Local Implementation Plan - Lajamanu

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Artist's Acknowledgement

Artist: Lily Nungarrayi Yirdingali Jurrah

Nungarrayi is an avid artist and lover of her culture. She is driven to record and preserve knowing she is fighting against the power of time and the new impeding culture. Nungarrayi

loves colour and expression. In her later years her style has changed slightly showing more freedom and use of colour, while years of experience with brushes show skilled execution

and technique. Nungarrayi now produces some truly stunning work with heavy bold confident brush work while manipulating a broad range of colour.

This artist’s depth of character and life experience is reflected in her work. She was also known as Maggie Jurrah/Hargraves. Now she prefers to be known as Jurrah. 

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Signatory Page

We will all work together to Close the Gap.

Through respect and collaboration we will create a better future for all of our children.

This Local Implementation Plan is our commitment to create a long lasting partnership between the people of Lajamanu and governments.

Introduction

Welcome to Country

The Lajamanu Reference Group would like to take this opportunity to pay respects to the Warlpiri elders, past and present and the Gurindji people who were the traditional owners of this land before past governments forced Warlpiri people to settle here. We solemnly respect the stories and ceremonies that they have granted to us as current custodians of this area. On behalf of the Warlpiri people we welcome you all.

We have had many meetings and lots of discussions on what our community needs and have come up with our list of priorities. The Governments (Commonwealth, Northern Territory and the Shire) have agreed to help us achieve them which is a positive sign of our partnership and our trust in each other.

These priorities have been established to make the Lajamanu community a centre where economic growth can create a prosperous future for our people. They have been chosen to make our community stronger, wiser and safer.

For the Lajamanu community to succeed into the future we need everyone to commit to this plan and to uphold the agreement in all of their actions. We, as the representatives of the Lajamanu community, have made our commitment by working on this plan to get it ready and finalized. In partnership with other signatories, we will continue to work on this plan to achieve its outcomes and will undertake to review it regularly to ensure that the actions are being followed and that they remain relevant.

In signing the Local Implementation Plan we are showing our commitment to Government and are proud and honoured that the Government has listened to our Community needs; we will work together to make sure that the Lajamanu community becomes a better place to live. We agree to do our part in closing the gap and ask that all parties commit with us to deliver on the actions in this plan.

We will work in harmony to achieve a proud and productive future for Lajamanu.

Closing the Gap in Lajamanu



The Australian and Northern Territory Governments are working together with Local Governments, through the Shire Councils, to reduce Indigenous disadvantage. In recognition that outcomes for Indigenous Australians remain below those of non-Indigenous Australians, the Council of Australian Governments has agreed to implement the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.


This Agreement is a long-term, generational commitment based on delivering coordinated, targeted and accelerated development in Indigenous communities, and it changes the way governments invest in remote areas. The Agreement takes a direct approach to improving conditions. This includes engaging directly with the communities on delivering improvements. It also involves clear accountability for who does what, where and by when, backed up by rigorous monitoring and reporting.

Lajamanu is one of the 29 remote Indigenous communities across Australia where this approach is being started through Local Implementation Plans. The Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan has been developed through close consultation between governments and the Lajamanu community through the Lajamanu Local Reference Group. It sets out the priorities for the Lajamanu community and includes targets, actions, success measures and timelines for achieving those priorities. Existing community and government plans and agreements in Lajamanu complement the Remote Service Delivery approach. All the signatories agree to work together to deliver the actions in the plan.

Transforming Lajamanu will require a two-way commitment to change. This means:

  • community members agree to take more personal responsibility and fully participate in the commitments of the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan, and
  • governments agree to listen to the community and provide resources and planning to improve infrastructure, services and access to services.

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Closing the Gap Building Blocks

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to six specific targets to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage, outlined below. These targets are underpinned by seven building blocks—priority areas where action is required. Improvements in one area will affect results in other areas.


 
COAG Targets Building Blocks Achieving COAG Targets

Ensure all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years.


Halve the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.


Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.


Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade.


Halve the gap in employment between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.


Halve the gap for Indigenous students in rates of Year 12 or equivalent attainment by 2020.

Early Childhood icon

For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to high-quality early childhood education and care services—including preschool, child care and family support services such as parenting programs—is critical. Facilities and infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention. Action on maternal, antenatal and early childhood health will help close the gap in child mortality as well as in early childhood development.

Schooling icon

Education is the key to future opportunity. Schooling that responds to Indigenous education priorities requires attention to infrastructure, teacher and school leader supply and quality, curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school-community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, and post-school education and training are also important. So are lifelong learning and the development of adult literacy and numeracy skills.

Health icon

Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving Indigenous Australians' health and life expectancy and reducing excess mortality from chronic disease. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care. These services need to be responsive to government and community health priorities and accountable for achieving them. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires intense efforts in preventing, managing and treating chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to use programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.

Healthy Home icon

A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (including design, availability and maintenance). Children need to live in houses that are free from overcrowding and provide the infrastructure they need for good hygiene and study.

Economic Participation icon

Indigenous people and communities should be able to benefit from the mainstream economy. This includes real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Economic participation needs to extend to disadvantaged job seekers and those outside the labour market. Access to land and native title can be leveraged to secure practical benefits for Indigenous people. Economic participation also needs other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures, and infrastructure such as communications and transport. Through economic participation, adults can become good role models for their family and community. The design and delivery of welfare (transfer payments and services) needs to encourage active engagement, greater capability and positive social norms. Ensuring that communities have support to overcome barriers to engagement such as problem gambling is critical.

Safe Communities icon

Indigenous men, women and children need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Meeting this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection, and preventative measures. Addressing related problems such as alcohol and substance abuse is critical to improving community safety as well as improving health.

Convernance and Leadership icon

Strong Indigenous leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations, as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels, are essential for long-term sustainable results. Indigenous people need to engage in developing reforms that will affect them. They need greater opportunities to build capacity in governance and leadership in order to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

Lajamanu's Partnership with Government



The Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan enables the three tiers of government and the Lajamanu community to reset their relationship through a partnership aimed at improving conditions and services in Lajamanu. This page explains the structures for Lajamanu's partnership with government.


Local Reference Group

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group is the main way Lajamanu consults and negotiates with government on the Local Implementation Plan. Its members are community people from across the different language groups, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Lajamanu.

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group set the community priorities for the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan. To do this it consulted with language groups, participated in capacity-building workshops and took advice from community members with experience in service delivery.

With support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager, the Lajamanu Local Reference Group consulted traditional owners and sought their agreement on the various community issues in the plan.

Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager

The Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager support the Lajamanu Local Reference Group and the Local Implementation Plan process. They work with both the Northern Territory and Australian Governments, as well as having strong connections with the Shire council. They both live and work in Lajamanu.

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is an Indigenous person from the local area whose job is to:

  • support the community in its consultations and negotiations with government,
  • ensure government engages with the community in a culturally appropriate way, and
  • assist the Lajamanu Local Reference Group to report on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Government Business Manager.

The Government Business Manager is the contact person for liaison between the community and government and also:

  • helps with community planning and agreement making,
  • helps with service coordination and delivery on the ground,
  • involves service providers such as non-governmental organisations in the Local Implementation Plan process, and
  • reports on Local Implementation Plan progress to the Regional Operations Centre.

Together the Government Business Manager and the Indigenous Engagement Officer are a Single Government Interface for the community. They help community people understand government programs and services, and help government and the shires understand community issues and priorities.

Schedule C details which groups were consulted and engaged with to develop the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan.

Regional Operations Centre and Board of Management

The Regional Operations Centre supports the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager with the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan. It also helps government to coordinate effective and timely service delivery. Regional Operations Centre staff are from both the Australian and Northern Territory Governments.

