South Australia: Annual Report 2009-10: National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness

NPAH Annual Review - Year 1 - South Australia, September 2010

Table of contents

Section 1. Introduction and Summary of Achievements

1.1. Introduction

1.1.1. Background

On 18th December 2008, the Government of South Australia signed the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (the Agreement). The aim is to facilitate significant reforms to reduce homelessness.

The Agreement contributes to the broader National Affordable Housing Agreement outcome: People who are homeless or at risk of homelessness achieve sustainable housing and social inclusion.

1.1.2. Updated Implementation Plan

South Australia’s updated Implementation Plan was prepared in early August 2010 and reflects current strategic directions, service development and related tendering activities.

1.1.3. Year One NPAH spend

Appendix two shows total NP expenditure for 2009/10. It highlights that unexpended funds from Year One of $2.7m have been carried over and allocated to specific projects for the next three years of the NP. Appendix three details the expenditure at service level.

1.1.4. The Targets

The Government of South Australia has agreed to meet three national targets to reduce homelessness. The national targets are:

  1. By 2013, 7 per cent reduction in the number of South Australian’s experiencing homelessness (from 7,962 in 2006 to 7, 405 - a reduction of 557).
  2. By 2013, one third reduction in the number of Aboriginal South Australians experiencing homelessness (from 858 in 2006 to 572 – a reduction of 286.
  3. By 2013, 25 per cent reduction in the number of South Australian’s who are sleeping rough (from 848 to 636 – a reduction of 211.

1.1.5. The Outcomes

  1. Fewer People will become homeless and fewer of these will sleep rough;
  2. Fewer people will become homeless more than once;
  3. People at risk or experiencing homelessness, will maintain or improve connections with their families and communities, and maintain or improve their education, training or employment participation; and
  4. People at risk of or experiencing homelessness will be supported by quality services, with improved access to sustainable housing.

1.1.6. Strategic Opportunities

The former Supported Accommodation and Assistance Program (SAAP) was a joint Commonwealth/State funded support program assisting people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness through a range of support services.  The existing program in South Australia is administered through the Department for Families and Communities, Homelessness Strategy Division. As of 1 January 2009, the SAAP program ceased and funding for that program was replaced by the National Affordable Housing Agreement (NAHA) on similar terms to SAAP.  NAHA is also a joint Commonwealth/State funded support program. From 1 July 2010, the Homelessness Strategy Division has consolidated funding resources from both NAHA and the Homelessness National Partnership Agreements to deliver a range of regionalised homelessness services in SA.

South Australia’s current homelessness service sector (formally SAAP) is comprised of a wide array of services and individuals that bring their extensive skills and experience to individuals and families who are homeless or at risk. In 2009/10 there were 94 programs in South Australia, with 67 operating in the metropolitan area and 27 in rural and remote areas. These programs target the following groups:

  • families
  • generic services egg funded to support more than one target group
  • youth
  • single adults (mostly in the inner city)
  • women and/or their children escaping domestic violence and family violence.

There has been a 77% increase in the volume of demand for these services over the past 8 years, from 7,700 clients per annum in 2000/01 to 13,600 in 2008/09, without additional funding. Support periods are now in excess of 21,000 per annum due to increasing numbers of clients returning to crisis circumstances more than once. Domestic Violence clients in particular will often need to return to services in order to progress towards independence due to immediate safety needs as well as personal ownership issues that are quite specific to the nature of the violence experienced by these women and their children.

The sector’s commitment and dedication to meet the growing volume and diversity of need with limited resources is commendable, and has enabled South Australia to achieve impressive results relating to the reductions in rough sleeping, couch surfing and overcrowding.

Further to the considerable results delivered across the State’s former SAAP Sector, the Government of South Australia has made some important inroads to reducing rough sleeping. While the 5.5% reduction achieved (2001-2006) was small it was significant in the context of a 16% average national increase.

Across both the specialist homelessness service sector and the mainstream services, South Australia has continued to build on current approaches whilst delivering required reforms through the implementation of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness.

The Agreement has to date enabled both expansion and reinvigoration of our current efforts across specialist homelessness services and mainstream services. The planned strategic reforms are making the most of additional funding so that provision of specialist homelessness services, mainstream services and housing are targeted, integrated, coordinated, sustainable and measurable. Sustainable outcomes are being delivered in conjunction with the Social Housing National Partnership Agreement, Indigenous Remote Housing National Partnership and the Jobs and Housing Component on the National Building and Jobs Plan (Economic Stimulus Package).

In addition to systemic reforms, new initiatives will support sector excellence to improve a continuum of care for clients and maximise resources. A high standard of excellence is being ensured whilst maintaining a flexible and individualised response to end homelessness for each client engaged through either the specialist homelessness service sector or mainstream services.

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1.2. Summary of Achievements - Year 1 of reform implementation

As a result of South Australia embarking on a whole of system reform process a program for reform implementation was designed across six key core output areas for year one of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness:

Output 1:  Continuation of base service delivery
Output 2:   Delivery and development of transition programs
Output 3:   Development and delivery of NPAH priority projects (year 1 operation)
Output 4:   Design of new NPAH projects (year 2 operation)
Output 5:   Design of the reformed service sector
Output 6:   Development and implementation of Reform Process

Mainstream Service Engagement with Homelessness Reform

Throughout this document where * appears this indicates that mainstream services have been involved in the reform process, service design and service delivery in a systemic and collaborative way.

NPAH Performance Indicators

NPAH Performance Indicators are listed in Appendix 1 with a reference number given to each one in the left hand column. These Indicators are referred to in Tables 3 – 8 below to illustrate which outcomes each program are targeted to deliver.

1.2.1. Continuation of base service delivery

During Year 1 of the National Partnership Implementation Plan, all existing NAHA homelessness sector services were continued. During this time, all NAHA funded services were actively invited to participate in extensive consultation and information sessions through a variety of mediums, in order to understand, inform and prepare for the significant reforms that would create specific improvement of the practice, workforce and direction of the service sector. The following Table provides a total list of all 94 homelessness sector programs (NAHA funded) that operated during Year 1.

Table 1: NAHA Services and Program Funding
Family Services
1. Anglicare SA Northern Family Accommodation
2. Bowden/Brompton Community Group Inc Bowden Brompton Housing Service
3. Domestic Violence Crisis Service Inc Family Accommodation Information & Referral Services (FAIRS)
4. Housing SA Aboriginal Families Emergency Accommodation Program
5. Lutheran Church of Aust. (SA District) Inc Calvary Lutheran Family Support Service
6. Mission Australia Mission Australia Family Service - The Parks
7. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Ingle Farm Family Supported Accommodation Service
8. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Port Augusta Community Services
9. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Riverland Community Services
10. St Joseph Family Care Centre Ltd St Joseph Family Care Centre
Generic Services
11. Anglican Community Care Inc South East Accommodation Service
12. Anglican Community Care Inc Waikerie Accommodation and Support Service
13. Centacare Catholic Family Services Adelaide Hills/Murraylands Supported Accommodation Service
14. Housing SA (cc2936) Port Augusta Transitional Housing Program
15. The Ranch Inc   Eleanora Centre Emergency & Transitional Accommodation
16. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Support & Accommodation Service
17. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Ceduna Emergency Accommodation Service
18. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Yorke Peninsula Support and Accommodation Service
Single Adult Services
19. Aboriginal Sobriety Group Inc Cyril Lindsay House & Alan Bell Hostel
20. Adelaide Day Centre for Homeless Persons Adelaide Day Centre
21. Baptist Community Services (SA) Inc Westcare Meal Service and Housing Support Service
22. Catherine House Inc Catherine House Supported Accommodation Service
23. Centacare Catholic Family Services Women's Supported Housing Program
24. Central Northern Adelaide Health Service Inc Street to Home
25. Families SA Inner City Community Outreach Worker Program
26. Hutt Street Centre Ltd Hutt Street Centre
27. Offenders Aid & Rehabilitation Services Women's Accommodation Support Service
28. Offenders Aid & Rehabilitation Services Freshstart Accommodation Services
29. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Towards Independence
30. St Vincent De Paul Society (SA) Inc St Vincent's Homeless Persons Accommodation Service
31. UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide Inc Byron Place Community Centre
DV/Women's Services
32. Anglicare SA Inc Barossa Light Intervention & Support Service (BLISS)
33. Catholic Diocese of Port Pirie Inc Ceduna DV and Family Service
34. Centacare Catholic Family Services Elouera House
35. Centacare Catholic Family Services Riverland Domestic Violence Service
36. Centacare Catholic Family Services Limestone Coast DV Service
37. Central Domestic Violence Service Inc Central Domestic Violence Service
38. Domestic Violence Crisis Service Inc Domestic Violence Crisis Service
39. Kangaroo Island Health Service Inc Kangaroo Island DV Service
40. Migrant Women's Support & Accom. Service Inc Migrant Women's Support & Accom. Service
41. Ngaanyatjarra Pitjantjatjara Yankunytjatjara Womens Council Aboriginal Corporation Cross Border Domestic Violence Service
42. Northern Domestic Violence Support Service Inc  Northern Domestic Violence Service
43. Nunga Mi:minar Inc Nunga Mi:minar Inc
44. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Bramwell House
45. Southern Domestic Violence Service Inc Southern Domestic Violence Service
46. UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide Inc The Domestic Violence Helpline
47. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Pt Augusta Regional DV Service
48. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Coober Pedy Safe House and Support Service
49. Yarredi Services Inc Yarredi Domestic Violence Service
Youth Services
50. Aboriginal Family Support Services Inc Youth Accommodation Support Services
51. Baptist Community Services (SA) Inc Youthcare Accommodation Services
52. Catholic Church Endowment Society Inc Coolock House and Malvern Place
53. Centacare Catholic Family Services Centacare Barossa Youth Services
54. Centacare Catholic Family Services Centacare Youth Services
55. Centacare Catholic Family Services Centacare Youth Services - Whyalla
56. Centacare Catholic Family Services Louise Place
57. Developing Alternative Solutions to Housing Inc Metro Housing
58. Mission Australia Riverland Youth Accomm. &Support Service
59. Ranges Youth Centre Inc Ranges Youth Centre
60. Salvation Army (SA) Property Trust Ingle Farm Youth Accommodation Service
61. Service to Youth Council Inc SYC Trace a Place
62. Southern Junction Community Services Inc Southern Junction Youth Service
63. St Johns Youth Services Inc St Johns Youth Service
64. UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide Inc Sidestreet Counselling Service
65. UnitingCare Wesley Adelaide Inc Youth & Parent Services
66. UnitingCare Wesley Port Adelaide Inc Port Youth Accommodation Program
67. West Coast Youth Services Inc West Coast Youth Services
Youth Services - Alt Care Brokerage
68. Alternative Care Unit (ACU) - Families SA Adolescent Community Care Options
69. Alternative Care Unit (ACU) - Families SA Muggy's South Youth Accommodation Service
Innovation & Investment
70. Anglicare Inc Northern Family Accommodation -  Play on the Go
71. Anglican Community Care Inc Accommodation Services Mt Gambier
72. Catherine House Inc Crisis Prevention Project
73. Domestic Violence Crisis Service Inc Extended Hours Support for Women in Motels Project
74. Hutt Street Centre Inc Investing in the Frontline
75. Mission Australia - The Parks Homeless Families Early Intervention Program (HFEIP)
76. Northern Domestic Violence Support Service Inc  Moving Towards Independence
77. Nunga Mi:Minar Inc Educational Pathways
78. Southern Domestic Violence Service Southern DV Service and Nunga Mi:Minar Project
79. Southern Junction Community Services Inc Fleurieu Housing Support Services
80. St John’s Youth Service Inc In-Service Child Support Project
81. St Joseph’s Family Care Centre Ltd Homeless Children’s Support Project
82. St Joseph’s Family Care Centre Ltd Waitlist Support Program
83. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Inc Domestic Violence Perpetrators Early Intervention and Prevention
84. UnitingCare Wesley Port Pirie Port Pirie SAHT Waiting List Support Project
85. Yarredi Services Inc Children’s Well Being Project
86. Anglicare SA Inc Waitlist Support Program
87. Families SA - Crisis Response Unit Homelessness Response Team
88. Homelessness SA Inc Homelessness Resources Development Project
89. Welfare Rights Centre SA Inc Housing Legal Clinic - Ceduna
CSTDA NGO Program - funding to Health Units
90. Central Northern Adelaide Health Service Inc Street to Home
Other CW Funded Projects
91. Catholic Diocese of Port Pirie Inc Ceduna Accommodation and Support Service
92. Nunga Mi:minar Inc Child Support Worker
93. Southern Domestic Violence Service Inc Child Support Worker - SDVS
NAHA Other CW SPPs
94. Homelessness Australia Inc 6th National Homelessness Conference 2010

