Local Implementation Plan Angurugu

Table of Contents

Artist Acknowledgement

Artist: Alfred Lalara and Alice Durilla

The Sawfish is the totem creator with Stingray of the Angurugu River. They began their journey with the Central Hill (yandarrnga) from the east coast of Arnhem Land. On their way they agreed to go to the centre of the Eylandt. Central Hill, however decided to centre from the north, but Sawfish said, “I’ll take a short cut”. After Central hill left him, Sawfish set off with a crowd of many different stingrays, all travelling together, and following on after him. Sawfish lead the way, probably because he was the biggest. Sawfish reached Groote, came out of the sea, and started to cut his way through the land, using his teeth and nose, as he went along. So he made the river bed of the Angurugu River, cutting out the land and throwing the earth aside, opening a way for himself. As the water came in, the dirt was stirred up and Lirreba and tide grew bigger, following on close behind Sawfish. Then came all the different stingrays, still following behind Sawfish as he led the way.

Sawfish (yukwurrirrindangwa) live in deep sea waters and around coral reef. A long time ago people used to use the “comb” to comb their hair. These sawfish are a great source of food for the Anindilyakwa people.

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1. Closing the Gap in Angurugu

The Australian, Northern Territory and local government, communities and private enterprise are working together to reduce Indigenous disadvantage. In recognition that outcomes for Indigenous Australians remain below those of non-Indigenous Australians, the Council of Australian Governments has agreed to implement the National Partnership Agreement on Remote Service Delivery.

This agreement is a long-term, generational commitment based on delivering coordinated, targeted and accelerated development in Indigenous communities, and it changes the way governments invest in remote areas.

The agreement takes a direct approach to improving conditions. This includes engaging directly with the communities on delivering improvements. It also involves clear accountability for who does what, where and by when, backed up by rigorous monitoring and reporting.

Angurugu is one of the 29 remote Indigenous communities across Australia where this approach is being started through Local Implementation Plans. The Angurugu Local Implementation Plan sets out the priorities for the Angurugu community and includes targets, actions, success measures and timelines for achieving those priorities.

Angurugu is part of the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement, which is already achieving positive outcomes in the community. The Angurugu Local Implementation Plan is based on the Regional Partnership Agreement and will allow the new Council of Australian Governments commitments to operate consistently with that framework. If there are any differences between this plan and the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Regional Partnership Agreement will prevail.

The Regional Partnership Agreement was developed through close consultation between governments and the Angurugu community, through the Anindilyakwa Land Council. Its aim is to achieve sustainable and measurable improvements for people living in the Anindilyakwa region. It sets out how government, the community and the Groote Eylandt Mining Company will work together to coordinate services and deliver initiatives in response to locally identified needs.

All parties have made significant contributions to the Regional Partnership Agreement, which represents well over $80 million of collective investment. The Anindilyakwa Land Council has committed to projects totalling over $14 million to be provided from royalty equivalent income.

The Regional Partnership Agreement represents a longstanding commitment for governments, the Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and communities to work together in Angurugu. It incorporates the following principles, signed by all parties on 9 November 2006: a recognition of the need for all parties to strengthen effort to address the full extent of Indigenous disadvantage, a spirit of cooperation, partnership and shared responsibility, an acknowledgement of the need to build the economic independence of the people in the region, a focus on priorities agreed at the regional level, a willingness by government to be flexible and innovative, a commitment to improvements in accountability and performance monitoring by all parties, a desire to achieve clarity of responsibility for service delivery and increased effectiveness across the three levels of government, an understanding that greater certainty and stability in funding arrangements, including multiyear funding agreements, can facilitate more effective planning and service delivery mechanisms, and a recognition of the need to build capacity and strengthen governance.

This Local Implementation Plan focuses on the Angurugu community, and a separate Local Implementation Plan focuses on Umbakumba. These Local Implementation Plans will be managed slightly differently to those in other Remote Service Delivery communities. The Regional Partnership Committee will be the main monitoring and decision-making body, rather than the Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery Board of Management. This Local Implementation Plan will be reviewed after twelve months to ensure that new opportunities under Remote Service Delivery can be incorporated.

Closing the Gap Building Blocks

The Council of Australian Governments (COAG) agreed to six specific targets to close the gap in Indigenous disadvantage below. These targets are underpinned by seven building blocks—priority areas where action is required. Improvements in one area will affect results in other areas. In signing the Regional Partnership Agreement Stage 2, the communities of Angurugu, Umbakumba and Milyakburra identified two additional areas where action is required to effect meaningful, long-term change: planning and infrastructure and youth, sport and recreation.

Additional Regional Partnership Agreement Priority Areas
COAG Targets Building Blocks Achieving COAG Targets
Ensure all Indigenous four-year-olds in remote communities have access to early childhood education within five years.

Halve the gap for Indigenous students in reading, writing and numeracy within a decade.

Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation.

Halve the gap in mortality rates for Indigenous children under five within a decade

  For an equal start in life, Indigenous children need early learning, development and socialisation opportunities. Access to high-quality early childhood education and care services—including preschool, child care and family support services such as parenting programs—is critical. Facilities and infrastructure, a sustainable early childhood education and health workforce, learning frameworks and opportunities for parental engagement are also important and require attention. Action on maternal, antenatal and early childhood health will help close the gap in child mortality as well as in early childhood development.
  Education is the key to future opportunity. Schooling that responds to Indigenous education priorities requires attention to infrastructure, teacher and school leader supply and quality, curriculum, student literacy and numeracy achievement, opportunities for parental engagement, and school-community partnerships. Transition pathways into schooling and into work, and post-school education and training are also important. So are lifelong learning and the development of adult literacy and numeracy skills.
  Access to effective, comprehensive primary and preventative health care is essential to improving Indigenous Australians’ health and life expectancy and reducing excess mortality from chronic disease. All health services play an important role in providing Indigenous people with access to effective health care. These services need to be responsive to government and community health priorities and accountable for achieving them. Closing the Indigenous health gap requires intense efforts in preventing, managing and treating chronic disease. Indigenous children and their parents need to use programs and services that promote healthy lifestyles.
  A healthy home is a fundamental precondition of a healthy population. Important contributors to the current unsatisfactory living conditions include inadequate water and sewerage systems, waste collection, electricity and housing infrastructure (including design, availability and maintenance). Children need to live in houses that are free from overcrowding and provide the infrastructure they need for good hygiene and study.
Halve the gap in employment between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

