Local Implementation Plan - Fitzroy Crossing

September 2010   

The Governments of Australia and Western Australia, working as one, are committed to closing the gap in the unacceptably high level of disadvantage experienced by Indigenous Australians. In particular, it acknowledges the additional challenges faced by Indigenous people living in remote areas.

Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities have been chosen as one of 29 priority locations across Australia to participate in implementing the reforms envisaged in the RSD NP.

Table of Contents

  1. Introduction
  2. How this Plan was Developed
  3. Building Block Priorities
  4. Local Implemenation Plans - an Iterative Process
  5. Progressing the Plan
  6. Glossary
  7. Attachments

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1. Introduction

The Governments of Australia and Western Australia, working as one, are committed to closing the gap in the unacceptably high level of disadvantage experienced by Indigenous Australians. In particular, it acknowledges the additional challenges faced by Indigenous people living in remote areas.

Recognizing these challenges, governments through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership (RSD NP) to build the capacities of both government and communities to engage with each other and agree on services appropriate to the needs and aspirations of Indigenous people.

Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities have been chosen as one of 29 priority locations across Australia to participate in implementing the reforms envisaged in the RSD NP. For Fitzroy Crossing this will:

  • Improve access to a full range of suitable and culturally inclusive services.
  • Raise the standards and range of services to be broadly consistent with similar sized and located communities.
  • Improve the level of governance and leadership.
  • Provide simpler access to better coordinated government services.
  • Increase economic and social participation wherever possible and promote personal responsibility.

The development of a Local Implementation Plan (LIP), agreed between governments and the Fitzroy Valley communities, which reflect the priorities of the communities, is an essential element of the RSD NP reforms.

To achieve the objectives set out above and to ensure that the planning and delivery of government services in the Fitzroy Valley runs smoothly, reforms in the way governments work with each other and conduct its business with communities is also essential.

"It's about working together, Community and Government, on how we can bring about change to the lives of our people and how we can Close the Gap".
Selina Middleton (FFFGC executive)

To this end, a Local Operations Centre (LOC) has been established as the direct link for community to all government business in the Fitzroy Valley.  The Local Operations Centre is staffed by a Local Area Coordinator and Indigenous Engagement Officers who have a key role in the design and facilitation of community engagement and in identifying priorities for inclusion in the Local Implementation Plan.

At the regional level, the Kimberley Regional Operations Centre (ROC), located in Broome, supports the LOCs and provides general oversight and direction for Remote Service Delivery in the Kimberley.

At the State level, the Department of Indigenous Affairs’ (DIA) Director General, as the State Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services, works with the State Operations Committee, jointly convened with the Commonwealth Department of Family, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs’ (FaHCSIA) State Manager, to monitor overall progress, address barriers in and between agencies and ensure that commitments in the LIPs are delivered.

At the national level, the Office of the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services assesses progress and advises governments where there are gaps or slow progress or where improvements need to be made to ensure governments meet their commitments under the RSD NP.

The RSD NP does not stand on its own. As part of a larger COAG Indigenous Reform, it relies on the application of Indigenous specific and mainstream National Agreements and National Partnerships1 in the priority locations. Its success also depends on the effective delivery of Commonwealth, State and Local government services in the priority RSD location.

  1. The National Agreements are: National Indigenous Reform Agreement, National Education Agreement, National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development, National Healthcare Agreement, National Affordable Housing Agreement, and National Disability Agreement. The key Indigenous specific National Partnerships are on: Indigenous Economic Participation, Indigenous Early Childhood Development, Indigenous Health Outcomes, and Remote Indigenous Housing. Mainstream National Partnerships contributing to the Remote Service Delivery NP are: Early Childhood Education, Literacy and Numeracy, Improving Teacher Quality, Social Housing, Homelessness, and Low Socio-Economic Schools Communities. Details of each agreement are available from the COAG website

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2. How this Plan was Developed

The LIPs have been developed in a ground up approach, ensuring that communities and local service providers have ample opportunity to identify local community issues and be an active part of any solutions. The LIPs will guide future government investment and will set out what services are required and how they should be delivered.

An assets based community development approach has been followed in developing each of the LIPs. This approach:

  • Recognises the social capital and its importance as an asset.
  • Emphasises a participatory approach to development which is based on the principles of empowerment and ownership of the development process.
  • Emphasises community economic development that places priority on collaborative efforts for economic development that makes the best use of its own resources.
  • Builds on efforts to strengthen civil society and how to engage people as citizens (rather than clients) in development, and how to make local governance more effective and responsive.

To make sure that the Plan was based on evidence, the Governments have collected information on the Fitzroy Valley about:

  • Existing community networks and decision making structures.

This information allowed governments to identify service gaps and/or underperforming services.

However, further information and baseline data needs to be collected, collated and made available to the public specifically on the Fitzroy Valley people, how healthy they are, how they are going at school and so on.

The governments then worked with the community to work out priorities and develop actions to address those priorities. Of particular note, the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee –COAG Engagement Workshops were held on August 12 and 13 and a further follow-up workshop on August 28 2009.

The workshops:

  • Identified the Fitzroy Futures Forum as the key body that would represent Aboriginal communities in the development and implementation of the Fitzroy Crossing Local Implementation Plan.
  • Provided an understanding of the COAG RSD partnerships and discussed what community governance structure would work in engagement with COAG.
  • Discussed community engagement strategy through appropriate and agreed communications strategies.
  • Identified some aspiration concepts that would require further discussions and detail.

The workshops were largely focused on setting the terms and conditions of engagement leading up to the population of a Local Implementation Plan and involved input from other groups with skills relevant to gathering data for baseline mapping of the Fitzroy Valley.

Agreement was reached on:

  • A participatory approach for baseline mapping consistent with the Fitzroy Futures Forum engagement model and which included qualitative information.
  • Any deficit-based model of baseline mapping must be understood in relation to the emphasis being placed on an asset-based approach.
  • The need for a place-based communications strategy that included broader community application.
  • Community priority projects. These projects were then aligned with the respective COAG Closing the Gap building blocks to highlight the inter-connected nature of the issues.
  • The necessity for a separate project and implementation plan for the each of the priority projects. These projects are in the areas of early childhood development, health, housing, education and employment.

Integrated into the Plan are priorities from the community engagement done by the Indigenous Engagement Officers and, from existing governance structures around justice, health, housing and early childhood from February to May 2010.

A further meeting to clarify and confirm the priorities in the Plan was scheduled for four hours for the 8 June 2010 but became a three day meeting from 8 to 10 June 2010 with the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee and the Fitzroy Local Operations Centre. This demonstrated the commitment of community members to have input into the LIP making the Plan a co-designed document to be owned by community and government.

During these meetings, the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee members included in the Plan the recommendations from the report handed down by Alastair Hope, State Coroner, in February 2008, after an inquest into the deaths of twenty two Aboriginal community members from the Kimberley (the Hope Report) under the relevant building blocks. In addition each building block outlines:

  • What we are trying to achieve, information about the building block.
  • Key Stakeholders.
  • What’s happening, projects or programs that exist or commenced.
  • What needs to happen, services, projects or programs that need to occur and are future priorities.
  • Priorities.

Following the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee meeting, priorities in the LIP were presented to government agencies and service providers from the 15 to 22 June 2010 under the building blocks to review, discuss and respond to the identified priorities.

Actions presented in this LIP are classified into three:

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced are designated as green Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. These are designated as green.

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments are designated as amber Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments (for example where a specific business plan is necessary to ensure effective outcomes or systemic reform is proposed which requires multiple stakeholder agreements). These are designated as amber.

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration are designated as blue Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration (to allow evaluation of impact, funding appropriation or policy reform). These are designated as blue.

Attachments provide detail on each of the building block and the actions to be undertaken. The following represents a summary of the priorities and agreements

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3. Building Block Priorities

Early Childhood: the best start to life

For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to quality early childhood education and care services, including pre-school, playgroups, child care and family support services such as parenting programs and supports, is critical. Opportunities for parental engagement, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce as well as facilities and physical infrastructure are required. Action in the areas of maternal, antenatal and early childhood health is relevant to addressing the child mortality gap and to early childhood development.

Community Aspiration

  • Ensuring all Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities have access to early childhood education within five years for an equal start in early learning, development and socialisation opportunities.
  • Access to quality early childhood education, Indigenous Cultural Learning Framework and care services, including pre-school, childcare and family support services such as after school care, parenting programs and supports, is critical.
  • Appropriate facilities and physical infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and healthy workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention.
  • Action in the areas of maternal, antenatal and early childhood health is relevant to address the child mortality gap and to early childhood development.
  • Fitzroy Crossing is a priority location for a Children and Family Centre under the Early Childhood National Partnership and the Department of Education (DoE) is currently consulting with the community on the design of the facility.

Local Priorities

Ensure the continued and genuine consultation of the design, governance and operation of the Children and Family Centre as per community aspirations. These aspirations include, but are not limited to:

  • An organic aesthetic to the child care and family centre, the design should not be a “box”, and the inclusion of eco friendly additions, such as water tanks and solar power.
  • The CFC to be governed and managed by local NGO.
  • The design does not need to be an extension of the District High School.
  • Incorporate an area for after school care.
  • Guaranteed ongoing funding for CFC.

Department of Education redesign the Children and Family Centre to include organic aesthetic and present to FVELCC and FFFGC Department of Education redesign the Children and Family Centre to include organic aesthetic and present to FVELCC and FFFGC.

The tender for the operation of the CFC has to be public but DoE will ensure local input into the process. The tender for the operation of the CFC has to be public but DoE will ensure local input into the process.

A workforce strategy for childcare workers A workforce strategy for childcare workers, linked to the workforce mapping and planning under the Economic Participation Building Block, to be developed.

Operational Funding is available for CFC until 2014. Operational Funding is available for CFC until 2014.

Kimberley TAFE to work with DEEWR, DTWD and DoE on training for Childcare Workers. Kimberley TAFE to work with DEEWR, DTWD and DoE on training for Childcare Workers.

FFFGC, FVELCC and FVDHS to investigate further with ROC and after school service. FFFGC, FVELCC and FVDHS to investigate further with ROC and after school service.

See Attachment A - Table 1 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Schooling: learning for life

Schooling: learning for life

Education is key to future opportunities. Responsive schooling requires investments in infrastructure, workforce, and curriculum. The focus is on student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school/community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, post school education and training are also important.

Community Aspirations

  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities in literacy and numeracy within a decade and halving the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • Human capital development through education is key to future opportunities. Responsive schooling requires attention to teacher and school infrastructure, workforce (including teacher and school leader supply and quality), curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement and opportunities for parental engagement and school/community partnerships.
  • Introduction of and strengthening of Indigenous Cultural Learning Framework.
  • Transition pathways into schooling and into work, post school education and training are also important.
  • Lifelong learning is important and attention is also needed regarding adult literacy and numeracy skills.

Local Priorities

  • Youth coordination program to help respond to specific youth needs and develop and progress activities for youth to engage in after school and during holidays which includes sport, arts, personal development, scouts, leadership and cultural activity.
  • Implement positive strategies of engaging youth.
  • Development of a Youth Advocacy Group.
  • Invest in evidence base data for the Local Implementation Plan.

Fitzroy Valley District High School will appoint a Program Coordinator Fitzroy Valley District High School will appoint a Program Coordinator – Student Services and Pastoral Care to manage student services in the school.

Fitzroy Valley District High School will appoint a Program Coordinator Fitzroy Valley District High School appointment of a youth support worker who will facilitate better family support throuhg interagency liaison and logistical support for families.

Funding to be provided for a Youth Coordinator. Funding to be provided for a Youth Coordinator.

Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee has provided funds for the Youth Coordinator Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee has provided funds for the Youth Coordinator. The Governing Committee will clarify the governance structure for support of this position.

To improve the attendance and retention rates of students there is a need to increase School Based Attendance Officers, Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers and Education Support teachers.

Fitzroy Valley District High School will introduce the “getting it right model” with an attendance specialist teacher. Fitzroy Valley District High School will introduce the “getting it right model” with an attendance specialist teacher.

Agencies to investigate a regionalised/rationalised strategic approach to schooling Agencies to investigate a regionalised/rationalised strategic approach to schooling that may include a residential facility in Fitzroy Crossing (eg VET students and secondary students).

Department of Education to evaluate the current funding ratio for AIEOs Department of Education to evaluate the current funding ratio for AIEOs given the special demands placed on the school (FASD etc).

See Attachment A - Table 2 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Health: lifelong health

Health: lifelong health

Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving health and life expectancy, and reducing early mortality caused by chronic disease. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires a concerted effort in the prevention, management and treatment of chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need access to programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care.