During 09/10 the above mentioned NAHA funded services exceeded the benchmarks set, as shown in the table below.

Table 2: NAHA total service Performance Indicators
Measure 09/10 Target 09/10 Actual
Total number of clients receiving Early Intervention 25% 51%
Total number of clients receiving Post Crisis support 25% 42%
Total number of clients receiving Case Management 60% 76%
Total number of Clients achieving agreed Case Management goals in the year 30% 60%

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1.2.2. Transition programs

A number of programs being funded by the Social Inclusion Unit (SIU) of South Australia were negotiated to be reformed, enhanced, and implemented via NPAH funding. During Year 1 these former SIU projects were operationalised by homelessness sector services, at the same time as undergoing a significant and detailed reform and review process.  Year 1 outputs are listed in the table below.

Table 3: Transition Program Implementation
NP KPIs Operational NP Project Yr 1: Yr 2 project will be part of: Year 1 Target Output Year 1
1, 8, 9, 11 Outreach Homeless Parenting Program Child Focussed Support 70 Families 66 Families
1,2, 4, 11 Integrated Housing Exits Program* Ex-Custodial Homelessness Support Program (in Partnership with Correctional Services) 60 Clients at any one time 48 Clients at any one time †
1, 2, 5, 6, 11 Intensive Tenancy Support Programme* Regional Generic Services 460 Clients 535 Clients
1, 9, 10, 11 Homelessness Legal Clinic* Stand Alone Service 250 Clients 643 Clients
1, 6, 11 Boarding House Outreach Regional Generic Services 250 Clients 291 Clients
1, 7, 8, 11 Homeless Students Program* Schools Assertive Outreach 200 Students 140 students
1, 8, 9, 11 Aboriginal Youth Early Intervention Program * Metropolitan Aboriginal Youth & Family Support 50 Families 41 Families

 

* Denotes mainstream service engagement

† Difficulty was experienced in obtaining suitable and appropriately located Housing SA rental stock. The new programme will alleviate this issue as 60 properties have been allocated from the Nation Building Economic Stimulus Plan.

As well as the 140 students provided with packages of support, 98 young people were provided with advice, information and referral and 119 young people were assisted into housing or accommodation. In addition, a separate group work program was conducted with Aboriginal youth utilising sport as the engagement medium and 191 young people participated in this.

1.2.3.NP Priority Projects

During Year 1 some new and critical programs were implemented. The table below highlights these.

Table 4: Priority Projects Implementation
NP KPIs Operational NP Project Yr 1: Yr 2 project will be part of: Year 1 Target Output Year 1
1, 2, 6, 11 Regional Integrated Homelessness Model * Street to Home 60 Clients 87 Clients
1, 5, 11 Northern Pilot Casework Support Program* Stand Alone – Mainstreamed yr 3 150 Clients 65 Clients provided with case plans.
1, 2, 4, 11 Homeless Response Team (operational 1 Dec 2010. Prior to that all calls came through Crisis Response Unit)* Generic Gateway Program 0 Clients (not targeted for operation until yr 2 – ahead of schedule) 4920 clients (410 active per month). This includes calls coming through the Crisis Response Unit prior to HART becoming operational 1st Dec 2010.
1, 5, 6, 9, 11 Supportive Housing Packages* Regional Generic Services 0 Clients (not targeted for operation until yr 2 – ahead of schedule) 164 Packages allocated
1, 2, 6, 11 Regional Assertive Outreach Ceduna* Ceduna Regional Generic Homelessness Service 80 Clients Staff Recruited
1, 2, 6, 11 Regional Assertive Outreach Riverland* Stand alone – In P’ship with Disability SA 80 Clients Recruitment Occurring
1, 11 Social Enterprise Homelessness Innovation Fund Min 5 grants per year 6 grants allocated in yr 1
1 Evaluation and Governance Internal   Staff recruited

 

* Denotes mainstream service engagement

1.2.3.1. A Place to Call Home

South Australia has agreed to implement 4 housing projects through the Commonwealth Government’s ‘A Place to Call Home’ initiative.

These projects are:

  1. Ladder St Vincent Street youth housing service, at a cost of $7.3m, based in Port Adelaide, to deliver 23 housing outcomes. The anticipated completion date for this building project is November 2010.
  2. Young families housing service will be implemented as a service element of the Young Family Support Program, at a cost of $2.2m, based at Findon, to deliver 10 housing outcomes.  The anticipated completion date for this building project is July 2011.
  3. The Common Ground project will be implemented as a service element of the Port Augusta Generic Homelessness Service, at a cost of $5.6m based at Port Augusta, to deliver up to 40 housing outcomes. The anticipated completion date for this building project is July 2011 (Site 1 – 15 housing outcomes and Site 2 – 5 housing outcomes) and March 2012 (Site 3 – 20 housing outcomes).
  4. Northern HYPA Housing project at a cost of $4.02m to deliver 30 housing outcomes across APTCH and Affordable Housing Innovations Fund. The anticipated completion date for this building project is March 2011 (Site 1 – 10 housing outcomes) and Sites 2 and 3 (total 20 housing outcomes) by December 2011.

In line with the broader South Australian homelessness sector reforms, many of these housing projects have become service elements within restructured regional services. The APTCH funding source is highlighted in the Reformed Homelessness Sector Tables. Additional financial information is provided in Appendix III.

1.2.4. Design of new NP projects (year 2 operation)

As a part of the Year 1 NPAH implementation process, the Homelessness Strategy Division redesigned all new projects to enable implementation and operation. These services have been consolidated into regional responses and have been tendered as part of the new services system, ensuring that new programs are not an ‘add on’ to existing services, but rather become an integrated part of South Australia’s response to homelessness. Service design incorporating the scrutiny of National and International Research into best practice has ensured that an extensive evidence base has informed service development, partnership design and infrastructure requirements of the service system.

1.2.5. Design of the reformed service sector

Reform of this magnitude takes considerable time, planning, communication and implementation.  Operating concurrently with project design, reform and implementation the HSD has spent year 1 of the NPAH undertaking a strategic reform of the system that delivers Specialist Homelessness Services across South Australia.  In line with Strategy 3: Better Connected Services, as outlined in the White Paper and the NPAH, SA has systematically designed a new service system to deliver streamlined, integrated specialist services that are joined up with mainstream services. 

The design of the reformed sector has required the detailed development and implementation of a number of components including:

1.2.5.1. Communication Strategy *

Homelessness Strategy Division, DFC has implemented a comprehensive communication and consultation process including the following consultative and communication mechanisms:

Aboriginal Consultation Advisory Group (ACAG) *

The ACAG provides cultural advice and expertise on the realignment of existing programs and the development of new ones. The group also provides input into policy frameworks for the delivery of services to Aboriginal people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness and informs strategies to assist non government organisations and Homelessness Strategy to achieve program targets for Aboriginal clients.

Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee *

The Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee aims to ensure a whole-of-government approach is taken in responding to Aboriginal Homelessness. It is chaired by Joslene Mazel, Chief Executive of DFC and membership is comprised of government and non-government representatives.

Domestic Violence Reform Steering Committee *

The Domestic Violence Reform Steering Committee is a joint initiative between DFC and the Office for Women, and is made up of Aboriginal representatives, Specialist Homelessness Services sector representatives and health representatives. The key areas that have been considered include supporting DV legislative changes, better supporting Aboriginal women and children and reform of service provision for Culturally and Linguistically Diverse women and their children.

DFC Domestic and Family Violence Strategic Plan Steering Group *

This Group consists of managers and senior practitioners from across DFC and other key government and non government stakeholders. The role of the Group is to facilitate the development and implementation of a DFC wide Domestic and Family Violence Strategic Plan, with the aim of improving the Department's response to clients who are experiencing domestic or family violence. 

Gateway Reference Group

The Gateway Reference Group is made up of youth, domestic violence and homelessness representatives. The focus of the group is to streamline processes in accessing emergency accommodation so that the response from services is consistent. 

Homelessness Services Advisory Group (HSAG)

The HSAG is comprised of youth, adults, families and domestic violence representatives from the Specialist Homelessness Services sector including regional representation.  This group is utilised for consultation and also provides advice to Homelessness Strategy on current reform projects.

Youth Service Excellence Committee (YSEC) *

The YSEC has clear objectives around developing a connected culture which is supported by systemic change across the Specialist Homelessness Services sector, in its responses to young people. Integration through the key partnerships between Homeless Strategy, Office for Youth, non-government organisations and relevant Government agencies from all three tiers of government (local, state and federal) is central to the success of achieving the objectives of YSEC.

Chief Executive Co-ordinating Committee (CECC) *

The CECC aids the development of cross agency planning, monitoring and evaluation for reducing homelessness. The Committee strengthens the capacity of agencies to respond to the needs of people who are homeless and those at risk of homelessness through improving existing service provision and developing ‘joined up’ service provision across agencies.

Social Inclusion Committee of Cabinet (SICOMM) *

SICOMM oversees the implementation of the State's social inclusion agenda that encompasses broader whole-of-government reform underpinning targets in SA's Strategic Plan.  SICOMM is jointly chaired by the Premier and the Commissioner for Social Inclusion and the Minister for Housing is a member of the Committee. 

Naha-Blah Newsletter *

A monthly newsletter produced and distributed by HSD to all relevant Government and Non-Government partners and stakeholders.

1.2.5.2. Consolidation and Regionalisation of the Sector * (including Homelessness Round Tables)

A partnership infrastructure has been designed incorporating the implementation of Regional Roundtables to that will bring together Government, non-Government, specialist and mainstream services on a regional basis.  These Roundtables will take responsibility for the development of a Regional Alliance Plan to address Homelessness and will each report directly to the Homelessness Inter-Ministerial Committee on regional outcomes. This systemic approach will be implemented via the Commonwealth Integration Project Funding and is central to the integrated outcomes required of the Reformed System.

Another critical reform area that guided the NPAH implementation process was consolidation and regionalisation. HSD wanted to ensure that new services funded under NPAH were not segregated additions to various services and communities across the state. There was a need to maximise their effectiveness by consolidating new programs as ‘service elements’ within a broader and regionally focussed service tender. Both new and existing services were reviewed and mapped in order that all demographic groups were effectively targeted. Consideration was given to ensure the following demographics received adequate and consistent responses across all regional areas:

  • Generic groups
  • Youth
  • Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
  • Domestic Violence
  • Children

The consolidation of services has occurred by joining together different service elements across target populations and regional settings. A number of generic service elements have been developed and will be operational across all regions and populations.  Regional generic service elements include:

NAHA Case Management:

  • Collaborative process
  • Intake, Assessment, Planning, Review, Exit
  • Case work supportive of Case Management
  • Support for duration of need

A Gateway for Service

  • Gateway to accommodation and support
  • Assessment for intake or referral
  • No wrong door

Support

  • Early Intervention
    • Case management for clients ‘at risk’ of homeless
    • Early identification
    • Intervention tailored to population group
  • Post Crisis
    • Continued support upon exiting homelessness
    • Help to sustain accommodation
    • Transition support into the community
  • Waitlist
    • Support to people awaiting accommodation
    • Ensuring safety
    • Engaged in case management
    • Exploring options
  • In Centre
    • Via shop front or onsite services
  • Outreach support
    • Engage people wherever they are
  • Brokerage Fund
    • Funding that supports Case Management
    • Access to specialist services not provided by mainstream agencies
    • Assistance with practical supports
  • Homeless Children’s Support
    • Response to accompanying children
    • Registered and recognised as clients in own right
    • Individual case planning, referral and case management where required

Supportive Housing Packages

  • Individual support to high needs clients
  • Attached to NBESP (Stimulus housing)
  • In partnership with HSA and PGPs

Metropolitan Boarding House Support

  •  Housing First response
  •  Case Management to maintain boarding house accommodation or access alternative housing
1.2.5.3. Key Performance Indicators

For all new services new Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) have been developed in order to measure progress against the NP Performance Indicators. KPIs for reformed services are:

Generic KPIs

  • 70% of clients per year are assisted to sustain their tenancies or exit into sustainable housing;
  • 70% of people in primary homelessness (rough sleeping) are assisted into accommodation and support;
  • 70% of people per year who have experienced family violence are assisted to sustain their tenancies or exit into sustainable housing;
  • No more than 5% of clients will exit into primary homelessness;
  • 70% of people are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so;
  • 70% of people are connected with education/training or employment opportunities;
  • 95% of people presenting to a Specialist Homelessness Service undergo an assessment for service which identifies their immediate risks, accommodation and health and welfare requirements;
  • At least 20% of people assessed identify as Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander;
  • 80% of people assessed for service have a NAHA case management plan in place;
  • 70% of homeless clients with a NAHA case management plan are identified as high risk as per the Service Coordination and Information Database;

In addition to Generic KPIs, some services have specialised KPIs as additional requirements for performance and reporting. Where this is the case, these are noted within the Tables outlining year 1 targets and outputs.

1.2.5.4. Homeless to Home case management and data system

Significant investment has been made in year 1 of the NPAH in planning and building an electronic, web based, case management system that will not only standardise case management responses across Specialist Homelessness Services, but will coordinate these responses across a coordinated system.  In addition this system will meet the reporting requirements for all State reporting as well as for the NPAH, NAHA and National minimum data set.

1.2.5.5. Preferred Support Provider Panel

During year 1 of the NPAH SA has implemented a process of assessing all agencies and identifying a Preferred Support Provider Panel. 

As a result of this process a total of 43 agencies have met the required standard and have been allocated to the panel. All Homelessness Preferred Support Providers (PSPs) have been assessed by DFC as having strong governance systems and a commitment to the provision of quality support to clients who are homeless, or at risk of homelessness and/or are experiencing a high level of need.

In addition the PSP scheme has:

  • Provided SA Government with a pool of high quality and high capacity support service providers able to maximise long term outcomes for homeless and at risk clients;
  • Assessed the capacity of agencies to adopt standardised, streamlined and integrated processes for case management and support to homeless and high need clients within a regionally based framework;
  • Determined agencies’ suitability for partnering with a Preferred Growth Provider.

All Preferred Support Providers were assessed on 4 key areas of capacity:

  1. Governance
  2. Financial Viability
  3. Leadership and Human Resources
  4. Service Delivery
    • Case Management Systems
    • Case Work Systems
    • Culturally Appropriate Services

In addition to generic eligibility agencies were able to attain status against three Speciality Areas:

  1. Domestic and Family Violence
  2. Youth
  3. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander
1.2.5.6. Gateway Reform *

As part of service reform all services will be required to utilise the new Service Coordination and Information Data Base to act as a gateway into the Homelessness Services Sector as per the Gateway Service Element.  This response is built on the notion of “No Wrong Door” and enables every point of access across the system to engage in initial assessment and referral to an appropriate response.

In addition a specialist Gateway is being developed and implemented across the state in line with specialisations identified through the PSP process.  Specialist Gateway Services include the following specialisations:

  • Generic
  • Youth
  • Domestic and Family Violence

All Specialist Gateway Services will incorporate an ATSI service element.

1.2.5.7. Separation of Property Management and Support *

(Target 500 Properties (total)    Yr 1 Output: 150 Properties)
This reform has involved ensuring that property management is undertaken separately to client support.  The key reasons for this reform are:

  1. To ensure high quality services are provided to clients without conflict of interest or a monopoly of services in a person’s life.
  2. To ensure that resources required for support are not consumed by property management and maintenance requirements

To ensure that high quality Property Management services are provided, DFC, Community Partnerships and Growth has undertaken a process of implementing a Preferred Growth Provider Panel.  This will ensure that housing management services are undertaken by high quality non-government organisations in the same way that the PSP process will ensure high quality support services.

1.2.5.8. Domestic and Family Violence Sector Reform *

The Department for Families and Communities, Homelessness Strategy Division and the Attorney General’s Department, Office for Women have over the last 12 months engaged in a partnership process to reform of the Domestic Violence Service Sector in line with new legislative directions by both State and Commonwealth Governments. This reform will coordinate domestic and family violence support and accommodation services with the criminal justice system.

In relation to domestic and family violence, the White Paper called for the development of new domestic and family violence programs that make it easier for victims to remain in their homes, whenever it is safe to do so.