Halve the gap for Indigenous students in rates of Year 12 or equivalent attainment by 2020.
  Indigenous people and communities should be able to benefit from the mainstream economy. This includes real jobs, business opportunities, economic independence and wealth creation. Economic participation needs to extend to disadvantaged job seekers and those outside the labour market. Access to land and native title can be leveraged to secure practical benefits for Indigenous people. Economic participation also needs other financial assets, capacity building, employment and training programs, incentive structures, and infrastructure such as communications and transport. Through economic participation, adults can become good role models for their family and community. The design and delivery of welfare (transfer payments and services) needs to encourage active engagement, greater capability and positive social norms. Ensuring that communities have support to overcome barriers to engagement such as problem gambling is critical.
  Indigenous men, women and children need to be safe from violence, abuse and neglect. Meeting this need involves improving family and community safety through law and justice responses (including accessible and effective policing and an accessible justice system), victim support (including safe houses and counselling), child protection, and preventative measures. Addressing related problems such as alcohol and substance abuse is critical to improving community safety as well as improving health.
  Strong Indigenous leadership is needed to champion and demonstrate ownership of reform. Effective governance arrangements in communities and organisations, as well as strong engagement by governments at all levels, are essential for long-term sustainable results. Indigenous people need to engage in developing reforms that will affect them. They need greater opportunities to build capacity in governance and leadership in order to play a greater role in exercising their rights and responsibilities as citizens.
Planning and Infrastructure   The region also requires supporting infrastructure and effective town planning to ensure sustainable growth of townships. Land tenure reform through the township lease will continue to facilitate investment and growth.
Youth, Sport and Recreations   Additionally, the success of the Australian Football League program in Stage 1 of the Regional Partnership Agreement highlights the significant return on investment that can be achieved through high-quality youth, sport and recreation initiatives. The Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra Youth Unit and the East Arnhem Shire Council also operate successful youth, sport and recreation programs in the region. Through the Regional Partnership Agreement parties will work together to further support the aspirations of young people in the region and deliver effective and coordinated sport and recreation programs.

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2. Regional Partnership Agreement

The Regional Partnership Agreement—Angurugu Local Implementation Plan enables government, the community and the Groote Eylandt Mining Company to reset their relationship through a partnership aimed at improving conditions and services in Angurugu. This page explains the structures for the partnership.

Regional Partnership Committee

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Committee makes sure the parties to the Regional Partnership Agreement are working well together to achieve the objectives of the regional partnership. It includes representatives of all the parties—the Anindilyakwa Land Council, Australian Government, Northern Territory Government, East Arnhem Shire Council and Groote Eylandt Mining Company. The functions of the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Committee are set out in Clause 4 of the Regional Partnership Agreement.

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Committee is the main way Angurugu consults and negotiates with government.

Local Reference Group

The Anindilyakwa Land Council consulted extensively with all the communities on Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island before they signed the Regional Partnership Agreement. They put Angurugu’s community priorities into the Regional Partnership Agreement and made sure that projects were delivered in partnership with the community.

To make sure that the people of Angurugu have an even stronger voice in the way government services and programs are delivered in Angurugu, the Angurugu Local Reference Group has been established. Its members are people from across 14 clan groups, genders, age groups, areas of expertise and other interests in Angurugu.

The Angurugu Local Reference Group will have a voice in new projects under this Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan, and will partner with government, the Anindilyakwa Land Council and the Groote Eylandt Mining Company to deliver them. The Indigenous Engagement Officer, Government Business Manager and Anindilyakwa Land Council will support the Local Reference Group.

Government Business Manager and Indigenous Engagement Officer

The Government Business Manager is the contact person for liaison between the community and government and also: helps with community planning and agreement making, helps with service coordination on the ground, involves service providers such as non-governmental organisations in the Local Implementation Plan process, and reports on Local Implementation Plan progress to government and the community.

The Indigenous Engagement Officer is an Indigenous person from the local area whose job is to: support the community in its consultations and negotiations with government, ensure government engages with the community in a culturally appropriate way, and help the Angurugu Local Reference Group raise concerns with the Government Business Manager.

Together the Government Business Manager and the Indigenous Engagement Officer are a single government interface for the community. They help people in Angurugu understand government programs and services, and help government understand community issues and priorities.

For Stage 2 of the Regional Partnership Agreement, government has agreed that the Government Business Manager and Indigenous Engagement Officer at Angurugu will work within the Regional Partnership Agreement framework.

At the same time, the Government Business Manager and Indigenous Engagement Officer, together with the Regional Partnership Committee, will work to ensure the Angurugu Local Implementation Plan aligns with the Regional Partnership Agreement and that Angurugu is not left out of the National Remote Service Delivery framework.

Regional Operations Centre and Board of Management

Umbakumba’s Government Business Manager and Indigenous Engagement Officer are supported by the Regional Operations Centre in Darwin and by the Regional Partnership Committee secretariat.

The whole-of-government regionally based operation centre, located in Darwin, is supported by locally based staff from agencies of the Northern Territory and Australian Government. The Regional Operations Centre works across government with local Indigenous people and other stakeholders to develop Local Implementation Plans and ensure that they are implemented in a timely and accountable way.

The Regional Operations Centre reports to the Northern Territory Remote Service Delivery Board of Management. The Board of Management is a partnership consisting of senior officials from both governments and from the shires responsible for providing oversight and guidance on the implementation of the Remote Service Delivery policy.

However, for Umbakumba the main governance group remains the Regional Partnership Committee because all parties to the Regional Partnership Agreement are represented on it.

Angurugu Local Implementation Plan Process

How the plan developed

The Angurugu Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan is based on the commitments already agreed in the Regional Partnership Agreement Stage 2. Details of these are in Schedule A.

Within the Regional Partnership Agreement framework, Schedule A will be monitored regularly, and will be reviewed, updated, amended and expanded as needed—but the commitments in the Regional Partnership Agreement Stage 2 cannot be compromised.

The Australian and Northern Territory Governments, with assistance from Shire Councils, surveyed conditions in Angurugu to get baseline mapping data. This information identifies the Angurugu community’s needs and is the starting point for measuring the results from the Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan. A summary of the baseline mapping data for Angurugu is in Schedule B.

Start and finish dates

The Angurugu Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan runs from 10 November 2009 to 30 June 2014.

Keeping the plan on track

The Regional Partnership Committee will: make sure the actions in the plan are happening, assess progress against the time frames and actions in Schedule A, and resolve any concerns if actions are not happening.

The Angurugu Local Reference Group will: recommend any new priorities to the Regional Partnership Committee, keeping the community well informed, recommend any changes to the plan that are needed to meet targets and remove barriers to progress, and meet regularly and provide regular information back to the community.

Reviewing the plan

The Regional Partnership Agreement outlines the arrangements for performance measurement and evaluation. They include an independent evaluation by 2011 and an annual review by the Regional Partnership Committee to make sure that it can respond to the changing needs, gaps and priorities for Angurugu.