Community Aspirations

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation and halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities under five within a decade.
  • Ensure access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving their health and life expectancy, and reducing excess mortality caused by chronic disease.
  • All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care, and being responsive to and accountable for achieving government and community health priorities. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires a concerted effort in the prevention, management and treatment of chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to access programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.

Local Priorities

Funding for a Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)/Early Life Trauma Program Coordinator and for Stage 2 to progress the FASD Prevalence Study.

Funding of $1million has been made available through DoHA and FaHCSIA. Funding of $1million has been made available through DoHA and FaHCSIA.Volunteer Coordinator supported by Nindilingarri.

Future funding for the coordinator. Future funding for the coordinator.Implement actions identified under the FASD/Early Life Trauma (Marulu Project) plan in Fitzroy Crossing.

Confirm ongoing funding for the FASD program Confirm ongoing funding for the FASD program (to include staffing, housing, administration and transport costs) via a agency meeting in August.

Development and implementation of an Alcohol Management Plan to:

  • Seek funding for additional alcohol and other drug counselling services.
  • Wrap around service provision.
  • Produce baseline mapping for the Local Implementation Plan.

The Regional Operations Centre will facilitate a meeting of the FVAODMG The Regional Operations Centre will facilitate a meeting of the FVAODMG to develop an Alcohol Management Plan for the Valley.

The Drug and Alcohol Office will provide logistical support for this development activity. The Drug and Alcohol Office will provide logistical support for this development activity.

Financial Support for the implementation of the plan will be the subject of an agency meeting in August (facilitated by the Local Operations Centre). Financial Support for the implementation of the plan will be the subject of an agency meeting in August (facilitated by the Local Operations Centre).

Development and funding for an annual Fitzroy Family Festival to educate promote and show case services available to mothers, fathers and children around health and parenting.

The Local Operations Centre will support (financially) the development of a business plan for the festival. The Local Operations Centre will support (financially) the development of a business plan for the festival.

Increase support and funding for the local care and preventative education of renal / dialysis problems.

WACHS is developing a Regional Dialysis plan. WACHS is developing a Regional Dialysis plan.

The Regional Operations Centre will facilitate a discussion with service providers to evaluate existing services (including preventative strategies). The Regional Operations Centre will facilitate a discussion with service providers to evaluate existing services (including preventative strategies).

The Local Operations Centre will facilitate the development of a local renal disease prevention plan. The Local Operations Centre will facilitate the development of a local renal disease prevention plan.

Development and implementation of an Environmental Health Plan.

The Actions targeting this priority are contained in the Healthy Homes Building Block.

Planning and Coordination of all Health Service Providers in the Fitzroy Valley to include:

  • Awareness of existing services for people in the community.
  • Improve access to the services.
  • Ensure quality Health Service delivery.

 The Regional Operations Centre has developed a list of community and visiting health services The Regional Operations Centre has developed a list of community and visiting health services including timing and duration of visit and nature of service offered.

The Regional Operations Centre to sponsor the development of a local health professionals workforce strategy. The Regional Operations Centre to sponsor the development of a local health professionals workforce strategy.

DOHA to sponsor the development of a Fitzroy Valley communications strategy. DOHA to sponsor the development of a Fitzroy Valley communications strategy. This is to include the location and accessibility of services currently provided.

Increase in Mental Health services and Healing initiatives for the Fitzroy Valley.

The Regional Operations Centre, with DOHA, will facilitate a meeting to evaluate existing services The Regional Operations Centre, with DOHA, will facilitate a meeting to evaluate existing services and investigate and fund further Mental Health and Healing initiatives’ for the Fitzroy Valley

See Attachment A - Table 3 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Economic participation

Economic Participation: building wealthy communities

Indigenous families and communities should have the opportunity to benefit from the mainstream economy – real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Employment and training programs, incentive structures and social and physical infrastructure, including communications and transport, are needed to foster economic participation and community engagement. Access to land and native title assets, rights and interests can be leveraged to secure real and practical benefits for Indigenous people. The design and delivery of individual and community support (both transfer payments and services) needs to promote active engagement, enhanced capability and positive social norms.

Community Aspirations

  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities within a decade.
  • The Fitzroy Valley communities should have the opportunity to participate in the mainstream market economy – real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation.
  • Access to land and native title assets, rights and interests can be leveraged to secure real and practical benefits for Indigenous people. Other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures and social and physical infrastructure, including communications and transport, are needed to foster economic participation and community engagement.
  • The potential for the Fitzroy Valley to realise future economic development opportunities, is to build partnership between current industry based stakeholders and the emerging Aboriginal entrepreneurs such as; Mingankala Contracting (Fencing), Leedal PTY LTD (Hospitality), Bunuba Cattle Company (Pastoral), J and J Contracting (Ag Services), Darngku Heritage Tours (Cultural Tourism), Mimbi Caves (Tourism), Bungoolie Tours (Tourism), Ngiyali Road House (Service Station), Hale contracting (Fencing and Earth Mover), Mangkaja Artist (Arts), Yungngora Cattle Company (Pastoral / Mining), Fitzroy Xpress (Music) and Hand and Davis Consultancy Services.
  • To support the development of emerging entrepreneurs it will be important to establish an appropriate support services such as; a business incubator, FV Chamber of Commerce and business development services.
  • Development of a Workforce Strategy to ensure a coordinated approach to increasing Indigenous employment in Fitzroy Crossing. Strategy need to acknowledge employment opportunities that will arise through the investment and infrastructure in the building blocks of Early Childhood (childcare workers), Schooling (AIEOs, teachers), Health (mentors, nurses, social workers), Healthy Homes (apprenticeships) and Safe Communities (environmental health workers, police).

Local Priorities

Economic Strategy for Aboriginal Employment and Development, as service that will be based in Fitzroy Crossing to investigate and assist with:

  • Coordination of Transition to Work activities for young adults leaving school.
  • Apprenticeships.
  • Business support and development to identify the key industry economic drivers for the FV.
  • Coordination of Employment Service Providers, CDEP organisations and employment opportunities.
  • The FFF Governing Committee monitors and evaluates the NPARIH program employment and economic participation targets.

The Local Operations Centre will provide the logistics for a forum The Local Operations Centre will provide the logistics for a forum, sponsored by DEEWR for all stakeholders to map and gap economic development services, develop an action plan to drive economic participation and develop a workforce strategy.

The Regional Operations Centre in partnership with the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Kimberley Land Council to resolve land tenure issues The Regional Operations Centre in partnership with the Department of Aboriginal Affairs and the Kimberley Land Council to resolve land tenure issues

The Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee will establish an Education, Employment and Training Sub-Committee The Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee will establish an Education, Employment and Training Sub-Committee

See Attachment A - Table 4 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Healthy Homes

Healthy Homes: investing in better housing

A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Health living conditions must include adequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity, appropriate housing design and maintenance and sufficient number of houses. Children in particular need to live in accommodation that has good environmental health, provides space for study and is free of overcrowding.

Community Aspirations

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation and halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and Surrounding Communities under five within a decade.
  • A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population.
  • Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (design, stock and maintenance).
  • Children need to live in accommodation with adequate infrastructure conducive to good hygiene and study and free of overcrowding.

Local Priorities

Development of a Fitzroy Crossing Housing Reference Group to assist with the coordination and consultation of the NP on Remote Indigenous Housing Issues. The housing reference group will ensure that there is input from the Fitzroy Valley communities and Fitzroy Valley Housing Service Providers Group.

Establishment of the Housing Reference Group Establishment of the Housing Reference Group will be a joint process guided by the Local Operations Centre and supported by the Department of Housing.

Development and implementation of an Environmental Health Plan:

  • Fitzroy Valley Environmental Health Reference Group.
  • Environmental Health Strategy:
    • Clean Water
    • Pest control
    • Plumbing
    • Dog Control
    • Cat Control
    • Feral Animals (Cat, Dog, Pig)
    • Waste Management
    • Training & Employment
    • Funding
  • Environmental Health Education and Awareness programs.
  • Road service upgrade.

The Local Operations Centre will coordinate the development of a Fitzroy Valley Environmental Health Plan The Local Operations Centre will coordinate the development of a Fitzroy Valley Environmental Health Plan. This will include measures on emergency management, dog control and waste management. Key partners will include the Shire of Derby West Kimberley, Health Services, Community Councils and the Department of Housing.

See Attachment A - Table 5 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Safe Communities

Safe Communities: keeping families safe

All Indigenous children, youth, women and men need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Improving family and community safety is essential through child protection, law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling services) and preventive approaches. Addressing related factors such as alcohol and other drug related harms will be critical to improving both community safety and achieving improved health outcomes.

Community Aspirations

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation and halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding Communities under five within a decade.
  • Indigenous people (men, women and children) need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Fulfilling this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection and also preventative approaches.
  • Addressing related factors such as alcohol and other drug related harms will be critical to improving community safety, along with the improved health benefits to be obtained.

Local Priorities

Ongoing funding for Yiriman Juvenile Diversion Program. Future funding support will be strengthened through data collection for inclusion into the Local Implementation Plan.

DOHA providing an allocation of $20,000 to KALACC DOHA providing an allocation of $20,000 to KALACC to separate the health outcome of the project from the Juvenile Justice component to allow a clear consideration of funding opportunities.

FaHCSIA has provided $59,400 to KALACC for the Yiriman Intensive Cultural Bush Walk. FaHCSIA has provided $59,400 to KALACC for the Yiriman Intensive Cultural Bush Walk.

A roundtable is planned for late July to discuss financial support for the project A roundtable is planned for late July to discuss financial support for the project. The Local Operations Centre to coordinate.

Development and funding of a new Court House to be co-located with the new Police Station. Ensure consultation with the community on the development of the Law Precinct.

Currently no formal negotiations have commenced on this development request Currently no formal negotiations have commenced on this development request. The Local Operations centre will convene a meeting of responsible agencies in August to evaluate options.

See Attachment A - Table 6 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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Governance and Leadership

Governance and Leadership: empowering communities

Strong leadership is needed to champion and create ownership of the Indigenous reform agenda. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels are essential to long term sustainable outcomes. Indigenous people need to be engaged in the development of reforms that will impact on them. Improved access to capacity building in governance and leadership is needed in order for Indigenous people to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

Community Aspirations

‘It’s about change and how government works with community. There is still a long way to go and we need to strengthen our Fitzroy Futures Forum”
Marmigee Hand, Fitzroy Futures Forum, 29 June 2010

  • To improve access to capacity building in governance and leadership, in order for residents of Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.
  • Strong leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels are essential to long term sustainable outcomes.
  • Indigenous people need to be engaged in the development of reforms that will impact on them.
  • Improved access to capacity building in governance and leadership is needed in order for Indigenous people to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

The Fitzroy Futures Forum, through the FFFGC, is the key body that represents Aboriginal communities in the development and implementation of the Fitzroy Crossing Local Implementation Plan. A review of FFF is to occur in July 2010 due to government agencies and service providers increased utilisation and engagement with the FFF to ensure the operation and structure remains flexible and responsive to the needs of the community and is effective in engaging and reporting back to community.

Local Priorities

Financial support to assist local people to attend leadership training and professional development. Assist local communities design and implement culturally specific leadership programs in the Fitzroy Valley for men, women, elders and youth.

ROC to work with the Fitzroy Future Governing Committee to develop the capacity building matrix. ROC to work with the Fitzroy Future Governing Committee to develop the capacity building matrix.

ROC will assist in the identification of potential leaders in partnership with the FFF. ROC will assist in the identification of potential leaders in partnership with the FFF.

ROC will develop a local community mentoring program. ROC will develop a local community mentoring program.

A process will be established to identify people suitable for future governance and leadership training (FFFGC to lead). A process will be established to identify people suitable for future governance and leadership training (FFFGC to lead).

Australian Government Leadership Development Programs to be targeted at residents of the Fitzroy Valley (FaHCSIA). Australian Government Leadership Development Programs to be targeted at residents of the Fitzroy Valley (FaHCSIA).

To develop local and cultural specific training on corporate governance ensuring that Language and methodology in delivering is appropriate to the participants. This will help to ensure boards function effectively.

ROC will work with the FFGC to develop/facilitate the training module ROC will work with the FFGC to develop/facilitate the training module. Additional partners will include TAFE, Karrayilli and ORIC.

See Attachment A - Table 7 for more detailed information on these priorities.

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4. Local Implementation Planning: An iterative process

This Local Implementation Plan for Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities is a living document, and is to be considered as the initial step in a continuing iterative planning and implementation process.

The community determined the priority targets for the first iteration of the plan and decided to focus on all seven building blocks. The following diagram reflects the approach.