Lajamanu's Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager are supported by the Regional Operations Centre staff in Darwin and Alice Springs.

The Regional Operations Centre reports to the Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery Board of Management, which is a partnership consisting of senior officials from both governments and from the shires who are responsible for providing oversight and guidance on the implementation of Remote Service Delivery policy.

The Board of Management will:

  • monitor and report on progress against the actions in the Local Implementation Plan,
  • take a whole-of-government approach to supporting the work of the Regional Operations Centre, and
  • solve any problems and seek to address any lack of progress on implementation.

Local Government

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments note the important role of local government through its elected representation and service provision to the Lajamanu community and are committed to working in partnership with the Central Desert Shire Council to implement the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan.


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Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan Process

How the plan developed

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group was established to set priorities to improve the quality of life in its community. The Lajamanu Local Reference Group was introduced to Local Implementation Planning at a local visioning forum convened by the Regional Operations Centre. Following this workshop, the Lajamanu Local Reference Group established a comprehensive list of community priorities under each building block. To do this it took suggestions from community people, traditional owners and senior elders with support from the Indigenous Engagement Officer and the Government Business Manager.

Through regular meetings, the Lajamanu Local Reference Group prioritised their top desired outcomes requiring immediate action in this first iteration of the Local Implementation Plan.

These top priorities were negotiated by the Regional Operations Centre with governments and service providers. Details of Lajamanu's top priorities with strategies and actions being committed to this year by the community, governments and the shires are in Schedule A. The source document listing all of the desired community outcomes supplied by the Local Reference Group is available from the Government Business Manager and will be used to inform future versions of and updates to the Local Implementation Plan.

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments, with assistance from Shire Councils, surveyed conditions in Lajamanu to get baseline mapping data. This information identifies the Lajamanu community's needs and is the starting point for measuring the results from the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan. A summary of the baseline mapping data for Lajamanu is in Schedule B.

Start and finish dates

This iteration of the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan commences upon the date of signing. Progress on Schedule A will be monitored regularly, and details of the plan will be reviewed, updated, amended and expanded annually throughout the lifetime of the plan until 30 June 2014.

Keeping the plan on track

The Regional Operations Centre will:

  • assess progress against the actions in Schedule A through regular communication with government agencies and the shires, supported by the Board of Management, and
  • work with the Lajamanu Local Reference Group and ensure it has the information it needs to implement the plan.

Government agencies and the shires will:

  • report regularly to the Regional Operations Centre on progress against committed actions in the plan, and
  • consult with the Regional Operations Centre on details of the plan's actions that evolve after the plan is agreed upon.

Supported by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, the Lajamanu Local Reference Group will:

  • check that the community is meeting its commitments in the plan,
  • meet regularly and keep the community well informed,
  • help raise awareness on agency progress on the ground, and
  • agree on any new priorities or changes to the plan that are needed to meet targets.

Reviewing the plan

The Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan is a living, evolving document that can respond to the changing needs, gaps and priorities for Lajamanu. There will be opportunities to update, add to and improve it annually or more frequently if required.

This first version of the plan was created within tight time frames, and the details and actions of the plan are certain to evolve.

Reviewing progress

The Regional Operations Centre will receive regular reports from government agencies on the plan's progress. The Regional Operations Centre will also receive regular reports from the Lajamanu Local Reference Group through the Government Business Manager regarding progress on the ground. The Regional Operations Centre will provide a regular general report, based on the community and agency progress reports, to the Board of Management.

The Board of Management will oversee the implementation process and alert the responsible agencies to gaps, delays or needs for improvement to ensure they meet their commitments.

The Office of the Coordinator-General for Remote Indigenous Services and the Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services also oversee the implementation process, with the authority to work across agencies to cut through bureaucratic blockages and red tape, and to make sure services are delivered effectively.

The Regional Operations Centre will also provide an annual report to the community on how the commitments are being achieved. It will work closely with the Lajamanu Local Reference Group, service providers, all levels of government and the shires to keep track of the commitments in Schedule A.

Addressing issues with plan progress

Any member of the Lajamanu Local Reference Group may raise an issue on behalf of the people they represent.

The Regional Operations Centre and the Board of Management are there to make sure that issues are addressed and resolved.

Lajamanu's Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager, with support from the Regional Operations Centre, are there to help the Lajamanu Local Reference Group get its issues dealt with.

This is the formal process for dealing with issues with plan progress:

  • A community member or group puts the issue in writing or tells it to a member of the Lajamanu Local Reference Group, which discusses the issue as a priority.
  • The Lajamanu Local Reference Group raises the issue to the Regional Operations Centre through the Government Business Manager's monthly progress report.
  • The Regional Operations Centre works with the relevant government agency to address the issue, and reports the issue to the Board of Management if necessary. The Regional Operations Centre will let the Lajamanu Local Reference Group know what is being done.

About Lajamnu

History

Aboriginal people have inhabited this region for more than 40,000 years. In 1948 the Native Affairs Branch of the federal government set up an Aboriginal Reserve at Catfish, a permanent waterhole almost 600 km north of the Warlpiri settlement of Yuendumu. They did this because of concerns about drought and overcrowding in Yuendumu. Two young Warlpiri men guided the way to Lajamanu but 150 km before they got to Catfish they found themselves in unknown country and decided to walk back. Later, the Native Affairs Branch put 25 Warlpiri men in a truck and sent them to Catfish. On the way, the men camped at the flowing Hooker Creek and decided to stay there instead.

Another 550 Warlpiri people were transported from Yuendumu to Hooker Creek over the next few years. People were not very happy about being removed from their country and their relatives, so they walked all the way back to Yuendumu. They were then trucked back to Hooker Creek, only to walk all the way back a second time. Eventually people stayed in Hooker Creek and began to see it as home, although their spiritual home remained in the southern Tanami.

In the 1970s Hooker Creek stopped being a welfare settlement and the Lajamanu Council became the first Community Government Council in the Northern Territory. In 2008 the Lajamanu Council became part of the Central Desert Shire Council.

Location

Lajamanu is located 870 km south of Darwin and 560 km south-west of Katherine by road in the central deserts of the Northern Territory. Lajamanu is on the northern edge of the Tanami Desert, midway between Alice Springs and Darwin, on the traditional country of the Gurindji people.

Population

The population of Lajamanu and its surrounds in 2006 was approximately 845, of which 735 were Indigenous (87 per cent). In 2006, 49 per cent of Lajamanu's Indigenous population was younger than 20 years of age. The Indigenous population of Lajamanu and its surrounds is projected to increase from 735 people in 2006 to 1,010 in 2026, an increase of 38 per cent. The number of Indigenous people of working age (15-64 years) is projected to increase from 441 to 649 over this period.

The greatest proportional increase is expected to be in the older population of 50 years and above, which is expected to double over the next 20 years from 75 in 2006 to 167 in 2026.

These numbers are based on the 2006 Census, adjusted using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates as the census under-counted Indigenous populations. It is recognised that this may not be an accurate assessment of the current population.

Languages

Warlpiri is the main language in Lajamanu, spoken by about 77 per cent of people. English is also spoken as a second language.

Language groups

Lajamanu is on traditional Gurindji country. Warlpiri people have settled here with the acceptance of the Gurindji. In a series of ceremonies in the late 1970s the Gurindji of the Wave Hill area ‘handed over' the country and the Dreaming to the Warlpiri. Many people now living in Lajamanu belong to the original families who settled here between 1948 and 1951. Many community people still relate very strongly to Yuendumu and other communities such as Willowra and Daguragu.

Traditional owners

The traditional owners of the country, the Gurindji people, mainly live around 100 km further north around Kalkarindji, Daguragu and Wave Hill. Honorary traditional owners from the Warlpiri people live in the community and consult with Gurindji traditional owners on traditional governance matters.

