Local Implementation Plan - Bardi Jawi

Table of Contents

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Introduction

The Governments of Australia and Western Australia, working as one, are committed to closing the gap in the unacceptably high level of disadvantage experienced by Indigenous Australians. In particular, it acknowledges the additional challenges faced by Indigenous people living in remote areas.

Recognizing these challenges, governments through the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to the Remote Service Delivery National Partnership (RSD NP) to build the capacities of both government and communities to engage with each other and agree on services appropriate to the needs and aspirations of Indigenous people.

The Bardi Jawi area has been chosen as one of 29 priority locations across Australia to participate in implementing the reforms envisaged in the RSD NP. For Bardi Jawi this will:

  • Improve access to a full range of suitable and culturally inclusive services
  • Raise the standards and range of services to be broadly consistent with similar sized and located communities
  • Improve the level of governance and leadership
  • Provide simpler access to better coordinated government services
  • Increase economic and social participation wherever possible and promote personal responsibility

The development of a Local Implementation Plan, agreed between governments and the communities in the Bardi Jawi area, which reflect the priorities of the community, is an essential element of the RSD NP reforms.

To achieve the objectives set out above and to ensure that the planning and delivery of government services in Bardi Jawi runs smoothly, reforms in the way governments work with each other and conduct its business with communities is also essential.

To this end, a Local Operations Centre (LOC) has been established in Bardi Jawi area as the main point of contact for all government business in the community. The LOC is staffed by a Local Area Coordinator (LAC) and Indigenous Engagement Officers (IEO) who have a key role in the design and facilitation of community engagement and in identifying priorities for inclusion in the Local Implementation Plan (LIP).

At the regional level, the Kimberley Regional Operations Centre (ROC), located in Broome, supports the LOC and provides general oversight and direction for Remote Service Delivery in the Kimberley.

At the State level, the Department of Indigenous Affairs (DIA) Director General, as the State Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services, works with the State Operations Committee, jointly convened with the Commonwealth Department of Family, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) State Manager, to monitor overall progress, address barriers in and between agencies and ensure that commitments in the LIPs are delivered.

At the national level, the Office of the Coordinator General for Remote Indigenous Services assesses progress and advises governments where there are gaps or slow progress or where improvements need to be made to ensure governments meet their commitments under the RSD NP.

The RSD NP does not stand on its own. As part of a larger COAG Indigenous Reform, it relies on the application of Indigenous specific and mainstream National Agreements and National Partnerships1 in the priority locations. Its success also depends on the effective delivery of Commonwealth, State and Local government services in the priority RSD locations.

  1. The National Agreements are: National Indigenous Reform Agreement, National Education Agreement, National Agreement for Skills and Workforce Development, National Healthcare Agreement, National Affordable Housing Agreement, and National Disability Agreement.
    The key Indigenous specific National Partnerships are on: Indigenous Economic Participation, Indigenous Early Childhood Development, Indigenous Health Outcomes, and Remote Indigenous Housing.
    Mainstream National Partnerships contributing to the Remote Service Delivery NP are: Early Childhood Education, Literacy and Numeracy, Improving Teacher Quality, Social Housing, Homelessness, and Low Socio-Economic Schools Communities.
    Details of each agreement are available from the COAG website

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How this Plan was developed

The major priorities and projects were developed from three primary sources:

  • Meetings with community members – including meetings with representatives of the Councils of Ardyaloon, Djarindjin and Lombadina, the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate
  • Existing strategic documents – the Bardi Jawi Nimidamun (2008 – 2010), Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation Strategic Objectives, the Aboriginal Justice Agreement for Ardyaloon, the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan for Kullarri Regional CDEP Inc, and the Ardyaloon Inc Economic Development Plan
  • Agency meetings – some of which included community representatives from one or more of the communities.

I was at one of the (consultation) meetings. I got a positive feeling out of it - the proof is going to be when things start to happen, when we see physical changes!”  

The broad priorities identified by the Bardi Jawi communities and service providers are:

  • Coordinated services that meet our needs
  • To “have a say” in our community
  • Sport and cultural activities for all community members
  • The best childcare and education for our children
  • Good housing, roads and municipal services
  • Economically self-sufficient and self-determining communities and more jobs and training for real jobs

Actions presented in this LIP are classified into three categories:

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced.

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments (for example where a specific business plan is necessary to ensure effective outcomes or systemic reform is proposed which requires multiple stakeholder agreements).

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration (to allow evaluation of impact, funding appropriation or policy reform).

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3. Building Block Priorities

Early Childhood building Block

Early Childhood: the best start to life

For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to quality early childhood education and care services, including pre-school, playgroups, child care and family support services such as parenting programs and supports, is critical. Opportunities for parental engagement, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce as well as facilities and physical infrastructure are required. Action in the areas of maternal, antenatal and early childhood health is relevant to addressing the child mortality gap and to early childhood development.

What the communities say about their young children:

Supporting good early childhood facilities and programs provides work opportunities for parents and gives the best start for children so they can transition to school, and on that solid basis will hopefully springboard off for higher education – and then return to their communities with skills and qualifications.

“We want motivated parents who are committed to the health, safety and quality education of their children and to their social and emotional well-being; to achieve this we need: culturally appropriate programs for our children; best practice programs that are relevant to the community; stronger families.”

Local Priorities

Educate parents on the importance of children participating in early childhood learning activities and their own participation in “parenting programs”

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Local Operations Centre in conjunction with agency and community partners to conduct a review of early childhood programs in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin in relation to changing community need including infrastructure, staffing, training needs and future childcare placement needs.

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Local Operations Centre will facilitate a process that ensures collaborative working relationships between the One Arm Point School Kindergarten and the Locational Supported Playgroup and develop a similar process for Djarindjin Lombadina School and the Djarindjin Quality Early Childhood Centre.

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Councils with assistance from the Local Operations Centre will hold an ‘Early Childhood Day

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Agencies with responsibility for early childhood will support the establishment and planning of an Early Childhood Steering Group for the region

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Community members will identify role models on parenting from within the communities

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The Local Operations Centre will explore options for resourcing an early childhood coordinator

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Agree parenting programs to be implemented through DEEWR

Conduct a feasibility study on the construction of a new Family and Child facility at Djarindjin

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Flexible funding under the Remote Services National Partnership Agreement to be used to purchase new playground equipment for Djarindjin

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Local Operations Centre will assist Djarindjin Council to conduct a feasibility study for new facilities

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Local Operations Centre will assist the community in developing enhanced governance arrangements on early childhood issues

The “Twenty-one Babies Project

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Local Operations Centre to assist the community to develop a project plan and funding application to examine services for babies and parents

See Attachment A, Table 1 for more detailed information on these projects

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Schooling Building block

Schooling: learning for life

Education is key to future opportunities. Responsive schooling requires investments in infrastructure, workforce, and curriculum. The focus is on student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school/community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, post school education and training are also important.

What the Djarindjin and Lombadina communities say about schooling for their children:

“We have a Djarindjin Lombadina School Community Partnership Agreement and this is about better ways of working together to improve learning for our children.”

“We want ‘language and respect for all’ to be instilled in our children, so they have a safe place to grow up, are respectful of everyone and themselves, so they can speak their language and know and respect their culture. We need them to have consistent and high quality education which helps them to grow into good leaders and educators and can run their own community.”

What the Ardyaloon community says about schooling for their children:

In Ardyaloon our people want high-quality education and educational outcomes for their children.  While many parents are actively engaged in their children's schooling there is still a need for broader participation from more parents and other members of the community.”

Local Priorities – Djarindjin and Lombadina

Encourage Djarindjin and Lombadina teachers and families to get to know each other

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The School and Djarindjin and Lombadina Councils will organise formal and informal meetings for teachers and the community, agree how new staff will be introduced to the community and provide cross cultural awareness training and engagement in cultural events

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Local Operations Centre will explore options for children’s activities, after school programs and holiday programs

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The partners to the Agreement will implement the priorities expressed in the School Community Partnership Agreement and encourage full community participation

Aim to have all children at school, on time, every day

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The FaHCSIA funded the Indigenous Parenting Support Service will, as a community based initiative, assist in getting children to school

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Councils will establish a curfew, restrict loud music late at night, not serve children during school hours and with the School develop a “5 step attendance process” and an award program for attendance

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The School will evaluate the need for an attendance officer, implement after school activities, talk with families about attendance, and help get kids to and from school

Follow the principle that “good behaviour helps learning”

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The School, with support from the Councils will work on a behaviour management plan with a clear process for detention and suspensions

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The School will improve attendance and behavior including through direct engagement with families as problems arise

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The Councils will develop and implement a Code of Conduct for the community which will have relevance for all children

Improve educational outcomes

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced There are more resources through National Partnership funding – for example, the Low SES Schools and literacy and numeracy funding

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Resources provided for the Reading Recovery program

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The community will fully support the actions of the Council and the School regarding children’s education

Local Priorities – Ardyaloon

Improve school attendance and student access to after school and extra curricular activities

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Indigenous Parenting Support Services program will provide one and a half positions to focus on parenting, child health, early learning and school readiness

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The School will evaluate a range of options to improve attendance to include after school activities, family engagement and more communication with community and parents

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Regional Operations Centre and the Local Operations Centre will sponsor the development of an integrated Peninsula Transport Strategy

Enhance parent engagement with the school and build School/community relationships through the continued development of the School Community Partnership Agreement

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Enhance active participation by School, community and Council to continue to develop the School Community Partnership Agreement

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Enhance local cultural awareness for School staff

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Continue to lift educational attainment to those of mainstream schools

Support Bardi culture programs for children and entire community

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The School has a well established cultural program integrating cultural studies as a part of the school timetable, the School and community will partner to ensure that language and culture is done the “right way”, continue to enhance the capacity of the Aboriginal and Islander Education Officer staff

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The Council will support cultural outings, events and will identify appropriate cultural volunteers mentors and trainers

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Council will support and promote a wide range of regular cultural events with Elders, for families and children

Access high quality education including improved literacy and numeracy

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Resourcing through the National Partnership for education targeting low SES schools has been made available

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The development of the Kimberley Success Zone to promote teaching and schooling best practices(DEEWR ‘What Works’)

Student services, behaviour, health, social and emotional well-being

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The Department of Education to investigate the feasibility of regular visits by psychologists and social workers to support local staff in case management of students

Vital vocational education and training strategy

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Develop an enhanced vocational education strategy, building on the work by TAFE with a view to establishing access to school based trade training

See Attachment A, Table 2 for more detailed information on these projects

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Health Building Block

Health: lifelong health

Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving health and life expectancy, and reducing early mortality caused by chronic disease. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires a concerted effort in the prevention, management and treatment of chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need access to programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care.

What the communities say about health services:

“We have very good health services here but sometimes we don’t know when the service is in community, and sometimes we have difficulty getting back to community after being in hospital. We’d like to see more coordination in these services to get the best out of them for our young and old. We also like to build up good relationships with the nurses in the clinic – if they change all the time the old people don’t like to see them. We need more dentists!”

Local Priorities

Deliver coordinated health services including:

  • Revise the existing community clinic services including infrastructure, staffing and programs
  • Revise visiting health services in relation to meeting changing community need
  • Improve awareness of and access to visiting services by community.

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Complete comprehensive mapping of current health services and programs in Bardi Jawi

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Develop a strategic plan outlining the future plans for community clinics

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Develop a communication strategy to ensure users can access existing health services

Develop and deliver appropriate health promotion and primary health programs including:

  • Men’s and women’s health promotion programs
  • Chronic disease prevention
  • School based health education curriculum

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Continue implementation of an integrated health promotion strategy

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration The Regional Operations Centre to work with health providers to identify resources for a Health Promotions Officer for the Peninsula

Ensure physical activity and recreational opportunities are available

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre, Department of Sport and Recreation and Garnduwa to complete an audit of recreational facilities and activities

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Develop a Sport and Recreation plan for the Peninsula (see also Safe Communities Building Block)

Ensure that Bardi Jawi communities have access to affordable healthy food and nutrition education

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre has secured EO support to expand sustainable gardens for fresh, local food production

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Local Operations Centre to work with Councils and stores to review existing food purchasing practices in stores and participate with the NPA Food Security program

Develop and deliver a culturally appropriate suicide prevention and community recovery program

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Audit social and emotional wellbeing services in the Bardi Jawi area

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Health agencies to develop a comprehensive suicide prevention program in partnership with the community and other partners

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Assess need for a Social Emotional Wellbeing Officer based on the Peninsula

Access to appropriate aged care programs and facilities including respite for carers

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The Regional Operations Centre with Councils and communities to identify aged care needs and develop a Bardi Jawi Aged Care Plan

Develop and implement a comprehensive alcohol management plan including:

  • Communication, evaluation and monitoring
  • Prevention and education
  • Community capacity building and action
  • Policing and legislation
  • Treatment and support services

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The Regional Operations Centre and Local Operations Centre in partnership with relevant agencies will audit alcohol and drug services provided in, or to the Bardi Jawi communities

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Milliya Rumurra Drug and Alcohol Treatment Services to develop further services for Bardi Jawi communities

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Regional Operations Centre and Local Operations Centre with the Drug and Alcohol Office, communities and agencies will assist in establishing an Alcohol Management Group for the Peninsula

Develop and implement an environmental health plan for the Bardi Jawi area including:

  • Suitable water supply
  • Waste management (including sewerage, treatment ponds, tip, water runoff)
  • Animal controls
  • Housing maintenance
  • Pest control
  • Environmental health education and awareness

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The Regional Operations Centre with the Local Operations Centre will audit all environmental health programs in the Bardi Jawi area

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Councils to meet with relevant agencies to develop and implement a comprehensive environmental health plan

Ensure childcare facilities for Bardi Jawi communities

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments This priority is described under the Early Childhood Building Block

See Attachment A, Table 3 for more detailed information on these projects.

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Economic participation building block

Economic Participation: building wealthy communities

Indigenous families and communities should have the opportunity to benefit from the mainstream economy – real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Employment and training programs, incentive structures and social and physical infrastructure, including communications and transport, are needed to foster economic participation and community engagement. Access to land and native title assets, rights and interests can be leveraged to secure real and practical benefits for Indigenous people. The design and delivery of individual and community support (both transfer payments and services) needs to promote active engagement, enhanced capability and positive social norms.

What the communities say about jobs and work:

“We want to encourage a ‘subsistence economy’ with activities like protecting our environment, fishing and development of the outstations, also a ‘traditional economy’ which we can support and keep going through government investment in endeavours like art centres, cultural programs, and our rangers and then what we call ‘mainstream economy’ – real jobs and training for real jobs as well as following our business plans. We hope to work together with the Remote Services Delivery program on all of these.”

Local Priorities

Rationalise and coordinate job service providers, CDEP organisations and real job opportunities

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Regional Operations Centre in partnership with relevant agencies will facilitate a coordination forum for employment, education and training

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The Regional Operations Centre and the Local Operations Centre will establish a mechanism to coordinate and align agency activity and services

Rationalise support for communities’ economic strategies and specific projects.

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced The Regional Operations Centre and Local Operations Centre will work with the communities and Councils in the Bardi Jawi area to develop an integrated economic development strategy based on existing strategic plans, current and future opportunities and community aspirations

See Attachment A, Table 4 for more detailed information on these projects

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Healthy Homes building block

Healthy Homes: investing in better housing

A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Health living conditions must include adequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity, appropriate housing design and maintenance and sufficient number of houses. Children in particular need to live in accommodation that has good environmental health, provides space for study and is free of overcrowding.