Local Implemenation Planning: Iterative Process

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5. Progressing the plan

The progress of the Plan will be monitored through the Regional Operations Centre, the Local Area Coordinator and the Indigenous Engagement Officers in partnership with the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee. The Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee will decide how often meetings are needed to ensure that information is shared, new priorities and projects are included, and how to overcome any blocks in progressing towards the COAG targets..

The next stages to implement the Plan will include;

  • scoping each project and activity to define boundaries,
  • form project teams that include community members and service providers,
  • secure commitment from all parties,
  • ensure that existing programs and agency activities are included rather than duplicated,
  • agree actions and responsibilities,
  • plan to avoid and manage risk,
  • set out realistic time frames and;
  • define how the COAG Closing the Gap outcomes will be achieved and measured.

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6. Glossary

AHW
Aboriginal Health Worker
AICS
Aboriginal Independent Community Schools
AIEOs
Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers
ALS
Aboriginal Legal Service
AACAP
Army Aboriginal Community Assistance Program
AOD
Alcohol and Other Drugs
BER
Building the Education Revolution
CKFL
Central Kimberley Football League
CDEP
Community Development Employment Program
DotAG
Department of the Attorney General
DFC
Department for Communities
DoE
Department of Education
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations
DEC
Department of Environment and Conservation
DEWHA
Department of Environment Water Heritage and the Arts
DoH
Department of Health
DoHA
Department of Health and Ageing
DIA
Department of Indigenous Affairs
DPI
Department for Planning and Infrastructure (Department of Transport)
DAO
Drug and Alcohol Office
DTWD
Department of Training and Workforce Development
ELT
Early Life Trauma
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
FESA
Fire and Emergency Service Association
FVASA
Fitzroy Aboriginal Sports Association
FV
Fitzroy Valley
FVAODMG
Fitzroy Valley Alcohol and Other Drug Management Group
FVDHS
Fitzroy Valley District High School
FVELCC
Fitzroy Valley Early Learning Centre Committee
FVHP
Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership
FVHSPG
Fitzroy Valley Housing Service Providers Group
FVMS
Fitzroy Valley Men's Shed
FASD
Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
FTE
Full Time Employee
HACC
Health Aged Community Care
IBA
Indigenous Business Australia
ICC
Indigenous Coordination Centre
ILC
Indigenous Land Corporation
JSA
Job Services Australia
KALACC
Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
KAMSC
Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service Council
KDC
Kimberley Development Commission
KDEO
Kimberley District Education Office
KDGP
Kimberly Division of General Practice
KGT
Kimberley Group Training
KLC
Kimberley Land Council
KLRC
Kimberley Language and Resource Centre
KPHU
Kimberley Population Health Unit
KRSP
Kimberley Regional Services Program
LAC
Local Area Coordinator
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
LOC
Local Operations Centre
MWRC
Marninwantikura Women's Resource Centre
MWW
Marra Worra Worra Aboriginal Resource Centre
NCHS
Nindilingarri Cultural Health Service
NPA
National Partnership Agreement
OAH
Office of Aboriginal Health
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
PBC
Prescribed Body Corporate
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
RFDS
Royal Flying Doctor Service
SBCD
Small Business Centre - Derby
SDWK
Shire of Derby / West Kimberley
UWA
University of Western Australia
WACHS
Western Australian Country Health Service
WAPOL
Western Australian Police

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]


Attachment A – Table 1

Early Childhood

Early Childhood: the best start to life

What we are trying to achieve

  • Ensuring all Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities have access to early childhood education within five years for an equal start in early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to quality early childhood education, Indigenous Cultural Learning Framework and care services, including pre-school, childcare and family support services such as after school care, parenting programs and supports, is critical and will ensure all children have every opportunity to maximise their opportunities and performance at school.
  • Appropriate facilities and physical infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and healthy workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention.
  • Action in the areas of maternal, antenatal and early childhood health is relevant to address the child mortality gap and to early childhood development.
  • Fitzroy Crossing is a priority location for a Children and Family Centre under the Early Childhood National Partnership and the Department of Education (DoE) is currently consulting with the community on the design of the facility. DEEWR will fund two Indigenous child care traineeship positions for the Fitzroy Valley Early Learning Centre via funding targeted to centre-based Indigenous funded child care services in RSD locations.  DEEWR will provide 100% wages and on-costs, no direct costs to the service.
  • Consideration has been given to schooling planning through national partnership and other school plans, primarily by the Fitzroy Valley District High School.
  • The universal access arrangements under the National Partnership requires that all children aged three turning four have 15 hours access to early learning each week.

Key Stakeholders

  • Marninwantikura Women’s Resource Centre (MWRC)
  • Nindilingarri Cultural Health Service (NCHS)
  • Kimberley Population Health Unit (KPHU)
  • Fitzroy Valley Health Partnership (FVHP)
  • Fitzroy Valley Early Learning Centre Committee (FVELCC)
  • Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations (DEEWR)
  • Family, Housing, Community Services & Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA)
  • Department of Health & Ageing (DoHA)
  • Department of Education (DoE)
  • Department for Communities (DfC)
  • Department for Communities (DFC)
  • Shire of Derby / West Kimberley (SDWK)
  • Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee (FFFGC)
  • Fitzroy Valley Men’s Shed (FVMS)
  • Kimberley Language and Resource Centre (KLRC)
  • Kimberley TAFE

What’s happening:

Current Early Childhood Initiatives:

  • Education Learning Precinct
  • Youth Forum
  • Creation of a Children and Family Centre
  • FASD /ELT research and development of FASD diagnostic tools.
  • Implementation of Section 64 Liquor Control Act
  • Implementation of Section 175 Liquor Control Act
  • Hey Dad Program
  • Development of the Men's Shed Programs
  • Expansion of the role of Marninwarntikura Women’s Resource Centre Programs (MWRC)
  • Indigenous Parenting Support Service

What needs to happen:

  • Children and Family Centre;
    • Health and education cooperation in the development of programs for the Children and Family Centre and the Fitzroy Valley community
    • Continued and genuine consultation of the design, governance and operation of the Child and Family Centre
    • Development of Child Care services and Early Childhood training programs
  • Assistance to playgroup / crèche facilities in all FV communities
  • Community Bus Service
  • Create awareness of appropriate management procedures for children identified within the FASD / ELT
  • Establishment Fitzroy Valley Knowledge Centre
  • Identification of mainstream funding sources to support successful unfunded CDEP activities
  • Increase of Section 175 Liquor Control Act
  • Community Facility Development

Priority 1

Ensure the continued and genuine consultation on the design, governance and operation of the Children and Family Centre as per community aspirations. These aspirations include, but are not limited to:

  • An organic aesthetic to the child care and family centre, the design should not be a “box”, and the inclusion of eco friendly additions, such as water tanks and solar power.
  • The CFC to be governed and managed by local NGO.
  • The design does not need to be an extension of the District High School.
  • Incorporate an area for after school care.
  • Guaranteed ongoing funding for CFC.
  • Development of a program which supports various activities around nutrition which would start at early years and upwards.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and Partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DOHA

DoE

DTWD

DfC

DFC

FVHPF Council

SDWK

FFFGC

FVELCC

FVMS

MWRC

KLRC

NCHS

Kimberley TAFE

A workforce strategy for childcare workers, linked to the workforce mapping and planning under the Economic Participation Building Block, to be developed.

DEEWR will fund 100% wages and on-costs for two Indigenous child care traineeship positions.

Kimberley TAFE to work with DEEWR, DTWD and DoE on training for Childcare Workers

Operational funding is available for CFC until 2014

The tender for the operation of the CFC to be Public (DoE will ensure local input into the process).

Provision of capital and recurrent funding for CFC (strategy needs to be developed for out years).

DoE to present organic aesthetic to FVELCC and FFFGC.

FFFGC, FVELCC and FVDHS to investigate further with ROC an after school service.

Quality early childhood education and care supports the workforce participation choices of parents.

Indigenous children have access to affordable quality early childhood education.

Mid 2011

Jan 2011

Agreed future action

Ongoing

Agreed and commenced

July 2010

Mid 2011

Future consideration

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Attachment A – Table 2

Schooling

Schooling: learning for life

What we are trying to acheive

  • Halving the gap for Indigenous students in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding Communities in Literacy and numeracy within a decade and halving the gap for Indigenous students in Year 12 attainment or equivalent attainment rates by 2020.
  • School attendance is also part of closing the gap.
  • Human capital development through education is key to future opportunities.
  • Responsive schooling requires attention to teacher and school infrastructure, improving school attendance, workforce (including teacher and school administration supply and quality), curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement and opportunities for parental engagement and school/community partnerships. 
  • Introduction of and strengthening of Indigenous Cultural Learning Framework.
  • Transition pathways into schooling and into work, post school education and training are also important.
  • Lifelong learning is important and attention is also needed regarding adult literacy and numeracy skills.
  • Based on National Assessment Program -- Literacy and Numeracy (NAPLAN) testing in 2009 Fitzroy Valley District High School is gaining improvements compared to statistically similar schools (Social Economic Index), however there is much work to be done to close the gap compared to all other Australian schools. This plan draws on:
    • Fitzroy Valley District High School plans (which require further input into this planning process);
    • Fitzroy Valley District High School National Partnership-Low SES communities Plan; and
    • Fitzroy Valley District High School Strategic Plan.
  • Other plans from schools in the surrounding region will inform future versions of this plan.
  • The My School website states there is 61% school attendance at the FVDHS and 95% of students at FVDHS are Indigenous.
  • Fitzroy Valley DHS now has a young women’s academy.

The below recommendations on Education were handed down by Alastair Hope, State Coroner, February 2008, after conducting an inquest into the deaths of twenty two Aboriginal community members from the Kimberley (the Hope Report, 2008).

Recommendation No. 12
I recommend that the efforts of the Clontarf Foundation be supported and that the State Government continue to work in partnership with that Foundation with a view to expanding the program to more schools throughout the Kimberley.

Recommendation No. 13
I recommend that there be a whole of government approach aimed at addressing truancy and its causes, particularly in respect of Aboriginal students in the Kimberley.

Students at educational risk as a result of truancy should be monitored and, when necessary, resources of a range of Departments should be applied to addressing the issue.

Recommendation No. 14
I recommend that in association with efforts made to address truancy, remedial teaching is provided to children attending school who have not achieved basic education levels for their ages.

The planning and strategies developed through the Kimberley Success Zone will also inform future school planning in the Fitzroy Valley.

Key Stakeholders

  • DEEWR
  • FaHCSIA
  • DoHA
  • DoE- KDEO & AISA
  • DfC
  • DFC
  • SDWK
  • FFFGC
  • Garnduwa Amboorny Wirnan Aboriginal Corporation (Garnduwa)
  • Kimberley TAFE
  • Fitzroy Valley Aboriginal Sporting Association (FVASA)
  • Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre (KALACC)
  • MWRC
  • Mangkaja Arts
  • Fitzroy Valley District High School (FVDHS) and other government schools across the Valley
  • Independent Schools
  • Department of Indigenous Affairs (DIA)
  • Karrayili Adult Education Centre
What’s happening:

Current Schooling Initiatives:

  • Education Learning Precinct
  • Wesley College Partnership (Yiramalay)
  • Vocational Education and Training
  • Youth forum
  • Swimming pool
  • Yiriman Juvenile Diversion Program
  • Yiriman Program
  • Girls Basketball / Dance Academy
  • Development of New TAFE Centre
  • Introduction of SIDE program at District High School
  • Expansion of the role of Marninwarntikura Women’s Resource Centre Programs
  • Development of the Men’s Shed Programs
  • Indigenous Parenting Support Service
  • Learning Community iniative conducted by FVDHS
  • Bush Ranger training program at FVDHS
  • Scouts program operating at FVDHS
  • Artist in residency program operating at FVDHS
  • Traditional languages in Curriculum

What needs to happen:

Schooling:

  • Fitzroy Learning Farm. i.e. Ag School.
  • Health and education cooperation
  • Increase School Attendance Officers and Student Support Officers
  • Increase Aboriginal and Islander Education Officer’s (AIEO’s)
  • Creation of a partnership between DET Schools and Independent Aboriginal Community School in the FV
  • Expansion of Traditional languages into Curriculum and to be adequately resourced
  • Develop a Community Cultural Mediation Program in the Schools
  • Funding for specialist teachers in performing arts, textile and design etc

Training / Employment:

  • Education curriculum changes to be relevant to local area and industry. i.e. job readiness – Tourism, Pastoral, Mining and Health Worker Training etc.
  • Preparing youth for work i.e. Work Experience
  • Employment pathway for Bush Ranger Program
  • Support Services:
  • Youth and Recreation facilities development
  • Fitzroy School of Natural Resources
  • Youth Hostel
  • Youth and Adolescent Mental Health Workers
  • Community Bus Service
  • Road Service Upgrade
  • Community Mentor / Peer Support Program
  • Development of a Youth Space
  • Continued support for Clontarf Football Development and Girls Basketball Academy (Sporting Chance Program)
  • Nyanangarri Project/UWA (Incorporate into Fitzroy Valley Knowledge Centre)
  • Investigate financial assistance for equipment / resources for SIDE students undertaking work experience.