The Angurugu Local Reference Group will be involved in these processes.

Reviewing progress

The Regional Partnership Committee monitors the progress of the Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan commitments. The committee secretariat is based in Darwin and asks all of the agencies to report on their commitments every three months.

The Government Business Manager provides a report on progress under the plan to the Regional Operations Centre and the Regional Partnership Committee secretariat regularly. If the Local Reference Group sees any issues, these will go into the report to make sure the Regional Partnership Committee knows about them.

The Regional Partnership Committee will provide an annual report to the community on how the commitments in the Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan have been achieved. It will review progress on the plan and ensure that the commitments in Schedule A are met.

The Office of the Coordinator-General for Remote Indigenous Services and the Office of the Northern Territory Coordinator-General for Remote Services oversee planning and investment in communities and advise government on good practice. They provide an independent overview of Local Implementation Plan progress and alert the responsible agency to gaps, delays or needs for improvement to ensure it meets its commitments. If there are any concerns about the way the Regional Partnership Agreement—Local Implementation Plan is being implemented, they need to go to the Regional Partnership Committee for consideration.

Addressing concerns

The Regional Partnership Agreement outlines the process for addressing concerns, which can be lodged by any member of the Regional Partnership Committee. If the committee cannot resolve the concern it can appoint an independent adviser to recommend a solution.


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3. About Angurugu

History

The Anindilyakwa people came to Groote Eylandt on songlines which created the land, rivers, animals and people and named everything about the region. Angurugu was an important meeting place for Groote Eylandt clans and people coming from the mainland for ceremonies.

The first European settlement on the island was the Emerald River Mission,13 km south of Angurugu, in 1921. Angurugu began as an Anglican Church Missionary Society station in 1943, as the Royal Australian Air Force needed to use the Emerald River Mission airstrip. By the 1950s almost all the clans living on the west of the island had settled at Angurugu, a big change to the traditional habits of occupation.

The island economy changed dramatically when manganese was discovered near Angurugu. The Church Missionary Society and BHP agreed on royalty payments to allow mining. In 1964 the Groote Eylandt Mining Company was granted leases on the island, and the first shipments of manganese ore left in 1966. Groote Eylandt now produces over three million tonnes of manganese ore each year.  Groote Eylandt became Aboriginal freehold land in 1976. In 2008 Angurugu became part of the East Arnhem Shire, and the Shire Council took over local government.

Mining employs many Indigenous people, however, to secure the island’s economic future, the traditional owners—through the Anindilyakwa Land Council and with Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises—have started the Dugong Beach Resort and other culture-based tourism businesses. 

The Groote Eylandt archipelago became an Indigenous Protected Area in 2006.

Location

The community is situated halfway down the western coast of Groote Eylandt, on the banks of the Angurugu River. Groote Eylandt is around 650 km east of Darwin and 50 km off the Arnhem Land coast in the Gulf of Carpentaria. Angurugu has a humid tropical climate, and 80 per cent of annual rainfall occurs in the wet season (between December and March).

Population

The population of Angurugu and its surrounds in 2006 was approximately 1,045, of whom 1,013 were Indigenous (97 per cent). In 2006, 46 per cent of Angurugu’s Indigenous population was younger than 20 years of age.

The Indigenous population of Angurugu and its surrounds is projected to increase from 1,013 people in 2006 to 1,372 in 2026, an increase of 36 per cent. The number of Indigenous people of working age (15-64 years) is projected to increase by 36 per cent, from 441 to 649 over this period. The greatest proportional increase  in expected to be in the older population of  50 years and above, which is expected to  double over the next 20 years from 75 in 2006  to 167 in 2026.

The changing size and age composition of the Indigenous population of Angurugu will increase the need for housing, employment opportunities, as well as aged care and health services.

These numbers are based on the 2006 census, adjusted using Australian Bureau of Statistics estimates as the census under-counted Indigenous populations. It is recognised that this may not be an accurate assessment of the current population.

The Anindilyakwa Land Council will survey all households in Angurugu in 2010 to get accurate numbers.

Languages

Anindilyakwa is the language of the communities of Groote Eylandt. Angurugu also has a number of Yolnu Matha speakers.

Clan groups

Groote Eylandt’s Indigenous population has 14 clan groups, which make up the two moieties on Groote Eylandt. The Anindilyakwa-speaking clans maintain traditions strongly tied with those of the people on the mainland community of Numbulwar and on Bickerton Island.

Traditional owners

Traditional ownership and custodian relationships for Angurugu and all other parts of Groote Eylandt are very complex, and are represented by the Anindilyakwa Land Council. The Anindilyakwa-speaking clans are traditional owners of this land.

Land Council

The Anindilyakwa Land Council represents the Aboriginals of the Groote Eylandt archipelago. It is responsible for matters under the Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976. This includes:  checking, representing and responding to  the wishes and opinions of local Indigenous people about legislation, tourism, development and commercial activities that affect traditional land,  helping traditional landowners claim, manage and protect the land, and being the first point of contact between Groote Eylandt traditional landowners and  the Groote Eylandt Mining Corporation on  all land-related issues and the payment  of royalties.

Stage 2 of the Regional Partnership Agreement includes governance development plans for the Anindilyakwa Land Council and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises. These will help to strengthen local governance and leadership.

The traditional owners have negotiated a whole-of-township lease with the Australian Government to support the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program, home ownership and economic development. The Executive Director of Township Leasing, who administers the lease, must act on the advice of the Traditional Owner Consultative Forum on any decisions involving land use.

Local Government

The East Arnhem Shire Council provides local government in Angurugu, which is one of the two major communities in the Anindilyakwa Ward. The Anindilyakwa Ward elects three of the 12 Shire Council members. The Shire’s headquarters are in Nhulunbuy and Darwin (both outside the Shire service delivery area), and it has a service delivery centre in Angurugu.

The Shire Services Manager, in cooperation with the Community Liaison Officer, consults local people through the Shire Local Board.  The board is made up of seven clan representatives, including the community liaison officer, and represents both men and women. Its current members were the elected community government councillors before the local Aboriginal town council became a part of the Shire. They also serve as council leaders.


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4. Early Childhood Highlights

The protection of children is everybody’s responsibility. It is the duty of all government and non-government workers and community members to identify and report children they believe may be at risk of harm or neglect. The community is keen to encourage parental involvement in early childhood activity programs.