What the communities say about their living environment:

“As a community Djarindjin has a lot of potential. If the proper resources were to be invested in the community that will bring out the best in people and make other communities see what we have, what we can have and what we should have in the way of community development, like economic development and business development. I think that we will be envy of other communities with similar aspirations”

We want to be closely involved in the building of new houses and in the refurbishing of our older houses to keep good standards in housing in Ardyaloon. We’d like to replace out old houses like the 80s style asbestos and the rammed earth houses.

Local Priorities - Ardyaloon

Review municipal services in the Bardi Jawi area.

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Regional Operations Centre will sponsor an audit to augment existing municipal services audits to inform future planning

Home refurbishment and maintenance (Djarindjin and Ardyaloon)

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Department of Housing to complete a comprehensive housing renovations program in the communities of Djarindjin and Ardyaloon

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Department of Housing will introduce the new “Living Skills “ program

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Establish a housing steering group in communities to monitor progress

New houses (Djarindjin and Ardyaloon)

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Local Operations Centre to liaise with Councils and the Department of Housing regarding the funding bid under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing

Improved drainage and roads (Djarindjin)

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Regional Operations Centre to identify funding to complete an evaluation of and plan for the upgrade of internal roads in Djarindjin including immediate remedial actions proposed by the Council

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Regional Operations Centre to identify funding for signage and street lighting in line with the safety considerations (see also Safe Communities Building Block)

Refurbish houses and provide essential services at Ardyaloon outstations

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Regional Operations Centre (with partners including the Department of Indigenous Affairs, the Aboriginal Lands Trust, the Kimberley Land Council and the Department of Housing) will evaluate the options for supporting outstation accommodation

See Attachment A, Table 5 for more detailed information on these projects.

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Safe communities Building block

Safe Communities: keeping families safe

All Indigenous children, youth, women and men need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Improving family and community safety is essential through child protection, law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling services), and preventive approaches. Addressing related factors such as alcohol and substance abuse will be critical to improving both community safety and achieving improved health outcomes.

What the communities say about safety:

“We in the community and our police understand the real need we have for more activities for our young people – in fact for all our people – to alleviate boredom. It’s good to make sure that young people have something to do with their time. They are keen sports men and women – let’s encourage that by providing more facilities in all of the communities.”

Local Priorities

Provide physical activity and recreational opportunities for all communities in the Bardi Jawi area

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Regional Operations Centre with the Local Operations Centre will sponsor an enhanced audit of all sport and recreation facilities to inform future planning

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments The Regional Operations Centre will develop a business case for buildings, equipment and positions to support enhanced sports facilities on the Peninsula (see also Health Building Block)

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Regional Operations Centre with the Local Operations Centre to conduct a feasibility study for a building in Djarindjin to be used as a sports and community facility and a cyclone shelter

Hold a Bardi Jawi community safety Expo and licensing “round up” to include implementation of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. The Regional Operations Centre with Department of the Attorney General and other partners will sponsor the community safety Expo.

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Licensing services to continue to be made available by Department of Transport on the Peninsula at regular times throughout the year

Reinforce road safety

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Western Australia Police with Councils and communities to identify collision “black spots” on the roads

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Council, with partners to be identified, to install better safety signage

Projects identified by the community requiring further consideration Funding will be sought to repair and maintain community roads

Emergency management and safety in the home

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Fire and Emergency Services Australia to continue work on the Peninsula on emergency management and safety in the home

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Council, with partners, to fund a marine rescue service

Control visitors to the Dampier Peninsula

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced. Local Operations Centre to bring together parties to review the existing Peninsula Access Management Strategy

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Regional Operations Centre, Western Australia Police and Councils to establish improved notification protocols

See Attachment A, Table 6 for more detailed information about these projects.

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Governanace and Leadership building block

Governance and Leadership: empowering communities

Strong leadership is needed to champion and create ownership of the Indigenous reform agenda. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels are essential to long term sustainable outcomes. Indigenous people need to be engaged in the development of reforms that will impact on them. Improved access to capacity building in governance and leadership is needed in order for Indigenous people to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.

What the communities say about governance and leadership:

“We like to make our own policies so that everything is fair and just and equal and fits with our cultural ways. But we would welcome the right help from the government to support our Councils and our other groups to get this done.”

“The positive of this process is the hope that something is going to be done in our community and the anticipation that promises and statements are going to be delivered on the ground.”

Local Priorities

Clarify decision making processes and land use between Councils and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate and Kimberley Land Council

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre will facilitate discussion of relationships between the Councils, Prescribed Body Corporate

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre will facilitate discussion and resolution of authority and responsibilities relevant to land and development in the Region (see also Healthy Homes Building Block)

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Establish a development process that satisfies native title and heritage rights and interests

Support and enhance the function of elected councilors and their constitutions by giving clarity, training, support and resources to the Councils and to the Prescribed Body Corporate concurrently

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre providing funding for Ardyaloon Council and Djarindjin to workshop enhancements in decision making and corporate governance

Projects where future action is required to finalise commitments Regional Operations Centre and Local Operations Centre to work with Councils to design a local leadership development program to strengthen corporate governance and decision making in Bardi Jawi

Review and audit government and non-government service provision

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Regional Operations Centre and Local Operations Centre to audit service provision augmenting existing Baseline Mapping to achieve an accurate and comprehensive list of nature and frequency of all services

Increase communication between Councils and community to increase civic participation in decision making

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Local Operations Centre to continue workshops on communication strategies to the benefit of community members with Councils and other government agencies

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Councils to design locally relevant communication products and processes to ensure open communication with community at large

Promote links between Councils in the Bardi Jawi area with a view to continue the approach in Bardi Jawi Nimidamun

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Local Operations Centre to facilitate ongoing discussion between the three Councils and the Prescribed Body Corporate

Projects that have been agreed and where action has commenced Local Operations Centre to encourage Councils to evaluate opportunities and benefits of Bardi Jawi Nimidamun and include in business and strategic plans as appropriate

See Attachment A, Table 7 for more detailed information on these projects.

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4. Local Implementation Plans – An Iterative Process

This Local Implementation Plan for Bardi Jawi is a living document, and is to be considered as the initial step in a continuing iterative planning and implementation process.

The Bardi Jawi community determined the priority targets for the first iteration of the plan. It decided to focus on all seven building blocks, representing the main issues of importance to the community.

The following diagram reflects the approach and identifies the iterative nature of the process.

Local Implementation Plans – An Iterative Process

Each identified action in the Local Implementation Plan will generate a measurable project plan, including timelines, identify lead agencies and outline an engagement process. The evaluation points will be clearly identified.

Where a specific commitment has been made, the project plan will reflect milestones, expected expenditure pattern and evaluation points.

Where the agreement is for future action (including business planning, systemic reform and strategic investigations) again milestones will be identified and a timeline clearly articulated for action.

Where the action identified is for future consideration the project plan will identify the parties to enter negotiation, the timeline for a decision (or way forward) and the measures to be taken.

In Bardi Jawi the development of these project plans will be completed in partnership, using established governance arrangements.

Progress will be measured monthly, through Situation Reports presented to the State Operations Committee and communicated with the Bardi Jawi Reference Group.

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5. Glossary

AHW
Aboriginal Health Worker
AIEO
Aboriginal and Islander Education Officer
ALT
Aboriginal Lands Trust
AOD
Alcohol and Other Drugs
CDEP
Community Development Employment Program
CEO
Catholic Education Office
COAG
Council of Australian Governments
DAO
Drug and Alcohol Office
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment & Workplace Relations
DEC
Department of Environment and Conservation
DEWHA
Department of Environment Water Heritage and the Arts
DFC
Department for Communities
DIA
Department of Indigenous Affairs
DPI
Department for Planning and Infrastructure (Department of Transport)
DTWD
Department of Training and Workforce Development
DoC
Department for Communities
DoE
Department of Education
DoH
Department of Health
DoHA
Department of Health and Ageing
ELT
Early Life Trauma
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
FESA
Fire and Emergency Service Association
FASD
Foetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
FTE
Full Time Employee
HACC
Health Aged Community Care
ICC
Indigenous Coordination Centre
ICSI
Indigenous Community Strategic Investment
IPSS
Indigenous Parenting Support Services
JSA
Job Services Australia
KACS
Kimberley Aged and Community Services
KALACC
Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Centre
KAMSC
Kimberley Aboriginal Medical Service Council
KDGP
Kimberly Division of General Practice
KLC
Kimberley Land Council
KPHU
Kimberley Population Health Unit
KRCI
Kullarri Regional CDEP Incorporated
KRSP
Kimberley Regional Services Program
LAC
Local Area Coordinator
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
LOC
Local Operations Centre
MHC
Mental Health Commission
NPA
National Partnership Agreement
OAH
Office of Aboriginal Health
OIPC
Office of Indigenous Policy Coordination
PBC
Prescribed Body Corporate
RIBS
Remote Indigenous Broadcasting Service
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
RFDS
Royal Flying Doctor Service
SDERA
School Drug Education and Road Awareness
WACHS
Western Australian Country Health Service
WAPOL
Western Australian Police

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Attachments

Attachment A - Table 1

Early Childhood

The facilities, assets and need are very different for the communities of Djarindjin and Ardyaloon, yet there is overlap between the potential solutions to the priorities identified by each community.

Existing facilities for very young children in Ardyaloon are the Locational Supported Playgroup, the Kindergarten at One Arm Point School (ages 3-5) and pre-natal and ante-natal services and education through the Clinic. Facilities in Djarindjin include the Djarindjin Quality Early Childhood Learning Centre and the Kindergarten at the Lombadina School for children aged 4 – 5. Early learning access will be enhanced through the rollout of 15 hours of access to quality early childhood education for those three-year-olds turning four -- under the Early Childhood Education NPA ‘universal access’ provisions. Good activities already exist, although more are needed with an underpinning that all early childhood services and activities must try to actively engage parents, caregivers and the children. On-going participation by the community in issues concerning very young children is seen as important and will be achieved through a committee/working group dedicated to issues concerning young children. The particular form of this will be up to the Council/Community to decide, while appropriate governance and initial ‘start-up’ support would be provided by FaHCSIA. Families and caregivers need to be fully aware of the available programs and services to ensure they are culturally and locally relevant and they engage parents. Other issues seen as highly relevant to young children were the poor state of community housing and the parlous state of community roads, the high turnover of staff at the Clinic resulting in relationships not being developed with community members and the high turnover of teachers (each of these are raised under other Building Blocks).

It is a component of the forward planning of the local application of the RSD program to gather community perspectives on young children’s health, nutrition, welfare, social and physical development, behaviour management and their opportunities to learn in preparation for success when commencing School. On-going civic participation in issues concerning very young children will be through a committee / working group. The need for such a committee and its potential form may be different for Djarindjin.

There is a perceived need for a new Family and Child Centre for Djarindjin. The existing childcare facility is in poor condition and meets regulatory requirements only through the granting of several exemptions. The facility is a converted house and too small to offer more or expanded services or to accommodate more children. The community has entered into a partnership with Save the Children which provides funding for staff at the centre and advice has also been sought from ‘Playgroup WA’ about setting up a mobile playgroup and the Indigenous Parenting Support Services program. ICSI funding has been expended by FaHCSIA in the 2009-10 financial year to carry out essential repairs to extensive termite damage, paint the inside of the building, repair the cooking area and to build a small extension to the building to accommodate an office space for the Director. (A new Family and Child Centre is seen by Djarindjin Council as essential to the achievement of a wide range of COAG outcomes).

There will be several babies born during 2010 in the Bardi Jawi area (approximately 21) presenting an ideal opportunity to examine how families and babies can access and benefit from available services. This ‘Twenty-One Babies’ Project is not yet fully developed although it is listed below, but will be collaborative across many agencies including DEEWR, Save the Children (the IPSS program), Footprints in Time, Playgroup WA, the Clinic and others. It presents an ideal opportunity to not only test the effectiveness of services but to also ensure that each of these babies and their parents receive the services available to them. If carried out over a five-year period it will provide a cohort of young children who can be assessed for such outcomes as health and school readiness. Funding will also be sought from the FaHCSIA, OIPC, NT and RSD Indigenous Planning, Research and Development Projects.

Priority 1: Educate parents on the importance of children participating in early childhood learning activities and their own participation in 'parenting programs'
Establish a community committee on 'early childhood' in Ardyaloon
Prepare a Plan for Our Young Children in Ardyaloon
Assess the need for a committee and/or a Plan in Djarindjin
Links with other Building Blocks: Health, Schooling
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: LAC / ROC

Co-leads:

Partners: DEEWR, DoE, DFC

FUTURE ACTIVITY
  • Conduct a review of early childhood programs and relevant government services in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin
Indigenous children acquire basic skills for life and learning End 2010 and 2011 Agreed future action
  • Review the suitability of the current childcare services available in community in relation to changing community need (including infrastructure, staffing, training needs and future childcare placement needs)
  • Develop a business case for costs to implement recommendations from childcare review
LAC/ROC
  • Bring together parties and establish a project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to progress and agree with the communities the best way to educate parents on the importance of participating in early child hood activities
More early childhood services and activities are needed and they must aim to actively engage parents, caregivers and the children ongoing Agreed future action
  • Facilitate positive and collaborative working relationships between the One Arm Point School Kindergarten and the Locational Supported Playgroup (and the Clinic)
  • Facilitate positive and collaborative working relationships between the Djarindjin/Lombadina School and the Child Care Centre (and the Clinic)
Council
  • Hold an ‘early childhood day’ with community and agencies to:
    • Educate and communicate about early childhood programs
    • Plan the early childhood committee
    • Scope the purpose of a Plan for Our Young Children
    • Design and execute a survey to find out why parents and families are not accessing services.
End 2010 Agreed future action

LAC/ROC

Council

School

Playgroup

DEEWR

DFC

Save the Children

Other government agencies

Childcare programs

WACHS

  • All relevant agencies will offer information and on the programs, strategies, funding streams and best practices currently available, and the governance system put in place for the committee will encourage the early childhood committee to stay up to date on these matters
More early childhood services and activities are needed and they must aim to actively engage parents, caregivers and the children Ongoing Agreed future action
  • Provide support and advice to the ‘early childhood committee’ and, if required, on the content of a Plan for Our Young Children
Ongoing Agreed future action
  • LAC to work with the ‘early childhood committee’ on resourcing, role and purpose of potential early childhood co-ordinator (following need being identified after review of services):
    • to support and co-ordinate early childhood and strong families programs and services currently being offered;
    • to help to identify and attract new programs and activities seen as important by the ‘committee’
    • to maximise the use of early childhood programs and visiting services by disseminating information about early childhood development, safety issues, programs and visiting services
    • to work closely with relevant government agencies
Ongoing Agreed future action
  • Build in good practices for the committee to engage the community on an on-going basis, e.g. through survey and open discussion and information sessions
Ongoing Agreed future action
  • Use RIBS to broadcast awareness about programs and include news and information on early childhood in Ardyaloon /Djarindjin Newsletters
Ongoing Agreed future action
  • Bring in expertise to train local Indigenous person(s) so expertise stays in the community (and there is a real job after the training)
Ongoing Agreed future action
DEEWR
  • Implement parenting and early learning programs (e.g. Parents as Learners Program - DEEWR)
  2010 Agreed and commenced
Council
  • Council and the ‘early childhood committee’ to work on alternatives strategies to fulfil functions if a ‘child and family co-ordinator’ cannot be resourced
  Ongoing Agreed future action
Community
  • Community members to identify role models on parenting from within the community
  • Community to participate fully in the ‘early childhood committee’
  Ongoing Agreed future action
Corporate/Non-Government Organisations
  • Non-government agencies and charitable foundations will offer information on the programs, strategies, funding streams and best practices currently available; and governance system put in place for the committee will encourage the early childhood committee to stay up to date on these matters.
  Ongoing Future consideration

 

Priority 2: Conduct feasibility study regarding the construction of a new Family and Child facility (Djarindjin)
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health; Schooling; Safe Communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

LAC/ROC (lead)

Council

Save the Children

Playgroup W. A.