Infrastructure Needs:

  • Community Facility Development
  • Information and technology
  • Purpose built facility to house Wangki Radio, FV TV and editing suites built into Education Learning Precinct.

Priority 1

Youth coordination program to:

  • Help respond to specific youth needs.
  • Develop and progress activities for youth to engage in after school and during holidays which includes sport, arts, personal development, scouts, leadership, cultural activities etc.
  • Implement positive strategies of engaging youth.
  • Development of a Youth Advocacy Group.
  • Invest in evidence base data for the Local Implementation Plan.
LINKS WITH OTHER CLOSING THE GAP BUILDING BLOCKS: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling
Lead and Partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DoHA

DoE- KDEO & AICS

Youth Connections Skill Hire

DIA

DfC

DFC

SDWK

FVDHS

FFFGC

Garnduwa

FVASA

KALACC

MWRC

Mangkaja Arts

Independent Schools

  • Youth Connections project to undertake work in conjunction with Youth Coordinator.

Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study

Ongoing

Agreed and commenced

  • FaHCSIA to investigate accommodation options for government and non-government staff.
  • Funding to be provided for a Youth Coordinator.
  • FVDHS will appoint a Program Coordinator – Student Services and Pastoral Care to manage student services in the school. Key roles include: focus on health and wellbeing of students; develop interagency support framework with Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder / Early Life Trauma (FASD / ELT) students; and improve Individual behaviour attendance plans (IBP) to support quick development of school behaviours.
  • FVDHS appointment of a Youth Support Worker (YSW) who will facilitate better family support through interagency liaison and logistical support for families.

Connecting the way government agencies work in remote areas.

Now

Now

Early 2011

Future consideration

Agreed and commenced

  • The FFFGC have provided funds with FaHCSIA for a Youth Coordinator.
  • FFFGC to clarify structure/coordination of Youth Advisory Group.

Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces the educational disadvantage of children, especially Indigenous children.

Now

ASAP

Agreed future action

Priority 2

To improve the attendance and retention rates of students there is a need to increase School Based Attendance Officers, Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers and Education Support teachers.

LINKS WITH OTHER CLOSING THE GAP BUILDING BLOCKS: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling
Lead and Partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

DEEWR

DoE – KDEO

ROC

Aboriginal Independent Community Schools

SDWK

FFFGC

FVDHS

FaHCSIA

DoHA

ROC, DoE, DEEWR to investigate a regionalised/rationalised strategic approach to schooling that may include a residential facility in Fitzroy Crossing (eg VET students and secondary students). Should dovetail with proposed worker residential facility.

Indigenous young people successfully transition from school to work and/or further study

Mid 2011

Future consideration

Department of Education to evaluate the current funding ratio for AIEOs given the special demands placed on the school (FASD etc).(using 2-Way Classroom approach as practiced by Catholic Education Schools).

Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces the educational disadvantage of children, especially Indigenous children.

Early 2011

Agreed future action

FVDHS plan to utilise the Getting it Right model with an attendance specialist teacher (GiRA).

Breakfast/lunch provided for students with attendance issues.

Implementation/monitoring of School Attendance strategy.

As above

Ongoing

Ongoing

Ongoing

Agreed and commenced

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Attachment A – Table 3

Health

Health: lifelong health

Background

On 29 November 2008, COAG agreed to an historic $1.6 billion dollar National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes to specifically address the first of the COAG Closing The Gap targets- to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.

The Commonwealth will contribute $805.5 million over four years to address three priority areas in the National Partnership Agreement on Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes - Tackling Smoking, Primary Health Services That Can Deliver and Fixing The Gaps And Improving The Patient Journey. The Western Australian Government committed $117.43 million dollars over four years to address five priority areas- Tackling Smoking, Primary Health Services That Can Deliver, Fixing The Gaps And Improving The Patient Journey, Making Indigenous Health Everyone’s Business and Healthy Transition To Adulthood.

Both the Commonwealth and Western Australian Governments have worked with key stakeholders to develop implementation plans committing the funds and have commenced the implementation of strategies to address the priority areas in all regions of Western Australia.

Subsequently, Both the Commonwealth and Western Australian Government have agreed to further progress Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes in the Fitzroy Valley by committing to the Remote Service Delivery NPA. The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) for the health building block will provide the Community local level direction setting required for Government commitment and investments to Close The Gap in Indigenous health Outcomes in the Fitzroy Valley.

Governance

The Fitzroy Futures Forum (FFF) is an overarching Community governance structure inclusive of service providers and Community members. For this initial iteration of the LIP the FFF utilised its executive to determine the health priorities to be included. Health service providers and health partnership groups have provided more detailed input into the health LIP via round table meetings and discussions. Linkages between the health LIP and other COAG building blocks will be clear throughout this document and translated back through the FFF.

The Fitzroy Valley Alcohol and Other Drug Management Group (FVAODMG) is the coordinating body for all AOD activity in the valley and will oversee the development and implementation of Priority 2 through the FFF.

Use of existing Fitzroy Valley health consultation and planning work

A number of previously developed health consultation and planning documents have been reviewed, aligned and accessed in preparation of the Fitzroy Crossing health priorities Local Implementation Plan (LIP) document. These include (but are not limited to):

  • Service Provider planning documents and feedback
  • State and Commonwealth planning documents and feedback
  • Program evaluation and reviews
  • Kimberley Aboriginal Regional Health Planning Forum needs assessments

Community forums and workshops

Local Operations Centre staff and Regional Operations Centre staff attended and/or facilitated a number of health specific Community Workshops and Service Provider Round Tables to further inform priority health issues, gaps and solutions to be included in this LIP.

The recent progress in creating more positive health outcomes for communities in the Fitzroy Valley has been made possible through strong community engagement, good health service partnerships and strong, well established models of health and community governance. The Fitzroy Futures Forum, Fitzroy Valley Alcohol and Other Drug Management Group and the WACHS/Nindilingarri Health Partnership are all examples of ongoing partnerships, coordinated service delivery and effective planning in the health arena.

In partnership with these and other local governance groups and where appropriate, individual agencies and community groups, the ROC Health Staff will work to develop a number of project plans to address the identified health issues in the LIP, including the tracking of existing health service providers and service delivery as a priority.

Future challenges will include:

  • Establishing suitable housing stock for existing and new positions.
  • Ensuring that the development of plans and programs is at direction of the community and in partnership with all relevant agencies.
  • Implementing adequate support for existing local and regional health governance, planning and coordination groups as they take on more responsibility in addressing issues through the LIP.
  • Negotiating funding for identified FTE’s and programs to ensure that the positive, short-term changes in health outcomes are translated into long-term health outcomes that are comparable to the broader population.
  • Building autonomy and sustainability in local communities.

Government “doing business differently” to Close The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes: Remote Service Delivery NPA for Health

  • Community and Government process to agreement on priority health action
  • Government supporting local Community strategies to enhance and sustain local health decision making
  • Community developed performance indicators on health
  • Reporting to Community on health progress
  • Health service contract management to oblige Community partnered planning, coordination and direction setting

Priority 1

Funding for a Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder (FASD)/ Early Life Trauma Program Coordinator and for Stage 2 to progress the FASD Prevalence Study.
To produce baseline mapping for the Local Implementation Plan.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Early Childhood and Schooling
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
1A: CONFIRMING LILIWAN STAGE 2 FUNDING

Nindilingarri /George Institute

Marulu Leadership Group

DoHA

FaHCSIA

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • A FASD/Early Life Trauma strategy has been developed: The Marulu Project. Contained in this project is the Lililwan Project which addresses FASD prevalence. Stage 1 of Lililwan is to develop a target group of children born between 2001 and 2003. Stage 2 is to complete comprehensive health assessment on the target group.
  • State COAG IECD 2 funding to Drug and Alcohol Office for a State-wide FASD Prevention service/program.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Confirm ongoing funding for the FASD program (to include staffing, housing, administration and transport costs).

Note:

  • Stage 1 of Lililwan is nearing completion (funded through private investment).
  • A funding proposal for stage 2 of project of currently before agencies for consideration.

Community and service providers have requested study to develop clear understanding of issue in Community.

Information gathered through the project will help inform the development of a FAS/D/Early Life Trauma strategic plan and support investment in other similar communities.

Completed

July 2010 – July 2014

August 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

1B: ADDRESSING SUSTAINABILITY OF LILIWAN FASD COORDINATOR ROLE

Nindilingarri /George Institute

Marulu Leadership Group

District Ed Office/school

WACHS

Police

Marninwarntikura

DoHA

FaHCSIA

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • There is currently a volunteer coordinating the activity of the Marulu Project, housed and supported through Nindilingarri.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Implement actions identified under the FASD/Early Life Trauma (Marulu Project) plan to establish funding and sustainability for coordination of project in Fitzroy Crossing.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing and office space.

  • Marulu Leadership Group currently seeking funding for a program coordinator.

Identified need for a coordinated response to FASD issues.

August 2010

Agreed and commenced

Future consideration

Priority 2

Development and implementation of an Alcohol Management Plan (AMP) to:

  • Seek funding for additional alcohol and other drug counselling services.
  • Wrap around service provision.
  • Produce baseline mapping for the Local Implementation Plan.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Safer Communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
2A: MAPPING OF RELEVANT SERVICE AND FACILITIES

ROC

LOC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • In community alcohol and other drug (AOD) services – 1 Child and Adolescent Mental Health Worker, 1 AOD Counsellor, 1 AOD Prevention Officer, 2 AHW (State funded and based at Nindilingarri)
  • Visiting AOD services – Kimberley Drug Service Team 2 AOD Counsellors’ fortnightly. Kimberley Mental Health Services 1 Mental Health Counsellor fortnightly. The Kimberley Division of General Practice (KDGP) 1 Mental Health Counsellor.
  • State COAG funding for Men’s Health Coordinator (WACHS).
  • State COAG IECD 2 funding to Drug and Alcohol Office for a State-wide FASD Prevention service/program.
  • State COAG IECD 2 funding to KAMSC for Maternal and Child Health.
  • State COAG IECD 3 funding to NCHS for Visiting Community Family Program $909,662.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a document that outlines all the in community and visiting alcohol and other drug services, and other AMP “wrap around” programs, training and other support services including frequency and service offered.
  • Provide to LOC to review with health services.

Community and service providers have identified the need for more comprehensive and better coordinated alcohol, other drug and mental health service delivery.

July 2010 – July 2014

September 2010

September 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

2B: DEVELOPMENT OF A COMPREHENSIVE FITZROY VALLEY ALCOHOL MANAGEMENT PLAN

ROC

Fitzroy valley Alcohol and Other Drug Management Group (FVAODMG)

LOC

DoHA

DoH

MHC

DCS

DAO

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • DoHA funding for KALACC to develop a health specific funding proposal for Yiriman as essential “wrap around” service in Fitzroy Valley an/or broader as required
  • DoHA funding for Milliya Rumurra Drug and Alcohol Treatment Service to undertake network meeting to develop better services (including to Fitzroy Crossing Community Members) $40,000.00.
  • The Drug and Alcohol Office (DAO) is funding a series of reports regarding the impact of liquor restrictions in Fitzroy. The outcomes of the 24 month report will help form the actions around any future alcohol management plans in Fitzroy.
  • NIDAC has also completed a report to be utilised in assisting with forming actions.
  • Milliya Rumurra is currently negotiating with the Fitzroy LOC and the ROC to facilitate a community meeting to ascertain future AOD service requirements in Fitzroy from Milliya Rumurra.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • ROC to facilitate a meeting of the FVAODMG to develop an alcohol management plan for the Valley.
  • FVAODMG to consider the following documents when developing alcohol management plan:
    • DAO Alcohol Restriction Impact Study (due out in Aug 10)
    • NIDAC recommendations
    • Mental health and AOD service provision gaps document
    • Health services review document
    • Working Together document (DIA 2001)
  • Develop an alcohol management plan project outline which includes:
    • Governance and reporting structures
    • Timeframes for plan development and reporting
    • The wrap around and support services/programs and strategies to be included in plan
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).
    • Service review and reorientation as required.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • There is an alcohol management group in Fitzroy Crossing that will support the development and oversee the implementation of an alcohol management plan in the community.
  • DAO has a format for alcohol management plans which will be considered for application in Fitzroy.

