community’s needs and aims set out in the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan.

    Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan

    The Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan builds from Yugul Mangi’s vision:

    To create one community that fosters unity, leadership, ownership and participation by all, while contributing to the social, cultural and economic activities of the wider Northern Territory community.

    It has 10 strategic priorities:

    1. New and improved community infrastructure.
    2. New and improved housing.
    3. Improved service delivery.
    4. Community health and welfare.
    5. Community education, skills and training.
    6. Community economic and business development.
    7. Community policing and safety.
    8. Community cultural and social development.
    9. Improved governance and leadership for our people.
    10. Community access.

    The Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan is one of the main ways the community is working with government to achieve these priorities.


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    Early Childhood Highlights

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for early childhood is: We want quality education, schooling and training—from pre-school to adult education—to give our community members the skills they need to grow and prosper. This should be delivered to the same standard that non-Indigenous people enjoy.

    The protection of children is everybody’s responsibility. It is the duty of all government and non-government workers and community members to identify and report children they believe may be at risk of harm or neglect. The community is keen to have access to high-quality child care and to ensure that babies and new mothers are healthy.

    Community Strengths

     

    • Baby health check-ups are provided through the health centre.
    • There is a playgroup
    • The childcare centre employs trained local childcare workers.
    • A new children and families centre is being built and is eagerly awaited by the community.
    • The children and families centre is near the aged care centre so people can benefit from co-locating the young with elders.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in early childhood are:

    1. New mothers are healthy and receive quality support before, during and after childbirth.
    2. Our children are born healthy and stay healthy.
    3. Our children acquire the basic skills for life and learning in a culturally appropriate way and are prepared when it’s time to start preschool.
    4. Parents and carers are supported and able to provide nurturing and quality care to their children.
    5. Quality and affordable child care is available in the community.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Quality and affordable child care is available.
    • Our children are born healthy and stay healthy.
    • New mothers are healthy and receive quality support before, during and after childbirth.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Construction and establishment of a 50 place child and family centre built to national quality standards.
    • To enhance the protection of children the Northern Territory Department of Health and Families is developing minimum service standards for child protection and related services for Ngukurr that will include an agreed program to implement these standards.
    • Pregnant women attend regular anti-natal checks.

    Details of Ngukurr’s early childhood priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Schooling Highlights

    The Ngukurr School is the preschool, primary school and secondary school, and provides education through to Year 12. In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for schooling is:

    We want quality education, schooling and training- from pre-school to adult education- using local people as teachers and mentors, to give our community members the skills they need to grow and prosper. This should be delivered to the same standard that non-Indigenous people enjoy.

    The community is keen to ensure that students make the transition from school to work or further study.

    Community strengths

     

    • A community elder is employed as Cultural Liaison Officer and is a member of the school council, which meets monthly.
    • The school provides breakfast and lunch to encourage good nutrition and attendance.
    • The percentage of people who have completed Year 10 or above is relatively high.
    • The school had a high level of Aboriginal staff and leaders for many years.
    • Ngukurr has a public library, although it could be used more often.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in schooling are:

    1. Our school meets student, teacher and community needs.
    2. Our school has quality teachers.
    3. All of our school-age children go to school regularly.
    4. Our school supports local culture and language for all years.
    5. Literacy and numeracy (and computer literacy) of our students is in line with mainstream standards.
    6. Students progress from school to work or further study.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Students transition from school to work or further study.
    • School provides local culture and language learning opportunities for all years.
    • Our school meets student, teacher and community standards.
    • Our school has quality teachers.
    • All our school-age children go to school regularly.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Vocational Education and Training trade training centre funding committed. Construction to commence 2010.
    • Government to support the community through the school council and the Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation to implement their School Attendance Management Plan.
    • School facilities will be made available from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community’s contact with the school and to help improve school attendance.

    Details of Ngukurr’s schooling priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Health Highlights

    Health services in Ngukurr are run by Sunrise Health Services. The Ngukurr Health Centre provides medical and public health services and access to visiting doctors and specialists.

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for health is:

    It is critically important that we improve the delivery of health, aged care and welfare services and standards in the community, to improve our health, eliminate disadvantage and allow us to live longer, healthier and happier lives.

    The community is keen to have the health centre equipped to meet local needs.

    Community strengths

     

    • The Yugul Mangi Aged Care Centre provides in-home services including one meal a day, help with laundry, and transport for shopping and health centre visits.
    • Extra nutrition and child health services are supported through the Ian Thorpe Foundation and the Fred Hollows Foundation.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in health are:

    1. Our people are healthy and live longer lives.
    2. Our health care meets community needs.
    3. Our sick people are treated in the community where possible.
    4. Our elders are cared for in the community.
    5. We work together to fix our grog, drug and gambling problems.
    6. A well-run community store.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Our health centre meets community needs.
    • Our people are healthy and live longer lives.
    • Sufficient accommodation for health staff.
    • Our sick people are treated in the community where possible.
    • A well-run community store to improve nutrition.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Governments to work together with Sunrise Health Services, in consultation with the community, to review and improve health service delivery and infrastructure.
    • Construction of a new community-owned store.

    Details of Ngukurr’s health priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Healthy Homes Highlights

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for healthy homes is:

    Our vision is to have enough appropriately designed new and upgraded homes to overcome chronic overcrowding, and to create healthier homes through upgrades and life-skills training programs, to meet the needs of our growing community.

    The community is keen to increase the amount and standard of housing available in Ngukurr.

    Community strengths

     

    • Under the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program the community will get new housing and refurbishment of existing housing.
    • Government will consult with Yugul Mangi to ensure local people have a say in decisions about housing in their community.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in housing are:

    1. Enough homes for our people to reduce overcrowding.
    2. Well-designed homes built or renovated to standard.
    3. Homes are looked after.
    4. Our people know about housing rights and responsibilities.
    5. We have the opportunity to buy our own homes.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • We have enough homes for our people to reduce overcrowding.
    • Homes are looked after.
    • Our people know about their housing rights and responsibilities.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • In consultation with the Ngukurr Housing Reference Group, undertake a review of Ngukurr housing requirements and develop a plan to provide appropriate housing in the future through the current New Futures Package.
    • In consultation with an established Healthy Homes working group, identify and implement the type and timing of housing support that will be provided at Ngukurr.