Key features of proposed reformed system for South Australia will include:

  • Coordination of the domestic and family violence support and accommodation services, with the criminal justice system
  • Support for women to remain in their own homes (when it is safe to do so)
  • Consolidation of domestic violence support and accommodation services across the state to produce more efficient economies of scales
  • Culturally appropriate responses to the issue of Aboriginal Family Violence and CALD communities
1.2.5.9. Aboriginal Homelessness Reform *

In year 1 of the NPAH SA has taken seriously its commitment to reduce Aboriginal Homelessness by 33%.  To do this a number of reforms have been initiated:

  • ATSI Targets: All reformed Homelessness Services across the State from 1 July 2010 have a minimum Key Performance Indicator that 20% of all clients must be Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander.  Programs identified as Aboriginal Focus in key areas around SA will have a target of 60% ATSI and programs identified as Aboriginal Specific will have a target of 100% ATSI.
  • Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee*: The Aboriginal Homelessness Steering Committee is ensuring aims to ensure a whole-of-government approach is taken in responding to Aboriginal Homelessness. It is chaired by Joslene Mazel, Chief Executive of DFC and membership is comprised of government and non-government representatives.
  • APY Lands Response*: South Australia is planning a specific response to address issues of Aboriginal Mobility, Homelessness and Aboriginal Family Violence across the APY Lands.  Homelessness Strategy has two key strategies in addition to linking with work being undertaken under the NP for Remote Indigenous Housing:
    • The employment of a Homelessness Case Manager within the team of staff in the Housing SA Regional Office currently being set up in Umuwa. This position links people on the lands experiencing homelessness to appropriate and available housing and support.
    • In response to the Mullighan Inquiry into the sexual abuse of children on the APY lands, HSD is implementing an APY Safe Response as part of its service contracts with the Cross Border Domestic Violence Program, The Coober Pedy Safe House Program and the Ceduna Safe House Program. This response will invest additional funds into these three programs and require that services provide additional service elements in the areas of case management, transport and partnership to ensure an integrated response to women and children experiencing domestic and family violence on the APY Lands.
  • Safe Tracks Strategic Framework *: The Safe Tracks Strategic Framework provides an opportunity to develop a strategic system of engagement and integration that links up operational responses as well as strategic policy initiatives to address Aboriginal Homelessness in SA. It will enable the linking of the contributions of all government departments and community sectors which form part of the state’s Aboriginal homelessness and housing response. The Strategic Framework will create a policy and operational environment whereby all relevant stakeholders will be able to submit information relating to their individual responses in order to accurately inform the current service environment. The Safe Tracks Strategic Framework will operate across 7 Key areas:
    • Strategic Policy
    • Framework  Governance
    • Partnership and Integration
    • Aboriginal Community Engagement
    • Workforce Development
    • Research and Data
    • Operational Responses
    The provision of a Safe Tracks Strategic Framework ensures:
    • Recognition is given to the inherent value in preserving traditional patterns of mobility and cultural understandings of place and home.
    • Responses are culturally supportive, respectful and inclusive of the diverse populations within the Aboriginal community.
    • Partnerships within and across tiers of Government are created and maintained.
    • Responses are sustainable, integrated, transparent and universally understood.
    • Responses will support the delivery of infrastructure, regional programs and services which collectively respond to mobility and transience.
    • Improvement of access to and outcomes for Aboriginal people across a range of social determinants is achieved, including housing, criminal justice, education, employment, health and wellbeing.

1.2.6. Staged Tender Process

In order to ensure smooth and clear transition of all services into a reformed homelessness sector, SA’s approach involved phased implementation of significant reform projects consolidated with existing but improved services and a 2 staged implementation of new programs during 2010 and a third stage comprising a small number of new programs attached to new dwellings and infrastructure to be implemented and/or tendered during 2011.

The following outlines the timeframes of the reform implementation process:

NPAH Year 1 Operational:

  • June 2009: NP Implementation began
  • July 2009: Consultation and Communication Strategy Implemented
  • September 2009: Preferred Support Provider Implemented
  • December 2009: Preferred Support Provider Panel announced
  • February 2010: Internal Procurement Team established
  • March 2010: Stage 1 Tender process released
  • April 2010: Stage 1 Tenders assessed
  • May 2010: Stage 1 Tender outcomes announced
  • July 2010: Stage 1 programs operational

NPAH Year 2 Operational:

  • July 2010: Stage 2 Tender Process released
  • August/Sept: Stage 2 Tender Process assessed
  • August 2010: Consolidation and Regionalisation reforms
  • September 2010: Stage 2 Tender outcomes announced
  • December 2010: Stage 2 Tendered programs operational

Section 2. Detail of Activities under the NP

2.1 A Reformed Specialist Homelessness Sector in South Australia

The following table outlines the new services that constitute the Stage 1 reformed Specialist Homelessness Sector across South Australia. Programs with a Year 1 target were operational for a part of 2009/10. The new programs with N/A against Year 1 Target and Output became active in July 2010.

Links to the relevant NPAH Performance Indicators and Outputs are referenced in the first column.