Research indicates that to address alcohol related harm in the long-term, a cultural change in the manner in which alcohol is used is needed. This can be achieved through the implementation of a comprehensive alcohol management plan and make the most of the current ‘window of opportunity’ that has been created through liquor restrictions.

June 2010

June 2010

July 2010

2010

August 2010

July 2010

August 2010

August – December 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Priority 3

Development and funding for an annual Fitzroy Family Festival to educate, promote and show case services available to mothers, fathers and children around health and parenting.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Safer Communities, Early Childhood
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
3A: IMPLEMENTATION OF AN ANUUAL FAMILY RESTIVAL IN FITZROY CROSSING

Fitzroy Family Festival Organising Committee

LOC

WACHS

FaHCSIA

ROC

DFC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • First Fitzroy Family Festival to be run in July 2010. Existing Fitzroy Family Festival Organising Committee are being supported by the community to develop this as an ongoing event.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a report that outlines the outcomes of the Fitzroy Family Festival and recommendations for any future events. Distribute report.
  • Fitzroy Family Festival Organising Committee develops project plan for future Festivals that includes:
    • Objectives and proposed outcomes
    • Funding requirements (ongoing in nature)

Note:

  • A Fitzroy Family Festival Organising Committee has been developed and they have sought funding and support to run the first Fitzroy Family Festival.

Community and services have identified that many families are unaware of services and how to access them. The Festival is designed to provide information, contact points and promote services in a non-threatening, family and community sensitive manner.

July 2010

December 2010

December 2010

Agreed and commenced

Future consideration

Priority 4

Increase support and funding for the local care and preventative education of renal / dialysis problems.

  • In the WA State government’s response to the Hope Report (2008) it stated there were 379 diabetic patients in the Fitzroy Valley and approximately 23 were on dialysis.
  • Data is required from agencies to produce baseline mapping for the Local Implementation Plan as projections on renal failure may require a District Dialysis Unit.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS:
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
4A: RENAL DIALYSIS

Nindilingarri/WACHS Partnership Group

KAMSC – KRSS

ROC

RFDS

LOC

DoHA

DoH

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • WACHS are in the process of developing a WACHS Regional Dialysis Plan and the KARHPF have developed a Regional Renal Development Plan in the recent past.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Identify and review existing plans and service mapping documents, including:
    • KARHPF Regional Renal Development Plan.
    • KRSS Renal Services Mapping.
    • WACHS Regional Dialysis Plan.
    • KAMSC renal services.
  • Nindilingarri, KRSS and WACHS meeting to identify barriers and explore options for suitable renal dialysis in Fitzroy Crossing.
  • Develop a Fitzroy Valley Dialysis Plan that identifies issues, gaps and barriers to accessing renal dialysis treatments in home, in Community and away from Fitzroy Valley, these will include:
    • Lack of Dialysis services within Fitzroy Valley.
    • Training and support services for renal dialysis patients and carers in Fitzroy Valley, including accommodation and transport from outlying communities in the Fitzroy Valley to Fitzroy Crossing.
    • Support services for renal dialysis patients when accessing services outside of Fitzroy Valley, including accommodation, transport and health service access.
    • Linkages with health services on patient return to Community and follow up with patient, carer and family.
  • Arrange a Renal Dialysis Community Forum through FFF to disseminate, educate and promote awareness about current status quo for renal dialysis patients- existing renal dialysis operation managers, health department executives and professional involved in renal dialysis should be presenting in clear format.

Note: any additional FTE will require housing.

  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • Additional and suitable storage for dialysis equipment and chemicals.
    • Training for community members to undertake dialysis.
    • FTE to monitor dialysis patients.
    • Suitable transport options for community accessing dialysis.
    • Accommodation for carers and patients from outlying communities in the Fitzroy Valley who may access the self caring dialysis located at Nindilingarri.
  • There is currently the capacity for 4 self caring home dialysis patients located at Nindilingarri.
  • KAMSC, through Kimberley Regional Support Services (KRSS) have completed renal service mapping in the past.
  • State Health currently provides a visiting Renal Physician every 2 months and KAMSC provide regional dialysis support.

In the WA State government’s response to the Hope Report (2008) it stated there were 379 diabetic patients in the Fitzroy Valley and approximately 23 were on dialysis.

 

Being able to provide some dialysis care in Fitzroy Crossing would negate the need for some patients to travel off community, reduce stress on family and free up spaces in the Broome service.

2010

June-August 2010

August 2010

October 2010

November 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Future consideration

 

4B: RENAL DISEASE PREVENTION

Nindilingarri/WACHS Partnership Group

KAMSC

ROC

RFDS

LOC

DoHA

DoH

KDGP

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Commenced ROC/LOC facilitated discussion with service providers relating to renal dialysis.
  • DoHA funded Nindilingarri “top up” assist with nutritional/health promotion/prevention programs ($10,000.00).
  • DoHA COAG funding for Indigenous Health Project Officer Positions for the Kimberley Division of General Practice and AHCWA- $256,500.00.
  • DoHA COAG funding for a State-wide Practice Manager role to support ACCHOs (Nindilingarri included).
  • DoHA COAG funding for 4 x FTE to West Kimberley through KAMSC for Regional Tobacco Coordination and Action and Healthy Lifestyle Workers approx $500,000.00. DoHA COAG measures will also include training for Chronic Disease Self Management.
  • DoHA COAG measure to undertake market research and local campaigns to promote health and wellbeing (National funding of $22,700,000.00)
  • COAG Remote Food Security NPA commencement.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding to WACHS Kimberley for Fitzroy Valley Core Primary Health Service $4,626,055.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding to Health Networks for Statewide Tackling Smoking Coordination program.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Mapping of existing renal disease prevention services and programs available in the Fitzroy Valley, provide this information to the FFF.
  • Identification of strategies required to improve prevention services to be developed with agencies and reference group.
  • Development of a local renal disease prevention plan including strategies and resource needs.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

Community and service providers have identified the need for more comprehensive prevention programs around renal disease.

June 2010

June 2010

2009-ongoing

2009/10

2010- ongoing

2009-2013

July 2010 – July 2014

June-August 2010

August 2010

December 2010

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed future action

Priority 5

Development and implementation of an Environmental Health Plan:

  • FV Environmental Health Reference Group.
  • Environmental Health Strategy
    • Clean Water
    • Pest control
    • Plumbing
    • Dog Control
    • Cat Control
    • Feral Animals (Cat, Dog, Pig)
    • Waste Management
    • Training & Employment
    • Funding
  • Environmental Health Education and Awareness programs.
  • Road Service Upgrade.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Safer Communities, Healthy Homes
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
5A: DEVELOPMENT OF AN ENVIRONMNETAL HEALTH PLAN

LOC

FaHCSIA

DoHA

WACHS

SDWK

OAH

DoH

Nindilingarri

Aboriginal Housing

FESA

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Complete mapping of all environmental health programs existing and funded into Fitzroy Crossing by all levels of Government and private sector.
  • Commenced ROC facilitated discussions between environmental health services.
  • Review the Environmental Health needs of Aboriginal Communities in WA 2008 survey and its findings.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • LOC will coordinate the development of a Fitzroy Valley Environmental Health Plan with relevant agencies.

Note:

  • There are currently a number of environmental health services operating in Fitzroy Crossing. These include Nindilingarri, Shire of Derby West Kimberley and Karrayili Adult Education Centre (certificate level training in environmental health services).

To be addressed under the Healthy Homes Building Block.

June- August 2010

June 2010

August 2010

2010-2011

Agreed and commenced

Future consideration

Priority 6

Planning and Coordination of all Health Service Providers in the FV to include:

  • Awareness of existing services for people in the community.
  • Improve access to the services.
  • Ensure equitable Health Service delivery.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Economic Participation, Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
6A: MAPPING OF SERVICES AND FACILITIES

ROC

LOC

DoHA

LOC

WACHS

Nindilingarri/WACHS Partnership

KAMSC

KDGP

Dental health

KALACC

Marninwarntikura

RFDS

Red Cross

Anglicare

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • The ROC has developed a list of in community and visiting health services, including timing and duration of visit and nature of service offered.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a document that outlines all visiting health services, including frequency and service offered.
  • Provide document to LOC to review with health services.
  • Review existing services list to identify gaps in delivery and strategies to meet needs and priorities.

Community have identified the need to better coordinate service delivery.

Agencies have identified the need to improve joint planning to better address gaps in services and reduce duplications.

March-July 2010

August 2010

August 2010

October 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

6B: COORDINATION AND PARTNERSHIP PLANNING

ROC

LOC

Nindilingarri/WACHS partnership group

DoHA

WACHS

KAMSC

KDGP

Dental health

KALACC

Marninwarntikura

RFDS

Red Cross

Anglicare

KACS

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • DoHA funding to KAMSC to trial a central health planning and coordination role for Kimberley Regional Aboriginal Health Planning Forum (Nindilingarri AND WACHS are members)- “Kimberley Aboriginal Health Planning and Coordination Pilot Project” $50,000.00.
  • DoHA funding for a State-wide COAG coordination role at AHCWA- COAG coordination and support to ACCHO’s (including Nindilingarri)- $83,170.
  • State COAG funding for two State-wide Aboriginal Liaison Coordinators, one based at AHCWA and one based at WACHS Area Office respectively (these positions will support the State-wide network of Aboriginal Liaison Officers being rolled out through COAG Closing the Gap funding.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding for WACHs Kimberley for Kimberley Regional Eye Program Coordinator.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap Funding to KAMSC for Kimberley Integrated Health Information Systems.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap Funding to WACHS Kimberley for Kimberley Integrated Health Information System.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a services coordination project outline which includes:
    • Services coordination strategy and communication plan.
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).
    • Service review and reorientation as required.
  • Develop and implement a communication strategy to ensure community is aware of health services and how they can be accessed.
  • Note: any addition FTE will need housing.
  • The FVAODMG has been established as the entry point for all AOD services entering Fitzroy.
  • The FVAODMG has developed a communication strategy for community information and reporting processes.

The ROC has identified a significant number of visiting service providers in Fitzroy Crossing and that much of this is uncoordinated and not well communicated with the community.

Community has expressed concern in that they are unaware of when services visit and how to access them.

June 2010

2009/2010

June 2010 –June 2014

December 2010

March 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Future consideration

6C: HEALTH WORKFORCE RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION

ROC

LOC

Nindilingarri/WACHS partnership group

DoHA

LOC

WACHS

KAMSC

KDGP

Dental health

KALACC

Marninwarntikura

RFDS

Red Cross

Anglicare

KACS

DTWD

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • DoHA COAG measure to undertake a national market research program, establish a public relations program and implement a campaign strategy aimed at generating interest and encouraging more health professionals to work in Indigenous health (National budget of $7,150,000.00)
  • DoHA COAG measure to build the Indigenous Health Workforce through training- including Nursing scholarships and supported clinical placements and training posts for GP’s and Nurses (National budget of $17,740,000.00).

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Mapping of current and existing health training and career pathways for local people.
  • Revision of current successful recruitment campaigns in/around the Kimberley.
  • Health services to investigate innovative ways of attracting and retaining quality staff in Fitzroy Crossing.
  • Develop a recruitment/marketing strategy to help attract quality staff to work in Fitzroy Crossing.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • WACHS have started to engage in more flexible employment options in Fitzroy Crossing.

There have been significant changes in the social and physical landscape of Fitzroy Crossing due to considerable investment by community and government. Despite these positive changes, it is still very difficult to attract quality staff to the community for long-term employment.

2009-2013

2009-2013

Aug 2010

Aug 2010

Sep 2010

Dec 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Future consideration

Priority 7

Increase in Mental Health services and Healing initiatives for the Fitzroy Valley.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation, Safer Communities and Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
7A: DEVELOPMENT OF A MENTAL HEALTH AND HEALING PLAN

ROC

LOC

Nindilingarri/WACHS partnership group

DoHA

WACHS

KAMSC

KDGP

Dental health

KALACC

Marninwarntikura

RFDS

Red Cross

Anglicare

KACS

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Complete mapping of all mental health programs existing and funded into Fitzroy Crossing by all levels of Government and private sector
  • The Regional Operations Centre, with DOHA, will facilitate a meeting to evaluate existing services and investigate and fund further Mental Health and Healing initiatives’ for the Fitzroy Valley

High rates of mental health illnesses amongst Aboriginal people and low rates of access to services.