Getting the best possible start in life will assist the next generation of Anindilyakwa children to achieve their full potential. The Baseline Community Profile in Stage 1 of the Regional Partnership Agreement highlighted the need to improve school readiness and other early childhood outcomes.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

A Women’s Council has been set up and is working on priorities in Angurugu. As a first priority, work is being undertaken on the women’s resource centre, and a women’s resource centre coordinator will be employed to link all the services together.

The community has a playgroup.

The Families as First Teachers program helps to engage families in school.

The school runs early language and literacy programs.

Desired community outcomes

Coordinate all the programs better and consult more with local people about their needs.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Funding for a Women’s Centre Coordinator.

The Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs will provide funding, over three years, for the Indigenous Parenting Support Service and Communities for Children playgroup service.

More details of Angurugu’s early childhood priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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5. Schooling Highlights

Closing the gap in educational outcomes is a big priority for families in Angurugu. The New Opportunities, New Responsibilities review of education needs in the region highlights the need to better support the educational aspirations of Anindilyakwa families.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

A review of education needs was completed in 2009 in consultation with the community.

Governments, schools and the community are working hard to address the recommendations of the report.

Angurugu has a public library.

Desired community outcomes

Build staff housing in the community so that teachers can live where they work, and encourage them to engage with the community.

Establish a board of management that includes local community members so that they can have a say in how the schools are run.

Bring all four schools in the region under the same operating framework.

Take immediate steps to improve school attendance.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Establish a taskforce to identify and act upon agreed timeframes and resources required for the implementation of the New Opportunities, New Responsibilities report.

The Anindilyakwa Land Council will contribute up to $1 million to addressing the outcomes of the report.

More details of Angurugu’s schooling priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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6. Health Highlights

The parties to the Regional Partnership Agreement have agreed to work together to improve primary health care services and oral health outcomes and continue to support the work of the Machado Joseph Disease Foundation.

The Angurugu Health Centre provides medical and public health services and access to visiting doctors and specialists.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

The Machado Joseph Disease Foundation works hard to support sufferers of Machado Joseph Disease and their families and carers.

Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises and the Northern Territory Government have agreed to fluoridate the Angurugu water supply.

The Groote Eylandt Mining Company has agreed to provide support for visiting medical staff, new ambulances and equipment.

An experienced and long-term committed team of health professionals and access to regular doctors, dentists and health specialists.

A well-run aged care centre with dedicated professional staff.

Desired community outcomes

Aged care

Establish a residential aged care centre to serve the growing ageing population and reduce the number of elders being moved out of the community.

Machado Joseph Disease

Encourage all stakeholders to work together through the Machado Joseph Disease Memorandum of Understanding to improve care and support services related to the disease.

Develop an implementation plan for the memorandum of understanding that is agreed to by all parties and provides real support to people with Machado Joseph Disease.

Oral health

Arrange for a full-time dentist to come to Groote Eylandt. The Anindilyakwa Land Council is arranging this.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Groote Eylandt Bickerton Island Enterprises to fund a Fluoride Treatment Plant and the Northern Territory Government will provide funding for ongoing operation.

Cooperation and funding to provide care and support services for Machado Joseph Disease clients, their families and carers.

More details of Angurugu’s health priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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7. Healthy Homes Highlights

Angurugu is a priority region for new housing and essential infrastructure to reduce overcrowding and improve living conditions.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement. Others may be added as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

Under the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program and as a result of the township lease, Angurugu will get new, upgraded and renovated housing in consultation with the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program Working Group.

The township lease has opened up opportunities for home ownership. Government has agreed to support these opportunities with special programs to help people to buy their homes in Angurugu.

Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises operate a construction company, Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises Civil and Construction. Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises Civil and Construction is a key partner in the new housing work. As many local people as possible will be employed and trained in the programs.

Desired community outcomes

Building

Complete the new housing works in genuine partnership with the community.

Continue to explore ways for local businesses to be supported through the construction work and refurbishments.

Tenancy arrangements

Fully engage the community to promote understanding of tenancy, leasing and rental agreements.

When the new houses are built, provide regular home inspections, reliable and responsive maintenance, fair rent, pest control and a home skills training program.

Make sure tenants agree to keep the houses clean, pay rent, avoid overcrowding and report damage.

Home ownership

Make sure the government’s policy on buying a house that has been built or refurbished through the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program is clear.

Help people in the Angurugu community understand what it means to buy a house.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Sixty new houses to be constructed in Angurugu through the Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program.

Commitment for people at Angurugu, Umbakumba and Milyakburra to have access to the Home Ownership on Indigenous Land program through Indigenous Business Australia.

More details of Angurugu’s healthy homes priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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8. Economic Participation Highlights

Job and small business opportunities in Angurugu are increasing, with major township housing projects about to start and growth occurring in other industries such as mining. Enabling local people to take up these opportunities is very important to the community.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

The number of job opportunities in the Groote Eylandt Mining Company and in the construction industry is growing.

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises Job Shop (started in December 2008) has provided a number of job placements, much-needed mentoring and pre-employment services, and has improved collaboration with local employers and the community generally.

An economic development officer has been employed for a three-year term.

The Economic Development and Employment Strategy completed in Stage 1 of the Regional Partnership Agreement identified significant small business potential, including in transport service provision.

Desired community outcomes

Local employment and training

Establish a local employment and economic development board so all major employers can work together to employ more local people and address the recommendations of the Economic Development and Employment Strategy. Work together to prepare a submission for a trade training centre to provide vocational training in Angurugu.

Provide a training and mentoring program to help local Indigenous people get jobs with Groote Eylandt Mining Company.

Business development

Build a threatened species research and education facility on Groote Eylandt.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Create a Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Local Employment and Economic Development Board.

The Groote Eylandt Mining Company will provide $1.5 million for a Training and Mentoring Program for Indigenous Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island people for employment with the Groote Eylandt Mining Company.

More details of Angurugu’s economic participation priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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9. Safe Communities Highlights

Cannabis misuse as a barrier to employment and trigger for social issues has been raised as a priority by the community throughout the Regional Partnership Agreement, and so has the need to improve community policing. The Groote Eylandt police are based in Alyangula, are responsible for a patrol area of 45,000 km2 and are assisted by a night patrol service.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

A women’s safe house and men’s cooling-off shelter have been built in Angurugu as part of the Northern Territory Emergency Response.

The Angurugu Community Safety Group enables the community to take a key role in setting community safety priorities.

Government has committed to build a visiting police facility in Angurugu.

The community is working with the Shire to improve road safety in Angurugu.

The sniffer dogs in Darwin and Katherine are giving special attention to policing the supply of cannabis into Groote Eylandt.

The Groote Eylandt Alcohol Management Plan has been very successful in reducing alcohol-related harm in the region and is viewed as a best practice model.