    Details of Ngukurr’s housing priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Economic Participation Highlights

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for economic participation is:

    We want to establish sustainable and profitable businesses that service our own and other communities, and we want our community members managing, working in and profiting from those businesses so we can work towards self-support and self-sufficiency. Business owners and managers will need ongoing training and administrative and financial support so the businesses can succeed.

    We will need some new and upgraded buildings, offices and other facilities to meet the needs of our growing community as it develops into a growth town.

    The community is keen to ensure year-round access to Ngukurr and increase local business opportunities.

    Community strengths

     

    • Community Development Employment Projects, Job Services Australia and Jobfind services are functioning in the community.
    • Progress on the Ngukurr Economic Development Initiative is well advanced.
    • The number of job opportunities in Ngukurr is growing.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in economic participation are:

    1. Establish Ngukurr as a regional hub town.
    2. More jobs in the community for local working-age people.
    3. More training to help people get jobs.
    4. More local people to own and run businesses.
    5. Develop tourism in and around Ngukurr.
    6. Keep our money in our community so we have a strong local economy.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Establish regional transport arrangements to enable year-round access.
    • More local people to own and run businesses.
    • Construct a professional business centre, including construction of a retail centre.
    • Develop a town plan.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Undertake a detailed survey of road network in and around Ngukurr including options for progressive road upgrade, and investigate passenger transport needs.
    • Develop a government/ community partnership proposal for a one-stop-shop for government services and other local businesses.
    • Funding secured to create a Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation Business Manager income stream through a visitor accommodation business, and government commits to establish a Yugul Mangi-managed campground at Tomato Island.
    •  

    Details of Ngukurr’s economic participation priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Safe Communities Highlights

    The Ngukurr police station, assisted by a night patrol service, is responsible for patrolling an area of 12,000 km2, which includes major waterways.

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan the vision for safe communities is:

    We want a community that is beautiful and strong, strong in its culture, and as self-sufficient as possible. We must respect and look after our country.

    We need to enhance cohesion between police and community members to ensure law and safety is applied equally and in a culturally sensitive manner.

    We need our leaders, our parents and our carers, to encourage community members to respect and protect each person’s right to a safe and healthy environment.

    We need to improve access for community people and service providers to Ngukurr and Rittarangu for 12 months of each year, to address the annual ‘isolation’ and slippage in service delivery.

    The community is keen to ensure that policing in Ngukurr meets local needs.

    Community Strengths

     

    • Ngukurr has a successful Youth Pathways Program in which young people build community infrastructure, learn from elders about culture and go on fishing trips and other fun activities.
    • Sport is strong in the community. Ngukurr has an Australian Rules football team (the Bulldogs) in the Katherine District Football League and (through the KickStart program) an under-16 team in the Katherine region youth competition. Basketball is also popular.
    • The women’s safe house runs well, despite being one of the most used women’s shelters in the Territory.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in safety are:

    1. Our community is a safe place to live.
    2. Our people are well behaved.
    3. Policing meets community needs.
    4. Our community is beautiful and clean.
    5. Easy access to and from our community all year round.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Policing meets community needs.
    • More street lights and seal all community roads.
    • Our community is a safe place to live.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Advise the Ngukurr community of the supported recommendations contained in the recently finalised Remote Police Review, addressing issues such as: access to all police services; the number of full time police officers at Ngukurr and aboriginal community police officers including male/female officers; and police staff accommodation.
    • Develop the Ngukurr Community Safety Plan.

    Details of Ngukurr’s safe community priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    Governance and Leadership Highlights

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Plan the vision for governance and leadership is:

    We want strong and responsible leaders who represent the community and make decisions in the best interests of the whole community. We want our leaders to set good examples, and to encourage our young people to learn and grow into strong leaders. We want to maintain and strengthen our language and culture. Our cultural and spiritual environments are the heart of who we are as a people. Our culture is strong but needs to be further strengthened. It plays a major role in bringing our people together and connecting us to our spiritual lands and ancestors. Our present and future elders will strive to pass on their knowledge and cultural traditions to our young people. We will strive to preserve, protect and strengthen our culture. We need to improve service delivery from government and non-government agencies, and from local workers.

    The community is keen to keep local culture strong and enhance local governance and leadership capacity.

    Community strengths

     

    • Yugul Mangi is strongly engaged, has wide community representation and is experienced in government consultation.
    • It has government funding to get its own local business manager, and is developing an income stream and community benefit trust account.
    • It has a strong mentoring program with elders encouraging and guiding young and emerging leaders.

    Desired community outcomes

    In the Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan, Ngukurr’s priorities for closing the gap in governance and leadership are:

    1. Keeping our culture strong.
    2. Strong and responsible community leaders.
    3. Our own business manager.
    4. Community involved in decision-making for our future.
    5. Improved service delivery.
    6. Governments listen to us and work with us to meet our needs.

    For this Local Implementation Plan the top priorities are:

    • Keep our culture strong.
    • Ability to manage our community business.

    Commitments

    The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

    • Work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of men, women and youth of Ngukurr.
    • The Regional Operations Centre supports the Yugul Mangi community’s application for Indigenous Protected Area status so local people can continue to manage and protect their country using traditional cultural methods.
    • Yugul Mangi will work in partnership with the Regional Operations Centre to implement the Local Implementation Plan.

    Details of Ngukurr’s governance and leadership priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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    List of Acronyms