2010-2011

Future consideration

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Attachment A – Table 4

Economic Participation

Economic Participation: building wealthy communities

What we are trying to achieve

  • Halving the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous residents in Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities within a decade.
  • The Fitzroy Valley communities should have the opportunity to participate in the mainstream market economy – real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation.
  • Access to land and native title assets, rights and interests can be leveraged to secure real and practical benefits for Indigenous people. Other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures and social and physical infrastructure, including communications and transport, are needed to foster economic participation and community engagement.
  • The potential for the Fitzroy Valley to realise future economic development opportunities, is to build partnership between current industry based stakeholders and the emerging Aboriginal entrepreneurs such as; Mingankala Contracting (Fencing), Leedal PTY LTD (Hospitality), Bunuba Cattle Company (Pastoral), J and J Contracting (Ag Services), Darngku Heritage Tours (Cultural Tourism), Mimbi Caves (Tourism), Bungoolie Tours (Tourism), Ngiyali Road House (Service Station), Hale contracting (Fencing and Earth Mover), Mangkaja Artist (Arts), Yungngora Cattle Company (Pastoral/Mining), Fitzroy Xpress (Music), Hand and Davis Consultancy Services.
  • To support the development of emerging entrepreneurs it will be important to establish a appropriate support services such as; a business incubator, FV Chamber of Commerce, and business development services.
  • Development of a Workforce Strategy to ensure a coordinated approach to increasing Indigenous employment in Fitzroy Crossing. Strategy need to acknowledge employment opportunities that will arise through the investment and infrastructure in the building blocks of Early Childhood (childcare workers), Schooling (AIEOs, teachers), Health (mentors, nurses, social workers), Healthy Homes (apprenticeships) and Safe Communities (environmental health workers, police).

The below recommendations were handed down from the Hope Report about Human Resources and Community Development and Employment Projects.

Recommendation No. 3
Positive action should be taken, where practicable, to employ Aboriginal people in Government sector activities in the Kimberley Region. In some cases this may require up skilling suitable local Aboriginal people.

In order for this to be achieved in some areas of activity it may be necessary to alter entrance requirements for particular positions so that suitable candidates without existing tertiary qualifications can be employed and trained.

Recommendation No. 15
I recommend that the CDEP system not be withdrawn from communities unless and until the prospect of alternative employment is achievable for people in those communities.

Recommendation No. 16
I recommend that the CDEP system be reviewed with a view to improving the quality of supervision of CDEP participants so that the quality and nature of work performed is reasonably consistent and there are no longer areas where CDEP work is described as “sit down money”. Workers should continue to perform important basic tasks required for communities, particularly those which would normally be performed by local Shires. The work should also be directed at health and safety issues and include the removal of rubbish, cleaning of properties and improving health outcomes for communities. I further recommend that there should be more flexibility in the system so that workers can increase the number of hours worked until they are able to work full time and gain unsubsidised employment.

I further recommend that there should be interaction between the Department of Employment and Workplace Relations and the Education Department so as to ensure that training can take place as part of the CDEP system and that regular attendance at CDEP work can be recognised in the form of a certificate which could be used by participants in seeking further employment.

Key stakeholders:

  • FVMS
  • MWRC
  • Mangkaja Arts
  • Pindan Contracting
  • MWW
  • ITEC
  • Job Futures
  • Derby Workforce
  • DIA
  • FaHCSIA
  • DEEWR
  • IBA
  • Kimberley Development Commission (KDC)
  • Karrayili Adult Education Centre
  • Kimberley Group Training (KGT)
  • ICC
  • Department of Environment Water Heritage and the Arts (DEWHA)
  • Indigenous Land Corporation
  • Leedal PTY LTD
  • Fitzroy Futures Forum
  • Aboriginal pastoral lease holders
  • Kurungal Inc
  • Yungngora Inc
  • Department of Environment and Conservation (DEC)
  • Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC)
  • Kimberley Land Council (KLC)
  • Small Business Centre - Derby (SBCD)

What’s happening:

Current employment and training iniative:

  • Upgrade of Karrayili Adult Education Facility
  • Development of New TAFE Centre
  • Training and employment community reference group
  • KGT apprenticeship program
  • Ngurrara Ranger program
  • Pallara training program
  • TAFE utilising existing community based organisation.
  • Men’s Shed programs

FV land reform:

  • Fitzroy Futures land tenure changes
  • Bunuba Heights residential subdivision
  • Fitzroy Futures Fund
  • KLC / Land tenure changes / Native Title

What needs to happen:

Identify the current and potential economic drivers for the FV:

  • NP agreement on remote indigenous housing.
  • Pastoralism
  • Conservation / IPA
  • Eco Tourism
  • Town based Hospitality
  • Agriculture / Horticulture
  • Kurungal Service Centre
  • Private Home ownership

Economic Strategy for Employment and Development:

  • Skills audit
  • Preparing youth for work
  • Training
  • Business incubator
  • Corporate Governance training
  • Development of a Apprentice Hostel Accommodation

IT and support services:

  • Local banking
  • Telecentre
  • Early Child Care Services
  • Community Bus Service
  • DPI – Licensing
  • Business funding support

Infrastructure Needs:

  • Community Facility Development

Priority 1

Economic Strategy for Aboriginal Employment and Development, a service that will be based in Fitzroy Crossing to investigate and assist with:

  • Coordination of Transition to Work activities for young adults leaving school.
  • Apprenticeships.
  • Business support and development to identify the key industry economic drivers for the FV.
  • Coordination of Employment Service Providers, CDEP organisations and employment opportunities.
  • The FFF Governing Committee monitors and evaluates the NPARIH program employment and economic participation targets.
  • To collect data for baseline mapping in Local Implementation Plan.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

DEEWR

ROC

FaHCSIA

DEWHA

ILC

IBA

ICC

DAFF

RIRDC

DIA

DEC

DOH

DTWD

Department of Commerce (DFC)

Department of Agriculture

Department of Tourism

SBCD

SDWK

Community

FFFGC

KLC

Central Kimberley Chamber of Commerce

JSAs, ITEC, Job Futures and Derby Workforce

MWW

Men’s Shed

Leedal

Bunuba Cattle Company

KRSP

PGA

WA Tourism Board

KGT

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • FFFGC established an Education, Employment and Training Sub-Committee.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • DEEWR to be the lead agency and facilitate a forum for all stakeholders to:
    • Map and gap economic development services.
    • Have an action plan for a service model around economic participation.
    • Develop a workforce strategy.
  • ROC to look at Land Tenure issues.

Build skills and assets to stimulate a local economy

January 2010

Agreed and commenced

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Attachment A – Table 5

Healthy Homes

Healthy Homes: investing in better housing

What we are trying to achieve

  • Closing the life expectancy gap within a generation and halving the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children in Fitzroy Crossing and Surrounding Communities under five within a decade.
  • A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population.
  • Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (design, stock and maintenance).
  • Children need to live in accommodation with adequate infrastructure conducive to good hygiene and study and free of overcrowding.The below recommendations were handed down by the Hope report:

The need for an Assessment of Sustainability to take place

Recommendation No. 2
I recommend that before vast amounts of money are invested in housing and infrastructure costs, there should be a plan in place for each region in the Kimberley addressing sustainability.

The issue of sustainability should take account of practical, historical and cultural factors

When a decision has been made that a community is sustainable, a real ongoing commitment should be made to improving the conditions in that community and the plan in respect of that community should not be abandoned without very good reason.

The type of Houses being Constructed

Recommendation No. 17
I recommend that future planning for construction of public housing for Aboriginal residents of the Kimberley specifically addresses the particular wants and needs of the people involved and includes consideration of alternatives to individual houses designed for the needs of nuclear families, such as provision of cluster housing and other forms of housing which enable different levels of communal living, particularly when these alternatives provide a less expensive option.

The Absence of Furniture

Recommendation No. 18
I recommend that in addition to providing public housing, the Housing Department be funded to provide very basic furniture, particularly beds which would raise mattresses off the floors. Provision of such furniture should occur after the occupants of public housing have been adequately educated in respect of the need to look after the properties and any furniture provided.
Provision of such furniture should only occur in circumstances where an identified person has accepted responsibility for the furniture and the furniture should, like the housing provided, be subject to audit.

The Home Maker Program

Recommendation No. 19
(i) I recommend that there should be a home maker program supported by the Department of Housing of Works, the Department of Health and the Department for Child Protection which would improve people’s life skills so that they would be taught how to maintain the homes provided to them in a clean and hygienic state; and
(ii) I further recommend that when it is considered necessary, satisfactory completion of such a program should be a necessary perquisite to proposed occupants being provided with a new home.

Key Stakeholders:

  • FaHCSIA
  • MWW
  • FFF
  • CAT
  • Department of Housing
  • KRSP
  • NCHS
  • MWRC

What’s happening:

Current Housing Initiatives:

  • Staged development of the NP on Remote Indigenous Housing refurbishments and new stock
  • Bunuba Heights residential subdivision
  • Implementation of Section 64 Liquor Control Act
  • Implementation of Section 175 Liquor Control Act
  • MWRC – In home practical support & Horticulture Course
  • Men’s Shed – Landscaping Project
  • AACAP site investigation for 2011

What needs to happen:

Better coordination and transparency from relevant stakeholders for the Housing needs in the Fitzroy Valley:

  • Clean Water
  • Waste Management
  • Residential development
  • Residential remodelling
  • Road Service Upgrade

Coordinated Environmental Health advisory Group:

  • Environmental Health Strategy
    • Clean Water
    • Pest control
    • Plumbing
    • Sewage
    • Dog Control
    • Waste Management
    • Training & Employment
    • Funding
  • Health Education and Awareness programs
  • Road Service Upgrade

Resource and Infrastructure Needs:

  • Community Facility Development
  • Creation of community based Housing issues project officer

Funding:

  • Continuation of existing funding for successful programs / Projects

Priority 1

Development of a Fitzroy Crossing Housing Reference Group to assist with the coordination and consultation of the NP on Remote Indigenous Housing Issues.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Economic Participation, Governance and Leadership, Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

FaHCSIA

ROC

Department of Housing

DIA

SDWK

FFFGC

MWW

FVHSPG

FV Community Steering Group

  • ROC to support and assist with the development of the FV Housing Reference Group.

The housing reference group will ensure that there is input from the Fitzroy Valley communities and Fitzroy Valley Housing Service Providers Group.

 

Agreed and commenced

Priority 2

Development and implementation of an Environmental Health Plan:

  • FV Environmental Health Reference Group
  • Environmental Health Strategy:
    • Clean Water
    • Pest control
    • Plumbing
    • Dog Control
    • Cat Control
    • Feral Animals (Cat, Dog, Pig)
    • Waste Management
    • Training & Employment
    • Funding
  • Environmental Health Education and Awareness programs
  • Road Service Upgrade
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Economic Participation, Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

LOC

FaHCSIA

DoHA

WACHS

SDWK

OAH

Nindilingarri

Aboriginal Housing

FESA

Karrayili Adult Education Centre

MWW

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • There are currently a number of environmental health services operating in Fitzroy Crossing. These include Nindilingarri, Shire of Derby West Kimberley and Karrayili Adult Education Centre (certificate level training).

 

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • LOC will coordinate the development of a Fitzroy Valley Environmental Health Plan with relevant agencies.
  • FaHCSIA planning to direct resources to Environmental Health Plans.
  • FaHCSIA to provide DoH with funds for animal control in environmental health services.

 

 

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

 

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Attachment A – Table 6

Safe Communities

Safe Communities keeping families safe

What we are trying to achieve

  • To close the life expectancy gap within a generation and halve the mortality rate for Indigenous children under five within a decade.
  • Eliminate violence, abuse and neglect for Indigenous men, women and children through:
    • Improving family and community safety through law and justice responses.
    • Accessible and effective policing and justice system.
    • Victim support such as safe houses and counselling.
    • Child protection.
    • Preventative approaches.
  • Addressing related factors such as alcohol and other drug related harm, critical to improving community safety, and obtaining improved health benefits.

The below recommendations were handed down by the Hope Report:

Child Protection
Recommendation No. 9
I recommend that a leadership organisation in government address the benefits being provided to regional workers employed by government organisations to ensure that –

  • Housing is not reallocated from one organisation to another in circumstances where such a reallocation could have an extremely detrimental effect on attempts to fill vital positions (such as Community Child Protection Workers).

Recommendation No. 11
I recommend that the system of Compulsory Income Management be introduced in Western Australia and that the Department for Child Protection have the ability to request compulsory income management in cases of child neglect.

Police Involvement
Recommendation No. 25
I recommend that both Commonwealth and State Governments continue to support the present police policy of providing an increased police presence in remote locations and, particularly, that multi-function police facilities continue to be constructed, adequately funded and staffed.

Recommendation No. 26
I recommend that greater resources be allocated to coordinating the police alcohol and drug response for the Kimberley District.

Recommendation No. 27
I recommend that a high priority be allocated by Western Australia Police to the detection and prosecution of persons involved in illicit alcohol sales.