Desired community outcomes

Policing

Make sure the Alyangula police have a strong enough presence in Angurugu and work with the community to keep people safe.

Cannabis

Engage a consultant to develop a substance misuse strategy and work together to address cannabis use.

Safe places

Finalise leases over the safe places.

Cyclones

Build a public cyclone shelter for Angurugu.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

The Northern Territory Government will fund construction of an Office for Visiting Police in Angurugu.

Engage a consultant to undertake a Substance Misuse Strategy.

More details of Angurugu’s safe communities priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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10. Governance and Leadership Highlights

Effective governance and leadership are crucial to effective service delivery and reforming relationships between the community and government agencies.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

There are some very strong leaders at Angurugu who have achieved good things for the community including the Indigenous protected area, the alcohol management plan, the Regional Partnership Agreement and the township lease.

Leaders at Angurugu have been able to participate in leadership workshops and courses.

There are also strong local organisations such as the Anindilyakwa Land Council and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises. The community is also represented on the Shire Council.

A women’s council has been set up and is working well.

The Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Committee gives leaders of Groote Eylandt a seat at the table with senior people from government and allows them to raise any concerns on behalf of the people of Angurugu.

Desired community outcomes

Training and support

Continue training and support for existing and emerging leaders, including opportunities to network with leaders from other communities.

Write a governance development plan for the Anindilyakwa Land Council and Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises to make sure members of those organisations are getting the support they need.

Consultation process

Streamline the process for government consultation and engagement with local governance groups—government should review all the committees that exist and talk to people about how consultation can improve.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Funding for the Governance Development Plan for the Anindilyakwa Land Council and the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises.

Further support for emerging leaders at Groote Eylandt.

More details of Angurugu’s governance and leadership priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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11. Planning and Infrastructure Highlights

Angurugu needs infrastructure and town planning to support its continuing growth. Land tenure reform through the township lease will continue to make investment and growth easier.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

The township lease will allow new planning priorities and things that are important to traditional owners to be enforced in Angurugu, through the Traditional Owner Consultative Forum.

Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises is a strong organisation which can invest in major projects for the benefit of the people of Angurugu.

The East Arnhem Shire Council is committed to better standards of local government service delivery.

The Groote Eylandt Mining Company has agreed to upgrade the road to Alyangula and build a public jetty in consultation with traditional owners.

A well-built school and community store with attached leased premises.

Historic buildings which are being used as training rooms, a women’s centre, community church.

Desired community outcomes

Planning

Make sure that there is enough land in Angurugu for future planning, without disrupting important sites.

Infrastructure

Build staff houses for government which are owned by the community and can be leased for an ongoing financial return.

Form a partnership between Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and East Arnhem Shire Council to improve road maintenance.

Seal the road between Angurugu and Umbakumba.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Northern Territory Government to commission a detailed town planning study addressing future needs of the current and projected population of Angurugu township.

Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises to construct, using funding from royalties, agreed government staff housing at Angurugu and Umbakumba.

More details of Angurugu’s planning and infrastructure priorities and actions are in Schedule A.

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12. Youth, Sport and Recreation Highlights

The parties to the Regional Partnership Agreement have agreed to work together to support the aspirations of young people in the region and deliver effective and coordinated sport and recreation programs.

The following community strengths and desired community outcomes have been identified through the Regional Partnership Agreement framework. Others may be identified as time goes on, with the involvement of the Angurugu Local Reference Group.

Community strengths

The Australian Football League program set up in Stage 1 of the Regional Partnership Agreement has been very successful. Lots of local people are getting involved in the league.

The Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra Youth Diversion Unit provides a range of programs for youth in Angurugu.

A basketball program has been set up for women in Angurugu and is well attended. An inter-island competition is under way.

The Australian Red Cross has been funded to employ youth workers in Angurugu.

The East Arnhem Shire Council provides sport and recreation services.

Desired community outcomes

Youth

Engage a consultant to look at all the services, programs and infrastructure for youth in Angurugu and make recommendations about how to improve them.

Set up a steering committee for all the different stakeholders to work together in supporting young people in Angurugu.

Sport

Continue to support the Australian Football League program and provide funding for a trainee from Angurugu to work with the regional development manager.

Build an Australian Football League club facility and get a bus to transport players between communities.

Take a zero-tolerance approach to violence at football matches.

Continue to support the AFL School Cats program to encourage kids to go to school in the morning.

Commitments

The community, Anindilyakwa Land Council, Groote Eylandt Mining Company and all levels of government have committed in the Regional Partnership Agreement to a number of actions to address the community’s priorities, including:

Develop and implement a Youth Strategy to respond to the needs of local young people.

Funding for the AFL Remote Regional Development Program.

More details of Angurugu’s youth, sport and recreation priorities and actions are in Schedule A.


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Schedule A: Acronyms

ABA
Aboriginal Benefits Account
ACPO
Aboriginal Community Police Officer
ACW
Aboriginal Community Worker
AFL
Australian Football League
AG
Australian Government
AGD
Attorney Generals Department
AIS
Australian Interpreter Services
ALC
Anindilyakwa Land Council
ALPA
Arnhem Land Progress Association
ALRA
Aboriginal Land Rights (NT) Act 1976
AMRRIC
Animal management in Rural and Remote Indigenous Communities
AMS
Aboriginal Medical Services
AMSANT
Aboriginal Medical Services Alliance Northern Territory
AODP
Alcohol and Other Drugs Project
ASC
Australian Sports Commission
ASM
Area Services Manager
BoM
Board of Management
BOOT/ BOOTS
Build, Own, Operate, Transfer and Support
BRACS
Broadcasting for Remote Aboriginal Communities Scheme
CA
Central Australia
CAALAS
Central Australian Aboriginal Legal Aid Service
CARH
Central Australian Remote Health
CASA
Civil Aviation Safety Authority
CAYLUS
Central Australian Youth Link Up Service
CDSC
Central Desert Shire Council
CDEP
Community Development Employment Projects
CDS
Central Desert Shire
CDU
Charles Darwin University
CEC
Community Education Centre
CEO
Catholic Education Office
CFC
Child and Families Centre
CLC
Central Land Council
CSP
Community Safety Plan
CWG
Capital Working Group
DBCDE
Department of Broadband, Communications and the Digital Economy
DBE
Department of Business and Employment
DCI
Department of Construction and Infrastructure
DEEWR
Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations
DET
Department of Education and Training
DHF
Department of Health and Families
DLP
Department of Lands and Planning
DoHA
Department of Health and Aging
DoJ
Department of Justice
DPI
Department of Planning and Infrastructure
DSEWPAC
Department of Sustainability, Environment, Water, Population and Communities
DVD
Digital Versatile Disc
EA
East Arnhem
EASC
East Arnhem Shire Council
EBA
Enterprise Bargaining Agreement
EDO
Economic Development Officer
FaFT
Families as First Teachers
FaHCSIA
Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs
FTE
Full Time Equivalent
GBM
Government Business Manager
GEBIE
Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Enterprises
GEH
Government Employee Housing
GEMCO
Groote Eylandt Mining Company
GPNNT
General Practice Network Northern Territory
HACC
Home and Community Care
HLGRS- (RD)
Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services - Regional Development
HLGRS/ DHLGRS
Department of Housing, Local Government and Regional Services
HOIL
Home Ownership Indigenous Land
HRG
Housing Reference Group
HSDA
Health Service Delivery Area
IBA
Indigenous Business Association
ICT
Information and Communications Technology
IEO
Indigenous Engagement Officer
ILC
Independent Land Corporation
IPSS
Indigenous Parenting Support Service
IPWG
Infrastructure and Planning Working Group
IRSD
Indigenous Remote Service Delivery Special Account
IT
Information Technology
JSA
Job Services Australia
KWHB
Katherine West Health Board
LAB
Local Advisory Board
LGANT
Local Government Association of the Northern Territory
LIP
Local Implementation Plan
LHA
Laynhapuy Homelands Association
LHRG
Local Housing Reference Group
LLNP
Language, Literacy and Numeracy Program
LRG
Local reference group
LSP
Locational Supported Playgroups
Malabam
Malabam Health Board
MCS
Murrupurtiyanuwu Catholic School
MES
Municipal Essential Services
MH
Mental Health
MJD FOUNDATION
Machado Joseph Disease Foundation