Table 5: Specialist Homelessness Services - STAGE ONE (2010-2013)
Operational 1 July 2010
NPAH Output & KPIs Service Description Targets Year 1 Output
Stand Alone / State-wide Services
17 (e) KPI 1 Service Evaluation and Governance The Homelessness Strategy Division and the Research Unit within DFC will jointly develop and implement monitoring and evaluation mechanisms and frameworks to track performance, impact and achievability of program initiatives described in this Implementation Plan.
The Core Monitoring and Contract Performance Management elements will be developed, implemented and managed from within the Homelessness Strategy Division.
A Contract Performance Management Framework will be implemented to ensure good governance, monitor the management of funds and delivery of quality services to all clients.
The core monitoring function will be designed to provide project and service performance data and trend analysis across all initiatives and services that form part of this implementation plan. Core monitoring data will supplement data derived from the national minimum data set and the further allow DFC to report on the targets as stipulated in the NPAH as well as progress against the South Australian Strategic Plan targets.
Responsibility for the Evaluation Framework will be undertaken by DFC’s Research Unit and a Principal Evaluation Officer has been appointed to develop, manage and implement an evaluation framework for the National Partnership Implementation Plan. This role is located within the Research Unit of the Department and the management of this position will be undertaken by the Manager of the Research Unit. The extensive research and evaluation experience that exists within the Research Unit makes it the most suitable place for the evaluation function to operate from. The outputs of the Evaluation Framework will be aligned to the targets, strategies and outcomes as set out in the National Partnership Implementation Plan.
The Evaluation Framework will have a strong focus on outputs and the impact that initiatives have on the lives of clients. It will subsequently identify factors (both positive and negative) which contributed to outcomes; document learning’s resulting from the reform and adds to the evidence base with regards to homelessness, services and interventions.
The evaluations within the Evaluation Framework will be conducted through a combination of expert evaluation consultants, academic institutions and in-house evaluations undertaken by the Department.  DFC will also maintain ongoing liaison with the Social Inclusion Division to promote whole of government coordination.
Delivering an agreed state evaluation framework, including specified number of service evaluations Staff recruited and draft framework being developed
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 5, 6, 11 Common Ground Adelaide Ltd (Light Sq & Flinders) Common Ground Adelaide Ltd. has been established to manage and provide an integrated range of support services available on-site.  It will seek to maximise the ability of tenants to live independently and maintain their tenancies.  Key workers will be located within the facility and will be available seven days a week, while personal support workers will provide a range of flexible supports – intensive, on-going or episodic in one-to-one and/or group settings.
Services will be provided from one site (Franklin Street) in Year 1, expanding to two sites late in Year 2 (Franklin Street and Light Square).
Franklin Street Apartments will primarily house clients with lower complexity due to design aspects of the building; Light Square will have greater capacity to assist clients with higher and more complex needs. Additional KPI:
50% of people housed enter from homelessness.
Year 1.  37
Year 2. 50
Year 3. 50
Year 4. 50
37 Tenants
16(d)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 11
Ex-Custodial Homelessness Support Service* The Ex-Custodial Homelessness Support Service will prioritise clients in prison to identify those who are most at risk of homelessness, and have complex needs as part of pre-release planning in partnership with DCS and Housing SA staff.
DCS staff will then refer eligible clients who have been allocated a housing outcome to the Ex-Custodial Homelessness Support Service for on-going case management support pre and post release enabling a smooth transition into the community and independent living.
Year 1. 351
Year 2. 351
Year 3. 351
Year 4. 351
538 Clients
16(d)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 6, 11
Integrated Housing Exits (Corrections) * The Integrated Housing Exits Program (IHEP) will reduce the incidence of homelessness and the cycling in and out of custodial institutions, as a consequence of being homeless, for people who are exiting from a period of custody and who have been incarcerated less than 12 months. It is a partnership program between the Department for Families and Communities (DFC) and the Department for Correctional Services (DCS). 
At any one time 60 clients, exiting a custodial setting, will receive accommodation and pre and post release case management support to prevent them from exiting into homelessness, ensure they develop independent living skills and support them to deal with risk factors that may lead to patterns of re-offending. Other eligible clients will receive pre-release case management support, advocacy and referral to suitable housing and support options post release. Housing Officers employed with program funding and located within the Corrections system will provide this support. 
Additional KPIs:
  • At least 20% of clients are women
  • No more than 50% of clients are charged with a new criminal offence for the duration of support
Year 1. 60
Year 2. 60
Year 3. 60
Year 4. 60
48 Clients
Difficulty was experienced in obtaining suitable and appropriately located Housing SA rental stock. The new programme will alleviate this issue as 60 properties have been allocated from the Nation Building Economic Stimulus Plan.
17(d)
KPI 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 11
Therapeutic Youth Service
(formally known as ‘Reunification and Homelessness Prevention’ Program)
The Therapeutic Youth Service will run accommodation services (in several metro regions) and offer both an onsite and outreach counselling programs.  Participants will be engaged in either supports that focus on reunification or establishment of independent living skills, although it is recognised that the nature of the service response may change over time.  The Service will provide the following elements:
  • Accommodation;
  • Outreach;
  • Family counselling; and
  • Sexual abuse counselling.
Additional KPIs:
  • 70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so.
  • 70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are connected with education/training or employment opportunities.
  • The Service will respond to at least 90% of requests for professional advice, training and support from specialist homelessness service providers.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 374
Year 3. 374
Year 4. 374
N/A
17(d)17(j)
KPI 1, 7, 8, 9, 11
Schools Assertive Outreach* (Operating in Year 1 as Homeless Students Program) This program will provide an early intervention, assertive and responsive outreach service to young people between the ages of 12-18 years to maintain connection with family, school and community. The program will be provided by a non government agency and will ensure that wherever possible, young people do not present to crisis homeless services and therefore be at greater risk of joining the long term chronic homeless population.
Outcomes will include:
  • Stabilised accommodation (either home based or independent) for students at risk of homelessness
  • Prevention of homelessness and maintenance of connection with school
  • Relationships with family strengthened where appropriate
  • Connection to community activities
Additional KPIs:
  • Increased number of schools with MOU’s with the program in each geographical metropolitan area (Northern, Eastern, Southern and Western Adelaide)
  • 75% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so.
  • 75% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are connected with education/training or employment opportunities.
Year 1. 200
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
140 Students.98 young people were also provided with advice, information and referral and 119 young people were assisted into housing or accomm. In addition, a separate group work program was conducted with Aboriginal youth utilising sport as the engagement medium and 191 young people participated in this.
16(d)17(d)
KPI 1, 4, 7, 9, 11
Youth Justice* The Youth Justice Program offers 20 housing outcomes for young people transitioning from custodial institutions. The program provides a case management and counselling response aimed at developing independent living skills and reducing the likelihood of re-offending. The service works in partnership with the housing providers (Housing SA or Preferred Growth Providers) and Families SA (juvenile detention centre managers). On exit from the institution the young person is provided housing under a 12 month lease within the closest location to the community of their choice.
Additional KPIs:
  • No more than 50% of clients are charged with a new criminal offence for the duration of support
  •  At least 20% of clients transitioning from Magill Training Centre per year are women
  • 70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so.
  •  70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are connected with education/training or employment opportunities.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 20
Year 3. 20
Year 4. 20
Operational in March 2010 – 3 months ahead of schedule. Two clients have already been assisted into accommodation. *See Case Study
17(b) 17(c) 17(g)
KPI 1, 8, 9, 11
Aboriginal Youth Early Intervention* This program will work in partnership with the Child Focused Support Program to provide service supports to Aboriginal children 0-12 year’s old accompanying adults into the Specialist Homelessness Sector or who are at risk of homelessness or who are homeless. Up to 70% of families engaging with this service are known to Families SA where child abuse and/or neglect are evident and an early intervention response is required to reduce the likelihood of children and their families being homeless and being at risk of further abuse and neglect.
Additional KPIs:
  • 70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so.
  •  70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are connected with education/training or employment opportunities.
Year 1. 50
Year 2. 50
Year 3. 50
Year 4. 50
41 Families
17(j)
KPI 1, 8, 9, 11
Child Focussed Support (Incl $100k to Mental Health for 1yr) * This initiative will provide individual and group supports for the children accompanying adults within the Specialist Homelessness Service Sector.  The intention is to recognise and respond to the specific needs associated with preparation for and engagement with the education system. Children aged 0-12 and will be involved in initiatives such as group play, connection with community, educational support and mentoring.
This program will work across the specialist homelessness sector including youth, families and domestic violence.  Strategic and operational partnerships will be formed with early childhood and education services within the mainstream sectors to ensure no duplication of services and appropriate access to existing services for homeless children.
Additional KPIs:
  • 70% of requests from specialist service providers for support to deliver services to accompanying children in the homelessness sector will be responded to per year.
  • 70% of clients per year participating in Stream 2 complete a program of group work.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 465
Year 3. 465
Year 4. 465
N/A
16(b) 17(h)
KPI 1, 2, 6, 11
Street to Home* Street to Home is a multi-disciplinary assertive outreach program that provides case management and professional assessment and referral of people rough sleeping across metro Adelaide. The service is jointly funded by Health SA, reflecting the various professional streams employed by the service.
Street to Home provides case management that utilises a housing first response and continues to provide support for a client up until the period of time that a client becomes stable in long term housing, or is receiving intensive case management services from an agency who will remain involved long term (egg mental health services).
Year 1. TBA
Year 2. TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA
N/A
17(e)
KPI 1, 2, 6, 11
Street to Home Integrated Homelessness Program* This program involves the secondment of experienced staff from key mainstream government services (namely Housing SA, Mental Health and DASSA) to Street to Home. The project aims to improve access to mainstream services for those experiencing homelessness as well as for staff working within homeless clients across the homelessness sector. The project also seeks to improve across sector coordination (both government and non-government) and streamline integrated service delivery to those clients who are identified as most at risk.
Additional KPIs:
  • 80% of clients requesting assistance through the ‘Return to Country Program’ are assisted in safe travel to return to homelands
Year 1. TBA
Year 2. TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA
87 People
17(g)
KPI 1, 8, 9, 11
Young Family Support Program
(includes financial contribution from APTCH)
This service is intended to provide individual case management and housing outcomes to 2 core target groups:
  • Young families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.
  • Young women who are either pregnant or have accompanying children and are homeless or at risk of homelessness.
The service utilises a holistic approach that integrates accommodation with personal support, life and parent skills, employment and training and engagement with community. Housing is offered under 6 and 12 month lease arrangements with a focus on building the strength and capacity of the young family unit.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 227
Year 3. 227
Year 4. 227
N/A
17(g)
KPI 1, 2, 6, 9, 11
Catherine House Catherine House will provide in centre and outreach case management and support to people living in the following accommodation options:
  • Catherine House - emergency accommodation for 16 women.
  • 8 transitional accommodation units
  • Other Housing SA or Community Housing that may be accessed through negotiations; and
  • 5 supportive housing packages.
In addition the service will maximise opportunity for people to be supported to access and maintain any other relevant accommodation settings.
Year 1. 270
Year 2. 275
Year 3. 275
Year 4. 275
334 Clients
17(b)
KPI 1, 5, 6, 11
Towards Independence Towards Independence provides a supported accommodation program for homeless people rehabilitating from addiction and progressing towards long term stable housing and support.   Service elements under the NAHA are based on "A Gateway for service", "Supportive Accommodation", "Support" including NAHA case management, early intervention & post crisis support, in-centre and outreach support, wait list support, brokerage funding and child focused support.  The Principles underlying the service include children accompanying adults will be recognised as clients in their own right and agreement to participate in the Service Coordination and Information Database (SCID).  NP funded elements are also included and although varying for different services and regions may include funding for packages of support tied to stimulus housing, intensive tenancy support, boarding house outreach and specialist child support programs.  Year 1. 125
Year 2. 125
Year 3. 125
Year 4. 125
117 Clients
Murray Mallee Region
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Riverland Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 251
Year 3. 251
Year 4. 251
N/A
16(b) 17(h)
KPI 1, 2, 9, 11
Riverland Assertive Outreach* The Riverland Homelessness Assertive Outreach Program will provide an assertive and intensive case management response to engage with people sleeping rough in the Riverland region and provide them with appropriate accommodation. The program recognises that people who are sleeping rough may be somewhat reluctant to receive support, or suspicious of assistance in the first instance and will apply an assertive outreach approach to establish connections, build trust, provide client centred services and pathways out of homelessness.  The program will:
  • Reduce the incidence of homelessness for people sleeping rough in the Riverland;
  • Establish an effective intake system;
  • Establish a multi-disciplinary approach to case management;
  • Target individuals’ immediate and longer-term needs;
  • Engage clients in developing exit-oriented case plans to support them in gaining independent living skills and moving into longer term housing with outreach support.
Additional KPI:
  • 90% of rough sleepers in the Riverland area are assertively engaged on a regular basis
Year 1. 60
Year 2. 60
Year 3. 60
Year 4. 60
Staff recruited
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Murray Bridge/Adelaide Hills Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 235
Year 3. 235
Year 4. 235
N/A
Limestone Coast Region
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Limestone Coast Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 252
Year 3. 252
Year 4. 252
N/A
17(d)
KPI 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, 11
Therapeutic Youth Service
(formally known as ‘Reunification and Homelessness Prevention’ Program)
The Therapeutic Youth Service will run a local accommodation service and offer both an onsite and outreach counselling programs.  Participants will be engaged in either supports that focus on reunification or establishment of independent living skills, although it is recognised that the nature of the service response may change over time.  The Service will provide the following elements:
Accommodation;
Outreach;
Family counselling; and
Sexual abuse counselling.
  • Additional KPIs:
  • 70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are re-engaged with family where it is appropriate and safe to do so.
  •  70% of young people (aged 12 – 18 years) per year are connected with education/training or employment opportunities.
  • The Service will respond to at least 90% of requests for professional advice and support from homelessness services (Sexual Abuse Counselling).
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 39
Year 3. 39
Year 4. 39
N/A
Eyre and Western Region
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Ceduna & Far West Generic Homelessness Service* The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Ceduna Assertive Regional Engagement: Assertive outreach, engagement, assessment and case management of rough sleepers and mobile Aboriginal populations in and around Ceduna.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. TBA
Year 2. TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA
TBA
17(d)17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Pt Lincoln Generic Homelessness Service (Youth Focus) The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 127
Year 3. 127
Year 4. 127
N/A
17(d)17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Whyalla Generic Homelessness Service (Youth Focus) The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 239
Year 3. 239
Year 4. 239
N/A
Southern Region
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Inner Southern Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 300
Year 3. 300
Year 4. 300
N/A
17(d)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Inner Southern Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 283
Year 3. 283
Year 4. 283
N/A
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Outer Southern Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 386
Year 3. 386
Year 4. 386
N/A
17(d)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Outer Southern Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 233
Year 3. 233
Year 4. 233
N/A
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Fleurieu and Kangaroo Island Generic Homelessness and Domestic Violence Service The Generic Homelessness Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2.
H/less: 155
DV: 50
Year 3. H/less: 155
DV: 50
Year 4. H/less: 155
DV: 50  
N/A
Northern Region
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Inner North & North East Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 624
Year 3. 624
Year 4. 624
N/A
17(d)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Inner North & North East Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 315
Year 3. 315
Year 4. 315
N/A
17(g)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Outer North Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 433
Year 3. 433
Year 4. 433
N/A
17(d)17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Outer North Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 289
Year 3. 289
Year 4. 289
N/A
Far North Region
16(b) 17(h)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 11
Pt Augusta ATAC* The Aboriginal Transitional Accommodation Centres (ATAC) will provide safe and secure accommodation for Aboriginal people who are homeless and who visit regional centres for services, health treatment and other reasons. The Centres offer:
  • Support for Aboriginal individuals and families needing safe, affordable and suitable transitional accommodation with support when travelling to regional centres to access services or visiting for social or cultural reasons.
  • Staff with knowledge and language skills supervise centres 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and provide access and pathways to health and well being through multi-agency support.
Assistance to return to communities and move through a range of alternative housing options when required.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA
N/A
Eyre and Western Region
1, 2, 6, 11 Regional Integrated Homelessness Model * Street to Home 60 Clients 87 Clients
Yorke & Mid North
17(g) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Yorke & Mid North Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 296
Year 3. 296
Year 4. 296
N/A
Western Adelaide Region
17 (d) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Western Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 190
Year 3. 190
Year 4. 190
N/A
16(a) 17 (d) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 7, 11
Ladder St Vincent Street*
(includes financial contribution from APTCH)
Ladder St Vincent Street, will provide supportive housing for young people exiting homelessness via 23 self contained apartments in Port Adelaide, situated in the Western suburbs of Adelaide. The onsite support will focus on connecting young people with training, education and employment outcomes which will be supported through a mentoring program provided by the AFL community organisation known as Ladder. Additional KPIs:
  • 90% of clients will be engaged in individual or group mentoring.
  •  
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 23
Year 3. 23
Year 4. 23
N/A
Eastern Adelaide Region
17 (g) 17 (h)
KPI 1, 2, 6, 11
Terrace Liaison Worker The Terrace Liaison Worker will provide case management support and referral for services for clients residing in the Terrace boarding house facility. Their role will include indentifying clients who are at risk and accessing relevant services that will assist people to stabilise their housing, health and other need. Year 1. 40
Year 2. 40
Year 3. 40
Year 4. 40
29 clients provided with consultation and case management