Jalygurr

DEEWR

FaHCSIA

DOE

Community

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Establish outcomes of the review of need based on early childhood programs and relevant government services
  • Prepare a feasibility plan based on existing documents
  • Project plan the potential renewal of family and childcare facilities at Djarindjin
  • Identify potential funding sources construct a new family and child facility for Djarindjin
  • Identify sources for new playground equipment and activities
More early childhood services and activities are needed that aim to actively engage parents, caregivers and the children 2011 and beyond Future consideration

 

Priority 3: The ‘Twenty-one Babies’ Project
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health; Schooling
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

LAC/ROC FaHCSIA

Community clinics

Child care centre

Council,

DOE

Save the Children (IPSS)

Playgroup WA

Jalygurr , DEEWR

CURRENT ACTIVITY

Project will be developed as collaborative across agencies including DEEWR, Save the Children (the IPSS program), Footprints in Time, Playgroup WA, the community Clinics and others to test the effectiveness of services and ensure that each of these babies and their parents receive the services available to them.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Apply for funding to the FaHCSIA OIPC NT and RSD Indigenous Planning, Research and Development Projects
  • Bring together parties and establish interest and project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to progress
  • Investigate possible University partnership (e.g. UWA)

Indigenous children are born and remain healthy

Children benefit from better social inclusion and reduced disadvantage

2010-2014

Future consideration

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Attachment A - Table 2

Schooling: Djarindjin and Lombadina

Djarindjin and Lombadina are neighbouring communities sharing the Djarindjin Lombadina Catholic School but otherwise are separate in their governance arrangements and other matters.

School data: Enrolment in the Djarindjin Lombadina Catholic School was 91 as at June 2010. My School data indicates a school attendance rate of 61%. According to the Catholic education office WALNA and NAPLAN testing results indicate “a significant upward trend over the last three years at all levels e.g. years 3, 5 and 7, for Reading” and ‘displays that the Numeracy program has been quite effective over the last three to four year period. The students from this school have moved well ahead, in comparison with the Like Schools' cohort. The main factor … is the ability of the school to attract experienced teachers”. Despite achieving results above the statistically similar schools average around Australia the School's results are below the ‘all Australian average’ and schooling outcomes need to be improved.

Issues to do with school age children and the relationship between the communities and the school were raised at each of the consultation sessions on other Building Blocks. In addition, the Djarindjin Lombadina School Board has a ‘School Community Partnership Agreement’ incorporated in the priorities below. The agreement is in draft form and has been the subject of community consultation in the last year. In addition, schooling and education are emphasised in the Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation strategic planning document stating that the Council is particularly concerned with “meeting the social and education needs for the youth in the Djarindjin community as well as the outstations and the Djarindjin lease”. Education was also a Key Result Area of the Bardi Jawi Nimidamun Strategic Plan 2008-2010.

Emphasis was laid on improving the interaction between the community and the School with more active participation from both parties. Parental responsibility for their children’s behaviour and education and participation in matters to do with school was seen as essential and there was a call from both communities to ensure that children are prepared for school and make a smooth transition from the type of activities at childcare and those practiced in Kindergarten to enhance their success in formal schooling and, a smooth transition to work or further education. The need was also expressed for better secondary education on the Peninsula.

The major emphasis of the Schooling priorities is to provide any necessary support for the governance of the new Djarindjin Lombadina School Board to ensure its continuity and contribution to the vitality of school-community collaboration to achieve the COAG outcomes. The planning and strategies of the proposed Kimberley Success Zone and school-based trade training will also inform planning in this area.

Priority 1: Help Djarindjin and Lombadina teachers and families to get to know each other
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Lead: ROC Co-leads:Partners: Catholic Education Office

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Facilitate the community priorities as expressed in the School Community Partnership Agreement and provide assistance to sustain the activities within the Agreement when needed
  • Provide facilitator or mediator if needed
Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces educational disadvantage Ongoing Agreed and commenced
Djarindjin Lombadina Catholic School Council
  • The School and the Djarindjin and Lombadina Councils organise ‘get togethers’ for the teachers and the community (e.g. BBQs, beach nights, cultural days)
  • The teachers and families will meet every term to talk about children’s learning (e.g. parent teacher meetings, report nights)
  • Regular communication with community about school activities, methods and achievements
  • Introduce new staff to community
  • Explore options for children's activities, after-school programs and holiday programs
  • Promote cultural events
Ongoing Agreed future action
Council
  • Participate with School to ensure that all teachers and School staff participate in cross cultural awareness and training
2010 beyond Agreed future action
Community
  • Be fully involved with School as central to the community
Ongoing Agreed future action

 

Priority 2: All children at school, on time, every day
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: LAC

Co-leads:

Partners:

CURRENT and FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Facilitate the priorities of the community and school as expressed in the School Community Partnership Agreement and provide assistance to sustain the activities within the Agreement when needed
Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards Ongoing Agreed and commenced
FaHCSIA
  • Indigenous Parenting Support Service program (IPSS) funding has been recently awarded and this community based initiative will assist in getting children to school
2010 Agreed and commenced

Lead: Principal

WA Police

WA Dept of Sport and Recreation DEEWR

Catholic Education Office

Djarindjin Lombadina

Catholic School

  • Scope the need for an attendance/liaison officer and/or a youth/schoolwork and liaison role/position with key functions including a focus on school readiness e.g.:
    • After-school activities
    • Liaise with families and community on school attendance
  • Help get children to school in the morning and home at night
All 2011 Agreed and commenced
Catholic Education Office Djarindjin Lombadina Catholic School
  • Publish targets and report to the community and parents on school attendance
  • Provide community/school liaison positions through ATAs to facilitate improved student attendance
2010 Agreed future action
Council

The Djarindjin and Lombadina Councils will:

  • Have a curfew to ensure kids go home for supper and bed
  • Restrict loud music late at night
  • Ask the shop, workshop and office not to allow children in during school hours
  • Develop a ‘5 step’ attendance process
  • Clarify sanctions if children are not at school
  • Develop a reward program for attendance (work on a process to deal with children not at school, e.g. not taken out on fishing trips, not allowed in shop, not allowed access to recreation officer – and vice versa as an incentive program)
  • Work on creating a canteen for school lunches
  • Ensure children are at school
  • Agree on targets for school attendance and help to implement school attendance targets
All 2011 Agreed future action
Community
  • Fully support the actions of council and school regarding children’s behaviour and school attendance.
2011 Agreed future action

 

Priority 3: Follow the principle that “good behaviour helps learning”
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Early Childhood; Safe Communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: LOC

Co-leads:

Partners:

CURRENT & FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Facilitate the priorities of the community and school as expressed in the School Community Partnership Agreement and provide assistance to sustain the activities within the Agreement when needed.
Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards Ongoing Agreed and commenced
Djarindjin Lombadina Catholic School
  • The School with support from Djarindjin and Lombadina Councils will work on a behaviour management plan with a clear process for DoE detention and suspensions.
  • The School will bring families in straight away to sort out problems between children before they get too big.
  • The school and the Council will introduce a Student Council.
  • All students will wear a school uniform to encourage pride, confidence and respect.
All Ongoing Agreed future action
Council
  • Develop and implement Code of Conduct for the community (in place of by-laws) with relevance to all young and old members of the community and devise possible sanctions
2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 4: Improve educational outcomes
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks:
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Commonwealth

Plan for process with WA

Education including CEO, TAFE and DEEWR

School Sector /CEO/’What Works’ /DEEWR

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Increased resourcing through National Partnership funding, e.g. low SES schools and literacy and numeracy funding
Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards 2010 Agreed and commenced
  • Increased resourcing through reading recovery
2010 Agreed and commenced

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Access to school based trade training to be developed
2011 and beyond Agreed future action
  • Vocational training in school provided in conjunction with Kimberley TAFE
End 2010 and 2011 Agreed and commenced
  • Planning underway for Kimberley Success Zone to promote teaching and schooling best practise
ongoing Agreed future action

Co-leads:

School

Catholic Education Office

  • Specialist teachers / attention to both high achieving students and low achieving students.
  • Ensure that children leaving school at grade 7 are fully prepared to enter high school (there is a perception that children need to ‘make up’ a year before entering high school)
  • Additional intensified literacy support for regional office consultants to visit on a planned cycle
  • Reading recovery program
2010 and beyond2010 and beyond Agreed and commenced
Community
  • Fully support the actions of Council and School regarding children’s education
ongoing Agreed future action

 

Schooling: Ardyaloon

Enrolment in One Arm Point School was 98 at June 2010 according to MySchool data indicating a school attendance rate of 80% which is an improvement on previous years. NAPLAN testing indicates results above the statistically similar schools average although the School's results are below the ‘all Australian’ average.

Stakeholders have suggested it is important to foster a sense of joint responsibility between parents and the School, and this is expected to be achieved through the development of the School Community Partnership Agreement.

A concern was the lack of vehicles to transport children between communities and to events which is inhibiting participation in the Peninsula Alliance VET initiative. A bus is provided by WA Department of Education but this is primarily to pick-up and drop-off children for school which limits their availability to transport students for other reasons.

The One Arm Point (Ardyaloon) Remote Community School Plans have been taken into consideration in the development of the priorities including the NPA School Community Partnership - Low SES Plan and School Operational Plan. The planning and strategies for the Kimberley Success Zone and school based trade training will also inform planning in this area.

 

Priority 1:Improve school attendance and student access to after school and extra-curricular activities
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Safe Communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Lead: ROC
  • Facilitate the priorities of the community and school as expressed in the School Community Partnership Agreement and provide assistance to sustain the activities within the Agreement when needed.
Schooling promotes the social inclusion and reduces the disadvantage of children ongoing Agreed and commenced
FaHCSIA
  • Indigenous Parenting Support Service program funding to provide 1.5 positions to focus on parenting, child health, early learning and school readiness
2010 Agreed future action
DEEWR & DoE
  • Investigate transportation issues
  Agreed future action

DoEOne

Arm Point School

  • Scope the need for an attendance/liaison officer and/or a youth/schoolwork and liaison role/position with key functions including a focus on school readiness e.g. After-school activities and iaison with families and community on school attendance
  • Help get children to school in the morning and home at night
2011 Agreed future action
DoEOne Arm Point School
  • Publish targets and report to the community and parents on school attendance
End 2010 Future consideration
Community
  • Ensure children are at school
  • Be aware of targets for school attendance and help to implement targets
Ongoing Agreed and commenced

ROC

DEEWR & DoE

Kimberley TAFE

  • Investigate an integrated transport strategy for the Peninsula (see Economic Participation) and organise discussion with DoE re providing adequate transport to ensure students can take advantage of all curricular and extra-curricular activities
2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 2: Enhance parent engagement with the school and build school community relationships through the continued development of the Ardyaloon School Community Partnership Agreement
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks:
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
LOCDoE OAP School Principal and School Board

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Facilitate the priorities of the community and School as expressed in the developing School Community Partnership Agreement and provide assistance to sustain the activities within the Agreement when needed
  • Develop a process to make continuous improvements to the School Community Partnership Agreement
Schooling promotes the social inclusion and reduces the disadvantage of children

Ongoing

 

Ongoing

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

OAP School Principal and School Board (and Council)
  • Support existing processes to develop the School /Community Partnership Agreement.
  • Expand the School Community Partnership Agreement between the Ardyaloon Council and the School which includes cultural awareness for all staff (existing and new) and a plan to ensure the level of education is the same as mainstream schools
Ongoing Agreed future action
Community
  • Fully support the actions of council and School regarding children’s education
Ongoing Agreed future action

 

Priority 3: Support Bardi Culture programs for all children and entire community
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Safe communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Leads: ROC, School and community

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • ROC to be aware of Bardi Jawi culture and incorporate in all projects
  Ongoing Agreed and commenced

School

DoE

Department of Sport & Recreation

KALACC

DEEWR

  • Support cultural activities as per School operational plans
  • Continue cultural studies as regular part of school timetable
  • The School and the community will work together to make sure that culture and language is done the ‘right way’ (for teachers and for students)
  • Involve Elders in new staff orientation
  • Increase community/parental involvement in the cultural program at school
  • Continue transformation of CLC room into dynamic cultural museum/LOTE (?) room
  • Develop and maintain the capacity building of all AIEO staff at school
  • Djarindjin-Lombadina School to contact Principal of One Arm Point School regarding its successful cultural program (collaborative with KALACC) with a view to implementing it
The importance of maintaining culture and language is a consistent priority expressed by community members All Ongoing2010

Agreed and commenced

 

 

 

Agreed and commenced

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Agreed and commenced

Save the ChildrenPlaygroup WAJalygurr
  • Teach culture and language to young children
  • Introduce language and culture into childcare curricula

 

 

Agreed future action

LOC/ROC

Community

Elders

  • Capture oral histories and stories into books, videos
  • Scope requirements to establish art workshops in each community

 

 

Future consideration

Community

School Board

Council.

  • Participate in and promote cultural outings and events
  • Identify cultural volunteers, mentors and trainers
  • Support and promote regular cultural events with elders, for families and children

 

Ongoing

Agreed future action

 

Priority 4: Access to high-quality education including improved literacy and numeracy
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Safe Communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Partners: DEEWR, DoE, OAP School

CURRENT ACTIVITY

Increased resourcing through NPA funding, e.g. low SES schools

FUTURE ACTIVITY Implementation and review of literacy and numeracy Strategy 1 together with school funded specialist teacher and literacy and numeracy funding

Indigenous children and youth meet basic literacy and numeracy standards and overall levels of literacy and numeracy are improving 2010 and beyond Agreed and commenced
DoE , ‘What Works’ DEEWR Kimberley Success Zone to promote teaching and schooling best practise -- planning under way End 2010 Agreed future action
Council and Community Fully support the School regarding children’s education

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Priority 5: Student services, behaviour, health, social and emotional well-being
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Lead: DoECo-leads:Partners: FUTURE ACTIVITYInvestigate feasibility of regular visits by psychologists and social workers to support local staff in case management of students Indigenous people have ready access to suitable and culturally inclusive primary and preventive services To be determined Future consideration

 

Priority 6: Vital vocational education and training strategy
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: DoE

Co-leads: TAFE

Partners: DEEWR, DoE

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Continue planning on access to school based trade training
  • Continue and strengthen current Vocational training in school provided in conjunction with Kimberley TAFE.

 

End 2010 & beyondEnd 2010 and 2011 Agreed future action

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Attachment A - Table 3

Health

On 29th November 2008, COAG agreed to an historic $1.6 billion dollar National Partnership Agreement (NPA) on Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes to specifically address the first of the COAG Closing The Gap targets- to close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.

The Commonwealth will contribute $805.5 million over four years to address three priority areas in the National Partnership Agreement on Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes - Tackling Smoking, Primary Health Services That Can Deliver and Fixing The Gaps And Improving The Patient Journey. The Western Australian Government committed $117.43 million dollars over four years to address five priority areas- Tackling Smoking, Primary Health Services That Can Deliver, Fixing The Gaps And Improving The Patient Journey, Making Indigenous Health Everyone’s Business and Healthy Transition To Adulthood.