Land Council

The Central Land Council is the land council for the community and the surrounding town area. It has headquarters in Alice Springs and a regional office in Lajamanu. The Central Land Council is responsible for matters under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. This includes:

  • checking, representing and responding to the wishes and opinions of local Indigenous people about legislation, tourism, development and commercial activities that affect traditional land,
  • helping traditional landowners claim, manage and protect the land, and
  • in Lajamanu, managing the Aboriginal Land Trust and the mining royalties trust on behalf of the traditional landowners.

The Central Land Council has an agreement— the Tanami Regional Partnership—with Newmont Asia Pacific, the Australian and Northern Territory governments and the Victoria Daly and Central Desert Shire Councils to improve education, create jobs in the mining industry, support Aboriginal businesses and build the capacity of Yuendumu, Lajamanu and Kalkarindji.

The Central Land Council sponsors the Granite Mines Aboriginal Affected Areas Corporation. The corporation's board of directors oversees the distribution of Granite Mines royalties for Lajamanu community projects.

Local Government

The Central Desert Shire Council provides local government in Lajamanu, which has about 20 per cent of the Shire's population. Lajamanu is in the Northern Tanami Ward, which elects two of the 12 Shire Council members. The Shire headquarters are in Alice Springs and it has a service delivery centre in Lajamanu.

The Shire consults local people through the Local Board, which has 12 members chosen by the community and approved by the Shire Council. This Local Board evolved from the old Lajamanu Community Council. It is organised by the Shire Services Manager and the Shire Governance Manager, and meets every month or every other month.

Local Reference Group

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group has 16 members—10 men and six women. Twelve of these are from the Shire's Local Board. The other four are men who responded to an advertisement for nominations to join the group. Group members are well-respected leaders in the Lajamanu community. They are experienced in negotiating better outcomes for the community with all levels of government. Further information about the Local Reference Group is found in Schedule C.

Early Childhood Highlights

Parents and other carers are working hard to look after the large number of children in Lajamanu. A top priority for the community is child care so that parents can go to work and not rely on grandparents to look after the children.

The protection of children is everybody's responsibility. It is the duty of all government and non-government workers and community members to identify and report children they believe may be at risk of harm or neglect. The community is keen to improve parenting skills and confidence.

Community strengths

  • The traditional owners have committed funds through the Warlpiri Education and Training Trust to develop the capacity of the community to care well for its children.
  • The Warlpiri Education and Training Trust has appointed a community member to develop an early childhood reference group and to help local people establish playgroups and parenting workshops.
  • The community has worked with the Families as First Teachers program, the Katherine Isolated Children's Program, the Indigenous Parenting Support Program and the Warlpiri Education and Training Trust to provide daily playgroups.
  • The Warlpiri Education and Training Trust is also paying for an early childhood trainer to deliver Certificate II in Working with Indigenous Children and Certificate III in Children's Services, ensuring that local people have long-term involvement in early childhood services.

Desired community outcomes

  • Parents with skills to care for children.
  • Capable and confident parents raising children.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • To enhance the protection of children the Northern Territory Department of Health and Families is developing minimum service standards for child protection and related services for Lajamanu that will include an agreed program to implement these standards.
  • Parents ensure children attend health centre for regular checkups and immunisations.
  • Provide a purpose build crèche/childcare facility to cater for 30 children.

Details of Lajamanu's early childhood priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Schooling Highlights

The Lajamanu School provides schooling from preschool to year 12.

The community is keen to reduce barriers to learning and improve school attendance.

Community strengths

  • A breakfast and lunch program at the school provides healthy meals and encourages attendance.
  • To help re-engage disengaged senior students, the school has organised former senior students to work on after-school and holiday programs.
  • The school supports vocational training via the Batchelor Institute.
  • The school has arts and crafts, cooking, music, library, woodwork and computer rooms.
  • Plans to build more staff housing are well under way.
  • Indigenous staff at the school include a senior teacher, a teacher and a number of teacher assistants.

Desired community outcomes

  • Barriers to learning are reduced.
  • Improve attendance and performance at school.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • A bilingual approach to education will be delivered with English as the predominant language of instruction supported by first language and enriched with an early years bi-literacy approach up to year 2.
  • Parents and community encourage and support children to go to school.

Details of Lajamanu's schooling priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Health Highlight

The Lajamanu Health Centre provides medical and public health services and access to visiting doctors and specialists.

The community is keen to improve access to health care and aged care

Community strengths

  • Lajamanu Health Centre staff include Aboriginal health workers, trainee Aboriginal health workers and a resident general practitioner.

Desired community outcomes

  • Access to primary health and preventative services through provision of adequate health infrastructure and facilities.
  • All the old people are properly cared for in aged care facility.
  • Local people trained and employed in health and administration positions.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • Develop new category 1 health centre that includes appropriate access for men and areas for renal treatment and emergency evacuation.
  • Support training of local staff to deliver health service programs.

Details of Lajamanu's health priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Healthy Homes Highlights

The community is keen to ensure that there is enough housing for everyone in Lajamanu.

Community strengths

  • Under the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program the community will get new housing and refurbishment of existing housing.
  • Government will consult with the Lajamanu Housing Reference Group to ensure local people have a say in decisions about housing in their community.

Desired community outcomes

  • Enough housing for all community members.
  • Appropriate training in household maintenance and equipment to ensure clean, tidy and healthy conditions.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • Undertake a review of housing requirements at completion of the Strategic Indigenous Housing Infrastructure Program, and develop a plan to provide enough housing in the future.
  • The Healthy Homes Working Group will identify and implement training and support to assist Lajamanu people with maintaining their homes, including home budgeting, home care (cleaning, minor repairs) and life skills (cooking, nutrition, safe food storage).

Details of Lajamanu's housing priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Economic Participation Highlights

The community is keen to see increased local training and job opportunities.

Community strengths

  • Community Development Employment Projects are functioning in the community.
  • Lajamanu's four main employers are the council, the Lajamanu Progress Association, the school and the health centre.

Desired community outcomes

  • Improved all-weather access to the community.
  • Access to appropriate vocational training courses.
  • Small business training for family groups wanting to start enterprises.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • The community will endeavour to achieve maximum participation in all government-funded training and development activities.
  • Identify and review the availability of adult education training facilities, and provide business support and mentoring to individuals and groups wanting to start a viable business.

Details of Lajamanu's economic participation priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Safe Communities Highlights

The Lajamanu police station has two permanent officers and serves an area of 34,000 km2, assisted by a night patrol service.

The community is keen to have local people more involved in administering justice.

Community strengths

  • The police at Lajamanu are actively involved in community sport and youth programs and social activities.
  • The community has a women's safe house.
  • The Warlpiri Youth Development Aboriginal Corporation—which includes the successful Mt Theo youth substance abuse program based in Yuendumu—offers outreach substance abuse and diversionary services to the youth of Lajamanu.

Desired community outcomes

  • Local people involved in the administration of justice.
  • Children and families are safe at night.
  • Adequate street lighting to ensure children and families are safe at night.
  • Men have safe retreat and sobering-up facility.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • Establish a Community Safety Working Party to work with community members to develop place-based strategies and a plan that will address safety concerns, including reviewing and incorporating aspirations of the Lajamanu Law and Justice Plan.
  • The Lajamanu community will review and incorporate aspirations of the Lajamanu Law and Justice Plan into their Safety Plan.

Details of Lajamanu's safety priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

Governance and Leadership Highlights

The community is keen to build local leadership capacity.