    ABA Aboriginal Benefits Account CSP Community Safety Plan
    ACPO Aboriginal Community Police Officer CWG Capital Working Group
    ACW Aboriginal Community Worker DBCDE Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
    AFL Australian Football League DBE Department of Business and Employment
    AG Australian Government DCI Department of Construction and Infrastructure
    AGD Attorney Generals Department DEEWR Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
    AIS Australian Interpreter Services DET Department of Education and Training
    ALC Anindilyakwa Land Council DHF Department of Health and Families
    ALPA Arnhem Land Progress Association DLP Department of Lands and Planning
    ALRA Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976 DoHA Department of Health and Ageing
    AMRRIC Animal Management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities DoJ Department of Justice
    AMS Aboriginal Medical Services DPI Department of Planning and Infrastructure
    AMSANT Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory DSEWPAC Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
    AODP Alcohol and Other Drugs Project DVD Digital Versatile Disc
    ASC Australian Sports Commission EA East Arnhem
    ASM Area Services Manager EASC East Arnhem Shire Council
    BoM Board of Management EBA Enterprise Bargaining Agreement
    BOOT/ BOOTS Build, Own, Operate, Transfer and Support EDO Economic Development Officer
    BRACS Broadcasting for Remote Aboriginal Communities Scheme FaFT Families as First Teachers
    CA Central Australia FaHCSIA Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
    CAALAS Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service FTE Full Time Equivalent
    CARH Central Australian Remote Health GBM Government Business Manager
    CASA Civil Aviation Safety Authority GEBIE Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises
    CAYLUS Central Australian Youth Link Up Service GEH Government Employee Housing
    CDSC Central Desert Shire Council GEMCO Groote Eylandt Mining Company
    CDEP Community Development Employment Projects GPNNT General Practice Network Northern Territory
    CDS Central Desert Shire HACC Home and Community Care
    CDU Charles Darwin University HLGRS- (RD) Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services - Regional Development
    CEC Community Education Centre HLGRS/ DHLGRS Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services
    CEO Catholic Education Office HOIL Home Ownership Indigenous Land
    CFC Child and Families Centre HRG Housing Reference Group
    CLC Central Land Council OCPE Office of the Comissioner of Public Employment
    HSDA Health Service Delivery Area OLSH TCS Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic School
    IBA Indigenous Business Association ORIC Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
    ICT Information and Communications Technology OTL Office of Township Leasing
    IEO Indigenous Engagement Officer PaCE Parents and Community Engagement
    ILC Independent Land Corporation PAW Media Pintubi, Anmatjerre, Warlpiri Media
    IPSS Indigenous Parenting Support Service PATS Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
    IPWG Infrastructure and Planning Working Group PHC Primary Health Care
    IRSD Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account PHCM Primary Health Care Manager
    IT Information Technology PWC/ P&W Power Water Corporation
    JSA Job Services Australia RGSC Roper Gulf Shire Council
    KWHB Katherine West Health Board RH Remote Housing
    LAB Local Advisory Board RHNT Remote Housing Northern Territory
    LGANT Local Government Association of the Northern Territory RIBS Regional Indigenous Broadcasting Services
    LIP Local Implementation Plan ROC Regional Operations Centre
    LHA Laynhapuy Homelands Association RSD Remote Service Delivery
    LHRG Local Housing Reference Group RTEED Remote Training, Employment and Economic Development
    LLNP Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program SDCU Service Delivery Coordination Unit
    LRG Local reference group SEAM School Enrolment and Attendance Measure
    LSP Locational Supported Playgroups SIHIP Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program
    Malabam Malabam Health Board SNP School Nutrition Program
    MCS Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School STEP Structured Training and Employment Projects
    MES Municipal Essential Services SWSBSC Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture
    MH Mental Health TBA To Be Advised
    MJD FOUNDATION Machado Joseph Disease Foundation TDC Thamarrurr Development Corporation
    MOU Memorandum of Understanding TIE Transforming Indigenous Education
    MSC McDonnell Shire Council TISC Tiwi Islands Shire Council
    MSOAP Medical Specialists Outreach Assistance Program TO Traditional Owners
    N/A Not Applicable TOR Terms Of Reference
    NGO Non Government Organisation TRPA Tanami Regional Partnership Agreement
    NLC Northern Land Council UNICEF United Nations Children’s Fund
    NPA National Partnership Agreement VET/ VETiS Vocational Education and Training in Schools
    NRETAS Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport WAHAC BOARD Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation Board
    NRT Nicotine Replacement Therapy WASC West Arnhem Shire Council
    NT Northern Territory WG Working Group
    NTCET Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training WETT Warlpiri Education and Training Trust
    NTFC Northern Territory Families and Children WHO World Health Organisation
    NTG Northern Territory Government WoG Whole of Government
    NTIEC Northern Territory Indigenous Education Council WYN BOARD Willowra, Yuendumu, Nyirripi Health Board
    NTPFES Northern Territory Police Fire and Emergency Services YMAC Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation
    NTPOL Northern Territory Police    
    OATSIH Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health    

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Early Childhood

    Early Childhood
    Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
    Number and proportion of low, normal, and high birth weight Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade
    Timing of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade

    Priority 1: All children to have access to high quality early childhood education and care services.

    Strategy 1.1: Quality and affordable childcare is available in Ngukurr.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 Construction and establishment of a 50 place child and family centre built to national quality standards. Lead - DET
    Supporting - DCI, DEEWR
    Planning and design started. Construction to start Dec-10 Jan-12
    1.1.2 Establish an early childhood coordinator to lead the integration of family services tailored to the Ngukurr community and its surrounding service delivery area. This will be achieved through a whole-of-government approach across all levels of government, non-government organisations and the community to develop and implement an integrated service model. All program content will be inclusive of Indigenous culture and have links to elders. Lead - DET
    Supporting - LRG, DHF, SHS Health Services, NGOs, Community
    Started Review Oct-11

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    Strategy 1.2: Provide universal access to preschool for every child in the year before full time school.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Provide universal access to preschool for every child in the year before full-time school. By 2013 the preschool program is to be delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year by a four-year, university qualified early childhood teacher. The program will be accessible across a diversity of settings and in a form that meets the needs of parents. Lead - DET
    Supporting - DEEWR
    Started Dec-13

    Strategy 1.3: Building skilled workforce able to deliver quality and affordable childcare.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 Deliver the Certificate III Community Services in the workplace through the FaFT-IPSS for the local Indigenous FaFT Family Liaison Officers and LSP staff. Lead - DET, Andy Cowan
    Supporting - DOHA
    Started Dec-11
    1.3.2 Implement the Building the Remote Early Childhood Workforce Pilot project. This pilot is to provide children services training for child care staff and VETiS in Schools and School Based Apprentices for secondary students. Lead - DET
    Supporting - DEEWR, RTEED
    Jan-11 Dec-12

    Priority 2: Ngukurr children are born healthy and stay healthy.