2.2. Case Studies

Case 1 – Youth Justice Service

The new Youth Justice Program, funded via the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness, has been a catalyst for behaviour change in a young male with an extensive offending history.

A young man commenced working with Service to Youth Council (SYC) in January 2010, when he participated in a term of SYC’s Social Competence Program – Ignition. Ignition is a crime prevention initiative offering transitional and post-release group work and case management support to young people exiting youth justice or adult correctional facilities. His SYC case manager was also able to meet with him individually on 3 separate occasions to begin setting a plan for release.

He was released from Cavan Training Centre in March 2010 following nine months of detention, and housed soon after in a newly built property under the Integrated Housing Exits – Youth Justice Program. His SYC case manager, working collaboratively with the Department for Families and Communities Youth Justice case manager assisted him to purchase furniture and household items using brokerage funds. He was also supported to move in to his property, including set up and unpacking.

Since release and being accommodated through this program, this young man has secured full time employment, and is re-paying all court imposed fines with the finances he earns working. He also, with support from SYC, completes weekly budget and food plans, has set up direct debits for his power bills, and keeps his property in an “immaculate” condition. SYC’s Health and Recreation services were also able to provide him with a membership to his local gymnasium, which he now accesses at least 3 times per week. He has demonstrated positive problem solving and coping skills, including setting boundaries with his friends around their behaviour when at his property. His SYC case manager refers to him as “extremely house proud”, and was surprised to find that he has incorporated planning for household purchases, including a door mat and rug for his living room, into his weekly budget plans. This is a young man that could not be described as having an “easy-ride”; however he now reports that his main frustration at home is “the dust that continues to get into the bathroom, no matter how often it is cleaned!”

Case 2 – Homeless Assessment Response Team (HART)

The Social Workers in the newly funded Homelessness Assessment Response Team (HART, Crisis Response Unit, DFC) endeavour to assist clients to address homelessness by providing holistic assessment, response and referral.  When a client calls, HART workers support clients (predominantly over the telephone) to identify and explore solutions to issues and complexities that place them at risk of homelessness.  Once a solution is identified and actioned, HART workers will link clients into ongoing support.

Consider the case of Ms X.  She contacted HART on a weekend following discharging herself from hospital with a newborn child.  She felt unsupported in hospital and believed she was being ‘watched’ and deemed a ‘bad mum’ by hospital staff because of her cultural background and disclosure of previous drug use.  Ms X felt her decisions about when to feed or cuddle her newborn child were being criticised.  She had no family to support her and had been evicted from a property prior to giving birth. 

In this case, the HART Social Worker explored and offered (after communication with the hospital) the possibility of mother and child returning to the hospital through a social admission.  There were no health concerns requiring the newborn to remain in hospital.  The mother did not believe hospital was an option for herself and child, even in the short term.  Immediate family may have been an option but they did not reside in the area.  Being provided transport to family was not an option as the mother was required to attend appointments during the week in the lead up to signing a new lease for long term accommodation that was to be offered through Housing SA within 7 days.
In making an assessment and working towards a positive outcome the HART worker endeavoured to maintain a respectful, transparent relationship between worker and client.  Assessment of potential outcomes were influenced by child safety, the nature of  previous domestic violence, understanding of women’s health (including post natal mental health), cultural specific considerations and policies / procedures of agencies involved.  Ultimately the HART worker arranged accommodation in a motel on the grounds that this would assist Ms X’s wellbeing and confidence to provide the love and care her newborn child required and that mother and child had shelter away from the risk of violence. 

The mother was provided with emergency financial assistance and supplies to assist her.  This included baby products (formula, bottles, sterilising equipment, clothing), but also food and personal care products for mother.  The mother was appreciative of being thought of when given products (e.g. moisturiser) to care for herself.   Mother and child safety and wellbeing were initially monitored through telephone contact and an outreach visit by HART and Crisis Care Workers. Ms X knew she was only a phone call away from help if she needed it.  HART worker provided counselling with mother that explored issues related to post natal physical and mental health, safety from domestic violence, motherhood and caring for a newborn.  The next day outreach visits from a homelessness support service and Women’s and Children’s Hospital Midwife outreach services continued support.  Ongoing motel accommodation until the Housing SA rental property was available was possible through support of Families SA (along with additional baby supplies).

Homelessness can create instability and difficulty linking with family and community support networks.  In this situation best practice in addressing Homelessness was achieved through holistic understanding and collaboration, communication and co-operation between client and a number of service agencies.

Section 3. Key Priorities for 2010-11

3.1 Stage Two Service Implementation

By 1 December 2010, Stage 2 of the homelessness reforms will be completed and a further 20 state-wide, metropolitan wide or regionalised Specialist Homelessness Services and 18 state-wide or regional Specialist Domestic Violence services will have been directly or selectively tendered and operational. A key priority for the Homelessness Strategy Division is to assist agencies in ensuring a smooth transition occurs from the old service models to the new. Tables 6 and 7 below outline the Stage two Specialist Homelessness Services, and the Stage 2 Specialist Domestic Violence Services.