Community strengths

  • Lajamanu has been very strong in its cooperative approach to governance and leadership that embraces Western approaches and respects traditional governance.
  • The Lajamanu Progress Association—an Aboriginal corporation governed by a board of local Indigenous people—owns and manages the community store, airline, takeaway, service station and garage.
  • The Wulaign Outstation Resource Centre is another Aboriginal corporation run by community leaders and senior traditional owners, and provides leadership, governance and support to Lajamanu.

Desired community outcomes

  • Enhance and improve local people's decision-making practices and capabilities.
  • Community organisations work together to enhance and strengthen governance and leadership.
  • Strong, credible and inclusive community governance.

Commitments

The community and all levels of government are committing to a number of actions to address the community's priorities, including:

  • Work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of the men, women and youth of Lajamanu.
  • Develop clear profile of community organisations and community-owned enterprises, detailing ownership and governance structures.
  • The Lajamanu Local Reference Group and the Regional Operations Centre will work in partnership to implement the Local Implementation Plan.

Details of Lajamanu's governance and leadership priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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Schedule A: List of Acronyms

  • ABA: Aboriginal Benefits Account
  • ACPO: Aborginal Community Police Officer
  • ACW: Aboriginal Community Worker
  • AFL: Australian Footbal League
  • AG: Australian Government
  • AGD: Attorney Generals Department
  • AIS: Australian Interpreter Services
  • ALC: Anindilyakwa Land Council
  • ALPA: Arnhem Land Progress Association
  • ALRA: Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976
  • AMRRIC: Animal management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities
  • AMS: Aboriginal Medical Services
  • AMSANT: Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory
  • AODP: Alcohol and Other Drugs Project
  • ASC: Australian Sports Commission
  • ASM: Area Services Manager
  • BoM: Board of Management
  • BOOT/BOOTS: Build, Own, Operate, Transfer and Support
  • BRACS: Broadcasting for Remote Aboriginal Communities Scheme
  • CA: Central Australia
  • CAALAS: Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service
  • CARH: Central Australian Remote Health
  • CASA: Civil Aviation Safety Authority
  • CAYLUS: Central Australian Youth Link Up Service
  • CDSC: Central Desert Shire Council
  • CDEP: Community Development Employment Projects
  • CDS: Central Desert Shire
  • CDU: Charles Darwin University
  • CEC: Community Education Centre
  • CEO: Catholic Education Office
  • CFC: Child and Families Centre
  • CLC: Central Land Council
  • CSP: Community Safety Plan
  • CWG: Capital Working Group
  • DBCDE: Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
  • DBE: Department of Business and Employment
  • DCI: Department of Construction and Infrastructure
  • DEEWR: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
  • DET: Department of Education and Training
  • DHF: Department of Health and Families
  • DLP: Department of Lands and Planning
  • DoHA: Department of Health and Aging
  • DoJ: Department of Justice
  • DPI: Department of Planning and Infrastructure
  • DSEWPAC: Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communites
  • DVD: Digital Versatile Disc
  • EA: East Arnhem
  • EASC: East Arnhem Shire Council
  • EBA: Enterprise Bargaining Agreement
  • EDO: Economic Development Officer
  • FaFT: Families as First Teachers
  • FaHCSIA: Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
  • FTE: Full Time Equivalent
  • GBM: Government Business Manager
  • GEBIE: Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises
  • GEH: Government Employee Housing
  • GEMCO: Groote Eylandt Mining Company
  • GPNNT: General Practice Network Northern Territory
  • HACC: Home and Community Care
  • HLGRS-(RD): Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services - Regional Development
  • HLGRS/DHLGRS : Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services
  • HOIL: Home Ownership Indigenous Land
  • HRG: Housing Reference Group
  • HSDA: Health Service Delivery Area
  • IBA: Indigenous Business Association
  • ICT: Information and Communications Technology
  • IEO: Indigenous Engagement Officer
  • ILC: Independent Land Corporation
  • IPSS: Indigenous Parenting Support Service
  • IPWG: Infrastructure and Planning Working Group
  • IRSD: Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account
  • IT: Information Technology
  • JSA: Job Services Australia
  • KWHB: Katherine West Health Board
  • LAB: Local Advisory Board
  • LGANT: Local Government Association of the Northern Territory
  • LIP: Local Implementation Plan
  • LHA: Laynhapuy Homelands Association
  • LHRG: Local Housing Reference Group
  • LLNP: Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program
  • LRG: Local reference group
  • LSP: Locational Supported Playgroups
  • Malabam: Malabam Health Board
  • MCS: Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School
  • MES: Municipal Essential Services
  • MH: Mental Health
  • MJD FOUNDATION: Machado Joseph Disease Foundation
  • MOU: Memorandum of Understanding
  • MSC: McDonnell Shire Council
  • MSOAP: Medical Specialists Outreach Assistance Program
  • N/A: Not Applicable
  • NGO: Non Government Organisation
  • NLC: Northern Land Council
  • NPA: National Partnership Agreement
  • NRETAS: Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport
  • NRT: Nicotine Replacement Therapy
  • NT: Northern Territory
  • NTCET: Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training
  • NTFC: Northern Territory Families and Children
  • NTG: Northern Territory Government
  • NTIEC: Northern Territory Indigenous Education Council
  • NTPFES: Northern Territory Police Fire and Emergency Services
  • NTPOL: Norther Territory Police
  • OATSIH: Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
  • OCPE: Office of the Comissioner of Public Employment
  • OLSH TCS: Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic School
  • ORIC: Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
  • OTL: Office of Township Leasing
  • PaCE: Parents and Community Engagement
  • PAW Media: Pintubi, Anmatjerre, Warlpiri Media
  • PATS: Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
  • PHC: Primary Health Care
  • PHCM: Primary Health Care Manager
  • PWC/P&W: Power Water Corporation
  • RAFCW: Remote Area Family and Community Workers
  • RGSC: Roper Gulf Shire Council
  • RH: Remote Housing
  • RHNT: Remote Housing Northern Territory
  • RIBS: Regional Indigenous Broadcasting Services
  • ROC: Regional Operations Centre
  • RSD: Remote Service Delivery
  • RTEED: Remote Training, Employment and Economic Development
  • SDCU: Service Delivery Coordination Unit
  • SEAM: School Enrolment and Attendance Measure
  • SIHIP: Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program
  • SNP: School Nutrition Program
  • STEP: Structured Training and Employment Projects
  • SWSBSC: Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture
  • TBA: To Be Advised
  • TDC: Thamarrurr Development Corporation
  • TIE: Transforming Indigenous Education
  • TISC: Tiwi Islands Shire Council
  • TO: Traditional Owners
  • TOR: Terms Of Reference
  • TRPA: Tanami Regional Partnership Agreement
  • UNICEF: United Nations Children's Fund
  • VET/VETiS: Vocational Education and Training in Schools
  • WAHAC BOARD: Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation Board
  • WASC: West Arnhem Shire Council
  • WG: Working Group
  • WETT: Warlpiri Education and Training Trust
  • WHO: World Health Organisation
  • WoG: Whole of Government
  • WYN BOARD: Willowra, Yuendumu, Nyirripi Health Board
  • YMAC: Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation

Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Early Childhood


 
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number and proportion of low, normal, and high birth weight Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5's within a decade
Timing of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5's within a decade

Priority 1: All children will have access to Early Childhood Education (ECE) in the year immediately preceding primary school.