    Strategy 2.1: New mothers are healthy and receive quality support before, during and after childbirth.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.1.1 Establish education and support programs to reduce smoking, drinking and poor nutrition during pregnancy through the FaFT-IPSS. Lead - DET
    Supporting- DHF
    ASAP Review Jun-11
    2.1.2 Establish the FaFT-IPSS program. This place-based integrated universal services program includes early learning and parenting support strategies. Including education and support programs to reduce smoking, drinking and poor nutrition during pregnancy through FaFT-IPSS. Lead - DET
    Supporting - FaHCSIA, Community
    dependent on housing supply Dec-12
    2.1.3 Pregnant women attend regular antenatal checks. Lead - Community
    Supporting - SHS Health Service
    From date of agreement Review Oct-11
    2.1.4 Working with SHS Health and the community review the current child health service delivery approaches and identify opportunities for enhancement of these models to meet the needs of Ngukurr. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - DoHA
    Started Jun-11

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Schooling

    Schooling
    Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
    Schooling enrolment and attendance Halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for Indigenous children within a decade
    NAPLAN participation and attainment Halve the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 equivalent attainment by 2020

    Priority 1: All community members value and promote education as the key to future opportunity.

    Strategy 1.1: Students transition from school to work or further study.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 Program of School- Based Apprentices to begin first term in 2011. Lead - DET Jan-11 Review Feb-11
    1.1.2 All NTCET graduates from Ngukurr will be provided with training and job opportunities under the Jobs Guarantee Plan. Lead - DBE, DET
    Supporting - RTEED
    2010 Review Feb-11
    1.1.3 NT Government committed to ensuring the minimum enrolment requirement for training courses will be flexible to meet local needs. Lead - DBE
    Supporting - RTEED
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.1.4 Construct a VET trade training centre. Lead - DET
    Supporting - DCI, DEEWR
    Started Review Feb-11
    1.1.5 Employ an adult educator to be based in Ngukurr. Lead - Mission Australia
    Supporting - DET
    Started Review Feb-11
    1.1.6 Provide children services training for staff, VETiS and School-Based Apprentices. Lead - DET
    Supporting - RTEED
    Jan-11 Dec-12
    1.1.7 Provide an annual career pathways information day for all senior students. Lead - DET
    Supporting - RTEED
    Started Review Feb-11

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    Strategy 1.2: School provides local culture and language learning opportunities for all years.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Communities are encouraged to use school facilities from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community’s contact with the school and to help improve school attendance. After hours access can be for local language courses and activities, as well as adult literacy, IT, parenting skills, music, sport and the arts. Lead - DET
    Supporting - NRETAS, RGSC, DEEWR
    2010 Review Feb-11

    Strategy 1.3: Increase school attendance so that no child has more than three unexplained absences in a row.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 Government to support community through school council and Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation to implement their school attendance management plan. Plan to include feasibility trial of three designated attendance supervisors. These positions could lead to appointment of cultural leaders. Lead - DET
    Supporting - Community
    Started Review Feb-11
    1.3.2 Negotiations will be held around a place-based approach to ensure pathways to education and employment are supported through the Strong Start Bright Future model covering birth to employment Lead - DET Started Review Feb-11
    1.3.3 NT DET to deliver a PaCE “Literacy and Numeracy in the Home for Parents” which will publish and produce a set of resources for parents of Indigenous children across a number of RSD communities including Ngukurr. Lead - DET
    Supporting - DEEWR
    Started 2012

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Priority 2: Education services in Ngukurr provide a rich learning environment.

    Strategy 2.1: Our school responds to student, teacher and community priorities.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.1.1 Continue the school nutrition program with support from DET and the provision of additional nutrition and food handling training for staff who prepare food. Lead - DEEWR
    Supporting - DET, Ngukurr CEC
    Started Jun-11
    2.1.2 Improve employment conditions. Lead - DET Started Review Feb-11
    2.1.3 Train and support local people into accredited teacher and teacher’s aid positions. Review teacher accommodation security and upgrade if required. Lead - DET Started Review Feb-11
    2.1.4 School to negotiate with police at local level to base an ACPO (once recruited) at the school on a part-time basis to educate students about safety, good behaviour and mutual respect for police and community. Lead - DET
    Supporting - Police
    Started Review Feb-11
    2.1.5 Construction of two transportable duplexes providing four accommodation units and review future needs. Lead - DET
    Supporting - Police
    Started Jul-10

    Strategy 2.2: School curriculum to incorporate sport and recreational activities, including regular swimming at the community pool.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.2.1 Physical Education teacher position will be considered by the principal and school council in line with teaching area priorities at Ngukurr. Lead - DET Started Review Feb-11

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    Health

    Health
    Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
    Number of health care episodes Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
    Number of episodes of health care and client contacts Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
    Child oral health disease profile for 7-to-12-year-olds Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation

    Priority 1: The people of Ngukurr have access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care.

    Strategy 1.1: Our health centre meets community needs.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 Governments to work together with SHS Health Services, in consultation with the community, to review and improve health service delivery and infrastructure in the community. Lead - SHS
    Supporting - DoHA, DHF, DCI
    Started Jun-11
    1.1.2 Work with the SHS Health Service to identify and support employment and career development opportunities for local people. Lead - SHS
    Supporting - DoHA, DHF
    Started Review Jul-11
    1.1.3 Conduct an administrative and service review of the current primary health care services at Ngukurr, in consultation with the community. Lead - DOHA, SHS
    Supporting- DHF, Community
    Started Jun-11
    1.1.4 Government commits to planning with the community for current and future health service delivery requirements, including: health infrastructure, mental health and delivery of regular sexual education programs at school and from the children and families centre. Investigate linking mental health services to children and family centre programs and deliver from CFC where appropriate. Lead - DoHA
    Supporting - DHF, SHS, DCI
    Started Oct-10
    1.1.5 Commit to consulting with the community on additional services required under the Indigenous chronic disease element of the Medical Specialists Outreach Assistance Program. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - DoHA, SHS
    Started Oct-10
    1.1.6 Review current dialysis facilities and incorporate in planning for new health centre. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - DoHA, SHS, DCI
    Started Dec-10

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.7 Review effectiveness and efficiency of current Patient Assistance Transport Service (PAT S), including dental services. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - SHS
    Started Sep-11
    1.1.8 Review the Oral Health Program to seek opportunities for service improvement and if appropriate, develop a fluoridation program. Lead – DHF for Oral Health Program
    Lead – DHLGRS, PWC for fluoridation Supporting - SHS
    Started Mar-11

    Strategy 1.2: Plan infrastructure to meet sport and recreation need.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Develop a submission for sport and recreation grants to upgrade facility. Improve co-ordination and standards of sport and recreation programs, including swimming and other carnivals. Lead - NRETAS
    Supporting - RGSC
    Jan-11 Jun-11

    Strategy 1.3: Plan infrastructure to provide sufficient accommodation for health staff.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 Assess staff housing needs including serviced land availability and future needs. Lead - SHS
    Supporting - DHLGRS
    ASAP Review Jun-11

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    Priority 2: Elders are cared for in the community.