Future challenges will include:

  • Establishing suitable housing stock for existing and new positions.
  • Ensuring that the development of plans and programs in done so through consolation and in partnership with all relevant agencies and the community.
  • Ensuring there is adequate support for existing governance groups as they take on more responsibility in addressing issues through the LIP.
  • Negotiating funding for identified FTE’s and programs to ensure that positive changes in justice outcomes.

Key Stakeholders:

  • DIA
  • FaHCSIA
  • DotAG
  • Department of Corrective Services
  • Department for Communities
  • WA Police
  • Attorney General’s Department
  • KALACC
  • DAO
  • Fitzroy Valley Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee
  • FFFGC

What’s happening:

Current Community Safety Initiatives:

  • Fitzroy Futures Fund
  • Development of Children’s and Family Centre
  • Development of New Police Station
  • Yiriman Juvenile Diversion Program
  • Girls Academy Program
  • Implementation of liquor restrictions under Section 64 of the Liquor Control Act 1988
  • Implementation of liquor restrictions under Section 175 of the Liquor Control Act 1988
  • Development of Aboriginal Justice Agreement

What needs to happen:

Housing:

  • Decreasing overcrowding
  • Increase capacity of Home Ownership
  • Residential development

Employment:

  • Increase indigenous recruitment in community safety programs.

Crime Prevention:

  • Community Watch program
  • Rural Watch program
  • Safety House program

Support Services:

  • Fitzroy Valley prison work camp
  • Family Counselling
  • Substance abuse programs
  • Domestic violence programs
  • Fitzroy Valley youth foundation
  • KLC / Land tenure / Native Title
  • Increase of Section 175 Liquor Control Act

Infrastructure Needs:

  • Community Facility Development
  • Better playground facilities
  • New Court House Facility
  • Road Service Upgrade
  • Better security lighting and personal alarm points in and around recreation points

Governance and Leadership:

  • Strengthening Governance System within communities

Priority 1

Ongoing funding for Yiriman Juvenile Diversion Program.

  • Future funding support will be strengthened through data collection for inclusion into the Local Implementation Plan.
  • Improved planning and financial support would enable this program to reach its full potential. Delivery at present by KALACC is ad hoc due to the uncertainty of financial commitment.
  • A roundtable meeting to scheduled for stakeholders to discuss financial support for this project.
LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSE THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: Schooling, Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
1A: ONGOING IMPLEMENTATION OF THE YIRIMAN PROGRAM

Fitzroy Valley Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee

Attorney General’s Department

KALACC

ROC

DIA

FaHCSIA

DotAG

Department of Corrective Services

Department for Communities

WA Police

FFFGC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • KALACC has been implementing the Yiriman program in the past on an ad-hoc basis. The program has received some Commonwealth and State funding in the past and has undergone some evaluation.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

ROC will convene a roundtable meeting with stakeholders to discuss:

  • Streamlining funding.
  • Streamlining reporting requirements.
  • Assisting KALACC with compliance issues.

The community sees the ongoing implementation of the Yiriman program as an important diversionary tool in reducing the high number of Aboriginal youth in custody.

Ongoing

July 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Priority 2

Development and funding of a new Court House to be co-located with the new Police Station. Ensure consultation with the community on the development of the Law Precinct.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSE THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS:
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
2A: MAPPING OF RELEVANT SERVICE AND FACILITIES

DotAG

WA Police

Department of Corrective Services

LOC

Attorney General’s Department

DIA

Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee

Fitzroy Valley Aboriginal Justice Advisory Committee

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • A new police station is being built in Fitzroy Crossing.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • DotAG to review incorporation of a new Court House to be co-located with the new Police Station.
  • DotAG maybe able to source funding from Royalties for Regions.

 

A new court house in the same locality as the new police station would improve functionality of the court system, increase security and safety for prisoner/custodial transfer.

2010 - 2011

October 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

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Attachment A – Table 7

Governance and Leadership

Governance and Leadership: empowering communities

Background

A key objective of the National Partnership agreement on Remote Service Delivery is to “improve the level of governance and leadership within Indigenous communities and Indigenous community organisations”.

The general principle adopted in partnership development in Fitzroy Crossing has been the use of the ‘existing community networks and decision making processes”.

In Fitzroy Crossing the Fitzroy Futures forum provided a clear governance model from which the Local Implementation Plan has been developed. The forum has established strong governance processes, is inclusive of the five language groups represented in the Fitzroy Valley and is open to all community residents of the Fitzroy Valley ( with additional membership being drawn from the three tiers of Government).

The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery provides some $67.7 million for the life of the agreement (2013-2014) for Building Community Governance Capacity (spread amongst the 29 RSD sites).

What we are trying to achieve

  • To improve access to capacity building in governance and leadership, in order for residents of Fitzroy Crossing and surrounding communities to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.
  • Strong leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels are essential to long term sustainable outcomes.
  • Indigenous people need to be engaged in the development of reforms that will impact on them.
  • Improved access to capacity building in governance and leadership is needed in order for Indigenous people to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

State Context

The Hope report made the following recommendations;

Recommendation 1
“I recommend that the State and Commonwealth governments identify an individual or organisation to lead the efforts to close the between the wellbeing of indigenous and non-indigenous people. That individual or organisation should be given the power and resources to make decisions, region by region, throughout the Kimberley and to coordinate the response to the disaster of aboriginal health, suicide rates and living conditions.”

Recommendation 4
“Aboriginal leadership should be encouraged where suitable leaders can be found and where good local leadership resource is not available, training and education should be provided to enable Aboriginal people to better participate in decision making.”

Recommendation 5
“I recommend that there should be cross –Departmental access to available human resources so that Departments can obtain advice and information from workers in the field employed by other departments.”

Recommendation 6
“I recommend that the system put in place to address aboriginal living conditions in the Kimberley should involve a system of accountability which would require relevant officials to accept responsibility for achieving targets considered attainable with resources provided and that there should be a system of accounting which would identify where the money has gone.

This system would also identify what proportion of the money has been used in administrative costs as against provision of services by direct service providers.

In other words, there should be a clear identification of the proportion of the total funds paid for head office and running costs, across government policy coordination, travel of administrators etc as contrasted with funds actually going to improve conditions by payment of medical practitioners, child protection workers and construction and maintenance of public housing etc”.

Governance and process in developing governance LIP

The governments worked with the community to work out priorities and develop actions to address those priorities. Of particular note, the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee –COAG Engagement Workshops were held on August 12 and 13 2009 and a further follow-up workshop on August 28 2009.

The workshops:

  • Identified the Fitzroy Futures Forum as the key body that would represent Aboriginal communities in the development and implementation of the Fitzroy Crossing Local Implementation Plan.
  • Provided an understanding of the COAG RSD partnerships and discussed what community governance structure would work in engagement with COAG.
  • Discussed community engagement strategy through appropriate and agreed communications strategies; and
  • Identified some aspiration concepts that would require further discussions and detail.

The workshops were largely focused on setting the terms and conditions of engagement leading up to the population of a Local Implementation Plan.

Agreement was reached on:

  • Community priority projects. These projects were then aligned with the respective COAG Closing the Gap building blocks to highlight the inter-connected nature of the issues.
  • The necessity for a separate Project and Implementation Plan for the each of the priority projects. These projects are in the areas of early childhood development, health, housing, education and employment.

Integrated into the Plan are priorities from the community engagement done by the Indigenous Engagement Officers and, from existing governance structures around justice, health, housing and early childhood from February to May 2010.

A further meeting to clarify and confirm the priorities in the Plan was scheduled for four hours for the 8 June 2010 but became a three day meeting from 8 to 10 June 2010 with the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee and the Fitzroy Local Operations Centre. This demonstrated the commitment of community members to have input into the LIP making the Plan a co-designed document to be owned by community and government.

During these meetings, the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee members included in the Plan the recommendations from the report handed down by Alastair Hope, State Coroner, in February 2008, after an inquest into the deaths of twenty two Aboriginal community members from the Kimberley (the Hope Report) under the relevant building blocks. In addition each building block outlines:

  • What we are trying to achieve, information about the building block;
  • Key Stakeholders;
  • What’s happening, projects or programs that exist or commenced;
  • What needs to happen, services, projects or programs that need to occur and are future priorities; and
  • Priorities

Following the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee meeting, priorities in the Plan were presented to government agencies and service providers from the 15 to 22 June 2010 under the building blocks to review, discuss and respond to the identified priorities

Governance arrangements for the plan

The Fitzroy Futures Forum, through the FFFGC, is the key body that represents Aboriginal communities in the development and implementation of the Fitzroy Crossing Local Implementation Plan. A review of FFF is to occur in July 2010 due to government agencies and service providers increased utilisation and engagement with the FFF to ensure the operation and structure remains flexible and responsive to the needs of the community and is effective in engaging and reporting back to community.

Three groups will work together to make sure that the aims of the plan are being met. The three groups will include the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee, the Australian Government and the Western Australian Government, and may also include other contributing interest groups (corporate/NGO sector).

The three groups will form a decision making or governance group that will:

  • Agree any new priorities and areas for joint action.
  • Make sure that things are happening and keep track of the Plan timelines and progress towards targets.
  • Agree any necessary changes to the Plan which would help to meet the targets, or get rid of barriers to progress.

The group will decide when and how often it needs to meet and how to manage its work.

Monitoring and Progress (Keeping track of the Plan

The Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee will invite people to get together at least every quarter to ensure Communities are working with government staff on actions in the Plan. Government staff includes Local Area Coordinators (LACs), Indigenous Engagement Officers (IEOs) and Regional Operations Centre staff.

Communities will have direct access to Local Operation Centre regarding the Plan.

Special Community roundtables on the Plan will take place every 12 months at the same time as a review of how the Plan is working.

Progress monitoring and reporting of agreed initiatives will involve measuring each Party’s achievements in meeting their commitments and delivering on agreed actions. The results of monitoring will form the basis of Progress Reports to the Parties that will be produced by the LAC/Regional Operations Centre in consultation with the Fitzroy Future Forum Governing Committee.

Formal progress reports will be reviewed by officials and published every 12 months. In April 2010, the Governments will also produce clear statements of their expenditure in each Aboriginal Community.

Addressing Concerns

Any member of the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee may raise a concern on behalf of the stakeholder interests s/he represents. The Committee as a whole is responsible for ensuring resolution of the concern.

n the case of a concern being raised, the following procedures will apply:

  1. The concern must be put in writing or told to a person who is part of the secretariat for the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee;
  2. The group will discuss the concern as a priority and responses or actions will be completed in a timely and fair manner;
  3. The group will ensure that issues are thoroughly investigated and that responses and actions are recorded and carried out;
  4. Where concerns cannot be resolved within the governance group, the group may seek the advice of an independent person to help resolve the matter.

Any responses to the concerns raised by communities through Local Operation Centre will be communicated through to the Fitzroy Futures Forum by writing to a person who is part of the secretariat for the Fitzroy Futures Forum Governing Committee.

Existing Governance and Leadership Activities

  • Community Learning Place Master Plan
  • Fitzroy Futures Fund
  • ORIC Training
  • Business Support

Government “doing business differently” to Close the Gap. -- Indigenous Governance and Leadership: Remote Service Delivery NPA

  • Developing the skills, knowledge and competencies, including independence and empowerment of Indigenous people, communities and organisations.

Priority 1

Financial Support to assist local people to attend leadership training and professional development.

Assist local communities design and implement culturally specific leadership programs in the Fitzroy Valley for men, women, elders and youth.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS: All
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

ROC/LOC

Fitzroy Futures Forum

ORIC

Karrayili

Fitzroy School of Natural Resources

Shire of Derby West Kimberley

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • ROC to generate and resource a comprehensive community leadership and governance capacity building matrix which also includes opportunities for government staff to enhance engagement capacity.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Identify potential leaders.
  • Provide opportunities within the community – mentoring.
  • Nominate people to attend governance and leadership training.
  • Provide Australian Government operated and funded opportunities.

Individual capacity building will improve decision making and engagement in the Fitzroy Valley.

July 2010-2013

August 2010-December 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed Future Action

Priority 2

To develop local and cultural specific training on corporate governance, ensuring that Language and methodology in delivering is appropriate to the participants. This will help to ensure boards function effectively.

LINKS WITH OTHER “CLOSING THE GAP” BUILDING BLOCKS : All
Lead and Partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

ROC/LOC

Fitzroy Futures Forum

ORIC

DIA

FaHCSIA

Shire of Derby West Kimberley

KALACC

Karrayili

TAFE

FUTURE ACTIVITY

Co-design corporate governance training. Special emphasis on decision making and conflict resolution.