Both the Commonwealth and Western Australian Governments have worked with key stakeholders to develop implementation plans committing the funds and have commenced the implementation of strategies to address the priority areas in all regions of Western Australia.

Subsequently, both the Commonwealth and Western Australian Government have agreed to progress Closing The Gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes in the Bardi Jawi Region by committing to the Remote Service Delivery NPA. The Local Implementation Plan (LIP) for the health building block will provide the Community local level direction setting required for Government commitment and investments.

Governance

The local Councils will be encouraged to work closely with the Clinics and to participate closely with the review processes described under the Health Building Block to ensure that the changes that the community has asked for are considered and, given sufficient resources, implemented. This may form a sub-committee of the Council attending to health issues.

  • Use existing health consultation and planning work

A number of previously developed health consultation and planning documents have been reviewed, aligned and accessed in preparation of the Bardi Jawi Region health priorities Local Implementation Plan (LIP) document. These include and are not limited to:

Service Provider planning documents and feedback

State and Commonwealth planning documents and feedback

Kimberley Aboriginal Regional Health Planning Forum needs assessments

  • Community forums and workshops

Local Operations Centre staff and Regional Operations Centre staff attended and/or facilitated a number of health specific Community Workshops and Service Provider Round Tables to further inform priority health issues, gaps and solutions to be included in this LIP. These included separate meetings in Ardyaloon, Lombadina and Djarindjin.

Future Direction

The desire to create positive health changes in the community was evident through the consultation with Community, local council and service providers. There are a number of programs currently underway in the Communities that have been identified for further development and expansion. These include the EON Edible Garden program in Ardyaloon and Djarindjin and the Be Active sporting program implemented through the Garnduwa Be Active Officer in Lombadina/Djarindjin and Ardyaloon.

The ROC and the Communities have identified a number of health service providers either in the community or visiting the community. It was agreed that when accessed, these providers generally do provide a good service. However, it was also agreed that service delivery is often not adequate to meet changing community needs and is not done in collaboration with the community or with similar service providers. It was also identified that community are often unaware of when services are in the community and what those services provide.

In partnership with the community, recognized governance bodies and agencies, ROC Health Staff will work to develop a number of project plans to address the identified health issues in the LIP, including the tracking of existing health service providers and service delivery as a priority.

Future challenges will include:

  • Establishing suitable housing stock for existing and new positions.
  • Ensuring that the development of plans and programs is at direction of Community and in partnership with all relevant agencies and the Community.
  • Implementing adequate support for existing local and regional health governance, planning and coordination groups as they take on more responsibility in addressing issues through the LIP.
  • Negotiating funding for identified FTE’s and programs to ensure that the positive, short-term changes in health outcomes are translated into long-term health outcomes that are comparable to the broader population.
  • Building autonomy and sustainability in local Communities Government “doing business differently” to close the gap in Indigenous Health Outcomes: Remote Service Delivery NPA for Health
  • Community and Government process to agreement on priority health action
  • Government supporting local Community strategies to enhance and sustain local health decision making
  • Community developed performance indicators on health
  • Reporting to Community on health progress
  • Health service contract management to oblige Community partnered planning, coordination and direction setting
Priority 1: Deliver appropriate and coordinated health services to better meet needs including:
- Revise the existing community clinic services including infrastructure, staffing and programs
- Revise visiting health services to meet changing community needs
- Improve community awareness of ,and access to, visiting services
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
1A: Strategic Planning

Lead:LOC

Co-lead: ROC

Partners:

Community Council

WACHS

KAMSC

KDGP

DoHA

FaHCSIA

RFDS

KinWay/Anglicare

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • ROC and LOC have met with clinic staff in both communities to include their input in the LIP.
  • Completed comprehensive mapping of current health services and programs provided in or to Bardi Jawi communities.
  • Commenced ROC facilitated discussions between services providers.
  • PHCAP plans are developed yearly and presented to the communities for input and consultation.
Community has identified the need to better coordinate service delivery to meet the changing needs of community.

March-June 2010

March-August 2010

June 2010

April/May

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a strategic plan that outlines the future directions of the community clinics, including:
    • Governance, community engagement and reporting structures within community;
    • Revision of service provision against changing community needs;
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs);
    • Means for improved patient management processes and information sharing between clinics and regional services.
    • Service review and reorientation as required.
    • Explicit governance arrangements on how the State and Commonwealth will work together
Agencies have identified the need to improve joint planning to better address gaps in services and reduce duplications Mar 2011 Agreed future action

Note: any addition FTE will need housing and office/operational space in the clinic.

  • There is a WACHS run community clinic in Ardyaloon and Lombadina, both staffed with two remote area nurses and one Aboriginal health worker, a part-time receptionist, a cleaner and gardener. There are positions vacant at each clinic site.
  • A number of state-based, NGO, and Commonwealth funded services provide visiting services to the Communities and/or through the clinics.
  • ROC consultation with community and services identified need for:
    • Improved internet access by clinics plus effective patient management software to improve patient information sharing.
    • A capital upgrade for clinics to include more meeting/consultation rooms

 

 

Future consideration
1B: Co-ordinate services

Lead:

ROC (lead agency in mapping and agency meetings)

Co–lead:
LOC

Partners:

Community

Council

WACHS

Dental Program

KAMSC

KDGP

DoHA

FaHCSIA

Headspace

KinWay/Anglicare

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • DoHA funding to KAMSC to trial a central health planning and coordination role for Kimberley Regional Aboriginal Health Planning Forum- “Kimberley Aboriginal Health Planning and Coordination Pilot Project” $50,000.00
  • DoHA funding for a State-wide COAG coordination role at AHCWA- COAG coordination and support to ACCHOs (including KAMSC)- $83,170
  • DoHA COAG measure to expand the Medical Specialist Outreach Assistance Program and creation of flexible funds pools to specialists for Indigenous Australians (National budget $70,780,000.00)
  • State COAG funding (KARHPF) to KAMSC for a SEWB position to the Dampier Peninsula $44,500.
  • State COAG funding for two State-wide Aboriginal Liaison Coordinators, one based at AHCWA and one based at WACHS Area Office respectively (these positions will support the State-wide network of Aboriginal Liaison Officers being rolled out through COAG Closing the Gap funding
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding for an Aboriginal Liaison Officer (ALO) based at Broome Regional Aboriginal Medical Service (BRAMS) will work closely with the comprehensive Primary Health Care (PHC) team at BRAMS, Broome Hospital and other local service providers.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap Funding to KAMSC for Kimberley Integrated Health Information Systems.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap Funding to WACHS Kimberley for Kimberley Integrated Health Information System.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding to WACHS Kimberley for Kimberley Regional Eye Program Coordinator.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a document that outlines all visiting health services, including frequency and service offered.
  • Meet with existing service providers and community governance to review appropriateness of current services and identify changes.
Community appears unaware when services visit and how to access them.

June 2010

 

2009/10

 

2009-2013

 

2010-2014

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

  • Develop a services coordination project outline which includes:
    • Services coordination strategy and communication plan
    • Substantiated need for the provision of a health services coordinator in the Bardi Jawi area.
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).
    • Service review and reorientation as required
November 2010 Dec 2010March 2011

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Note: any additional FTE will need housing and office space.

  • During ROC and LOC community consultations, community and health agencies identified that there may be a need to review the relevance of some of the visiting services in light of the changing needs of the community.
  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • 1 FTE Health Service Coordinator for the Bardi Jawi Region – to be housed on the Peninsula.
    • Improved transport options between communities and town.
    • Visiting services accommodation to be built.
    • Training to community members to continue health promotion programs in the community between specialist services visits. FTE required for community positions.
  • Extra mental health and AOD counsellor FTE to be based on Peninsula (refer to priority 7 for details).

 

Future consideration
1C: Communication and awareness

Lead:LOC

Co–lead:
Community Council

Partners:ROC

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a communication strategy to ensure community are aware of health services and how they can be accessed, this may include the services of the health service coordinator position.
Community appears unaware when services visit and how to access them. February 2011 Agreed future action
  • Development of a central point for information distribution and gathering and for community to seek advice around health service delivery

February 2011

Future considerations

 

Priority 2: Develop and deliver appropriate health promotion and primary health programs including:
- Men’s and women’s health promotion programs
- Chronic disease prevention
- School based health education curriculum
Links with other Building Blocks: Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Map relevant services and facilities

Lead:Health Promotion Officer

Co-lead: ROC/LOC

Partners:

Community Council

WACHS

Dental Program KAMSC

KDGP

RFDS

Milliya Rumurra

SDERA

School/ DoE

DoHA

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • The community have identified a number health promotion programs needed to meet their current health needs.
  • List of health promotion priorities include:
    • Drug and alcohol (see Alcohol Management Plan)○ Smoking
    • Nutrition
    • Heart disease
    • Lung disease
    • Diabetes
    • Renal
  • DoHA COAG funding for Indigenous Health Project Officer Positions for the Kimberley Division of General Practice and AHCWA- $256,500.00
  • DoHA COAG funding for a State-wide Practice Manager role to support ACCHOs (KAMSC included)
  • DoHA COAG funding for 4 x FTE to West Kimberley through KAMSC for Regional Tobacco Coordination and Action and Healthy Lifestyle Workers approx $500,000.00. DoHA COAG measures will also include training for Chronic Disease Self Management
  • DoHA COAG measure to undertake market research and local campaigns to promote health and wellbeing (National funding of $22,700,000.00)
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding to Health Networks for State-wide Tackling Smoking Coordination program
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding to KAMSC for region wide Ear Health Program
  • State COAG funding Closing the Gap funding to WACHS Kimberley for Kimberley Regional Eye Program Coordinator and Kimberley Regional Ear Health Program $412,937

Community and service providers identified the need for targeted and comprehensive health promotion programs as a priority for the community.

The World Health Organisation’s Ottawa charter recommends a five pronged approach for health promotion including public awareness campaigns.

Health promotion is an important factor in reducing risk factors at the population level

March-June 2010

 

2009/10- ongoing

2009/10

2009/10- ongoing

2009-2013

2009-2013

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed future action

 

Future Consideration

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a health promotion plan for the Bardi Jawi area to include:
    • Dedicated Health Promotion Officer
    • Governance and reporting structures.
    • A calendar of health promotion events.
    • A list of priority health promotion topics (to be identified by community) – completed.
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include Health Promotion FTE salary, housing, support, transport and program costs).
    • Links with the schools to ensure appropriate and comprehensive health education programs are in place.

Note: any additional FTE will need housing.

  • The ROC has identified a limited number of health promotion programs currently being undertaken within the community. Agencies have identified a desire to conduct further programs but they lack current capacity to do so (in community and visiting).
  • KDGP recognised opportunity to provide permanent health promotion support and resources- FTE funding required
  • KDGP recognised opportunity for Women’s Health Screening dependent on further Community discussions
  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • First aid kits and training for community. The clinic will need first aid kits and FTE support for training.
    • 1 FTE Health Promotion Officer for the Bardi Jawi Region – to be housed on the Peninsula.
    • 1 FTE based a clinic to support implementation of school health programs.
    • Ardyaloon – RIBS media centre needs to be moved from the childcare centre and greater access to community.
  • Early childhood centres attached to schools with appropriate staffing – 1 FTE Child Health Nurse and 1 FTE Early Development Teacher.
Dec 2010

Agreed future action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future Consideration

 

Priority 3: Ensure availability of suitable physical activity and recreational opportunities
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Develop physical activity and recreation programs

Lead:ROC

Co-lead:Garnduwa

Partners:

LOC

DSR

DoHA

Be Active Officers

Community Council

Sport and Recreation Program Coordinator - take over as lead if funded.

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Ardyaloon oval upgrade – underway (Com/State funded)
  • Ardyaloon change rooms/toilet facilities/ community kitchen upgrade underway – Com/Private funding)
  • Department of Sport and Recreation Kimberley Infrastructure Audit

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • ROC, DSR and Garnduwa to complete an audit of recreational activities and programs in the Bardi Jawi Region and compile with infrastructure audit.
  • Develop a sport and recreation plan for the Bardi Jawi area to include:
    • Governance and reporting structures.
    • A calendar of sporting and recreational events.
    • Health activity- other than physical
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include Sport and Recreation Coordinator FTE salary, housing, support, transport and program costs).
    • Appropriate transport options to enable people to attend activities.

Note: any additional FTE will need housing

  • Garnduwa, currently have 2 part-time Be Active sport officers in the Bardi Jawi area.
  • Many members of the communities already participate in sporting activities despite the poor level of facilities available. Some work is being done to upgrade some of the facilities in Ardyaloon.
  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • 1 FTE for Sport and Cultural Activities Coordinator for the Peninsula – work with the current Be Active Coordinators.
    • Capital works – multi-purpose undercover courts in Ardyaloon and oval upgrade in Lombadina/Djarindjin.
    • Training to community members to coordinate and implement recreational programs
Community and services have identified the need for increased physical activity and recreational programs as a priority to:- Encourage engagement in exercise- Promote healthy and safe alternative activities- Address boredom in youth- Promote healthy social interaction

June 2010

June 2010

Complete

Nov 2010

Mar 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Future Consideration

 

Priority 4: Ensure access to affordable healthy food and nutrition education.
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Early Childhood
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
4A: Access to healthy foods

Lead:ROC

Co-lead: LOC

Partners:

Community council

Community stores

DIA

FaHCSIA

DoHA

EON

DoH Environmental Health

Directorate

Shire of Broome

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • The EON Foundation has established a sustainable garden in schools in the Bardi Jawi area and is looking to expand the program to provide greater opportunities for fresh local food to the community.
  • ROC has met with EON representatives and has engaged their support in expanding the gardens.
  • Implementation of the COAG National Strategy for Food Security in Remote Indigenous Communities (the COAG food security strategy) has commenced in all communities.

 

The availability of healthy and affordable food is critical to health and wellbeing.

Established and ongoing

March-June 2010

Commenced- ongoing

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

 

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Bardi Jawi to review and provide input into COAG Food Security Strategy.
  • Review existing food purchasing practices by the community stores and develop recommendations for more effective bulk food purchases and transport options.
  • Review appropriateness of the food currently available in the community stores and make recommendations as to healthier alternatives.
  • Meet with EON Foundation to explore the possibility of expanding the EON community gardens.
  • Develop a planning document to increase the availability of fresh food including through the EON gardens.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • Food is available to community members through local community stores. The stores in Lombadina and Djarindjin source their food and transport from a separate company to that of Ardyaloon. Ardyaloon get fresher and cheaper food.
  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • 1 FTE based a clinic to support implementation of school health programs (including nutritional programs)
    • Horticulture training for the community members to develop community gardens.
    • Cooking classes using food form the community gardens.

Dec 2010

Dec 2010

Dec 2010

Dec 2010

Dec 2010

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Future Consideration

4B: Uptake of healthy foods

Lead:ROC

Co-lead:

WACHS

KDGP Schools

Partners:

EON

Community council

Community stores

DIA

FaHCSIA

DoHA

LOCK

AMSC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • ROC has met with KDGP and WACHS and they have agreed to be involved in coordinating service delivery.
  • There is a new community kitchen being developed in the community hall upgrade that can be used for cooking classes.
  • DoHA COAG measure to undertake market research and local campaigns to promote health and wellbeing (National funding of $22,700,000.00)

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Work with the schools and KDGP to coordinate, develop and implement a comprehensive nutrition education program within the communities, this will include:
    • Further revision and mapping of all current and existing health promotion, nutritional allied health positions and programs○ Resourcing requirements to be included in a project plan.