MOU
Memorandum of Understanding
MSC
McDonnell Shire Council
MSOAP
Medical Specialists Outreach Assistance Program
N/A
Not Applicable
NGO
Non Government Organisation
NLC
Northern Land Council
NPA
National Partnership Agreement
NRETAS
Natural Resources, Environment, The Arts and Sport
NRT
Nicotine Replacement Therapy
NT
Northern Territory
NTCET
Northern Territory Certificate of Education and Training
NTFC
Northern Territory Families and Children
NTG
Northern Territory Government
NTIEC
Northern Territory Indigenous Education Council
NTPFES
Northern Territory Police Fire and Emergency Services
NTPOL
Northern Territory Police
OATSIH
Office for Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Health
OCPE
Office of the Commissioner of Public Employment
OLSH TCS
Our Lady of the Sacred Heart Thamarrurr Catholic School
ORIC
Office of the Registrar of Indigenous Corporations
OTL
Office of Township Leasing
PaCE
Parents and Community Engagement
PAW Media
Pintubi, Anmatjerre, Warlpiri Media
PATS
Patient Assistance Transport Scheme
PHC
Primary Health Care
PHCM
Primary Health Care Manager
PWC/ P&W
Power Water Corporation
RAFCW
Remote Area Family and Community Workers
RGSC
Roper Gulf Shire Council
RH
Remote Housing
RHNT
Remote Housing Northern Territory
RIBS
Regional Indigenous Broadcasting Services
ROC
Regional Operations Centre
RSD
Remote Service Delivery
RTEED
Remote Training, Employment and Economic Development
SDCU
Service Delivery Coordination Unit
SEAM
School Enrolment and Attendance Measure
SIHIP
Strategic Indigenous Housing and Infrastructure Program
SNP
School Nutrition Program
STEP
Structured Training and Employment Projects
SWSBSC
Strong Women, Strong Babies, Strong Culture
TBA
To Be Advised
TDC
Thamarrurr Development Corporation
TIE
Transforming Indigenous Education
TISC
Tiwi Islands Shire Council
TO
Traditional Owners
TOR
Terms Of Reference
TRPA
Tanami Regional Partnership Agreement
UNICEF
United Nations Children’s Fund
VET/ VETiS
Vocational Education and Training in Schools
WAHAC BOARD
Western Aranda Health Aboriginal Corporation Board
WASC
West Arnhem Shire Council
WG
Working Group
WETT
Warlpiri Education and Training Trust
WHO
World Health Organisation
WoG
Whole of Government
WYN BOARD
Willowra, Yuendumu, Nyirripi Health Board
YMAC
Yugul Mangi Aboriginal Corporation

Schedule A: Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions

Introduction

Once approved by the Regional Partnership Committee, these Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions will be incorporated into the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Regional Partnership Agreement through Schedule D to that Agreement.

Schedule D to the Regional Partnership Agreement reconfirms the commitment of all parties that the Regional Partnership Agreement has primacy as the vehicle for implementation of Remote Service Delivery in Angurugu and Umbakumba. The Regional Partnership Committee will remain the primary governance mechanism for Regional Partnership Agreement activities at Groote Eylandt and the Regional Partnership Agreement the primary method of coordinating government business.

Consistent with the commitments in Schedule D to the Regional Partnership Agreement, these Local Implementation Plan Priority Actions are based on Stage 2 of the Regional Partnership Agreement. New projects may be added with the endorsement of the Regional Partnership Committee, allowing the Local Implementation Plan to incorporate priorities and opportunities identified under Remote Service Delivery, while remaining consistent with the Regional Partnership Agreement framework.

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Early Childhood
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number and proportion of low, normal, and high birth weight Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade
Timing of antenatal visits for regular clients delivering Indigenous babies Halve the gap in mortality rates for under 5’s within a decade

 

Actions agreed to for Early Childhood in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Families as First Teachers - Indigenous Parenting Support Service (FaFT-IPSS) program established. This place based integrated universal services program includes early learning and parenting support strategies. Lead - DET
Supporting: DHF, FaHCSIA and the community
Started Dec-12
1.2 Deliver the communities for children playgroup service. Lead - FaHCSIA Started Jun-12
1.3 Early childhood language and literacy course. Lead - DEEWR Started Jun-12
1.4 Mentor tutor support program. Lead - DEEWR Started Jun-12
NEW actions agreed to in the Local Implementation Plan Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.5 Establishment of an Early Childhood Coordinator to lead the integration of family services tailored to the Angurugu community and its surrounding service delivery area. This will be achieved through a whole of government approach across all levels of government, non-government organisations and the community to develop and implement an integrated service model. All program content will be inclusive of Indigenous culture and have links to elders.

Lead – DET

Supporting: Shire, Government Service Providers, DHF, NGO’s and the community
Started Review June 2011
1.6 Provide Universal Access to preschool for every child in the year before full-time school. By 2013 the preschool program is to be delivered for 15 hours a week, 40 weeks a year by a four-year, university qualified early childhood teacher. The program will be accessible across a diversity of settings and in a form that meets the needs of parents. This will be delivered in the context of the Education Review. Joint Lead – DET / DEEWR Started Dec-13
1.7 Deliver the Certificate III Community Services in the workplace through the FaFT-IPSS for the local Indigenous FaFT family liaison officers.