    Strategy 2.1: Plan infrastructure to meet aged care service delivery needs.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.1.1 Undertake a comprehensive review of aged care and disability services to inform service and facility development. Lead - DoHA Started Oct-10

    Priority 3: The people of Ngukurr will actively encourage and support family members to make healthy life choices.

    Strategy 3.1: Develop local strategies that will reduce the levels of smoking.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    3.1.1 Have the store stock nicotine abatement products. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - LRG, Store Committee
    Oct-10 Nov-10
    3.1.2 Stop people smoking inside our homes, cars and enclosed places where children are present. Lead - Community
    Supporting - DHF
    ASAP Review Jun-11
    3.1.3 Declare playgrounds, schools and government buildings and grounds smoke free areas. Lead - Community
    Supporting - DHF
    Oct-11 Nov-11

    Strategy 3.2: Develop a Ngukurr alcohol management plan.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    3.2.1 Consult with the broader Ngukurr community through public meetings to plan a way forward. Lead - DoJ
    Supporting - FaHCSIA, DHF, Community
    Started Review Jun-11

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Strategy 3.3: Improve dog management and control in Ngukurr.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    3.3.1 Community to discuss with RGSC and both NT and Australian governments strategies for animal management including implementation of by-laws. Lead - RGSC
    Supporting - FaHCSIA, AMRRIC
    Started Review Oct-11

    Strategy 3.4: Improved nutrition in Ngukurr.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    3.4.1 Construction of a new community owned store. Lead - Community Started Review Jun-11

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    Healthy Homes

    Healthy Homes
    Progress Output Indicators
    Condition of current housing stock
    Overall crowding rates: average per bedroom density and number houses overcrowded

    Priority 1: We have enough homes for Ngukurr people to reduce overcrowding.

    Strategy 1.1: Determine how many new houses, rebuilds and refurbishments are needed including future requirements through the Strategic Indigenous Housing Infrastructure Program.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 In consultation with the Ngukurr HRG commence planning for the provision of additional housing following the completion of the current SIHIP which includes the immediate housing need and future demand based on population estimates. Lead – DHLGRS
    Supporting- Community (HRG)
    Started Jan-11
    1.1.2 Governments and the Ngukurr HRG to review future housing needs by developing housing audit process. Lead - DHLGRS
    Supporting - Community (HRG)
    Dec-10 Jun-11
    1.1.3 Targets for new houses, refurbishments and rebuilds to be determined once leasing agreement is finalised and the package is allocated to the Alliance Partner. Lead - DHLGRS/ FAHCSIA
    Supporting - Community (HRG)
    Oct-10 Jan-11

    Priority 2: Ngukurr people have the skills to live in public housing and maintain the premises in a clean, tidy and healthy condition.

    Strategy 2.1: Coordinate a range of tools and support services for Ngukurr people to access to assist with maintaining their home.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.1.1 Provide training and support including home budgeting, home care (cleaning, minor repairs), life skills (cooking, nutrition, safe food storage). Lead - DHLGRS
    Supporting - Community, Centrelink, DHF, DET, PWC
    Started Jun-11
    2.1.2 Assess fencing requirements and develop a fencing program. Lead – DHLGRS, FAHCSIA
    Supporting – RGSC, HRG
    Started Jan-11

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Economic Participation

    Economic Participation
    Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
    Total employment (Indigenous/non-Indigenous) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.
    Total employment (private/public) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
    Number of participants on Newstart, Youth Allowance and CDEP To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade

    Priority 1: The town of Ngukurr becomes the service hub for surrounding areas.

    Strategy 1.1: Improve access to Ngukurr.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 Undertake a detailed survey of road network in and around Ngukurr including options for progressive road upgrade. Lead - DLP Started Jun-10
    1.1.2 Develop funding submission to improve the unsealed sections of the Roper Highway including river crossings. Lead - DHLGRS (Submission)
    Supporting - DLP (Survey), EASC
    Started Dec-10

    Strategy 1.2: Improve transport arrangements for the Ngukurr region.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Facilitate workshops in partnership with the RGSC to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships. This work will include economic viability, business opportunities and potential support through joint ventures and organisations such as Indigenous Business Australia. This work will need to link to the area plan and town centre urban design plan and promote walkability and the use of bicycles. Lead - DLP
    Supporting - RGSC
    Feb-11 Jul-11

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    Strategy 1.3: Identify and create opportunities for small business development.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 Develop a proposal for a government business and service centre at Ngukurr. A range of services may be provided from this building and options will be considered for local organisations to build and own the shopfront with long-term tenancy. Lead - DBE
    Supporting - RTEED, RGSC
    Started Dec-10
    1.3.2 Provide business support and mentoring including appropriate training to individuals and groups wanting to start a viable business. Lead – DHLGRS, Tourism NT (for tourism specific businesses)
    Supporting - RTEED
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.3.3 Economic profiling and development of an investment and opportunities prospectus. Lead - DHLGRS
    Supporting - RTEED
    Started Sep-10
    1.3.4 Government will work with financial institutions to assist with removing barriers to accessing finance for investment on ALRA land. Support will be provided to joint ventures and other partnership vehicles which enable local people to access capital and expertise. Land tenure arrangements that encourage local development are adopted. Lead - DBE/ DHLGRS
    Supporting - RTEED, SDCU, Tourism NT
    Started Review Oct-11
    1.3.5 In partnership with community champions hold Futures Forums that provide information on employment options and business development services available to community members. Provide information on opportunities arising from potential private sector involvement. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - DHLGRS, RGSC, RTEED
    Started Aug-10
    1.3.6 Employ local elders in paid cultural liaison positions. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - ROC, SDCU
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.3.7 Participation in training and development activities paid for by Government will be maximised surpassing minimum participation rates. Lead – Community
    Supporting - RTEED
    From date of agreement Review Jun-11
    1.3.8 Newstart Allowance recipients will meet their allowance obligations, measured by an increase in the number of people taking up job-readiness programs. Lead – Community
    Supporting - Centrelink
    From date of agreement Review Jun-11
    1.3.9 Government Contracts: All procurement processes undertaken in remote areas will optimise opportunities in Indigenous employment and enterprise development. Lead – RTEED
    Supporting - All Agencies
    Started Review Oct-11
    1.3.10 In close coordination with the current rollout of E-health and on-line education initiatives, develop an integrated ICT strategy that covers: infrastructure requirements; deployment of equipment; use of new technologies by government agencies and; access to ICT services by businesses, NGOs and local people. Lead – DBE
    Supporting – RTEED
    Oct-10 Ongoing
    1.3.11 Explore partnership opportunities in the private sector, with a particular emphasis on building formal links with industries operating in the region. These partnerships could include (but not be limited to) training, employment, infrastructure and community development. Lead – DBE
    Supporting – RTEED
    Oct–10 Apr-11
    1.3.12 Jobs, training or further education offers guarantee for all NTCET graduates living in Ngukurr, through an organised transition to work program. Lead – DBE, DET, RGSC
    Supporting – RTEED
    Started Review Jan-11
    1.3.13 Government agency staff working in Ngukurr undertake locally delivered cross cultural training when available. All Government Started Ongoing