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • Potential position from FaHCSIA to WACHS Environmental Health for a 12 month community nutritionist to work with store and community (funding not adequate as of July 2010).
  • The Kimberley Division of General Practice (KDGP) and WACHS both have visiting nutritionist/dieticians visiting the Bardi Jawi area on a regular basis.
  • KDGP health promotion resources and programs require ongoing funding to be utilised in conjunction with schools programs
Community and service providers identified the need for targeted and comprehensive health promotion programs as a priority for the community.The community has identified the active engagement of the school in promotion of healthy eating habits to be a priority. May 201020102009-2013Feb 2010

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed and commenced

 

Agreed future action

Future consideration

 

Priority 5: Develop and deliver a culturally appropriate suicide prevention and community recovery program.
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Safer Communities, Schooling
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
5A: Develop a suicide prevention program
Lead:

LOC

Co-lead:

KinWay/Anglicare

Men’s Outreach

Service/Saints Football Team

Partners:

School

Community Council

KDGP

Headspace

KAMSC

WACHS

MHC

DFC

FaHCSIA

DIA

ROC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Comprehensive mapping of social and emotional wellbeing services available in or to the Bardi Jawi Region, this will include:
    • Drug and alcohol
    • Suicide prevention
    • Healing and trauma services
    • Mental health services
    • Youth diversion and engagement strategies
    • Violence and abuse services
  • Commenced ROC facilitated discussions between service providers.
  • State COAG funding (KARHPF) to KAMSC for a SEWB position to the Dampier Peninsula $44,500.
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funds to KAMSC for a Peninsula Youth SEWB Worker Program $453,008 and KAMSC Headspace Region wide Kimberley Youth SEWB Program
  • State COAG Closing the Gap funding for Men’s Outreach Service for a Kimberley wide Suicide Prevention Program (Alive and Kicking Goals project)

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop a comprehensive suicide prevention program in partnership with the community. To include:
    • Training appropriate community members to become crisis response workers.
    • Costed resource and FTE requirements
    • Facilitation of healing workshops.
    • Training to school staff to recognise and respond to sexual abuse/assault in their client group.
  • Identify the need for a Social Emotional Wellbeing Officer to be based on the Dampier Peninsula (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).

Note: any additional FTE will need housing.

  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • Training to community members to become Crisis Response Workers.
    • Funding for community crisis response positions.
    • Development of healing workshops in each community.

High rates of Aboriginal Community member suicide and self harm.

High rate of trauma and grief not being addressed with adequate resourcing for locally designed strategies.

March-August 2010

March 2010-ongoing

2010/2014

July 2010 – July 2013

March 2011

March 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Future consideration

 

Priority 6: Ensure access to appropriate aged care programs and facilities to including respite for carers
Links with other Building Blocks: Safe communities
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
6A: Develop an aged care plan
Lead:LOCCo-lead: KACSPartners:Community CouncilDoHADoHWACHS

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Comprehensive mapping of current aged care infrastructures, services and programs existing in or to Bardi Jawi Region, and provide this information to the LOC.
  • Commenced ROC facilitated discussions between Aged Care services and LOC.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • KACS to meet with community representatives to identify aged care needs of the community.
  • DoHA to meet with KACS to identify and address policy and program barriers
  • Development of a Bardi Jawi Aged Care Plan. To include:
    • Activity programs
    • Facility and service needs
    • In home and out of home care
    • Day/respite centre
    • Activities of Daily Living support services- cooking, cleaning, hygiene assistance
    • Transport needs
    • Respite for carers
    • Social and emotional support structures
    • Preventative education programs and infrastructure needs
    • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • Development of multi-purpose aged care facilities in community – to include some residential beds, day respite, activity rooms and visiting services areas.
    • Visiting meals services for elderly and disabled.
    • Explore introduction of travelling respite service (WACHS Issue).
Community see the importance of keeping older community members in community as active participants for as long as possible and to provide carers with respite.

March-July 2010

March 2010- ongoing

Dec 2010

Dec 2010

Feb 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Agreed further action

Agreed future action

Future considerations

 

Priority 7: Develop and implement a comprehensive alcohol management plan including:
- Communication, evaluation and monitoring
- Prevention and education
- Community capacity building and action
- Policing and legislation
- Treatment and support services
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Safer Communities, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
7A: Map services

Lead:ROC

Co-lead: LOC

Partners:

Milliya Rumurra

SDERA

Community councils

WACHS

DAO

KAMSC

DoHA

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • Completion of the mapping of alcohol and drug services provided in or to the Bardi Jawi Communities.
  • ROC has commenced meetings with key government and non-government agencies to ascertain interest in being involved in an alcohol management group. DAO has developed templates for terms of reference for alcohol management groups which can be considered.
  • DoHA funding for Milliya Rumurra Drug and Alcohol Treatment Service to undertake network meeting to develop better services (including to Bardi Jawi) $40,000.00
  • State COAG IECD 2 funding to Drug and Alcohol Officer for a State-wide FASD Prevention service/program

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Develop an alcohol management group for the Dampier Peninsula, representative of key government and non-government agencies and community.

Note:

  • None of the Bardi Jawi communities are gazetted as dry communities and they experience a level of alcohol related harm. There is a community desire to regulate and control the consumption of alcohol within the community and to instigate a broader approach to alcohol management.
  • Through the KRAHPF gaps in AOD and mental health service delivery and resources required to fill them have been identified.
  • The DAO funded SDERA project officer provides teacher training, curriculum material and school support to develop and implement school drug education programs. Neither Bardi Jawi area schools have engaged with SDERA.
Community and service providers have identified the need for more comprehensive and better coordinated alcohol, other drug and mental health service delivery.

March-August 2010

March 2010-ongoing

 

March 2010-ongoing

 

 

 

 

September 2010

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

Agreed and commenced

 

 

 

 

Agreed future action

 

 

Future considerations

7B: Develop alcohol management plan

Lead:

Dampier Peninsula Alcohol management Group

Co-lead: LOC

Partners:

Milliya Rumurra

SDERA

Community councils

WACHS

DAO

KAMSC

ROC

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • In community alcohol and other drug (AOD) services – there are currently no AOD/Mental Health services based permanently on the Dampier Peninsula.
  • Visiting AOD services – Kimberley Drug Service Team 1 AOD Counsellors Monthly. Kimberley Mental Health Services 1 Mental Health Counsellor monthly to 6 weekly. The Kimberley Division of General Practice (KDGP) 1 Mental Health Counsellor 2 visits per month.
  • Milliya Rumurra provides Alcohol and Drug rehabilitation, treatment and follows up services from Broome.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

Develop an alcohol management plan project outline which includes:

  • Addressing and implementing “wrap around” services
  • Governance and reporting structures
  • Timeframes for plan development and reporting
  • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).
  • Service review and reorientation as required.

Note: any additional FTE will need housing.

ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:

  • 3 FTE (1 alcohol and other drug counsellor, 1 mental health professional and 1 health promotion officer) based in the Bardi Jawi Regional.
  • Funding for targeted alcohol and other drug prevention programs.
Research indicates that to address alcohol related harm in the long-term a cultural change in the manner in which alcohol is used is needed to be achieved through a comprehensive Alcohol Management Plan.

Ongoing

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

February 2011

Agreed future action

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Future considerations

 

Priority 8 : Develop and implement an Environmental Health Plan in Lombadina and Djarindjin including:
- Suitable water supply
- Waste management (including sewerage, treatment ponds, tip, water runoff).
- Animal controls
- Housing maintenance
- Dust suppression
- Pest control
- Environmental health education and awareness
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Healthy Homes
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
8A: Develop an environmental health plan

Lead: Nirrumbuk

Co-lead: ROC

Partners:

Shire of Broome

Aboriginal Housing

DoHA

Community Council

WACHS

LOC

DoH

Environmental Health

Directorate

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • The ROC is completing the mapping of all environmental health programs existing and funded into Bardi Jawi lands by all levels of Government and private sector.
  • Review the Environmental Health Needs of Aboriginal Communities in WA 2008 survey and its findings

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Community Council to meet with appropriate agencies to develop and implement a comprehensive environmental health plan, to include:
  • Governance and reporting structure
  • Calender of events and a works schedule
  • Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).

Note: any additional FTE will need housing.

  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:
    • Community sewerage pump truck
    • Upgrade of community sewerage systems
    • Introduction of a ‘Deadly Dogs’ program.
    • Health living programs in the community.

Unhealthy homes and/or communities have a significant impact on personal and family health outcomes.

Community members say that until homes are healthy people will be sick.

March-Dec 2010

February 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Future considerations

 

Priority 9: Ensure appropriate child care facilities in Lombadina and Djarindjin
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks:: Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
9A: Plan for appropriate childcare

Lead:LOC and Councils

Partners:

ROC

DFC

Department for Communities

DoHA

FaHCSIA

WACHS

Other State and Commonwealth Government Departments

DTWD

CURRENT ACTIVITY

  • LOC is working with WACHS clinics to identify predicted birth rates in the community.

FUTURE ACTIVITY

  • Review the suitability of the current childcare services available in community in relation to changing community need (including infrastructure, staffing, training needs and future childcare placement needs)
  • Develop a strategic plan to address the changing childcare needs into the future, to include:○ Governance and reporting structure○ Projected birth rates and future childcare placements○ Training and development needs for existing and future staff○ Service gaps and required resources (to include salary, housing, transport and program costs).

Note: any addition FTE will need housing.

  • Through the community forums, the community and service providers have identified a need to improve childcare facilities, services and places.
  • ROC consultation with community and services has identified need for:○ Capital upgrade of existing childcare facility.○ 2 FTE for coordinating and implementing early childhood programs (WACHS issue).○ New after school care facility and FTE to staff.
Community and service providers have identified a current and future need for improved and increased child care services.Community see the lack of childcare services as a reason why people do not seek work/training.

March- August 2010

November 2010

March 2011

Agreed and commenced

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Future consideration

[ Return to Top   Return to Section ]

Attachment A - Table 4

Economic Participation

The COAG specific outcomes under this Building Block include that working age people have the depth and breadth of skills and capabilities to participate in the labour market and that they participate effectively in all levels of the labour market. The priorities that have been identified by the communities will contribute to those outcomes. Strategies to increase economic participation can include encouragement of individual entrepreneurship; improvement in money management and financial planning; and strategies to increase adult learning each of which will be considered in the further development of the LIP.

At each consultation meeting on other Building Blocks the issues of ‘youth to work’ transition, support for small business, CDEP transition, and other matters relevant to economic participation were raised as very important priorities. Both Djarindjin and Ardyaloon have economic development plans, in addition to which there is the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan for Kullarri Regional CDEP Inc (KRCI) North Ward – November 2009 2. Specific community economic development plans are included in the:

  • Ardyaloon Inc Economic Development Plan 2010 – 2015
  • Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation – Strategic Objectives
  • The Bardi Jawi Nimidamun (2008-2010)

At the Round Table discussion on 17th June 2010 with communities and stakeholders, Djarindjin’s mixed economy model of Subsistence Economy (including protection of the environment; fishing and outstation development); Transitional Economy (e.g. government investment in the programs, art centres, cultural programs, rangers) and Mainstream Market Economy (e.g. the proposed Roadhouse development at Djarindjin, profitable Art Centres) was adopted. Already, as a result of the Round Table discussions a further meeting is arranged with KRCI in July on the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan.

The two Projects under this Building Block are substantial and multi-faceted requiring contribution and ‘buy-in’ from Councils and community members and from a wide range of government and non-government agencies. While some aspects can be dealt with fairly quickly, others require more time.

Priority 1: Rationalise and coordinate job service providers, CDEP organisations and real job opportunities
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
ROC
  • Bring together parties and establish project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to progress.
  • Ascertain procurement processes and priorities (e.g. government construction contracts) with a view to jobs for local people
  • Ensure progress of CDEP training facility infrastructure and FTEs at Djarindjin through KRCI (already underway)

 

August Agreed and commenced

Councils and community FaHCSIA, DEEWR

Kimberley TAFE

JSAs (ITEC & Kullarri Employment Services)

Kullarri Regional CDEP Inc (KRCI)

Other trainers

School

DoE

DTWD

  • Meet with three communities re the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan for Kullarri Regional CDEP to be revised by KRCI working with community
  • Provide advice and support regarding ‘CDEP transition’
  • Assess future opportunities and identify service gaps and including, e.g. building, arts, horticulture, aquaculture, repairs and maintenance
  • Connect CDEP and JSA planning processes
  • Develop mentoring in communities and on the job work experience (e.g. in administration, construction, retail, tourism)
  • Work with education and training organisations to tailor services to develop the ‘whole person’ from early childhood to employment, co-ordinate transition to work for school leavers – including apprenticeships. (DTWD in partnership with DEEWR and Kimberley TAFE)
  • Co-ordinate a forum on education and training (model on the Fitzroy Futures sub committee on education and training)
  • Progress specific accredited training opportunities (e.g. retail/business management for the Bardi Store and Kooljaman Resort; business management re Ardyaloon Hatchery)
Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors and at all levels of the labour market August Agreed and commenced

WA Education

TAFE,

DEEWR, DTWD

DEEWR & ‘What Works’

  • Access to school based trade training to be delivered.
  • Continue and strengthen current Vocational training in school provided in conjunction with Kimberley TAFE.
  • Kimberley Success Zone to promote teaching and schooling best practise

 

End 2010 & 2011

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

Council
  • Participate actively in further development of the Community Participation Profile and Action Plan

 

 

Agreed future action
Corporate/Non-Government Organisations
  • Link with corporate entities, e.g. mining companies, regarding training and potential work placement

 

 

Future consideration

 

Priority 2 : Rationalise support for communities’ economic strategies and specific projects
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

ROC

IBA

DEEWR

PBC and others

  • Meet relevant partners and agencies to devise an overall long range community economic development strategy including existing economic plans including the KRCI CAP and incorporate the three levels of economic development outlined by Djarindjin
  • Consider land use issues and work with relevant bodies regarding development applications
  • Consider viability of specific economic aspirations, and how best to progress and support:

(1) Djarindjin Economic Development Plan including Roadhouse development;

(2) Ardyaloon Inc Economic Development Plan including Ardyaloon hatchery development;

(3) Lombadina tourism development plan including new-build tourist accommodation, and commercial gubinge horticulture

Indigenous people of working age participate effectively in all sectors and at all levels of the labour market   Agreed and commenced

ROC

IBA, DEEWR

Department of Health

Health and Aging

Department of Education

Department of Sport and Recreation DTWD

  • Consider viability of, and how best to progress a Dampier Peninsula Transport System as an economic initiative, devising a management and shared use plan across the Peninsula, and considering collaborative funding across agencies/corporate sponsors for purchase of bus / other transport (this sub-Project has relevance across all services & service provision, e.g. sports activities, health)
    Agreed future action
Council
  • Work with agencies to achieve economic aspirations
     
Corporate partners
  • Assess viability of work with corporate partner
     
  1. This document became known to the LAC on the 17th of June 2010 so best use has not yet been made of its contents, nor has it been discussed collectively with the three communities – this will happen in July 2010.