Strategy 1.1: Provide adequate creche or child care services and places for all children in the year preceding primary school.
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 Review future childcare staff requirements, prepare report on staffing requirement for new childcare facility (30 childcare places). Lead - DEEWR Supporting - CDSC, DET, DCI, DHF 2010 2012
1.1.2 Establish an early childhood coordinator to lead the integration of child and family services tailored to the Lajamanu community and its surrounding service delivery area. This will be achieved through a whole-of-government approach across all levels of government, non-government organisations and the community to develop and implement the integrated service model. All program content will be inclusive of Indigenous culture and links to elders. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG, CDSC, Government Service Providers, NGOs, community, DEEWR Started Review Jun-11
1.1.3 Provide childcare training for local staff engaged in delivery of childcare services. Lead - DEEWR Supporting - World Vision, CDSC Started Dec '10
1.1.4 Provide universal access to preschool for every child in the year before full-time school. By 2013 the preschool program is to be delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year by a four-year, university qualified early childhood teacher. The program will be accessible across a diversity of settings and in a form that meets the needs of parents. Lead - DET Supporting - DEEWR Started Dec-13

Priority 2: Adequate infrastructure to deliver early childhood programs.

Strategy 2.1: Plan infrastructure to meet service needs.
2.1.1 Provide purpose built Creche/Child Care facility to cater for 30 children. Work progressing is dependent on gaining land tenure to appropriate site. Planning will be guided by the Capital Working Group, which has been established as a result of the Local Implementation Planning process and comprises lead agencies from governments. Lead - DEEWR Supporting - CDSC, DCi Started 2012
2.1.2 Prepare report on childcare staff housing requirements for operation of new Childcare facility. Lead - DEEWR Supporting - CDSC Started 2012

Priority 3: Children are prepared for education.

Strategy 3.1: Assist and support parents to raise their children and understand the value of early childhood education for their children.
3.1.1 Establish Families as First Teachers - Indigenous Parenting Support Service (FaFT-IPSS) program. This place-based integrated universal services program includes early learning and parenting support strategies. Lead - DET Supporting – DHF, FaHCSIA and the community Started Dec-12
3.1.2 Implement Locational Supported Playgroup as part of FaFT-IPSS program. Lead - DET Supporting - FaHCSIA and the community Started Jun-12
3.1.3 Investigate opportunities for local people to deliver parenting programs for young mothers and fathers. Lead - WETT Supporting - World Vision, CDSC, DEEWR, DET Started Dec-10
3.1.4 FaFT-IPSS is delivering Certificate III Community Services in the workplace for the local Indigenous FaFT family Liaison Officers and Locational Supported Playgroup staff. Lead - DET Supporting - FaHCSIA and the community Started Dec-11
3.1.5 All program content to include Warlpiri culture and links to elders. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG Started Review Jun-11

Priority 4: Lajamanu children are born healthy and stay healthy.

Strategy 4.1: New mothers are healthy and receive quality support before, during and after childbirth.
4.1.1 Education and support programs to reduce smoking, drinking and poor nutrition during pregnancy. Lead - KWHB Supporting - DHF, DoHA Started Review Oct-11
4.1.2 Pregnant women attend regular antenatal checks. Lead - Community, LRG From date of agreement Review Jun-11
4.1.3 Deliver pre-natal, nutrition and healthy baby programs. Lead - KWHB Supporting - DHF, DoHA Started Review Oct-11
4.1.4 Parents ensure children attend health centre for regular checkups and immunisations. Lead - Community, LRG Supporting - KWHB From date of agreement Review Jun-11

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Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Schooling


 
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Schooling enrolment and attendance Halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for Indigenous children within a decade
NAPLAN participation and attainment Halve the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 equivalent attainment by 2020

Priority 1: All community members value and promote education as the key to future opportunity.


Strategy 1.1: Increase student attendance and parental participation across all levels of the education system.
Action Responsible Party Start When Finish When     
1.1.1 Establish a school attendance working group to work through school operational plan and develop a localised school attendance strategy that will: increase school attendance; and increases the number of young adults and parents engaging with and returning to school. Lead - Det Supporting - LrG, NretAs Started Review feb-11
1.1.2 A bilingual approach to education will be delivered, with English as the predominant language of instruction, supported by first language and enriched with an early years bi-literacy approach up to year 2. Lead - Det Supporting - School
Council
Started Review feb-11
1.1.3 Scope potential for additional parent and community engagement project in Lajamanu. Lead - DEEWR Started Dec-10
1.1.4 Provide quality nutrition for school students. Lead - DEEWR
Supporting - LrG, Det, Lajamanu CeC
Started Jul-11
1.1.5 Parents and community encourage and support children to go to school. Lead - Parents & local organisations, LrG. From date of agreement Jun-11

Priority 2: Young people leave the education system with skills and capacity to enter and progress in the workforce.

Strategy 2.1: Develop a clear education pathway that encourages “birth to jobs”, participation in education, training and tertiary studies.
2.1.1 Develop an education and training strategy that outlines clear pathways from early childhood through to adult education, and jobs. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG Started Review Feb-11
2.1.2 Tailor and coordinate literacy and numeracy programs ensuring participation of targeted youth. Lead - DET Supporting - School Council. Started Review Feb-11
2.1.3 Jobs, training or further education offers guarantee for all NTCET graduates living in Lajamanu, through an organised transition to work program. Lead - DBE , DET Supporting – All Agencies, RTEED, RGSC Started Review Oct-11
Strategy 2.2: Enhance services to meet education needs.
2.2.1 Support, encourage and provide training for Indigenous school staff. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG, School Council Started Review Feb-11
2.2.2 Communities are encouraged to use school facilities from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community's contact with the school and to help improve school attendance. After hours access can be for local language courses and activities, as well as adult literacy, internet technology, parenting skills, music, sport and the arts. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG, Service Agencies, NRETAS Feb-11 Review Oct-11
2.2.3 Enhance school - community communications, school and parents work through the school operational plan. Lead - School Council Supporting - DET Started Review Feb-11
2.2.4 Introduce cultural training for all teachers. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG, School Council Started Review Feb-11
2.2.5 Implement strategies to attract and retain experienced teachers. Lead - DET Supporting - LRG, School Council Started Review Feb-11

Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Health


 
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number of health care episodes Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Number of episodes of health care and client contacts Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Child oral health disease profile for 7-to-12-year-olds Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation

Priority 1: Lajamanu children, parents and adults have access to quality health programs and services that promote healthy lifestyle and prevent illness.


Strategy 1.1: Comprehensive primary health and aged care services are available to all Lajamanu residents
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 Support training of  local staff to deliver health service programs Lead- KWHB Supporting - DHF, DoHA Started Review Jun-11
1.1.2 KWH and DHF to conduct education and outreach programs, in particular targeting children, youth, parents and the aged. Lead – KHWB
Supporting – DHF, DoHA
Started Review Jun-11
1.1.3 Develop smoking reduction strategies in consultation with community. Lead – KWHB
Supporting – DHF, DoHA
Started Review Jun-11
1.1.4 Review the Oral Health Program to seek opportunities for service improvement and if appropriate, develop a fluoridation program. Lead – DHF
Supporting – KWHB
Started Mar-11
Strategy 1.2: Provision and planning of health, aged care, sport and recreation infrastructure and facilities to meet service and community needs.
1.2.1 Develop new category 1 health centre that includes appropriate access for men and has appropriate areas for renal and emergency evacuation. Lead- DoHA Supporting - DHF, KWHB, DCI Started 2012/ 2013
1.2.2 Undertake a comprehensive review of aged care and disability services to inform service and facility development. Lead- DoHA Supporting - CDSC, KWHB Started Oct-10
1.2.3 Implement the CDSC Waste Management Strategy. Lead- CDSC Supporting - NTG, AG Started Review Oct-11
1.2.4 Upgrade telecommunication services to support Healthy Towns project, supporting health, education and police business systems. Lead- DBE Started Review Jun-11

Priority 2: Lajamanu residents with support from stakeholders improve self management of personal health and wellbeing.