Lead – DET

Supporting: DHF, FaHCSIA
Started Dec-11
1.8 Establish a women's centre coordinator.

Lead – GEBIE

Supporting: FaHCSIA, Shire
Started Jun-11

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Schooling
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Schooling enrolment and attendance Halve the gap in reading, writing and numeracy achievements for Indigenous children within a decade
NAPLAN participation and attainment Halve the gap for Indigenous students in year 12 equivalent attainment by 2020

 

Actions agreed to for Schooling in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Establish a taskforce to implement recommendations of education review and include community in key education decisions. Lead - DET
Supporting - DEEWR, ALC,
GEMCO
Started Dec-10
1.2 Contribute up to $1 million to education reforms (across Groote Eylandt). Lead - ALC Nov-11 NA

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Health
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number of health care episodes Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Number of episodes of health care and client contacts Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation
Child oral health disease profile for 7-to-12-year-olds Close the gap in life expectancy within a generation

 

Actions agreed to for Health in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Implement MoU for care and support services for Machado Joseph Disease clients, families and carers (applies to all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - DHF
Supporting - MJD Foundation, EASC
Started Aug-13
1.2 Recruit MJD Coordinator (applies to all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - DHF, MJD Foundation Started Review July-11
1.3 Provide $200,000 for MJD projects (across Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - GEMCO
Supporting - MJD Foundation
Started N/A
1.4 Install fluoride treatment plant for Angurugu water supply. Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - DHF, EASC, GEMCO
ASAP Nov-11
1.5 Provide $1 million for accommodation facilities at Angurugu aged and respite centre (subject to further discussions with stakeholders). Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - EASC, DHF, OTL, DoHA
Started Dec-11
1.6 In kind support for visiting medical staff (to all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - GEMCO
Supporting - DHF
Started Ongoing
1.7 Provide two new ambulances and medical equipment (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - GEMCO Supporting - DHF Started Jul-12

 

New actions agreed to for Health in Local Implementation Plan, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
New actions agreed to in the Local Implementation Plan Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.8 Provide wheelchair lift for airport.

Lead - FaHCSIA
Supporting - MJD Foundation, private sponsors

Started Jun-10

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Healthy Homes
Progress Output Indicators
Condition of current housing stock
Overall crowding rates: average per bedroom density and number houses overcrowded

 

Actions agreed to for Healthy Homes in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Construct 60 new houses in Angurugu. Lead - HLGRS
Supporting - FaHCSIA, ALC
Started Dec-13
1.2 Schedule C on SIHIP negotiated and implemented. Lead - HLGRS
Supporting - FaHCSIA, ALC
Started Nov-12
1.3 At least 75 refurbishments and rebuilds under SIHIP (across Angurugu, Umbakumba and Milyakburra). Lead - HLGRS
Supporting - FaHCSIA, ALC
Started Dec-13
1.4 Painting of all houses. Lead - HLGRS
Supporting - FaHCSIA, ALC
Started Nov-12
1.5 Home Ownership on Indigenous Land - first home loans issued. Lead - IBA
Supporting - FaHCSIA, OTL
Started Ongoing
1.6 Minimum 20 per cent local employment in housing construction and maintenance. Lead - HLGRS
Supporting - FaHCSIA, ALC
Started Dec-13
1.7 Deliver integrated Money Management Services. Lead - FaHCSIA Started Jun-14

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Economic Participation
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Total employment (Indigenous/non-Indigenous) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.
Total employment (private/public) To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.
Number of participants on Newstart, Youth Allowance and CDEP To halve the gap in employment outcomes between Indigenous and non-Indigenous Australians within a decade.

 

Actions agreed to for Economic Participation in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Creation of the Groote Eylandt and Bickerton Island Local Employment and Economic Development Board as a forum for all major employers in the region to share information and improve collaboration in enhancing sustainable employment outcomes for Anindilyakwa people. Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - GEMCO, ALC, EASC, DEEWR, DET, DHF, FaHCSIA
Started Ongoing
1.2 Provide three years funding for Economic Development Officer (one position for Angurugu, Umbakumba and Milyakburra). Lead - DEEWR
Supporting - GEBIE
Started Nov-12
1.3 Prepare submission to DEEWR for Trade Training Centre (depending on funding). Lead - DET
Supporting - GEBIE, DEEWR, OTL
Started Nov-11
1.4 Develop a $1.5 million training and mentoring program to employ more Groote Eylandt people in the mine. Lead - GEMCO Started Jul-15
1.5 Establish a threatened species research and education centre. Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - ABA
Started Nov-11
1.6 Provide $100,000 for threatened species research (across Groote Eylandt). Lead - GEMCO Started Jul-12

 

New actions agreed to for Economic Participation in the Local Implementation Plan, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
New actions agreed to in the Local Implementation Plan Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.7 Develop Town Centre Urban Design Plan including community transport strategies.

Lead – DLP
Supporting – DCI, EASC

Started Dec-10
1.8 In close coordination with the current rollout of E-health and on-line education initiatives, develop an integrated ICT strategy that covers infrastructure requirements; deployment of equipment; use of new technologies by government agencies and; access to ICT services by businesses, NGOs and local people. Lead – DBE
Supporting – RTEED
Oct–10 Ongoing
1.9 Explore partnership opportunities in the private sector, with a particular emphasis on building formal links with industries operating in the region. These partnerships could include (but not be limited to) training, employment, infrastructure and community development.

Lead – DBE
Supporting – RTEED

Oct–10 Apr-11

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Safe Communities
Progress Output Indicators
As a proportion of all offences: (i) alcohol related offences (ii) drug & substance abuse related offences (iii) offences against the person

 

Actions agreed to for Safe Communities in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Develop a substance misuse strategy (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - DoHA
Supporting - DHF, DoJ, ALC
Started Dec-10
1.2 Intensive intervention by sniffer dog unit and Substance Abuse Intelligence Desk (for all of Groote Eylandt). Lead - NTPFES
Supporting - FaHCSIA
Started Ongoing
1.3 Office for visiting police in Angurugu and regular visits from Alyangula police, with operations plan and schedule of visits to be presented to the Regional Partnership Committee Lead - NTPFES
Supporting - ALC, OTL
Started Nov-10
1.4 Establish local Tasking and Coordination Group (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - NTPFES
Supporting - ALC, DoJ, FaHCSIA
Started Ongoing
1.5 Finalised Community Safety Plan (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - NTPFES
Supporting - ALC, DoJ, FaHCSIA
Started Nov-10
1.6 Establish women's safety house, and provide ongoing funding. Lead - DHF
Supporting - FaHCSIA
Started Complete
1.7 Establish men’s cooling off shelter, and provide ongoing funding. Lead - DHF
Supporting - FaHCSIA
Started Complete
1.8 Establish public cyclone shelter. Lead - DCI Started Nov-11

 

New actions agreed to for Safe Communities in the Local Implementation Plan, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
New actions agreed to in the Local Implementation Plan Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.9 Install Traffic Calming—safety signage, road safety awareness campaign.