    Strategy 1.4: Develop tourism in and around Ngukurr.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.4.1 NTG to establish a managed campground at Tomato Island and explore with YMAC the possibility of managing the campground with appropriate training. Lead - NRETAS
    Supporting – Tourism NT, YMAC
    Jan-11 Jun-11
    1.4.2 Work with government agencies (e.g. DEWHA, DEEWR, IBA, NT Tourism) to support the Yugul Mangi Rangers being involved in tourism/enterprise activities and continue participating in the Working on Country program. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - DEWHA, DEEWR, DHLGRS, NRETAS, NLC
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.4.3 Governments support the establishment of visitor and commercial accommodation, managed for community benefit. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - RTEED, Tourism NT
    Started Review Jun-11

    Priority 2: Town develops in an orderly manner with appropriate process.

    Strategy 2.1: Develop a town plan.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    2.1.1 Complete and gazette a town plan (area plan and zoning map). Lead - DLP Started 2011
    2.1.2 Develop Town Centre Urban Design plan including community transport strategies. Lead - DLP
    Supporting - DCI
    Started Dec-10

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    Safe Communities

    Safe Communities
    Progress Output Indicators
    As a proportion of all offences: (i) alcohol related offences (ii) drug and substance abuse related offences (iii) offences against the person

    Priority 1: Ngukurr community is a safe place to live.

    Strategy 1.1: More street lights and traffic management.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 Stop people driving fast in the community by encouraging safe driving and by installing traffic control signs and pedestrian crossings at important community locations (i.e. school, health centre, store, sporting facilities). Lead - RGSC
    Supporting - DLP
    From date of agreement Review Oct-11
    1.1.2 Establish a community safety committee to work with Ngukurr’s Justice and Harmony Committee and other key stakeholders to develop place-based strategies (such as a community safety plan) that will address safety concerns.

    Early priorities identified that need to be addressed include: child protection and welfare; and alcohol management plan.
    Lead - DoJ, NTPFES
    Supporting - DHF, FaHCSIA, AGD, DLP, Community
    Started Review Oct-11

    Strategy 1.2: Policing meets community need.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Advise the Ngukurr community of the supported recommendations contained in the recently finalised Remote Police Review, addressing issues such as: access to all police services; the number of full time police officers at Ngukurr and ACPOs including male and female Officers; and police staff accommodation. Lead - NTPFES
    Supporting - DHLGRS
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.2.2 Minimum service standards for child protection and related services will be developed in Ngukurr, including an agreed program to implement these standards. Lead - DHF
    Supporting - LRG
    Started Review Oct-11

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    Schedule A: Priorities, Strategies and Actions

    Strategy 1.3: Review the men’s and women’s safe places.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 Government will review the safe place infrastructure and program delivery of both the women’s centre and men’s centre in negotiation with the community, including improved links to the night patrol service. Community support is required for this initiative. Lead - DHF Feb-11 Jun-11

    Strategy 1.4: Ngukurr is better prepared for emergencies.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.4.1 Establish and train a volunteer Emergency Services Response group in Ngukurr. Lead - NTPFES
    Supporting - RGSC
    ASAP Review Oct-11
    1.4.2 Establish and support NT Emergency Service volunteer units capable of reacting to known hazards for the community. Lead - NTPFES
    Supporting - RGSC
    ASAP Review Oct-11
    1.4.3 Maintain an all hazard response plan for Ngukurr and review or establish specific hazard response plans for the community (e.g. cyclone plan) as necessary. This will include ensuring adequate community education and preparedness (including public shelters where necessary) for known hazards. Lead - NTPFES
    Supporting - RGSC
    ASAP Review Oct-11

    Strategy 1.5: Maintain an effective animal management program.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.5.1 Maintain an effective animal management program. Lead - RGSC
    Supporting - FaHCSIA
    Started Review Jun-11

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    Governance and Leadership

    Governance and Leadership
    Progress Output Indicators
    Number of registered organisations under ORIC and NT Associations Act

    Priority 1: Ngukurr leaders and elected council members have the skills to govern effectively.