Strategy 2.1: Encourage and facilitate better health outcomes for youth through participation in cultural, sport and recreational activities.
2.1.1 Develop a simpler, streamlined and integrated approach to sport and recreation services, including undertaking an assessment of available infrastructure now and for the future. The refined approach should enable a range of activities that addresses specific gender and age group requirements. Lead- NRETAS Supporting - PM&C, CDSC, LRG, Mt Theo Started Jun-12
2.1.2 Residents and stakeholders encourage and support children and youth to participate in cultural, sporting and recreational activities. Lead- LRG, Mt Theo Supporting - NRETAS Started Review Jun-11
Strategy 2.2: R esidents seek and live healthy lifestyle.
2.2.1 Identify strategies that will encourage people to attend specialist appointments. Lead - LRG Supporting - KWHB From date of agreement Review Nov-11
2.2.2 Lajamanu residents reduce smoking. The Local Reference Group supported by the wider community: encourage local shops to make nicotine abatement products available; encourage community members to stop smoking inside cars, homes and around non-smokers (including children, the elderly and the sick); provide support and encouragement to family members who are trying to quit smoking; and support the declaration of smoke free areas including playgrounds, buildings and other public areas. Lead - LRG Supporting - KWHB, DHF From date of agreement Review Nov-11
2.2.3 Lajamanu residents support each other to reduce alcohol, marijuana, petrol sniffing and other drug consumption. Lead - LRG Supporting - KWHB, DHF From date of agreement Review Nov-11

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Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Healthy Homes

Progress Output Indicators

  • Condition of current housing stock
  • Overall crowding rates: average per bedroom density and number of houses overcrowded

Priority 1: There are adequate and appropriate homes for Lajamanu residents with access to all basic utilities.


Strategy 1.1: Build and refurbish appropriate housing in the Lajamanu community through the Strategic Indigenous Housing Infrastructure Program.
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 Finalise housing precinct lease. Lead – CLC/DHLGRS Supporting - FaHCSIA, Community Started 2011
1.1.2 Provide advice on number of new houses, refurbishments and rebuilds. Lead - DHLGRS, FaHCSIA Pending lease Pending lease
1.1.3 Commence refurbishments and construction of new homes. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - Community Pending lease Pending lease
1.1.4 Where appropriate local Indigenous owned resources are used for the building of new houses. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - FaHCSIA, Community Pending lease Pending lease
1.1.5 Seek policy guidance on "local" staff housing and housing maintenance. Lead - FaHCSIA Pending lease Pending lease
Strategy 1.2: Determine how many new houses will be needed when the Strategic Indigenous Housing Infrastructure Program is complete.
1.2.1 Commence planning for the provision of additional housing following the completion of the current SIHIP which includes the immediate housing need and future demand based on population estimates. Lead – DHLGRS, FaHCSIA Supporting - Community Started Jun-11

Priority 2: Lajamanu people have the skills to live in public housing and maintain the premises in a clean, tidy and healthy condition.

Strategy 2.1: Deliver a range of tools and support services for Lajamanu people that assist them to maintain their home at a required standard.
2.1.1 Provide training and support to Lajamanu people to assist with maintaining their homes. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - DHF, PWC, Centrelink, DET, CDSC, Service providers, Community Started Ongoing
2.1.2 Assess fencing requirements and develop a fencing program. Lead – DHLGRS, FAHCSIA Supporting – CDSC, HRG Started Review June 2011

Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Economic Participation


 
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Total employment (Indigenous/non-Indigenous) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.
Total employment (private/public) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade
Number of participants on Newstart, Youth Allowance and CDEP To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade

Priority 1: Local businesses and projects are developed creating local jobs.


Strategy 1.1: Identify jobs and assist the development of small businesses.
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 Government agency staff working in Lajamanu undertake locally delivered cross cultural training when available. All Government Started Ongoing
1.1.2 Provide business support and mentoring to individuals and groups wanting to start a viable business including support for a small business to provide 'back office' service to assist Lajamanu small businesses to meet statutory reporting and accounting requirements. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - RTEED Started Review Jun-11
1.1.3 Develop Lajamanu economic and opportunities profile. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - RTEED Started Jun-11
1.1.4 Support the development of workforce planning strategies for identified industries and major projects. Lead - DBE Supporting - RTEED, Tanami RPA Started Review Oct-11
1.1.5 NT Jobs Package - Australian Government funded jobs offered to Indigenous Australians created from former CDEP funded positions. Lead - FaHCSIA Supporting - AGD, DEEWR, DSEWPAC, Office of the Arts, PM&C, DoHA, ILC, RTEED Started Jun-11
1.1.6 Governments will work together to define and support employment pathways for people employed in SIHIP after program completion. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - RTEED Started Ongoing
1.1.7 Government will work with financial institutions to assist with removing barriers to accessing finance for investment on ALRA land. Support will be provided to joint ventures and other partnership vehicles which enable local people to access capital. Lead - DBE Supporting - RTEED Started Review Oct-11
1.1.8 In close coordination with the current rollout of E-health and on-line education initiatives, develop an integrated ICT strategy that covers infrastructure requirements; deployment of equipment; use of new technologies by government agencies and; access to ICT services by businesses, NGOs and local people. Lead – DBE Supporting – RTEED Oct–10 Ongoing
1.1.9 Explore partnership opportunities in the private sector, with a particular emphasis on building formal links with industries operating in the region. These partnerships could include (but not be limited to) training, employment, infrastructure and community development. Lead – DBE Supporting – RTEED Oct–10 Apr-11
Strategy 1.2: Provision and planning of infrastructure and services that support economic development.
1.2.1 Establish branch of Traditional Credit Union and provide access to banking and financial literacy training. Lead - FaHCSIA Started Review Oct-11
1.2.2 Develop a proposal for a one stop shop for government services and other local businesses. A range of services may be provided from this building and options will be considered for local organisations to build and own the shopfront with long-term tenancy. Lead - DBE Supporting - RTEED Started Review Oct-11
1.2.3 Facilitate workshops in partnership with the CDSC to investigate passenger transport needs, potential community resources and partnerships. This work will include economic viability, business opportunities and potential support through joint ventures and organisations such as Indigenous Business Australia. This work will need to link to the area plan and town centre urban design plan and promote walkability and the use of bicycles. Lead - DLP Supporting - CDSC Feb-11 Jul-11
1.2.4 Scope possibilities for commercial visitor accommodation and develop an action plan to inform future work in this area. If viability is established, work with local entrepreneurs seeking to invest in this businesses. Lead - DEEWR Supporting – DBE, IBA, DHLGRS Started Dec-10
1.2.5 Visual and environment aspects of Lajamanu town are improved, dust suppression, tree planting, parks. Lead - CDSC Supporting - LRG, PWC Started Review Oct-11
1.2.6 Land tenure arrangements that encourage development are adopted. Lead - Community, CLC Supporting - DLP From date of agreement Review Oct-11
1.2.7 Review and report on options for the provision of multi-purpose community centre or facilities that could include public library, ICT and training facilities, sport and recreation facilities. Lead - NRETAS Supporting - DCI Started Jun-11
1.2.8 Identify and review availability of adult education training facilities. Communities are encouraged to use school facilities from 3pm to 9pm to increase the community's contact with the school and to help improve school attendance. After hours access can be for local language courses and activities, as well as adult literacy, IT, parenting skills, music, sport and the arts. Lead - DET Supporting - DEEWR, Community, NRETAS Feb - 11 Review Oct-11
1.2.9 Ensure access to appropriate TV, radio, and ICT Services. Lead - ROC Started Review Jun-11
1.2.10 Reconstruct and upgrade sections of the Buntine Highway to a two lane seal. Lead - DLP Started End 2010
1.2.11 Construct a new sealed aerodrome at Lajamanu. Lead - DLP Started Sep-11
1.2.12 DHLGRS in conjunction with DLP to prepare submission for upgrading and sealing of community roads. Lead - DHLGRS (Submission) Supporting - DLP (Survey) Started Review Dec-10

Priority 2: The working age population has the depth and breadth of skills and capabilities required to enter the labour market.