Lead - EASC
Supporting - FaHCSIA,

Started Jun-10
1.10 Establish and support NT Emergency Service volunteer units capable of reacting to known hazards for the community. Lead – NTPFES
Supporting - EASC
Started Ongoing
1.11 Maintain an all hazard response plan for Angurugu and review or establish specific hazard response plans for the community (e.g. Cyclone Plan) as necessary. This will include ensuring adequate community education and preparedness (including public shelters where necessary) for known hazards.

Lead – NTPFES
Supporting - EASC

Started Ongoing
1.12 Minimum service standards for child protection and related servies will be developed in the Angurugu community including an agreed program to implement these standards. Lead - DHF Started Review Jun-11
1.13 Child Protection and Welfare are to be considered as part of the Community
Safety Plans.
Lead - DOJ Feb-11 Ongoing

 

Progress Output Indicators and COAG Target for Governance and Leadership
Progress Output Indicators COAG Target
Number of registered organisations under ORIC and NT Associations Act Nil

 

Actions agreed to for Governance and Leadership in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Leadership and governance training for aspiring leaders (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - ROC
Supporting - GEBIE
Started Ongoing
1.2 Develop a Governance Development Plan for ALC and GEBIE (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - ALC
Supporting - FaHCSIA
Started Jun-11
1.3 Governance mapping project (for Angurugu and Umbakumba). Lead – DHLGRS
Supporting - ROC
Oct-10 Mar-11

 

Actions agreed to for Planning and Infrastructure in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Detailed town planning study in consultation with OTL, EASC, GEMCO and ALC. Lead - DLP Started Complete
1.2 Town Plan (Area Plan and Zoning Map) approved by Minister. Lead - DLP Started Complete
1.3 GEBIE construct government staff housing in return for economical rent arrangements. Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - DBE
Started Nov-11
1.4 Seal Angurugu to Umbakumba Road. Lead - DLP
Supporting - GEBIE, ABA
Apr-11 Dec-11
1.5 Agree words for shire subleases regarding standards of service delivery. Lead - OTL, EASC Started Complete
1.6 Provide road maintenance for arterial roads totalling $50,000 per year (across Groote Eylandt). Lead - GEMCO Started Jul-14
1.7 Improve safety of Rowell Highway in consultation with traditional owners. Lead - GEMCO Started Dec-11

 

Actions agreed to for Youth, Sport and Recreation in the Regional Partnership Agreement, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
Actions agreed to in the Regional Partnership Agreement Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.1 Deliver women’s basketball program (across Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - DoHA Started Jun-11
1.2 Develop and implement a youth strategy (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - FaHCSIA, EASC, NRETAS, DoHA, DEEWR
Started Dec-10
1.3 $150,000 sponsorship for Poly Farmer Foundation (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra). Lead - GEMCO Started Jul-12
1.4 Three years funding for AFL Remote Regional Development Program (for all of Groote Eylandt and Milyakburra) Lead - FaHCSIA, GEBIE, GEMCO Started Nov-12
1.5 Employment of an Indigenous AFL trainee from Angurugu Lead - DEEWR Nov-09 Nov-12
1.6 Provide $250,000 for AFL club facilities Lead - GEBIE
Supporting - OTL, AFL NT, EASC
Started Nov-11
1.7 Provide vehicle for transporting AFL players Lead - GEBIE May-10 N/A

 

New actions agreed to for Youth, Sport and Recreation in the Local Implementation Plan, the Responsible Party and Timeframe
New actions agreed to in the Local Implementation Plan Responsible Party Start When Finish When
1.8 Red Cross employ youth worker and trainees Lead- FaHCSIA, Red Cross Started Jun-12
1.9 Upgrade to youth facilities - recreation hall, basketball court Lead - EASC
Supporting - FaHCSIA,
Started Jun-10

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Schedule B: Baseline Mapping Summary

Detailed baseline mapping of social, economic and service delivery indicators for Angurugu will be included in this Local Implementation Plan as Schedule B when further consultation on this data has been completed.

 

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Schedule C: Plan for Future Engagement

Plan for future engagement

Schedule D to the Regional Partnership Agreement clarifies the relationship between Remote Service Delivery and the Regional Partnership Agreement and highlights the need for an effective engagement strategy that takes into account the primacy and history of the Regional Partnership Agreement process.

The community engagement strategy will guide the way government agencies engage with Indigenous Australians on the implementation of the Regional Partnership Agreement and on the development and delivery of future programs, services and initiatives. The strategy will be developed in late 2010 and will be endorsed by the Regional Partnership Agreement Committee. Key elements are outlined below.

Regional Partnership Agreement

Stage 2 of the Regional Partnership Agreement formed the basis to the Angurugu and Umbakumba Local Implementation Plans in the first instance. Projects cover all seven building blocks and include two other priority areas; infrastructure and planning, and youth, recreation and sport. These projects were negotiated between Regional Partnership Agreement parties: the Australian Government, the Northern Territory Government, the East Arnhem Shire Council and the Groote Eylandt Mining Company. The communities were represented by the Anindilyakwa Land Council.

Local Reference Group

Local Reference Groups have been established in Angurugu and Umbakumba to build on the projects in the Regional Partnership Agreement and set future priorities for their communities under each building block. Representatives from the Anindilyakwa Land Council participate in the Local Reference Groups. Government Business Managers and Indigenous Engagement Officers will convene these groups as required.

Other Community Engagement

Ongoing consultation with the Anindilyakwa Land Council will occur via scheduled quarterly Regional Partnership Agreement Committee meetings and through regular discussions as required to progress the projects outlined in the Regional Partnership Agreement. The Committee also has a number of sub-committees comprised of various government and community members to progress Regional Partnership Agreement projects and provide advice to the Committee as required. They represent numerous stakeholders within the communities.

The Committee is responsible for making sure that the communities are consulted in the development and delivery of initiatives. The sub-committees will carry out these tasks through the Government Business Managers, Indigenous Engagement Officers, and the Anindilyakwa Land Council Regional Partnership Agreement Coordinator.

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