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Attachment A - Table 5

Healthy Homes

The COAG specific outcomes under the Healthy Homes Building Block include basically, that the living environments of Indigenous people have access to basic utilities, that overcrowding is reduced and that Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other Australians. At every consultation meeting on other Building Blocks, the issues of housing, roads, major capital works and relevant matters of environmental health were raised. There is concern across all three communities about the implications of new policies and legislation regarding housing so an important part of the Round Table discussion will be the overview of the NPA on Remote Indigenous Housing. There are also concerns across communities with regard to certainty around land use and the role of various bodies in the region in determining access. Specific priorities were communicated to the Local Area Co-ordinator as follows:

Djarindjin Community Council indicated in an email (28th May 2010) to the LAC regarding the council priorities that their priorities were:

  • The building of seven new houses
  • Rebuild and reseal community roads
  • Installation of water and power mains “along the north side of the proposed rural blocks” (indicated as Blocks 1027 – 1036 CLP vers.3 3)
  • Installation of services in the proposed new housing sub-division (Streets D10, D11, D12 & D13, CLP vers. 3)

In addition, they have said that unsuitable and overcrowded housing is a ‘big issue’ for child protection and that there are no ‘safe houses’ in the community

Ardyaloon Community Council indicated in an email (31st May 2010) to the LAC regarding the council priorities that their priorities were:

  • To “drive and be satisfied with the processes that will be taken when new houses and/or upgrading/refurbishing”
  • To be involved in “dealings with the Department of Housing, Shire of Broome (termites treatments etc); and Horizon Power;
  • “Real homes and adequate essential services for community members that are living on their outstations”;
  • Replacement for our old houses (80s Style Asbestos), Rammed Earth (Termite Moulds) houses.

At a separate discussion with Lombadina Community Council (2nd June 2010) priorities were the implications of the Interim Housing Management Agreements and expectations around the repair of houses. The community also saw the need for a small number of new-build houses.

In view of the importance of these issues to communities, community representatives and members of the Prescribed Body Corporate were invited to the Round Table discussion (18th June 2010) with stakeholders to allow discussion and to decide on actions to be taken. The RSD program provides the opportunity for collaborative solutions as was evidenced by the positive outcomes of the Round Table Discussion (e.g. stakeholders travelled to the communities for first hand experience on the 21st of June). A meeting advancing the issues from the Round Table for all communities is set for the end of July.

It is important to note that the housing, roads and other infrastructure needs at Djarindjin are obvious and will require careful consideration and solution if the gap is to be closed for the residents of this vibrant community whose Centennial occurs in 2012. Solutions may be a mix of short-term and long-term and may even be collaborative between government agencies and corporate sponsors. The Projects are set out below with these provisos in mind.

The request that the Ardyaloon airstrip be brought up to a standard suitable for the Royal Flying Doctor Service (RFDS) was seen as not likely since there is a properly maintained airstrip 25 minutes away at Djarindjin. It was thought that adequate ground transportation can overcome this problem and will not be dealt with in this L.I.P. A request for a new water bore at Ardyaloon and a vehicle and other resources for the DoH employee at Ardyaloon will be referred to the appropriate agencies and dealt with outside of the L.I.P. process.

 

Priority 1: Review municipal services in the Bardi Jawi area
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
ROC
  • Coordinate issues concerning municipal services by bringing together relevant agencies and parties

 

 

Agreed and commenced
ROC with Councils, Shires and other parties
  • Investigate with partners and other agencies the installation of power and other services, where needed - DIA to explore funding options to run service lines to community-built Western Australia Planning Committee (WAPC) ratified houses (Djarindjin) (unlikely to be resolved in the short term)
  • Investigate with partners improved signage and street lighting (all communities)
  • NPARIH Employment and Workforce Development Strategy. The Department of Housing has agreed under the NPA to a target of 20% Indigenous employment in the deployment of its Capital Works Plan and is currently exceeding the set targets by a considerable amount. This is expected to again increase in the 2010/11 year when new constructions will be built on site rather than be factory constructed.
  • NPARIH Employment Relation Accommodation Strategy. The funding for Capital Works included a component to be directed at Employment Related Accommodation. At the June Joint Steering Committee meeting it was reported that a site has been identified in Broome and that a site is under investigation for suitability in Derby
  • NPARIH Municipal and Essential Services Audit. An audit was conducted as a result of the NPA on Municipal and Essential Services, this included the Dampier Peninsular. This audit will form a report to COAG to determine clearer roles and responsibilities and funding in respect to municipal and essential services
Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic amenities

 

Agreed and commenced
Councils & Shire of Broome
  • Work with Shire in preparation for municipal services tender
 

 

Agreed future action
Shire of Broome
  • Develop Business Plan in line with COAG NPA including audit of Indigenous Economic Strategy
 

Dec 2010

Future consideration
Shire of Broome
  • Convene community consultation on completion of (above) Business Plan
 

2012

Future consideration

 

Priority 2: Home refurbishment and maintenance
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
ROC
  • Bring together parties and establish project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to progress
Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic amenities

 

Agreed and commenced
FaHCSIA
  • Introduce and roll out ‘Living Skills’ tenancy support program

 

July 2010 Agreed and commenced
FaHCSIA
  • Continue repairs following Health Habitat ‘Fixing Homes for Better Health’ project (Ardyaloon)

 

 

Agreed and commenced
Department of Housing
  • Continue repairs following WA Housing Refurbishment Program house to house survey of needed repairs (Djarindjin)
  • Install 12 new stoves through WA Housing Refurbishment Program (Djarindjin)
  • Repair leaking pipes as part of Repair and Maintenance under current six month Housing Management Agreement (Djarindjin)

 

 

Agreed and commenced

 

  • $81.834 million potentially available for funding under the NPARIH in WA in the 2010/11 financial year to be used in RSD sites

 

 

Agreed future action
Councils Plan for temporary tenant accommodation during housing refurbishments

 

 

Future consideration

 

Priority 3: New houses Djarindjin and Ardyaloon
Links with other Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Department of Housing
  • Introduce and roll out ‘Living Skills’ tenancy support program

 

July 2010 Agreed and commenced
Department of Housing
  • Advise Councils on outcome of Department of Housing’s funding bid
  • Meet with communities to discuss Housing Management Agreements (HMA) (already completed 21 June 2010)
  • Schedule Regional HMA meetings and identify negotiators to work with reference groups and Councils
  • Current capital works proposed for 2010/11:Ardyaloon 14 new dwellingsDjarindjin 6 new dwellingsLombadina 1 new dwelling
  • NPARIH Land Tenure Reform. Progressive resolution of land tenure issues to ensure adequate protection of housing assets and to facilitate future economic development and home ownership opportunities for Indigenous people.
Funding bid currently being considered under NPA. outcome expected July 2010August 2010 Agreed future action
Council
  • Participate in the design of new houses

 

 

Future consideration

 

Priority 4: Improve drainage and roads (Djarindjin)
Links with other Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
ROC
  • Investigate how an audit of roads and municipal services can be carried out within RIH NPA
  • Investigate (with partners identified at the Round Table Meeting 18th June 2010) the rebuild and re-seal of community roads (identified by Djarindjin as a significant road safety issue) according to the existing community plan and progress as far as possible (unlikely to be resolved in the short term)
Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people

 

Agreed future action
Council (Djarindjin) & ROC
  • Carry out remedial actions to prevent dangerous corners on dirt road
  • Devise improved management plan for the regular repair and maintenance of roads
  • Investigate with partners improved signage and street lighting

 

 

Agreed future action
Shire of Broome
  • Develop Business Plan in line with COAG NPA including audit of Indigenous Economic Strategy

 

Dec 2010 Agreed future action
Shire of Broome
  • Community consultation on Business Plan

 

2012 Agreed future action
Councils & Shire of Broome
  • Work with Shire in preparation for municipal services tender

 

 

Agreed future action

 

Priority 5: Refurbish houses and provide essential services at Ardyaloon outstations
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling, Economic Participation
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC

Partners: DIA , ALT, KLC, Department of Housing

  • Bring together parties and establish project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to overview and monitor progress
  • Refurbishment plan 2010/11Ardyaloon 14 refurbishmentsDjarindjin 37 refurbishmentsLombadina 14 refurbishments
Indigenous families live in appropriate housing with access to all basic amenities

 

Agreed future action
Department of Housing
  • Assess Peninsula on ‘housing need’ basis and engage HMA process with outstations that have been identified as priority (unlikely to be resolved in the short term)
  • Engage with DIA/ALT regarding ILUA development and heritage clearances
Indigenous people have the same housing opportunities as other people

 

Future consideration
Community Council
  • Provide information to outstation residents regarding HMAs to prepare for possibility of refurbishment if deemed priority

 

 

Future consideration
  1. Maps of the three communities are provided in an Annexure

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Attachment A -Table 6

Community Safety

The COAG specific outcomes under the Community Safety Building Block cover protecting indigenous children and families from violence and neglect, overcoming alcohol and drug abuse and breaking cycles of criminal behaviour and violence normalisation. Community Safety also encompasses emergency management.

However, when discussing community safety the priorities for residents include the COAG outcomes while also focussing on support for families, licensing, mental health, adequate and appropriate housing for families especially those with young children and - most importantly - diversionary activities for all community members. Police officers working in the area argue forcefully that sports and other activities need to be made available to alleviating boredom and avoiding anti-social behaviour and criminality. The police are very much involved in community activities to achieve this goal. While much of the emphasis was placed on sports activities for young people, the need for activities for young children through to the oldest people in the community was also a priority. In each community real importance was laid on sport, and art, language and cultural activities. This priority encompasses social cohesion and inclusion, breaking cycles of criminal behaviour, achieving good school attendance and achievement of positive educational outcomes, good health at every age, and the continuity of Bardi culture and language.

Improvements are already underway to the Ardyaloon Football Oval with the assistance of WA Water Corporation with some support from the FaHCSIA ICSI fund, and FaHCSIA using the ICSI fund with some additional support from Pluton Mining Exploration is currently refurbishing the Ardyaloon Community Hall to encourage its use for activities. The male and female toilets at the Hall are also being repaired. A management plan to ensure that they are looked after and maintained properly is also under negotiation with the Ardyaloon Council.

The community of Djarindjin feels disadvantaged through an inability to create and enforce by-laws. The reason is that the communities of Lombadina and Djarindjin are not gazetted Aboriginal communities (unlike Ardyaloon). It was suggested that the Council develop its own Code of Conduct (set of ‘Rules’) to manage and model desired community behaviours. This may be a useful alternative and can be worked on with the Council, the Community and WA Police. The Council already have certain behavioural controls that they wish to implement (e.g. where and when alcohol consumption can occur) and also have pledged controls over the behaviour of school age children in the community to encourage school attendance. In addition, Djarindjin identified the need for women's safety self defence courses as well as the authority and resources to monitor and restrict access to the community.

The community expressed a desire for a fourth police officer to augment the existing complement of three. This will be referred to WA Police and not be pursued within the L.I.P.

 

Priority 1 : Provide physical activity and recreational opportunities for communities in the Bardi Jawi area
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health, Early Childhood, Schooling,
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC

Co-Leads: Community Councils, Bardi Jawi Reference Group

Partners:

Department of Health

Garnduwa

Department of Sport and Recreation

DotAG

DoE,

DTWD

WA Police

WACHS

Broome Shire

DAO

KAMSC

Headspace

Department for Communities

Department for Child Protection

Workshops have been conducted that have clearly articulated the need for sports, cultural and recreational activities in the Peninsula Each community saw this as important to achieve health and community safety outcomes to overcome boredom in community members because of limited access to diversionary activities June 2010 Agreed and commenced

Conduct environmental scan of current resources

Assess current gaps and resources needed;

Work with community, Garnduwa and existing ‘Be Active’ Officers to further develop recreational and sporting programs

Conduct a series of planning meetings that include community; through this to facilitate the following:

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future actionAgreed future actionAgreed future actionAgreed future action

Develop the Dampier Peninsula Family and Youth Program and seek advice on funding and programs from agencies

Develop a business case to upgrade / build/ purchase appropriate recreational facilities and equipment on the Dampier Peninsula

Develop a business case for a Sport and Recreation Program Coordinator (1 x FTE) to be based on the Dampier Peninsula

Develop a business case for the construction of a cyclone category 5 rated community building to double as Multi-Purpose Sport and Recreation Facility at Djarindjin

 

 

Future consideration

Future consideration

Future consideration

Future consideration

 

Priority 2 : Hold a ‘Bardi Jawi community safety Expo and licensing round up’ and include implementation of the Aboriginal Justice Agreement
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC/LOC

Co-leads: Community Councils; Bardi Jawi Reference Group

Partners:

DotAG

Department of Transport (licensing and registration)

WA Police

Department for Child Protection

FESA

Bardi Jawi and Women’s’ Rangers

Round Table discussions at the ROC identified actions by participating agencies to organize, fund and participate in a Bardi Jawi community safety Expo

Department of Transport will visit communities to audit all blocks to appropriate licensing on 13th July 2010.

Each community saw overcoming the difficulties of licensing as important.

Providing this opportunity along with a wide range of community safety and crime prevention messages will prevent individuals’ entry into the criminal justice system because of traffic offences and consequent unpaid fines.

June 2010 Agreed and commenced

Bring together partners and project plan with agencies to include licensing and registration facilities and all aspects of community safety, e.g. road safety, women’s’ self defence, DV, drug and alcohol education, emergency management etc.

Agencies to provide support for individuals to obtain identification documents prior to the Expo;

Establish licensing services from the multi-purpose police facility to overcome unlicensed drivers and unregistered vehicles in the community.

July 2010 - October 2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 3 : Reinforce Road Safety
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Health; Healthy Homes
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Leads: WA Police; Bardi Jawi Reference Group; Community Identify road safety ‘Black Spots’ in the communities and refer to appropriate body for remedial action

Community consultation identified multiple road safety issues due to poorly maintained roads and community members’ disregard of road safety

Indigenous Australians in remote areas achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future action

Department of Transport

Funding to be committed to repair and maintain community sealed and unsealed roads, install safety signage and street lighting

Indigenous Australians living environments are healthy.

Commencing July 2010

Future consideration

 

Priority 4 : Emergency management and safety in the home
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Healthy Homes; Health
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status
Council
  • Include safety education and awareness in the Ardyaloon Community Newsletter
  • Use RIBS for communicating re emergency management and safety messages
  • Identify partners to work with on emergency management
Indigenous Australians in remote areas achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.

 

Agreed and commenced
FESA
  • Conduct a safe community audit on the Peninsula through FESA, e.g. on vegetation, infrastructure, and street lights and convene a meeting of responsible agencies to fix
  • In collaboration with FESA, the Bardi Jawi Rangers and WA Police set up an Emergency Management Committee and conduct a risk analysis
  • Audit the ability of Dampier Peninsula communities to cope with cyclones (see existing FESA audits)
  • Continue to provide training to each community twice a year on cyclone awareness and tidy-up.
  • Continue work with local rangers to train people in emergency management and fire control
  • Develop more print material suitable for communities – identify funding source.
  • Launch Good Fire Bad Fire program (presentation 29th / 30th June 2010 in community).
  • Meet with Rangers and other community reps to identify emergency management needs and plans include KRSP
Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy

 

Agreed and commenced
WA Department for Housing
  • Educate on safety in the home e.g. fire risks, fire alarm maintenance, dangers of faulty wiring4 and the responsibilities of home occupants.
Indigenous children’s living environments are healthy

 

Agreed future action
Bardi Jawi Rangers
  • Continue development of marine rescue facilities and ascertain costs and on-going resource needs including staff allocation
Indigenous Australians in remote areas achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.