Strategy 2.1: Lajamanu residents acquire the skills required to find and take up jobs.
2.1.1 All training and development activities paid for by government will be well supported and attended by community members surpassing the minimum participation rates. Lead - LRG, Community Supporting - RTEED From date of agreement Review Jun-11
2.1.2 Develop labour market profile that demonstrates current positions, skill requirements and jobs that are available. Lead - DBE Supporting - RTEED Started Complete
2.1.3 In partnership with community champions hold Futures Forums that provide information on employment options and business development services available to community members. Provide information on opportunities arising from potential private sector involvement. Lead - DHLGRS Supporting - All government agencies, CDSC Jul-12 Jun-13
2.1.4 Deliver Training for Work: targeted to meet employment needs, assists community members in gaining employment and advancing their careers. Lead - DET Supporting - RTEED, LRG Started Review Jun-11
2.1.5 Work Readiness: Government will ensure that Job Services Australia and CDEP providers develop work experience activities that meet local needs, including accredited and non-accredited training and work readiness activities, which lead to employment outcomes. Lead - DEEWR Supporting - RTEED, JSA Started Jun-12
2.1.6 VETIS programs and school- based apprenticeships are aligned with community employment pathways. Lead - DET Supporting - RTEED, Community Started Review Jun-11
2.1.7 Community members learn safe driving practices, access driver training and acquire driver's licences. Lead - LRG Supporting: DLP Started Jun-11
2.1.8 Newstart Allowance recipients will meet their allowance obligations, measured by an increase in the number of people taking up job-readiness programs. Lead – Community Supporting - Centrelink From date of agreement Review Jun-11
2.1.9 Government Contracts: All procurement processes undertaken in remote areas will optimise opportunities in Indigenous employment and enterprise development. Lead – DBE Supporting - RTEED, all agencies Started Review Oct-11

Priority 3: Town develops in an orderly manner with appropriate process.

Strategy 3.1: Develop a town plan.
3.1.1 Complete and gazette a town plan (area plan and zoning map) Lead - DLP Started Dec-10
3.1.2 Develop town centre urban design plan including community transport strategies. Lead - DLP Supporting - DCI Started Jun-11

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Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Safe Communites

Progress Output Indicators

As a proportion of all offences: (i) alcohol related offences (ii) drug and substance abuse related offences (iii) offences against the person

Priority 1: Lajamanu people are safe from violence, abuse and neglect.


Strategy 1.1: People have the skills and facilities to prevent and manage violence, abuse and neglect.
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 The Lajamanu community have noted the following to be considered as part of the safety plan: child protection and welfare; reviewing and incorporating aspirations of the Lajamanu law and justice plan; and alcohol management plan. Lead - DoJ Supporting - NTPFES, CDSC, DHLGRS, DHF, FaHCSIA, AGD, DLP, LGANT, LRG Started Review Jun-11
1.1.2 The supported recommendations of the recently finalised Remote Policing Review will be communicated to the Lajamanu community, including timeframes and strategies for implementing the recommendations. Lead - NTPFES, LRG, Community Elders ASAP Review Jun-11
1.1.3 Prepare proposal on requirements for men's safe house/sobering up facility. Lead - GBM Supporting - FaHCSIA, LRG ASAP Review Jun-11
Strategy 1.2: Minimise alcohol and other drug use.
1.2.1 Develop an alcohol management plan. Lead - DoJ Supporting - NTPFES, CDSC, DHF, FaHCSIA, LRG, Community Elders. ASAP Review Jun-11

Priority 2: Make Lajamanu a safer place.

Strategy 2.1: Ensure children and families are safe.
2.1.1 Maintain an effective animal management program. Lead - CDSC Supporting - FaHCSIA Started Review Jun-11
2.1.2 Maintain and improve street lighting as required. Lead - CDSC Supporting - PWC, LRG Started Review Oct-11
2.1.3 Install speed signs and restrictors at important community locations (eg. school, health centre, store, sporting facilities). Lead - CDSC Supporting - DLP Started Review Oct-11
2.1.4 Minimum service standards for child protection and related services will be developed in Lajamanu including an agreed program to implement these standards. Lead - DHF Supporting - LRG Started Review Oct-11
2.1.5 Establish and support NT Emergency Service volunteer units capable of reacting to known hazards for the community. Lead – NTPFES Supporting - CDSC ASAP Review Oct-11
2.1.6 Maintain an all hazard response plan for Lajamanu and review or establish specific hazard response plans for the community (e.g. Flood plan) as necessary. This will include ensuring adequate community education and preparedness (including where necessary public shelters) for known hazards. Lead – NTPFES Supporting - CDSC ASAP Review Oct-11

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Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Governance and Leadership

Progress Output Indicators

Number of registered organisations under ORIC and NT Associations Act

Priority 1: Lajamanu leaders and elected council members have the skills, tools and information to effectively govern their community.


Strategy 1.1: Enhance and improve local peoples understanding of governance and leadership practises.
Action Responsible Party Start When     Finish When     
1.1.1 Elected members of CDSC will receive professional development to enable them to better understand and undertake their roles. Lead - CDSC Supporting - LGANT Started Ongoing
1.1.2 Work with the community to develop an integrated and strategic program of community governance and leadership support that suits the needs of the men, women and youth of Lajamanu. Lead - FaHCSIA Started Review Jun-11
Strategy 1.2: Develop and provide tools and information that enhances local people's governance capacity.
1.2.1 Undertake a research project that will map the community governance arrangements and community engagement for Lajamanu. Lead – DHLGRS Supported - ROC Oct-10 Mar-11
1.2.2 Develop a clear profile of community owned enterprises, detailing ownership and governance structures. Lead - DHLGRS Started June 2011
Strategy 1.3: Improve consultation and engagement processes.
1.3.1 Ensure interpreters are used for all meetings, consultation and negotiations with community members. Lead - AG, NTG Started Ongoing
1.3.2 Develop and implement a system through which meetings and consultations are coordinated, streamlined and encourage community input. Lead - ROC, LRG Started Review Jun-11
Strategy 1.4: The GBM and the ROC will support the LRG to monitor the progress and timelines of the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan.
1.4.1 The Lajamanu Local Reference Group and the ROC will work in partnership to progress Local Implementation Plan actions and report back to government. Lead - Local Reference Group, ROC From date of agreement Review Jun-11

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Schedule B: Baseline Mapping Report Snapshot



The Lajamanu Baseline Mapping Report provides information about the people, services and infrastructure in Lajamanu and the surrounding region. Most of the information in the report was collected during 2009, but often relates to earlier points in time (in particular, the Census data is from 2006). The full Lajamanu Baseline Mapping Report is a very large document and includes a lot of technical information. The Government Business Manager has a copy to show people, and can arrange specialists to help people understand particular parts of the report.


The following is some of the information from the Lajamanu Baseline Mapping Report that relates specifically to the ‘Progress Output Indicators' in Schedule A of the Local Implementation Plan. These measures will give an indication of the progress being achieved in Lajamanu in these key areas.

Early Childhood

  • Of the all births in the Lajamanu Statistical Local Area in 2004-08, 38.5 per cent (37 births) were to teenage mothers aged 15 to 19. Births to mothers aged 20-24 comprised 31.3 per cent of all births (30 births).
     
  • Preschool enrolments at Lajamanu School steadily increased from 19 to 38 children between 2001 and 2005, but then declined to 22 children in 2007. In 2009, the number of enrolments increased to 30 children, greater overall than in 2001. As the 2006 census shows the zero to four year old Indigenous population to have been 98, this data indicates a low enrolment rate.
     