    Strategy 1.1: Enhance and improve local peoples decision-making practices and capabilities.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.1.1 RGSC local board members and other incorporated bodies to receive ongoing governance and leadership training to allow them to better understand and undertake their roles. Lead - RGSC
    Supporting - LGANT
    ASAP Review Oct-11
    1.1.2 Work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of men, women and youth of Ngukurr. Lead - FaHCSIA
    Supporting - RGSC, YMAC
    Started Review Jun-11
    1.1.3 Discuss with Roper Gulf RGSC the current operational status the of the BRACS program in Ngukurr. Lead - LRG
    Supporting - ROC
    ASAP Review Oct-11

    Strategy 1.2: Develop governance and leadership capacity for the next generation of Ngukurr leaders.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.2.1 Undertake a research project which will map the community governance arrangements and community engagement for Ngukurr. Lead - DHLGRS
    Supporting - ROC
    Oct-10 Mar-11
    1.2.2 Keep our culture strong by introducing a junior rangers program to teach young people how to manage country. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - Community, NRETAS, DSEWPAC, NLC
    ASAP Review Oct-11
    1.2.3 Review ongoing infrastructure requirements and funding for Yugul Mangi Land and Sea Rangers. Lead - DSEWPAC
    Supporting - NRETAS, NLC
    Started Review Oct-11
    1.2.4 Support the Yugul Mangi application to DSEWPAC for Indigenous Protected Area status so local people can continue to manage and protect their country using traditional cultural methods. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - ROC, DSEWPAC, NLC
    ASAP Review Oct-11
    1.2.5 Develop and implement a system through which meetings and consultations are coordinated, streamlined and encourage community input. Lead - ROC, YMAC Started Review Jun-11

    Strategy 1.3: The GBM and ROC will assist Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation to monitor the progress and timelines of the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan.

    Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When
    1.3.1 The Ngukurr YMAC and ROC will work in partnership to implement Local Implementation Plan actions and report back to government. Lead - YMAC
    Supporting - ROC
    Started Review Jun-11

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    Schedule B: Baseline Mapping Report Snapshot

    The Ngukurr Baseline Mapping Report provides information about the people, services and infrastructure in Ngukurr and the surrounding region. Most of the information in the report was collected during 2009, but often relates to earlier points in time (in particular, the Census data is from 2006). The full Ngukurr Baseline Mapping Report is a very large document and includes a lot of technical information. The Government Business Manager has a copy to show people, and can arrange specialists to help people understand particular parts of the report.

    The following is some of the information from the Ngukurr Baseline Mapping Report that relates specifically to the 'Progress Output Indicators' in Schedule A of the Local Implementation Plan. The facts and figures in these assessments will be reviewed each year to monitor the progress being achieved in Ngukurr in these key areas.

    Early Childhood

     

    • Of the all births in the Yugul Mangi Statistical Local Area (which includes Ngukurr) from 2004-08, 26.5 per cent (18 births) were to teenage mothers aged 15 to 19. Births to mothers aged 20-24 comprised 33.8 per cent of all births (23 births).
    • Since peaking in 2006 and 2008 at 42 children, preschool enrolments at Ngukurr School declined to 28 enrolments in 2009, less overall than in 2001 (30 children). As the 2006 census shows the zero to four year old Indigenous population to have been 141, this data indicates a very low enrolment rate.
    • The number and proportion of low, normal and high birth weight Indigenous babies in Ngukurr was collected by Northern Territory health services and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Due to concerns about small numbers in the data, permission to use it in the Baseline Mapping Report was not provided by the Northern Territory.
    • The timing and number of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies in Ngukurr was collected by Northern Territory health services and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Due to concerns about small numbers in the data, permission to use it in the Baseline Mapping Report was not provided by the Northern Territory.

    Schooling

     

    • In August 2009, 212 students were enrolled in Ngukurr School from preschool to Year 6, and 54 were enrolled from Year 7 to Year 12. The 2006 census shows the school-aged Indigenous population (ages five to 14) to have been 246.
    • The yearly average attendance at Ngukurr School decreased from 69.5 per cent in 2008 to 62.9 per cent in 2009. Since 2001, the average yearly attendance rate (averaged over the eight collection points) at Ngukurr School has increased overall. The attendance rate in 2009 of 63 per cent was similar to 2003, but greater the lowest attendance rate of the period (56 per cent) recorded in 2001. The highest attendance rate during the period was 73 per cent in 2007.
    • Participation in the National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) increased between 2008 and 2009, and in 2009 all years had 100 per cent participation in the reading and numeracy assessments. For example, there was a 34 per cent increase in Year 7 participants in the reading assessment, and a 38 per cent increase in Year 7 participation in the assessment for numeracy.
    • Overall results in 2009 indicate that students are achieving below the national minimum standard in most subjects. For example, 25 per cent of Year 3 participants and seven per cent of Year 7 participants achieved at or above the national minimum standard for reading. When assessed for numeracy, 58 per cent Year 3 participants and 10 per cent Year 7 participants achieved at or above the national minimum standard.
    • More information on NAPLAN results is available online at www.myschool.edu.au.

    Health

     

    • In 2009-10 the Ngukurr health centre reported 16,192 episodes of care, with 58 per cent reported as care for female clients and 96.2 per cent reported as care for Indigenous clients.
    • Eight to 12 year olds have an average of 1.4 permanent teeth affected by decay. Decay experience in permanent teeth in 7- to 11-yearolds is between 0.5 and 5.9 times the Northern Territory average and between 0.4 and 4.6 times the Australian average depending on age.
    • In 2008-09 there were a reported 25 Home and Community Care clients in Ngukurr, all of whom were Indigenous.
    • In 2009-10 the Aged and Disability Program reported 18 open cases, 24 referrals and nine closed cases. Open cases are those cases being actively managed by a disability coordinator.

    Healthy Homes

     

    • In 2009, there were 105 residential dwellings in Ngukurr providing 319 bedrooms. This resulted in an average of 3.27 people per bedroom. Sixty six per cent of Ngukurr households are considered to be overcrowded.
    • Fifteen of the assessed dwellings were deemed in need of refurbishment, and 67 were deemed in need of significant capital expenditure.
    • Between 2003-04 and 2007-08, Indigenous people in the Yugul Mangi Statistical Local Area, which includes Ngukurr, were hospitalised for diseases associated with poor environmental health at a rate of 20.7 per 1,000.

    Economic Participation

     

    • An employment survey was undertaken in 2009 in Ngukurr. Of the 217 employed people, 169 were Indigenous—95 people were employed full-time, 60 were part-time, 10 were casual and four held Community Development Employment Projects positions.
    • At the time of the survey 133 Indigenous people were employed in the public sector (82 full-time, 47 part-time and four casual) and 32 were employed in the private sector (13 full-time, 13 part-time and six casual).
    • Ninety seven per cent of income support recipients were of workforce age (15–64 years of age). Fifty four per cent of all income support recipients were female.
    • About 47 per cent of all income support recipients received Newstart Allowance (199 recipients) and about eight per cent received Youth Allowance (37 recipients). Twenty seven per cent received Parenting Payments and eleven per cent received Disability Support Pension payments. Between June 2008 and June 2009, the number of recipients on Disability Support Pension and Youth Allowance—other increased by 55 per cent and 32 per cent respectively. In contrast, the number of Newstart Allowance recipients decreased by 19 per cent (48 people).
    • None of the 243.7 km of roads surveyed in and around Ngukurr were found to be in good condition, 61 per cent were found to be in fair condition, and 39 per cent were found to be in poor condition.