 

Agreed future action
ROC
  • Investigate process to commence conducting a Business Case for a purpose built cyclone category 5 building for Djarindjin which can also be used as a multi-purpose sport and recreation facility (see Health Building Block)
Indigenous Australians in remote areas achieve health outcomes comparable to the broader population.

 

Future consideration

 

Priority 5 : Control visitors to communities on the Dampier Peninsula
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: Governance and Leadership
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

ROC

WA Police

Councils

PBC

KLC

  • Bring together parties and establish project plan, and/or agree and work with other lead agency to progress
  • Proper notification and protocols regarding community members on bail or having been released from prison
  • Investigate staffing levels within the multi-purpose police facility in light of anticipated increase in visitors and as the roads improve;
  • Locate and review (Peninsula) Access Management Strategy
  • Consider protocols and site for entrance point (e.g. on the highway)
The issue of control over who was entering Aboriginal land (potential interaction with residents and children) including released prisoners returning to community was identified by communities Consider at the end of 2010

Agreed future action

Agreed future action

  1. Faulty and dangerous wiring will be repaired under the Fixing Homes for Better Health Program or under the Housing Management Agreements.

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Attachment A -Table 7

Governance and Leadership

In December 2007, the Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to a partnership between all levels of Government to work with Indigenous communities to close the gap on Indigenous disadvantage. A key objective of the subsequent National Partnership agreement on Remote Service delivery is to “improve the level of governance and leadership within Indigenous communities and Indigenous community organizations.”. The National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery provides some $67.7 million for the life of the agreement (2013-2014) for Building Community Governance Capacity (spread amongst the 29 RSD sites)

The principle that has been agreed in the Bardi Jawi area is to have a group representing the three councils, Ardyaloon, Djarindjin and Lombadina and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate, made up of at least two representatives from each governance body. The structure and shape of this reflects closely and draws from the existing governance arrangements in the communities and fits well with the way communities want to do business with government. Good governance of communities and of the Local Implementation Plan itself is fundamental and the RSD process will build on and facilitate self-sustaining governance in communities.

Governing institutions

Each of the three communities has a Council of elected members.  Djarindjin Corporation works under the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Communities (ORIC) as does Lombadina, while Ardyaloon Incorporated works under the State scheme. It is the intention of Ardyaloon to move to ORIC when possible (this is a priority under the Governance and Leadership Building Block). There is also a Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate under the Kimberley Land Council. How these governing institutions will work together co-operatively is the subject of two Projects under the Governance and Leadership Building Block.

Leadership, self-determination and capacity building

Existing leaders need support to confidently carry out their work. The leaders in the communities (the Council Chairs, Deputies and Council members) assisted by the CEOs have a very broad scope of duties, fore example, dealing one to one with community member’s problems, dealing with a very large number of government and other visitors into the community, attending and organising meetings, supervising administrative staff, managing budgets, working closely with CEOs and many other duties.  In working with the Councils and the CEOs from the three communities, while there is some variation in now communities are run and the degree to which tasks are carried out by the CEOs, it is clear that leaders are carrying out very complex jobs very well, but would benefit from further mentoring and skill enhancement. Support for leaders and methods to ‘grow’ and develop new leaders for succession planning is the subject of a Project and a commitment of funds to supporting existing leaders.

More civic participation by community members is desirable to broaden the base of community decision-making and this will be developed hand-in-hand with strengthening the work of Councils and encouraging Councils to devise ways to be more communicative and inclusive with community members.  The inclusion of Elders in decision-making is also an important element of governance being championed by the KALACC.  Specific Projects have been devised to build capacity and increase self-determination. It is also important that the various governance bodies in the Bardi Jawi area work collaboratively – a significant aspect of which is land use and development. At the Round Table Discussion on 21st June, Djarindjin community commented that it needs clarity regarding the ALT lease and the PBC and that land reform on the Dampier Peninsula is a priority.  This is a general issue for the Peninsula.  An important Project has been devised in this area with commitment from the ROC to facilitate discussions around these topics and reach conclusions. If this Project is successful it will deliver significant improvements to governance in the Bardi Jawi area to allow harmonious discussion of and planning around land use and economic development.

Cultural match and resources

In all aspects of governance cultural protocols and relevance need to be observed.  Cultural issues run as a theme in all the Projects (either implicitly or explicitly). The matter of resourcing Councils to operate is a significant issue which will emerge in project planning and implementation of the Governance and Leadership Projects. There have been recent changes to the funding structures for Aboriginal communities. Communities are still adjusting to the impact of some of these changes. A significant and wide reaching first Project has been identified to review and audit service provision to the Bardi Jawi area, and aspect of which will be the degree to which services meet actual need. The area appears to benefit from good government service provision, however, there are difficulties in each community coping with relatively frequent changes in policy and legislation (e.g. CDEP transition and administration) some of which difficulty can be attributed, at least initially, to poor communication from relevant agencies, or perhaps good communication that may not be culturally relevant. A general recommendation would be that when legislation and policy changes, significant local effort is expended to ensure that the collateral implications of the change are understood and that communities are assisted in adjusting.  This is an example of a way in which the RSD process can assist both communities and government agencies to achieve the best outcomes from the considerable service concentration in communities.

 

Priority 1: Clarify decision making processes and land use between councils and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate and the Kimberley Land Council
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: All
Lead and Partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC

Co-Leads: Bardi Jawi PBC, Community Councils, KLC, Bardi Jawi Reference Group

Partners:

DIA, FaHCSIA, ORIC

Current Activity:

Community leaders have clearly articulated the need for an agreed authority matrix for the region.

Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms June 2010 Agreed and commenced

Future Activity:

Facilitate discussion and resolution of authority/ responsibilities pertaining to land and development in the region (formal agreement)

Establish a development process that satisfies native title and heritage rights and interests, while giving certainty to Councils in developing communities.

ROC to pay for a facilitator to drive this outcome

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 2: Review and audit government and NGO service provision
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: All
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC/LOC

Co-leads: Councils Partners: all Government Departments; all NGO service providers; Community Councils; Community members

Current activity:

Audit of service provision has commencedBaseline mapping will be available later in the yearKLC already conducting a social Impact assessment of the proposed gas facility

Connecting the way government agencies work in remote areas and developing community capacity

 

Agreed and commenced

Future activity:

Survey of service provision to achieve an accurate and comprehensive list of nature, frequency of all services validated with (i) service providers (ii) from user’s perspective

August 2010 - December 2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 3: Support and enhance the function of elected councillors and their constitutions by giving clarity, training, support and resources to the Councils and to the PBC concurrently
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: All
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC/LOC

Co-leads: TAFE; DEEWR; ORIC and other relevant trainers in governance and leadership

Current activity:

Regional Operations Centre to provide funding for Ardyaloon Council and Djarindjin to workshop enhancements in decision making and corporate governance

Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms July 2010 -2013 Agreed and commenced

Future activity:

Design a local leadership development program to strengthen corporate governance and decision making in Bardi Jawi

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 4: Increase communication between Councils and community and increase civic participation and decision-making
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: All
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC/LOC

Co-leads: Community Councils

Current Activity:

Workshops completed with governance bodies to generate communication strategies

Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation/ governance mechanisms June 2010 Agreed and commenced

Future activity:

Locally designed communication products and processes facilitated by councils

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future action

 

Priority 5: Promote links between Councils in the Bardi Jawi area with a view to continue the approach in Bardi Jawi Nimidamun
Links with other Closing the Gap Building Blocks: All
Lead and partners Actions Rationale Timeline Status

Lead: ROC/LOC

Co-leads: Community Councils; Bardi Jawi Reference Group

Current Activity:

Ongoing discussion between the three councils

Indigenous communities are represented through credible consultation June 2010 Agreed and commenced

Future activity:

Business planning to evaluate opportunities and benefits

Commencing July 2010 Agreed future action

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Attachment B - Community Profile for Bardi Jawi

Key Points

This profile provides information about the Bardi Jawi strengths, challenges confronting the communities, as well as government and non-government services in Ardyaloon, Lombadina and Djarindjin. The information was largely collected during 2009, but often relates to earlier points in time (in particular, the Census data is from 2006).

Background Community Information

People and language

  • In 2006, the population is estimated to have been 275 people, of whom 243 were Indigenous (88 per cent) (census 2006).
  • The people of the Northern Peninsula are predominately members of the Bardi-Jawi language groups.
  • In 2006, 48 per cent of Ardyaloon Indigenous residents were aged less than 20 years and those aged 50 years or more made up just 9 per cent of Ardyaloon’s population (census 2006).

Geography

  • Ardyaloon is located on the northern tip of the Dampier Peninsula, 220 km from Broome along the Cape Leveque road.

Community Strengths

Local Employment Initiatives

  • Bardi Jawi has made use of its abundant natural resources by developing some small-scale employment opportunities.
  • Local employment initiatives have included artefact manufacture, small scale camp ground enterprises, a hatchery, fishing, tourism, mining and a ranger program.

Child and Family Support

  • The Ardyaloon community places a strong emphasis on child and family support.
  • The community has set priorities to maintain, expand and increase the operational capacity of the childcare centre and early childhood services.

Community Involvement in School

  • The One Arm Point Remote Community School has a strong cultural studies program combining language and culture, the program receives a high level of support and input from the community.
  • The school is undertaking an initiative to document language and cultural knowledge and develop support materials and resources.
  • A high number of AIEOs (Aboriginal and Islander Education Officers) and Indigenous teachers employed in the school provide a strong community presence in the school.
  • The edible garden project is valued and is supported by children and the community.

School Attendance

  • One Arm Point Remote Community School’s average attendance is around 80 per cent.

NAPLAN Results

  • The NAPLAN results in Ardyaloon are much better than those in most remote Indigenous communities.
  • The NAPLAN results indicate that the majority of year three and seven students at One Arm Point Remote Community School achieved at or above the national minimal standard in all subjects.
  • Students in year three and seven performed substantially better in all subject areas than students in statistically similar schools.
  • Students in year three performed best in the Reading and Numeracy sections of the NAPLAN with all students achieving at or above the NMS benchmark.

Challenges facing the Community

Employment

  • The high rate of participation in Community Development Employment Projects (CDEP) reflects a community economy that affords limited diversity in employment opportunities.
  • For some age groups, CDEP accounted for all employment in 2006.
  • Currently there are no trade apprenticeship programs for young people in the community.
  • The challenge is to improve employment pathways by addressing educational attainment (particularly literacy and numeracy), pre-vocational skill development, training and employment.

Education

  • In 2006, Ardyaloon’s Indigenous population had comparatively lower rates of educational attainment and qualification than the total Australian population.
  • The attainment rate for 20- to 24-year-olds at Ardyaloon who attained Year 12 or equivalent was 38 per cent. This is lower than the national Indigenous rate of 47 per cent and less than half of the total Australian rate of 83 per cent (census 2006).
  • The qualification rate for 20-to 64 year olds at Ardyaloon was 14 per cent in 2006; this is lower than the national Indigenous rate of 22 per cent and the total Australian rate of 45 per cent (census 2006).

Crime

  • In the period 2004–05 to 2008–09, the greatest proportion of offences in the Dampier Peninsula recorded by police was acts intended to cause injury (24 per cent), followed by property damage (17 per cent) and unlawful entry (15 per cent).
  • A significant proportion of these offences were recorded as alcohol related, especially with regard to assault (60 per cent).
  • In the period 2004–05 to 2008–09, domestic violence was identified as a factor in 20 per cent of offences and was found in half of all acts intended to cause injury.

Health

  • Indigenous persons residing in Broome SLA were hospitalised at higher rates than other Australians residing in Broome SLA for all principal diagnoses.
  • For diabetes, after adjusting for age differences, the observed number of separations for Indigenous Australians in Broome SLA was 7 times the number that would be expected if national rates for other Australians applied in this SLA (SMR= 7.6).
  • Hospitalisation rates for assault and alcohol related conditions (principal diagnosis) were also high. For diabetes, after adjusting for age differences, the observed number of separations for Indigenous Australians in Broome SLA was 7 times the national average.
  • For diseases associated with poor environmental health, after adjusting for age differences, the observed number of Indigenous separations in Broome SLA was more than 3 times the national average.
  • For Broome SLA in the 15-19 year age group, the Indigenous age-specific fertility rate was four times the non-Indigenous rate.

Accessibility

  • The main access road to Ardyaloon is in poor condition and is frequently closed during the wet season.
  • Poor accessibility impedes service provision, particularly services provided to the community from Broome.
  • Freight costs are expensive, increasing the cost of food and everyday living.

Potential Issues with Service Delivery

Education

  • There is a demand for improved infrastructure with an emphasis on early childhood and secondary school facilities.
  • The early childhood teaching room is in need of some renovation, the primary school teaching space is too small for requirements, the home economics and manual arts room requires some renovation and the staff administration area is insufficient for staff requirements, particularly planning and meeting areas.
  • The whole secondary program needs additional strengthening, particularly with regard to VET. The challenge is to address the lack of links between secondary education and training pathways.
  • Delivery of an appropriate range of VET courses is not feasible without a suitable facility to fit the requirements.

Language and English as a Second Language (ESL) Teaching

  • The overwhelming majority of children are exposed to the traditional language Bardi in their homes.
  • The school linguistic environment comprises various combinations of Bardi, Aboriginal English, Kriol and to a lesser extent Standard Australian English (SAE).
  • None of the teachers at the One Arm Point Remote Community School have ESL training.
  • Recreational Activities for Young People
  • There is a need for organised recreational activities during school holiday breaks.

Emergency Services

  • Community members are not adequately trained to respond appropriately to emergencies, hazards and accidents.

Aged Services

  • The population projection for Ardyaloon community indicates that by 2026 the greatest proportional increases would be in the post working age (aged 65 and above) population which is expected to double over the next 20 years.
  • There is a growing need for aged care services and facilities.
  • Residential and respite care for the aged is not available in Ardyaloon. Aged care services in Ardyaloon extend to only very basic HACC (Home and Community Care program) type assistance.

Disability Services

  • Support for the disabled is limited. Assistance with equipment, home conversion as well as respite (let alone more comprehensive care) is very limited.

Municipal and Essential Services

  • The standard of some services fall below that of comparator, Marble Bar.
  • Environmental health activities, staff accommodation, lighting, sporting facilities, animal management, solid waste removal, landscaping and dust control are all notable areas for attention.

Water Supply

  • The water supply within the community is not reliable and sustainable. The current rate of water consumption is estimated at 2,500L per person per day.
  • Saline intrusion is already occurring due to the reduced availability of water as a result of excessive consumption.
  • Since the audit of these services was undertaken it is worth noting that, as part of a $51.7millon funding program, (by the Commonwealth Department of Environment, Water, Heritage and Arts announced on 23rd April 2010), Ardyaloon and Warmun will receive a total of $11,000,000 in funding to develop and implement proposals for improvement to the water infrastructure.

Waste Disposal

  • Management of the landfill site is not adequate. This site poses major environmental health challenges for the community.
  • As it stands, the community will require a new site within a year, currently there is no available land for this application.

Community Facilities

  • The maintenance regime of community facilities is not sufficient. It has resulted in some of the facilities being in poor condition.
  • The oval, community hall facilities, cemetery, and the public toilets on Middle Beach are notable areas for attention.
  • The supermarket (store), playgroup (early childhood) centre and administration building appear to be in adequate condition.5

Improving Community Access

  • The need was identified for a bus service from the northern Dampier Peninsula area to Broome to provide transport for people without four-wheel drive vehicles.