  • The number and proportion of low, normal and high birth weight Indigenous babies in Lajamanu was collected by Northern Territory health services and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Due to concerns about small numbers in the data, permission to use it in the Baseline Mapping Report was not provided by the Northern Territory.
     
  • The timing and number of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies in Lajamanu was collected by Northern Territory health services and the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. Due to concerns about small numbers in the data, permission to use it in the Baseline Mapping Report was not provided by the Northern Territory.
     

Schooling

  • In August 2009, 158 students were enrolled in Lajamanu School from preschool to Year 6, and 33 were enrolled from Year 7 to Year 12. The 2006 census shows the school-aged Indigenous population (ages five to 14) to have been 172.
     
  • Since 2001, the average yearly attendance rate (averaged over 8 collection points) at Lajamanu School has fluctuated between 51 per cent in 2005 and a peak of 67 per cent in 2003. By 2009, the attendance rate had declined to 53 per cent, lower overall than in 2001(60%).
     
  • Participation in the National Assessment Program—Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) increased significantly between 2008 and 2009, with 100 per cent participation from all years for the reading and numeracy assessments.
     
  • Overall results in 2009 indicate that students are achieving below the national minimum standard in most subjects. For example, less than five per cent Years 3, 5 and 9 participants and 33 per cent Year 7 participants achieved at or above the national minimum standard for reading. When assessed for numeracy, less than five per cent Years 3, 5 and 9 participants and 17 per cent Year 7 participants achieved at or above the national minimum standard.
     
  • More information on NAPLAN results is available online at www.myschool.edu.au.
     

Health

  • In 2009-10 the Lajamanu health centre reported 12,774 episodes of care, with 65 per cent reported as care for female clients and 96 per cent reported as care for Indigenous clients.
     
  • In 2008-09 there were 21 reported Home and Community Care clients in Lajamanu, all of whom were Indigenous.
     
  • In 2009-10 the Aged and Disability Program reported 24 open cases, 26 referrals and three closed cases. Open cases are those cases being actively managed by a disability coordinator.

Healthy Homes

  • In 2009, there were 100 residential dwellings in Lajamanu providing 153 bedrooms. This resulted in an average of 4.84 people per bedroom. Fifty four per cent of Lajamanu households are considered to be overcrowded and seven assessed dwellings were deemed in need of significant capital expenditure.
     
  • Between 2003-04 and 2007-08, Indigenous people in the Lajamanu Statistical Local Area were hospitalised for diseases associated with poor environmental health at a rate of 45 per 1,000.

Economic Participation

  • An employment survey was undertaken in 2009 in Lajamanu. Of the 205 employed people, 125 were Indigenous—41 people were employed full-time, 44 were part-time, 32 were casual and eight held Community Development Employment Projects positions.
     
  • At the time of the survey 61Indigenous people were employed in the public sector (20 full-time, 39 part-time and two casual) and 56 were employed in the private sector (21 full-time, five part-time and 30 casual).
     
  • Ninety per cent of income support recipients were of workforce age (15–64 years of age). Fifty eight per cent of all income support recipients were female.
     
  • In Lajamanu, about 39 per cent of all income support recipients received Newstart Allowance (120 recipients) and about eight per cent received Youth Allowance-Other support (25 recipients). Thirty two per cent received Parenting Payments and 16 per cent received Disability Support Pension.
     
  • About four per cent of the 174.9 km of roads surveyed in and around Lajamanu were found to be in good condition, 0.2 per cent were found to be in fair condition, and 95.4 per cent were found to be in poor condition.

Safe Communities

  • From 2006–07 to 2008–09, a total of 816 offences were recorded in Lajamanu. The number of offences was very stable from one year to the next with a small decrease across the period overall.
     
  • In total, 23.8 per cent of offences recorded over the three-year period was alcohol related. Over the three-year period, the total proportion of offences that were drug and/or substance abuse related was 18.7 per cent.
     
  • Interpersonal offences were the most likely to be alcohol related (95 per cent and 70 per cent, respectively). No break and enters and only seven per cent of thefts were found to have alcohol involved.

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Schedule C: Summary of Community Engagement



The Lajamanu Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager worked with community groups and individuals, as well as key stakeholders, service providers and non-government organisations to guide the Lajamanu Local Implementation Plan process. This section outlines the nature of consultation, engagement and capacity-building that occurred during this process.


Consultation with the Local Reference Group

The Local Reference Group in Lajamanu is the key community group for engagement in the Local Implementation Plan process.

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group comprises members of the Shire Local Board including six males and six females, plus an additional four males who were self-nominated following community consultations and local advertising. Local Reference Group members are recognised as well-respected leaders in the community, and have experience negotiating on behalf of the Lajamanu community with all levels of government. Membership includes the Traditional Owner residing in Lajamanu, and representation from each of the family groups. The Local Reference Group is currently seeking nominations from young females and males to be included in the Group.

To date, the Local Reference Group has held six well-attended meetings including the initial visioning forum.

Local Reference Group members

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group members are: Joe James, Robert George, Jerry Patrick, Geoffrey Matthews, Lynette Tasman, Robyn Lawson, Doris Lewis, Laura Doolan, Peter Jigili, Joyce Herbert, Kirk Herbert, Robyn Payton, Geoffrey Barnes, Martin Johnson, Steve Patrick and Willie Johnson.

Consultations with community members

The Indigenous Engagement Officer and Government Business Manager held many consultations with individual community members who contributed to the Local Implementation Plan.

Consultations with service providers and governance structures

Meetings with service providers and stakeholders were also convened by the Government Business Manager regarding Local Implementation Planning. Furthermore, the Lajamanu Local Reference Group included representation from across a range of service providers and stakeholders, spanning the interests of each of the seven building blocks. Most members are members of one or more of a number of governance groups including the School Council, Housing Reference Group, Shire Local Board or other community and regional organisations such as the Lajamanu Progress Association.

Engagement

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is the key engagement officer at the local level, responsible for meeting with families and individuals on a regular basis to keep the community well informed about the Local Implementation Plan and other government projects. Additionally, a range of tools have been created to support an informed engagement process:

  • The source document listing all of the desired community outcomes supplied by the Local Reference Group is available from the Government Business Manager and will be used to inform future versions of and updates to the Local Implementation Plan.
  • Community posters and fact sheets about Closing the Gap, Remote Service Delivery and the Local Implementation Plan have been developed and presented to the Local Reference Group during meetings.
  • A community notice board has been sent to the Government Business Manager to display information for the broader community.
  • A DVD was produced in Lajamanu profiling the success of the Lajamanu art centre and its contribution to 'closing the gap'.
  • A photographer has visited Lajamanu in August 2010. The Regional Operations Centre will create distinctive Lajamanu communications materials with the photographs.

Capacity-building

The Lajamanu Local Reference Group has been supported in its capacity-building by the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre. On 16 February 2010, the Regional Operations Centre convened an in-community Visioning Forum for Lajamanu Local Reference Group facilitated by an experienced Indigenous facilitator. The Visioning Forum explored government's vision in Closing the Gap and Remote Service Delivery, and achieving the Lajamanu community's vision through a Local Implementation Plan. The community's desired outcomes were presented for prioritisation. Over a series of five in-community meetings between Lajamanu Local Reference Group, the Single Government Interface and the Regional Operations Centre, priorities under each building block were finalised and negotiated with government.

Lajamanu Local Reference Group members also participated in a regional Remote Service Delivery Governance and Leadership Workshop held in Katherine 22-23 April 2010. The workshop focused on building the capacity of current and emerging local leadership in the areas of: Western concepts of visions and goal setting; how to work with governments; the local implementation process; community accountability; sharing stories of local leadership; and democratic governance.

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