Stronger more harmonious governance and decision making in the Fitzroy Valley

July 2010

Scope out project plan

Agreed Future Action

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7. Attachment B

Local Implementation Plan Sign Off

We have all had our say in what goes into this Plan. We have talked together at meetings and we have listened to each other.

In the Plan you will see your aspirations for your communities and what we will do together to achieve those aspirations to close the gap.

Aboriginal Corporations, Community Councils and other representative individuals and groups together with the Commonwealth Government, Western Australia State Government, Local Government and non-government agencies will work together.

The Remote Service Delivery National Partnership Agreement requires a two-way commitment:

From governments and their staff – to cooperate to put in place the resources and planning for better infrastructure and services and to develop the capacity of individuals, communities and local service providers.

From the community and community members – to work with government to improve the community and to take responsibility for their own wellbeing, in particular the health, safety and education of their children

Together we will see improved access to a better standard and range of culturally inclusive services, simpler access to coordinated government services, increased economic and social participation, and improved governance and leadership.

By signing this Plan we agree to keep talking with each other to make sure our Plan is achieving the targets we have set and that we will work together to close the gap. We agree that it is not a final Plan but is a ‘living’ document that will change as time goes on.

The Parties to this Agreement are:

  • Fitzroy Valley community
  • Commonwealth of Australia
  • Government of Western Australia

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Attachment C - Fitzroy Crossing Community Profile

Fitzroy Crossing straddles the Fitzroy River, 2524km north of Perth via the Great Northern Highway and is surrounded by the vast floodplains which form the Fitzroy Valley. By road, Fitzroy Crossing is 288 km west of Halls Creek and 258 km south east of Derby and is in the Shire of Derby / West Kimberley.

Community Information

Aboriginal Communities in Fitzroy Crossing and Surrounding Areas

  1. Town-based Communities

    Junjuwa, Mindi Rardi, Kurnangki, Darlngunaya, Burawa, Bungardi and Parukupan (Loanbung).
  2. Remote Communities

    Bayulu, Muludja, Joy Springs, Djugerari (Cherabun), Ngurtuwarta, Gillarong, Karnparrmi, Galamunda, Biridu, Bidijul, Ganinyi, Bawoorrooga, Gilliyoowa, Gilly Sharpe, Galeru Gorge, Jimbalakundunj, Kadjina / Millijidee, Koorabye, Kupartiya, Kurlku, Mingalkala, Mimbi, Moongardie, Munmural, Ngumpan, Yungnora (Noonkanbah), Ngalingkadji, Ngararntjadu, Purluwarla, Rocky Springs, Wangkatjunka, Warangarri, Yiyili, Ngalapita and Yakanarra.

The Fitzroy Valley is home to people from 5 main language groups, being Bunuba, Walmajarri, Wankatjunka, Gooniyandi and Nyikina, across 44 Aboriginal Communities spread across the valley with a radius of approximately 200km from Fitzroy Crossing. Whilst there is a strong Aboriginal culture and heritage, there is a history of family displacement and long term trauma and grief associated with historical events. This presents a set of concerns some of which are identified in this document.

Fitzroy Crossing is the service centre for the surrounding Aboriginal Communities located in the Fitzroy Valley, and plays an important part in the Kimberley's pastoral, mining, oil and tourist industries.

People

  • The estimated population for Fitzroy Crossing for 2006 was 1,018 people, of whom 733 were Indigenous.
  • Fitzroy Crossing has 42 % of its Indigenous population aged less than 20 years old.

Community Strengths

Language, culture and tradition

  • The Fitzroy Crossing community has a strong connection with the traditional culture of the region, with programs that actively support the preservation of the arts, language and culture and encourage learning and education in younger generations.

Community Leadership

  • Fitzroy Crossing has been the focus of a community / government partnership under the Fitzroy Futures Forum. This forum operates in collaboration with government agencies to coordinate services and engage community groups on issues of community development, governance and social reconstruction.

Safety

  • The Marninwarntikura Fitzroy Women’s Resource Centre operates a women’s shelter that provides accommodation for women escaping family violence and is open 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.
  • There is a Community Justice Group established under the Western Australian Aboriginal Justice Agreement. The group has developed a local justice plan and works with a range of agencies to develop strategies to reduce offending and contact with the justice system.

Education

  • The school has recently relocated to impressive new premises, with computers situated in classrooms and wireless internet infrastructure available.

Youth

  • A project funded by the Sporting Chance Program in Fitzroy Crossing is the Fitzroy Valley Girls Sporting Academy, delivered by Madalah Ltd. The academy began operations in 2010, supporting approximately 80 Indigenous girls.  In the 2009-2012 period the academy will receive a total of $537,000 in SCP funding from DEEWR.

Alcohol Restrictions

Alcohol restrictions have been in place in Fitzroy Crossing since 2007 and have had a range of positive effects on the community.

The benefits of the restrictions have included reductions in: the severity of domestic violence, the severity of wounds inflicted in general public violence, public drinking, anti-social behaviour and humbugging and the amount of alcohol consumed.

Police have reported a 28 % reduction in the average number of alcohol-related tasks undertaken each month, allowing police to take a more proactive policing approach.

Other benefits found to result from the liquor restrictions have included: better care of children and more attention being paid to their health and wellbeing, increased recreational activities, more money being spent on food and clothing rather than on alcohol, and increased effectiveness of a range of services in the area.

Challenges facing the Community

Employment

  • In 2006, 70 % of the Indigenous working-age population in Fitzroy Crossing were employed. The overwhelming majority of these were Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) jobs.
  • If the figure is adjusted for the large number of CDEP jobs, the Fitzroy Crossing’s Indigenous employment rate (23 %) is approximately one half of the national Indigenous rate (42 %).

Education

  • Attendance at Fitzroy Valley District High School in 2009 was 62 %.
  • Fitzroy Crossing’s Indigenous population has a relatively low rate of educational attainment – in 2006, 38 % of Indigenous 20-24 year olds in Fitzroy Crossing attained a Certificate II (i.e. Year 12) or higher qualification.  This is approximately two thirds of the Indigenous education attainment rate for Australia for this age group.
  • The engagement rate of 15-24 year olds in full time education or full time work in Fitzroy Crossing is 16 % - well below the Indigenous national average of 44 %.
  • NAPLAN data shows that the majority of students who sat the tests do not meet National Minimum Standards in areas of numeracy, spelling, reading and writing.
  • The school’s VET facilities are adequate for entry-level courses but inadequate for delivery of industry-standard programs in any field, particularly hospitality, and building and construction.

Disengaged youth

Fitzroy Crossing has a high proportion (42 %) of its Indigenous population aged less than 20 years old, when compared to total Australia (27 %).

A challenge for the future will be maintaining and increasing participation in employment for the youth in the community, by increasing the number of jobs available to match projected population increases of 2.2 % per annum (a 40 % increase by 2026).

Community Safety

  • In 2008-09 there were 636 offences recorded in Fitzroy Crossing. Acts intended to cause injury and unlawful entry made up a significant percentage of total offences, at 19.3 % and 15.6 % respectively.
  • There was a 13 % increase in the number of offences in 2008-09 compared to 2007-08 when there were 565 offences recorded.
  • In Fitzroy Crossing in the years from 2004-05 to 2008-09, there were 875 alcohol-related offences, which represents 36 % of all offences. Of those offences indicated as being alcohol related for which the offence type was known (n=808), 55 % related to assault.
  • In 2003-08, the SLA of Derby-West Kimberley reported 106 separations (instances of hospital care) of Indigenous people due to assault, which equates to a rate of 35 cases per 1000 people. This hospitalisation rate is 30 times higher than for non-Indigenous persons in the same SLA.
  • Of the 1,643 police incident reports (which may contain multiple offences) for Fitzroy Crossing during the period 2004–05 to 2008-09, one-quarter (24%; n=391) were indicated to contain domestic violence–related offences. While fluctuations are evident, the number of domestic violence–related offences increased across the observation period, from a total of 84 in 2004–05 to 171 in 2008–09. While this may appear to be a detrimental outcome, it is likely that this is due to victims being more willing, and more able by virtue of not being intoxicated, to report their victimisation to police.
  • Overall, 67 % of assault offences in Fitzroy Crossing from 2004–05 to 2008–09 were indicated by Western Australian police to have been domestic violence related.
  • Across the five-year period from 30 June 2004 to 31 December 2009, 52 juvenile community-based orders were commenced, 34 were successfully completed and 12 orders were terminated.

Housing

  • In Fitzroy Crossing, 29 % of dwellings were identified in the census as experiencing overcrowding in 2006.
  • The Indigenous rate of overcrowding across Australia is 14% and the (Indigenous and non-Indigenous) Australian rate of overcrowding is approximately 3 %.
  • Establishing suitable housing stock for existing and new positions in service provision of service providers as there are limited houses available, especially for non-government organisations.

Health

  • The rate for hospital separations due to preventable acute conditions for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Derby-West Kimberley SLA population was more than four times the total national population rate.
  • For diseases associated with poor environmental health, after adjusting for age differences, the observed number of Indigenous separations in Derby-West Kimberley SLA was more than 6 times the national average.
  • Fitzroy Valley has ‘epidemic trachoma rates’ and around one in four children suffer from foetal alcohol syndrome. Overcrowded housing has contributed to poor environmental health outcomes, with up to 15 people per house. Diseases such as scabies, trachoma, skin diseases and gastric ailments are common.

Potential Issues with Service Delivery

Accessibility

  • Fitzroy Crossing has a sealed airstrip that is well serviced and regularly operates flights between Fitzroy Crossing, Broome and Hall’s Creek.
  • Fitzroy Crossing is located on the Great Northern Highway.  During the Wet season frequent road closures restrict access to Fitzroy Crossing, sometimes for weeks at a time.
  • In 2006 the Commonwealth Government committed AusLink funding to Main Roads WA to upgrade sections of the Great Northern Highway between Fitzroy Crossing and Gogo. However, at present there is no timeframe or estimated date of completion for this upgrade, which would provide access to Fitzroy Crossing during the wet season.

Water supply system

  • Water Corporation provides water to Fitzroy Crossing town, and a single connection to Mindi Rardi and Kurnangki communities. The communities of Parakupan, Burawa and Junjuwa have water sourced from bores, piped into tanks for treatment then articulated throughout the towns.
  • Water consumption is high (1000L per person per day) and could be reduced with ongoing maintenance of water systems in housing to address leaking and faulty taps/pipes.
  • There is potential for an improvement in the quality of supply and consistency of maintenance and monitoring by connecting all of the town communities in the area to the Water Corporation’s system.

English as a Second Language (ESL) teachers

  • An increased focus on support for ESL students is required in professional development programs. While the school has several programs addressing language awareness and incorporating effective teaching strategies, more support and professional development opportunities for teachers would be of benefit, especially considering the ongoing high levels of staff turnover.
  • The recruiting and retaining of staff is of paramount importance and the school needs to be actively involved in this process in order to create a positive culture consistent with the retention and development of staff.

Health Services

  • At present there is a need for more education for the residents of Fitzroy Crossing on health issues such as diabetes, (there is a very high rate of dialysis treatment required, and availability of this treatment needs to be increased to meet demand) nutrition, trachoma, and other health issues that can arise from living in overcrowded conditions.
  • Fitzroy Crossing has restrictions on the sale of alcohol (no alcohol stronger than 2.7% volume can be sold as take-away from licensed venues in Fitzroy Crossing) but some residents will travel to external communities to purchase alcohol.
  • The effects of decades of alcohol abuse (such as foetal alcohol syndrome and long term poor health outcomes) are still developing and presenting in the Fitzroy Crossing community, and there is scope for more investment in the current clinical services to help address these issues.

Victim Support and Community Safety Services

  • Fitzroy Crossing community members seeking victim support and assistance would generally need to access services in Broome or Derby. Two thirds of assaults on 2008-09 were domestic violence related, indicating a possible need for increased services for victims in the community.
  • There is no night patrol presently operating in Fitzroy Crossing, following the cessation of the Marralla Patrol in 2003/04. There is no Community Warden scheme in the town.

Major New Investments

  • A Children and Family Centre will be established in Fitzroy Crossing through the National Partnership Agreement on Indigenous Early Childhood Development.
  • A new TAFE centre is planned for a site adjacent to the school. Kimberley TAFE has undertaken a community consultation process regarding the nature of the new facility.
  • In Fitzroy Crossing under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing, 8 new dwellings are being constructed and 19 refurbished this financial year.
  • Under the Building the Education Revolution Program, $1.125 m has been allocated for covered areas and shade structures at FVDHS. Other BER investment worth over $6.64m has been allocated to the Fitzroy Valley’s schools for libraries, teacher housing, multipurpose halls and shade and covered areas.

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