Table 6: Specialist Homelessness Services – STAGE TWO (2010-2013)
Operational 1 December 2010
NPAH Output Service Description Target Year 1 Output Year
Stand Alone / State-wide Services
17 (g)
KPI 1, 2, 5, 6, 11
St Vincent De Paul This service will provide in-centre support and links to case management to people living in the following accommodation options:
Accommodation for up to 49 people in a purpose built facility at 22 – 28 Whitmore Square, Adelaide. This facility will be operational 24 hours, 7 days per week, with flexible staffing and service provision dependent on individual client need and to ensure the safety and welfare of all residents.
In addition the service will maximise opportunity for people to be supported to access and maintain any other relevant accommodation settings.
Year 1. 800
Year 2. 800
Year 3. 800
Year 4. 800
1,150 Clients
17(d) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 7, 11
Youth Gateway The Youth Gateway Service is a telephone based service providing access to the Specialist Homelessness Service sector for young people (15 – 24 years old) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.   The Youth Gateway Service is an integral part of the broader Specialist Homelessness Sector system and will develop relationships, and align closely with other specialist gateway services including:
  • Homelessness Assessment and Response Team (HART) Gateway Service
  • Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Gateway Service
95% of callers are supported to engage with the specialist homelessness services system N/A
17(d) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 5, 7, 9, 11
Youth Accom: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Specific (Operational in Year 1 as the Aboriginal Family Support Service) This Youth Accommodation Service provides short, medium and long term accommodation to young Indigenous people. Olga Fudge Lodge and Narungga House operate over 24 hours, 7 days per week. The service includes intake, referral and NAHA case management as well as onsite accommodation support. Year 1. 40
Year 2. 40
Year 3. 40
Year 4. 40
73 Clients
17(a)
KPI 1, 2, 5, 6, 11
Aged Homelessness Assistance Safe and long term supported accommodation for homeless people aged over 55 years including an 18 unit apartment block and 30 supportive housing packages in the community. Service support is focussed on reducing isolation, sustaining tenancies, community integration and connecting clients with services in the aged care sector. Year 1. 48
Year 2. 48
Year 3. 48
Build of 18 unit block due for completion in December 2010/ January 2011. Service to be tendered with occupation date estimated for February 2011.
17(e) 17(d)
KPI 1, 11
Workforce Development* South Australian government will make a commitment to the provision of professional development opportunities relating to service provision, preferred provider systems, performance management, developing agency capacity, workforce development and integrated case management processes. The program will provide a specifically funded training and development quality assurance mechanism that will enable accreditation and service excellence for all agencies within the Specialist homeless Sector. Particular focus will be given to the employment and support of Aboriginal staff across the sector, which will involve the creation of state-wide consultation and advisory positions, which will be accessible to all homelessness sector services. Workshop / Training Program (1/2 or full day courses) = TARGET 300 participants per annum Education / Learning Program (Certificate / Degree courses, assignment based and/or RPL) = TARGET 150 per annum N/A
17(e)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 11
HART* In partnership with Families SA Crisis Response Unit, Homelessness Assessment Response Team (HART) assists homeless people in crisis seeking assistance 7 days per week.  HART offers a specialist telephone based assessment and response service providing information, assessment and counseling service for all people affected by homelessness and domestic violence. If necessary, HART will organize short term crisis accommodation in shelters or a variety of commercial accommodation and link clients to relevant regional day time services that can assist them further the next day.  Calls to daytime Gateway Services such as Domestic Violence Gateway and Youth Gateway are automatically put through to HART after hours.
A key target for the service is that 95% of callers are supported to engage with the specialist homelessness services system
Year 1. 0 Clients (not targeted for operation until Year 2)
Year 2.
10, 000 calls
Year 3.
10,000 calls
Year 4. 10,000 calls
Ahead of Schedule – active on 1st Dec 2010. In first 7 months approx. 410 calls per month. Totalling 2,870 calls.
17(k)
KPI 1, 5, 6, 9, 11
Financial Services Clinic The Financial Clinic will provide individual financial counselling, planning and advice to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. The service will also provide an expansion of financial pathways and of pro bono financial services for the target group, as well as representing and providing a greater understanding of homelessness issues outside the Specialist Homelessness Sector. Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
N/A
17(k)
KPI 1, 2, 6, 9, 11
Adolescent Community Care Brokerage* The Brokerage funding for Adolescent Community Care Options is specifically targeted towards young people aged 16 – 20 years, who have been assessed by Families SA and/or other service providers as being homeless or at risk of homelessness.  The brokerage funding is aimed at supporting placement stability and addressing needs and issues that have a detrimental impact on the successful transition into independent living for the young person. Year 1.  $5k per client/year
Year 2. $5k per client/year
Year 3. $5k per client/year Year 4. $5k per client/year
Average of $2.4k per package
Far North Region
16(a)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Port Augusta Generic Homelessness Service
(includes financial contribution from APTCH)
The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Common Ground Pt Augusta: This will provide supportive housing outcomes for Aboriginal and Non Aboriginal people exiting homelessness via 40 self contained apartments or houses situated over 3 sites in the Port Augusta region. It will have a strong focus on integrating residents into community via employment, training and lifestyle supports.
Additional KPI:
50% of people housed enter from homelessness
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 140
Year 3. 180
Year 4. 180
N/A
17(d) 17 (j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Port Augusta Youth Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 182
Year 3. 182
Year 4. 182
N/A
Eastern Adelaide Region
17(a)
KPI 1, 2, 5, 6, 9, 11
Day Centres Each day centre will be funded to provide a Community Transition Worker who will provide an assertive case management and transition support for clients at risk of homelessness to connect with local services, education and employment, recreational activities and social supports within their community to establish a connection, sustain their tenancy or re-establish in more suitable accommodation. Community Transition support will include but is not limited to the following aspects:
  • Consolidate a connection to the community of choice and establish skills and confidence to access services and activities away from the inner city.
  • The support will be provided for a period until networks are established;
  • Contact with the client can be maintained on an as needs basis in a variety of settings as negotiated;
  • Provide practical assistance;
  • Advocacy for the client;
  • Refer to other agencies for therapeutic support and intervention as required and negotiated with the client.
Year 1.N/A
Year 2. 230
Year 3. 230
Year 4. 230
N/A
17(g) 17(j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Eastern Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 250
Year 3. 250
Year 4. 250
N/A
Western Adelaide Region
17(g) 17(j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 9, 10, 11
Western Generic Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 390
Year 3. 390
Year 4. 390
N/A
17(g) 17(j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11
Western Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Service Provides short term accommodation for 10 men through Cyril Lindsay house and 8 women and children through Annie Koolmatrie house.  Provides appropriate counselling and / or support according to client need and referrals to appropriate agencies. Service elements under the NAHA are based on “A Gateway for service”, “Supportive Accommodation”, “Support” including NAHA case management, early intervention & post crisis support, in-centre and outreach support, wait list support, brokerage funding and child focused support. The Principles underlying the service include children accompanying adults will be recognised as clients in their own right and agreement to participate in the Service Coordination and Information Database (SCID). NP funded elements are also included and although varying for different services and regions may include funding for packages of support tied to stimulus housing, intensive tenancy support, boarding house outreach and specialist child support programs.        Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 140
Year 3. 140
Year 4. 140
N/A
Southern Adelaide Region
16(d)
KPI 1, 2, 7, 9, 11
Muggy’s South* Muggy’s South Youth Accommodation Service provides a leaving care service in the southern metropolitan area, and provides an accommodation and support service for young people 16-18 years who are homeless or at risk of homelessness and who are under the Guardianship of the Minister and have experienced difficulties with other alternative placement options. The project’s aim is to provide a range of integrated and collaborative services that meet the individual needs of young people within the community and deliver services in such a way as to build the young person’s abilities. The target is to provide a minimum of 20 placements to young people at any one time with a minimum of 3 placements in a Family Group Home and 17 young people residing in outreach accommodation, where each young person receiving a service will have a current case plan signed and negotiated with them. Year 1. 37
Year 2. 37
Year 3. 37
Year 4. 37
33 Young people
17(d) 17(j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11
Eastern Youth Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
N/A
17(g) 17(j)
KPI 1, 2, 4, 5, 6, 8, 9, 10, 11
Eastern Aboriginal Specific Homelessness Service The Service will provide the following outputs to meet the defined outcomes under both NAHA and NP:
Gateway: Utilisation of appropriate assessment tools and SCID to identify and prioritise clients for service, and provide a pathway to relevant external services.
Supportive Accommodation: Provision of, or gateway to, accommodation and support.
Support: Provision of NAHA case management incorporating early intervention; post crisis support; in-centre and outreach support; waitlist support; brokerage; and homeless children’s support.
Intensive tenancy support: Provision of early intervention for tenants at risk of eviction from public, community and/or private rental accommodation.
Supportive housing packages: Individual support and case management to tenants in supportive housing properties
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 250
Year 3. 250
Year 4. 250
N/A
Table 7: Specialist Domestic Violence Homelessness Services – STAGE TWO (2010-2013)
Operational 1 December 2010
NPAH Output Service Description Year 1 Target Year 1 Output
Stand Alone / State-wide Services
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 11 Domestic Violence & Aboriginal Family Violence Gateway The Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Gateway Service is a telephone based service providing access to the Specialist Domestic Violence Service sector and the broader Specialist Homelessness Service sector through an intake and referral process. This service is provided to people who are experiencing domestic violence or Aboriginal family violence.  The Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Gateway Service is an integral part of the broader Specialist Homelessness Sector system and will develop relationships, and align closely with other specialist gateway services including:
  • Homelessness Assessment and Response Team (HART) Gateway Service;
  • The Youth Gateway Service; and
  • National Domestic Violence 1800 number.
95% of callers are supported to engage with the specialist homelessness services system N/A
17 (f) KPI 1, 2, 3, 6 Domestic Violence Safety Packages* The Domestic Violence Safety Packages (DVSP) program is a state-wide response for women and their children experiencing domestic violence and Aboriginal family violence. The DVSP program provides a risk and safety assessment and safety package to enable women and their children to remain safely in, or return safely to, their houses and prevent homelessness. Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
N/A
KPI 1, 2, 3, 6, 9, 11 State-wide CALD Domestic Violence Service The State-wide CALD Domestic Violence service will work closely with, and provide support to, the Specialist Domestic Violence and Specialist Homelessness Services sector with a focus on those that provide support to women and their children who experience domestic violence. The State-wide CALD Domestic Violence Service will incorporate two elements being service delivery and sector support:
Sector support and resources for domestic violence services within the Specialist Domestic Violence and the Specialist Homelessness Sectors to better meet the needs of CALD women and their children who experience domestic violence.  Specialist advice, training, assistance with access to interpreters, assessment and referral support, advocacy, and where appropriate, joint NAHA case management
Service delivery to CALD women and their children including assessment, referral, crisis response, access to interpreter services, motel waitlist support, brokerage and joint NAHA case management.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 400
Year 3. 400
Year 4. 400  
N/A
Murray Mallee Region
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Murray Mallee including Adelaide Hills Domestic Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 400
Year 3. 400
Year 4. 400  
N/A
Limestone Coast Region
17(g)
KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11
Limestone Coast Domestic Violence  Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 220
Year 3. 220
Year 4. 220
N/A
Eyre and Western Region
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Ceduna Regional Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Ceduna Domestic Violence Service has a 60% Aboriginal focus. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Ceduna Regional Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Service will work in partnership with Cross Border/APY Lands Aboriginal Family Violence Service and Coober Pedy Regional Domestic and Family Violence   Service to provide timely service responses including case work and transport for leaving/returning to the APY Lands.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 75
Year 3. 75
Year 4. 75  
N/A
17 (g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Port Lincoln Regional Domestic Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200  
N/A
17 (g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Whyalla Regional Domestic Violence service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 140
Year 3. 140
Year 4. 140  
N/A
Southern Region
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Southern Regional Aboriginal Family Violence Service The Southern Regional Aboriginal Family Violence Service will have the capacity and expertise to engage and intervene effectively on behalf of Aboriginal homeless people or those at risk of homelessness, and on behalf of women and children who experience domestic violence or Aboriginal family violence.  The intake process undertaken will be a gateway to emergency, short and long term accommodation and support.
All people who present will be considered potential clients of the service and will be assessed to identify their presenting crisis and longer term needs.
  • Assessment processes will be flexible and sensitive to the characteristics and needs of presenting clients but will incorporate common assessment tools.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 100
Year 3. 100
Year 4. 100  
N/A
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Southern Adelaide Domestic Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 350
Year 3. 350
Year 4. 350
N/A
Northern Region
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Northern Regional Aboriginal Family Violence Service  The Northern Regional Aboriginal Family Violence Service will have the capacity and expertise to engage and intervene effectively on behalf of Aboriginal homeless people or those at risk of homelessness, and on behalf of women and children who experience domestic violence or Aboriginal family violence.  The intake process undertaken will be a gateway to emergency, short and long term accommodation and support.
All people who present will be considered potential clients of the service and will be assessed to identify their presenting crisis and longer term needs.
  • Assessment processes will be flexible and sensitive to the characteristics and needs of presenting clients but will incorporate common assessment tools.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 100
Year 3. 100
Year 4. 100
N/A
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Northern Adelaide Domestic Violence  Service (incorporating the Safe Road Home) Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
This service also incorporates case management and support services for a 10 unit core and cluster supportive housing element (The Safe Road Home).
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 550
Year 3. 550
Year 4. 550
N/A
Yorke and Mid North Region
17 (g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Yorke and Mid North Domestic Violence  Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 250
Year 3. 250
Year 4. 250
N/A
Far North Region
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Port Augusta Regional Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence  Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Port Augusta Domestic and Family Violence Service has a 60% Aboriginal focus. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 150
Year 3. 150
Year 4. 150
N/A
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Coober Pedy Regional Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Coober Pedy Domestic and Family Violence Service has a 60% Aboriginal focus. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
  • Targeted early intervention response to male perpetrators
Coober Pedy Regional Domestic Violence and Aboriginal Family Violence Service will work in partnership with Cross Border/APY Lands Aboriginal Family Violence Service, and Ceduna Regional Domestic and Family Violence   Service to provide timely service responses including case work and transport for leaving/returning to the APY Lands.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 70 plus 30 men
Year 3. 70 plus 30 men
Year 4. 70 plus 30 men  
N/A
17(g) KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11 Cross Border/APY Lands Aboriginal Family Violence  Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. The Cross Border/APY Lands Aboriginal Family Violence Service will have the capacity and expertise to engage and intervene effectively on behalf of homeless people or those at risk of homelessness, and on behalf of women and children who experience domestic violence or Aboriginal family violence.  The intake process undertaken will be a gateway to emergency, short and long term accommodation and support.
All people who present will be considered potential clients of the service and will be assessed to identify their presenting crisis and longer term needs. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Cross Border/APY Lands Aboriginal Family Violence Service will work in partnership with Coober Pedy Regional Domestic and Family Violence and Ceduna Regional Domestic and Family Violence   Service to provide timely service responses including case work and transport for leaving/returning to the APY Lands.
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 250
Year 3. 250
Year 4. 250
N/A
Eastern Adelaide Region
17(g)
KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11
Eastern Adelaide Domestic Violence Crisis Accommodation Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 139
Year 3. 139
Year 4. 139
N/A
17(g)
KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11
Eastern Adelaide Domestic Violence  Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
N/A
Western Adelaide Region
17(g)
KPI 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 9, 10, 11
Western Adelaide Domestic Violence Service Domestic Violence Services are designed and delivered based on a common understanding that violence against women is a violation of human rights and has significant consequences for the health and well being of women and their children. Each region will have strong links to the state-wide Domestic Violence Gateway service and provide a regional response targeting women and children experiencing domestic and Aboriginal family violence. Service elements include but are not limited to:
  • Supportive accommodation
  • NAHA case management including counselling
  • Waitlist/motel support
  • Children’s support
Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 200
Year 3. 200
Year 4. 200
N/A