    Safe Communities

     

    • From 2006–07 to 2008–09, a total of 479 offences were recorded in Ngukurr. There was a 52 per cent decrease in the number of offences recorded between 2006–07 and 2007–08, from 236 offences to 113. Recorded offences increased between 2007–08 and 2008–09.
    • Over the three year period, 23 per cent of offences were recorded as alcohol related, including 36 per cent of acts intended to cause injury, 89 per cent of ‘other’ offences against the person and 64 per cent of public order offences. Across the three-year period, nine per cent of all offences in Ngukurr were considered by police to be drug or substance abuse related, in various categories.
    • Between 2006–07 and 2008–09, 14 per cent of all offences were recorded as domestic/family violence related.

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    Schedule C: Summary of Community Engagement

    The Ngukurr Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager worked with community groups and individuals, as well as key stakeholders, service providers and non-government organisations to guide the Ngukurr Local Implementation Plan process. This section outlines the kinds of consultation, engagement and capacity-building that occurred.

    Consultation with the Local Reference Group

    The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation is the key community group for engagement in the Local Implementation Plan process.

    The Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation was registered with the Registrar of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Corporations on 10 April 2008. Yugul Mangi resolved at its 24 November 2009 meeting that all of its elected directors would be members of the Local Reference Group and that key service providers would be invited to participate throughout the negotiations of the Local Implementation Plan process.

    Since then, Yugul Mangi has held monthly Local Reference Group meetings regarding the Local Implementation Plan, with key service providers attending (including representatives from the school, police, health centre, Roper Gulf Shire, art centre, rangers and night patrol). Leading up to the final negotiations for the Local Implementation Plan three community workshop meetings were held (in February, May and July 2010) to work toward finalising the community’s priorities in the Plan.

    Meetings have been generally well attended, with a quorum requiring at least one director representing each clan. This means attendees can change from meeting to meeting. However it also allows the clans to share the meeting-load and provide diverse representation from elders, youth and females. Directors are responsible for sharing meeting information with the other directors and with their respective clan groups. They also determine which director from their clan will attend a particular meeting depending on their experience, age or gender as appropriate to the issues being discussed.

    Local Reference Group Members

    The Yugul Mangi members serving as the Local Reference Group are: Daphne Daniels, Jerry Ashley, Andy Peters, David Daniels, Davis Daniels, Bobby Nunggumajbarr, Olga Daniels, Derek Thompson, William Hall, Lindsay Hall, Sophia Tapau, Cliff Thompson, Owen Turner, Gwen Rami, Robert Roberts, Stella Roberts, Jacob Lansen, Grace Daniels, Glen Blitner, Clement John-Forrest, Theresa John-Forrest, Kevin Rogers, Robin Rogers, Raina Rogers, Walter Rogers, Aaron Joshua, Alan Joshua, John Graham Rogers, Alison Bush, Roger Thompson, Clarrie Rogers and Rev Andrew Robertson.

    Consultations with community members

    The Indigenous Engagement Officer held over 60 consultations with individual community members and family groups who contributed to the prioritising of the Local Implementation Plan.

    Consultations with service providers and governance structures

    As well as meeting regularly with the Local Reference Group, the following groups were directly consulted with on a regular basis over the past six months by the Government Business Manager and Indigenous Engagement Officer: sport and recreation staff; aged care provider; women’s safe place; men’s safe place; the church group; shire services manager; Childcare; Indigenous Business Australia Consultant who is developing Ngukurr’s Economic Development Initiative; the Yugul Mangi Rangers; the police; Northern Territory Tourism working on the region’s tourism scoping study; the school principal and teaching staff; and health centre staff

    Engagement

    The Yugul Mangi Community Development Plan was a key tool and information source used to begin community engagement on developing the Local Implementation Plan.

    The Indigenous Engagement Officer is the key engagement officer at the local level, responsible for meeting regularly with families and individuals to keep the community well informed about the Local Implementation Plan and other government business.

    Additionally, a range of tools have been created to support an informed engagement process:

    • Community posters and fact sheets about Closing the Gap, Remote Service Delivery and the Local Implementation Plan have been developed and presented to Yugul Mangi during the visioning forum and subsequent meetings.
    • A community notice board has been sent to the Government Business Manager to display information to the broader community about Closing the Gap.
    • A DVD was produced in Ngukurr profiling the success of the local apprenticeship program and how this and other community initiatives contribute to Closing the Gap.
    • A photographer visited Ngukurr in June 2010, and the photographs will be used by the Regional Operations Centre to create distinctive Ngukurr engagement materials.
    • A well-known Indigenous performer hosted a one-week youth engagement workshop at the school to explore young people’s priorities for a happy, healthy future in Ngukurr. During this week the children created songs, artwork and mini-movies about their vision for the community.

    Capacity- building

    Yugul Mangi has been supported in its capacity-building by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre. On 9 February 2010, the Regional Operations Centre convened an in-community Visioning Forum for Yugul Mangi facilitated by an experienced Indigenous facilitator. The Visioning Forum explored government’s vision in Closing the Gap and Remote Service Delivery, and the Ngukurr community’s vision through a Local Implementation Plan based on their Community Development Plan. The community’s desired outcomes set in its Community Development Plan were presented for prioritisation. Over a series of in-community meetings between Yugul Mangi, the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, priorities under each building block were finalised and negotiated with government.

    Yugul Mangi members also participated in a regional Remote Service Delivery Governance and Leadership Workshop held in Katherine on 22-23 April 2010. The workshop focused on building the capacity of current and emerging local leadership in the areas of: Western concepts of visions and goal setting; how to work with governments; the local implementation process; community accountability; sharing stories of local leadership; and democratic governance.

    Yugul Mangi has also secured government funding and is working to establish its own local business manager, an ongoing income stream and a Community Benefit Trust account which will expand the capacity of the group.


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