Significant New Investments

Investments in Education

  • One Arm Point Remote Community School is expected to benefit from the Low Socio-Economic Status School Communities National Partnership Agreement.
  • Through the Building the Education Revolution program the school has been allocated funding for a new assembly area/basketball court and for the refurbishment of fencing.

Investment in Families

  • Funding has been approved for a Locational Supported Playgroup and an Indigenous Parenting Support Service.

Investments in Housing

  • In Ardyaloon under the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Indigenous Housing (NPARIH), one new dwelling is being constructed and six are being refurbished.

Investments in Access Roads

  • The Roads to Recovery program has allocated funding that will improve 5.6 km of the Cape Leveque Road.

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Attachment C - Governance Arrangement for the Development of the Plan

How the Plan was developed

The Local Area Co-ordinator constructed the Plan based on all the sources of information described below. The draft L.I.P. was sent to communities and agencies for comment on 28th June 2010 and discussed over the telephone or in person with agencies and community members. The three communities and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate were visited on 29th June 2010 and any resulting adjustments to the Plan based on feedback were made on the 30th of June 2010. It was submitted on the 1st July 2010 for consideration by the State Operations Committee on the 2nd July 2010.

The Plan is a ‘living document’ and it will be reviewed in 2011 and 2013. The Plan will continue to be co-created, iterative and to reflect communities working with agencies and with the Local Area Coordinator the Indigenous Engagement Officers. The ‘life’ of the Plan will be the period 2010 – 2014.

The source of information in the Plan

The major priorities and the constituent projects were developed from the following three sources.

(1) Meetings with community members:

The Local Area Co-ordinator (LAC) commenced employment on the 6th April 2010. The following is a summary of some of the major meetings which took place in the Bardi Jawi area with communities and service providers.

  1. Separate preliminary meetings took place (8th April 2010) between the LAC and the Council Chair and Deputy Chair at Ardyaloon (who are also the Indigenous Engagement Officers) the (now ex) CEO at Lombadina, and the CEO and Council Chair at Djarindjin. Further discussion took place between the LAC and the Ardyaloon Deputy Council Chair (9th April 2010).
  2. A more formal meeting occurred between the LAC and two Bardi Elders on 22nd April 2010 in a meeting arranged by Wes Morris of the Kimberley Aboriginal Law and Culture Council (KALACC). The meeting was cordial although the Elders expressed their need for further explanation of the RSD program. The LAC explained her intention to hold a meeting between the three Councils and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC) where Richard Aspinall and the LAC could explain the purposes of the RSD program and seek the views of these community representatives on how best to collect the views of the communities with regard to achieving COAG outcomes.
  3. The LAC was invited by Ardyaloon Council (27th April 2010) to formally provide information about the program. In addition, the LAC met with Clinic Staff, the Child Care Centre Manager, the School Principal in Ardyaloon and the WA Department for Child Protection officer. Formal discussions with these service providers focussing on health issues took place (3rd and 4th May 2010) in Ardyaloon, which pre-figured the wider community discussions on the Early Childhood, Schooling, Health and Safe Communities Building Block arranged for week beginning the 24th May 201. The consistent priority expressed at these meetings was a need for more information about the purpose of the Remote Service Delivery Program and its benefits for the communities, and an invitation was extended to Richard Aspinall to come to meet the communities (planned for the 5th May 2010).
  4. Meetings with representatives from the three Councils and from the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate were then held on the 5th of May 2010 and on the 14th of June 2010. The first meeting celebrated the fact that these four bodies were meeting together for the first time in some years, resulting in a resolution to work together (formulated as a Project under the Governance and Leadership Building Block). A meeting on 5th May 2010 set out the plan for the ROC to fund a Project as a comprehensive exercise on the roles and responsibilities of the Councils to work collaboratively with the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate (PBC). It was stated at that meeting that Councils need certainty on their roles and decision-making capacity while the PBC wants structure, support and certainty about its role with Councils. PBC funding is still unresolved but Commonwealth is looking at ways to support and underpin the PBC. There is also an opportunity to use RSD leadership funds to grow the PBC’s governance and establish corporate entities. At this meeting it was also agreed that the governance body for the implementation of the L.I.P. should be formed from representatives of the three Councils and the PBC. The purpose of the second meeting with this group was to present a draft of the Bardi Jawi L.I.P. Belinda Collins Senior Advisor for WA and SA from the Co-ordinator General’s Office also attended the meeting on the 14th June.
  5. Ardyaloon Council want all contact with the community to occur through the Council Chair and the Deputy Chair. In Ardyaloon, consultations on early childhood, health and safe communities took place in the same week as the One Arm Point School Cultural Days which resulted in no community members attending two of the three meetings held in community and only five people attending a third meeting. However, community priorities were drawn from facilitated discussions with the Ardyaloon Council Chair and Deputy Chair, and from a list of written priorities provided by the Chair (30th May 2010). Issues to do with economic development and housing frequently were raised by the Council Chairs. The decision was made to invite Ardyaloon community representatives to Round Table Discussions with relevant agencies in Broome on economic participation, healthy homes and governance and leadership. Using this different method, the Ardyaloon Council Chair and Deputy attended two of the three meetings.
  6. Djarindjin Council want all contact with the community to be through the Chief Executive Officer and from him through to the Council. However, despite this strongly expressed desire the CEO and Council Chair supported these meetings by attending, and even closed the shop on one occasion to encourage community members to attend. This resulted in 15-25 community members attending each of the community meetings on early childhood, health and safe communities, including two to three members of the Council at each. We were very pleased with the energetic response to the issues raised and the degree to which community members expressed their community’s priorities. Issues to do with housing and economic participation arose at each community meeting so, again community representatives were invited to Round Table Discussions with agencies in Broome on economic participation, healthy homes and governance and leadership. Representatives including Council members, the CEO and the Council Chair attended these meetings providing robust and useful positions.
  7. A meeting with the Council Chair, CEO and previous CEO was held separately in Lombadina on the 2nd June 2010 and they were also invited to the meetings in Broome although did not attend. The priorities for Lombadina were collected at the 2nd June meeting.
  8. The area is served by a Multi-Functional Police Facility and the Officer in Charge is highly engaged with the communities in the Peninsula. He has initiated an Inter-Agency Meeting with Councils and local service providers. The Local Area Co-ordinator is also on that group. Information on community priorities, problems and events is shared at that meeting and will, over time, contribute usefully to the L.I.P.
  9. Over time it is hoped that an approach of Bardi Jawi Nimidamun (‘Bardi Jawi together’) will be followed where collectivity and sharing between the three Councils in some aspects of their business is seen as beneficial by them. A collective approach is built into governance practices around the implementation of the L.I.P. by creating the Bardi Jawi Reference Group as the advisory body.

(2) Existing strategic documents:

In the recent past, consultation has occurred frequently with the communities in the Bardi Jawi area to the extent that there is suspicion on the part of community members as to its value. It is a truism that such documents are often not used as well as they should be considering the money, effort and community members’ time that is invested in their production. Bearing that in mind, and wishing to avoid duplication, existing records of consultation and consultants’ reports and documents are used where possible. It is anticipated that the number of documents to which the LAC for the Bardi Jawi area will have access to will increase over the life of the Plan as documents are discovered or new reports are written.

So far, the documents used in developing this L.I.P. are:

  • The Bardi Jawi Nimidamun (2008-2010)
  • Djarindjin Aboriginal Corporation – Strategic Objectives
  • The Aboriginal Justice Agreement for Ardyaloon
  • The Community Participation Profile and Action Plan for Kullarri Regional CDEP Inc (KRCI) North Ward5 – November 20096 (produced by KPP Business Development)
  • The Ardyaloon Inc Economic Development Plan 2010 – 2015 (produced by KPP Business Development)

(3) Agency meetings:

Priorities from the Bardi Jawi communities were presented at each of the following meetings with relevant agencies:
Date Building Block
8th June 2010 Early Childhood
8th June 2010 Schooling (Catholic Education)
9th June 2010 Health
10th June 2010 Safe Communities
15th June 2010 Schooling (WA State School)
17th June 2010 Economic Participation*
18th June 2010 Healthy Homes*
21st June 2010 Governance and Leadership**

* Incl. community reps. from Djarindjin and Ardyaloon

** Incl. a community rep. from Djarindjin; no rep. from Ardyaloon.

Governance arrangements for the Plan

Since the governance of communities and of the Plan itself are fundamental to the success of the RSD program, this separate section has been written to clarify the approach taken and why particular Projects under the Governance and Leadership Building Block have been devised in consultation with communities. The LOC and the ROC will have a facilitative role in ensuring successful and self-sustaining governance in communities and this will be achieved through the projects listed below.

Each of the projects in the Plan will have a strong governance element to ensure that communities fully participate in decision-making, and have ownership and on-going involvement in the Plan. The overall approach taken is guided by two aspects of governance and a third aspect which is, of course, the governance of the Plan itself.

  1. The way the communities are organised to make decisions affecting the community; and
  2. The ‘governance of government’, that is, way that government services are organised and delivered.

Source: Productivity Commission

Collectively with the three communities, the “six determinants of good Indigenous governance” have been discussed informally under several Building Blocks, and the projects are designed to support governance and leadership where needed. The six determinants are grouped below:

Governing institutions

Each of the three communities has a Council of elected members. Djarindjin Corporation works under the Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Communities (ORIC) as does Lombadina, while Ardyaloon Incorporated works under the State scheme. It is the intention of Ardyaloon to move to ORIC when possible (this is Project under the Governance and Leadership Building Block). There is also a Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate under the Kimberley Land Council. How these governing institutions will work together co-operatively is the subject of two Projects under the Governance and Leadership Building Block.

Leadership, self-determination and capacity building

Existing leaders also need support to confidently carry out their work. The leaders in the communities (the Council Chairs, Deputies and Council members) assisted by the CEOs have a very broad scope of duties, fore example, dealing one to one with community member’s problems, dealing with a very large number of government and other visitors into the community, attending and organising meetings, supervising administrative staff, managing budgets, working closely with CEOs and many other duties. In working with the Councils and the CEOs from the three communities, while there is some variation in now communities are run and the degree to which tasks are carried out by the CEOs, it is clear that leaders are carrying out very complex jobs very well, but would benefit from further mentoring and skill enhancement. Support for leaders and methods to ‘grow’ and develop new leaders for succession planning is the subject of a Project and a commitment of funds to supporting existing leaders.

More civic participation by community members is desirable to broaden the base of community decision-making and this will be developed hand-in-hand with strengthening the work of Councils and encouraging Councils to devise ways to be more communicative and inclusive with community members. The inclusion of Elders in decision-making is also an important element of governance being championed by the KALACC. Specific Projects have been devised to build capacity and increase self-determination. It is also important that the various governance bodies in the Bardi Jawi area work collaboratively – a significant aspect of which is land use and development. At the Round Table Discussion on 21st June, Djarindjin community commented that it needs clarity regarding the ALT lease and the PBC and that land reform on the Dampier Peninsula is a priority. This is a general issue for the Peninsula. An important Project has been devised in this area with commitment from the ROC to facilitate discussions around these topics and reach conclusions. If this Project is successful it will deliver significant improvements to governance in the Bardi Jawi area to allow harmonious discussion of and planning around land use and economic development.

Cultural match and resources

In all aspects of governance cultural protocols and relevance need to be observed. Cultural issues run as a theme in all the Projects (either implicitly or explicitly). The matter of resourcing Councils to operate is a significant issue which will emerge in project planning and implementation of the Governance and Leadership Projects. There have been recent changes to the funding structures for Aboriginal communities. Communities are still adjusting to the impact of some of these changes. A significant and wide reaching first Project has been identified to review and audit service provision to the Bardi Jawi area, and aspect of which will be the degree to which services meet actual need. The area appears to benefit from good government service provision; however, there are difficulties in each community coping with relatively frequent changes in policy and legislation (e.g. CDEP transition and administration) some of which difficulty can be attributed, at least initially, to poor communication from relevant agencies, or perhaps good communication that may not be culturally relevant. A general recommendation would be that when legislation and policy changes, significant local effort is expended to ensure that the collateral implications of the change are understood and that communities are assisted in adjusting. This is an example of a way in which the RSD process can assist both communities and government agencies to achieve the best outcomes from the considerable service concentration in communities.

Keeping track of the Plan

The Regional Operations Centre through the Local Area Co-ordinator and the Indigenous Engagement Officers will work with the ‘Bardi Jawi Reference Group’ comprising representatives from the three Councils in the Bardi Jawi area and the Bardi Jawi Prescribed Body Corporate to monitor the progress of the Plan. Specifically, the Bardi Jawi Reference Group will decide how often the Group needs to meet (indicatively every 3 months), to ensure that information is shared, that the Plan is updated to incorporate new priorities and projects as needed, and agree how to overcome any blocks to progress towards COAG targets. The projects are not of equal size and complexity and, in the interim for the purposes of this document, the ‘actions’ and ‘responsibilities’ under some of the Priorities are ‘proposed’ at this stage and will be clarified and agreed following intensive project planning.

We will need to account for what we plan to do and have done and how things have changed in partnership between communities and government. In other words the agencies and other partners will need to commit to action, and the LOCs and the ROC will need to ensure progress by facilitating co-operation. Progress Reports will occur each six and twelve months outlining achievements and measures against targets creating a legacy of stronger families, community control and control of individual destiny.

The immediate next stage of the Plan following this first iteration, is to scope each project and activity, and apply appropriate project management methodology to define parameters, form the project team to include community members and service providers, secure ‘buy-in’ of all parties (in particular ensuring that existing programs and agency activities are included rather than duplicated), agree actions and responsibilities, plan for risk mitigation, set out realistic time frames and – importantly - define how the COAG Closing the Gap outcomes will be achieved and measured.

A fundamental of measurement will be the Baseline Mapping Community Profiles with observation of changes in the baseline statistics. Project outcomes will also be measured in the more global terms outlined in the National Indigenous Reform Agreement (Closing the Gap). For example under the Schooling Building Block one desired outcome is that ‘Schooling promotes social inclusion and reduces the educational disadvantage of Indigenous children’. How such broad outcomes are best measured may be through a combination statistics and qualitative measures.

The leadership, active support and involvement of Councils and community members are assumed in all projects and the LAC will encourage and support leadership and civic participation. To augment the baseline measures and ensure that these measures are meaningful to communities, the knowledge that community members and Councils have about the community will be used. The community is likely to have its own ideas about how change can and should be measured so, to ensure their ‘buy-in’, it is intended that local culture will be a strong element in the design, implementation and maintenance of each project so that locally relevant and locally generated ways of measuring results will be negotiated in partnership with communities.

Governments also have reacted to the priorities expressed in the Plan and have their own on-going methods to measure progress towards targets. The way that agencies measure outcomes, (e.g. literacy and numeracy in education) are also obvious measures to be included in assessing progress towards closing gaps.

Collectively these indicators of change will be used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the Closing the Gap strategies in a transparent way.

Addressing concerns

Concerns may be brought to the Bardi Jawi Reference Group verbally and/or in writing. The Group will then discuss the concern and ensure that responses or actions are completed in a timely and fair manner. Independent advice can be sought when the Group cannot resolve issues. Care is needed to work with existing governance arrangements, e.g. the Councils, and also the existing relevant complaint mechanisms, e.g. through services or agencies themselves, or statutory bodies.

  1. ‘North Ward’ is the term previously used by ATSIC to denote the Bardi Jawi area of the Dampier Peninsula
  2. This document became known to the LAC only on the 17th of June 2010 so best use has not yet been made of its contents.

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Content Updated: 17 July 2013