 

3.2. Stage Three Service Implementation

Another major focus of 2010-11 will be the development of Stage 3 programs which are due to become operational from 1 July 2011.

Table 8: Specialist Homelessness Services – STAGE THREE (2011-2013)
Operational from 1 July 2011
NPAH Output Service Description Targets
Stand Alone / State-wide Services
17(e) Homeless to Home case management and data system To achieve the target of “better connected services” South Australia embarked on the development of a state-wide case management and client management system. The system provides a common client register with standardised case management tools and processes, common intake and assessment tools, common referral tools and pathways, and improved data collection and reporting capability.
The system has been developed to support the case management work delivered to homeless and at risk people through funded Non-Government Organisations (NGOs). The system will link NGOs in the service sector supporting a “no wrong door” access to service policy. The system also has the potential to link in support providers from Mainstream agencies who are working with the same client base.
The system will provide more robust data collection around homelessness and the risk of homelessness and will replace the SMART 5 data collection tool that is due to be phased out in July 2011.
  Year 1. N/A
Year 2. State-wide Implementation
17(f)
KPI 1, 3
*Perpetrator Housing Program 10 short term houses will be allocated out of the economic stimulus package for housing perpetrators of domestic violence who are removed from the family home allowing women and children to remain/return when safe.  This program is being developed in partnership with the Attorney General’s Department and is dependent on the development of other perpetrator interventions. The expected implementation date is January 2011. $10,000 will be allocated for each housing support package p/a to provide specific interventions and referrals for appropriate programs. This program will be trialled over the first year of the implementation plan to ensure effective and appropriate allocation of resources. Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 25
Year 3. 25
Year 4. 25
KPI 1, 2, 7, 9 Youth Crisis Accommodation YCA is an intensive supported accommodation service situated within an inner-city innovative development that also incorporates home ownership and affordable housing. The YCA component includes 30 self contained apartments with 24/7 support providing a housing first response to highly vulnerable young people experiencing homelessness. The length of client stay will be dependent on individual client needs and case planning.  Year 1. N/A
Year 2. 60-90
Year 3. 60-90
Year 4. 60-90  
17 (b)
17 (c)
17 (g)
17(h)
17 (j)
Coober Pedy ATAC* The Aboriginal Transitional Accommodation Centre (ATAC) will provide safe and secure accommodation for Aboriginal people who are homeless and who visit regional centres for services, health treatment and other reasons. The Centres offer:
  • Support for Aboriginal individuals and families needing safe, affordable and suitable transitional accommodation with support when travelling to regional centres to access services or visiting for social or cultural reasons.
  • Staff with knowledge and language skills supervise centres 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and provide access and pathways to health and well being through multi-agency support.
Assistance to return to communities and move through a range of alternative housing options when required.
Year 1. N/A
Year2.  TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA
17 (b)
17 (c)
17 (g)
17(h)
17 (j)
Metro Aboriginal Transitional Accommodation* The Aboriginal Transitional Accommodation Centre (ATAC) will provide safe and secure accommodation for Aboriginal people who are homeless and who visit regional centres for services, health treatment and other reasons. The Centres offer:
  • Support for Aboriginal individuals and families needing safe, affordable and suitable transitional accommodation with support when travelling to regional centres to access services or visiting for social or cultural reasons.
  • Staff with knowledge and language skills supervise centres 24 hours a day, 7 days a week and provide access and pathways to health and well being through multi-agency support.
Assistance to return to communities and move through a range of alternative housing options when required.
Year 1. N/A
Year2.  TBA
Year 3. TBA
Year 4. TBA

3.3. The Future of the Specialist Homelessness Services Sector in South Australia

As is evident South Australia has embarked on a bold process of sweeping reforms in order to capitalise on the current climate and additional investment from both the Commonwealth and SA Governments. We have systematically incorporated all effort, including NAHA, NPAH, APTCH and NBESP into an integrated and streamlined service sector that will enable us to achieve the targets we have committed to under all of these agreements. The reform process and phased implementation of projects is on schedule for Year Two, and Year One NPAH targets and objectives have been successfully achieved.

Critical to the success of our reform process is the capacity for the Commonwealth Government to assess our future progress against the combined outputs of the NPAH and the NAHA.  Future reporting of South Australia’s performance must be assessed as a whole reformed sector to ensure that the outcomes of both funding streams are maximised going forward.

Appendix 1 - NPAH Performance Indicators

Ref Performance Indicator Baseline Performance Benchmark
1 Proportion of Australians who are homeless 9,531 Indigenous people are homeless
104,676 Australians who are homeless 9,531 Indigenous people are homeless (ABS Census 2006)
By 2013, a decrease of 7 per cent the number of Australians who are homeless to less than 97,350 people
By 2013, a decrease of a third to 6,300 Indigenous Australians who are homeless
(ABS Census 2011)
2 Proportion of Australians who are experiencing primary homelessness (rough sleeping) Eight people per 10,000
16,375 Australians rough sleeping or equivalent measures of 8 homeless people sleeping rough per 10,000 population
(ABS Census 2006)
A decrease by 25 per cent the number of Australians sleeping rough to less than 12,300 people or equivalent measure of 6 homeless people sleeping rough per 10,000 population
(ABS Census 2011)
3 The number of families who maintain or secure safe and sustainable housing following family violence Interim Measure: 42,000 SAAP(a) support periods(b) for women and women with children To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans
4 Increase in the number of people exiting care and custodial settings into secure and affordable housing Interim Measure:
4,736 SAAP(a) support periods(b)
The number of people released from such institutions into homelessness is reduced by 25percent (3,552) by 2013
5 Reduce the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness. 4,037 SAAP(a) support periods(b) The number of people exiting from social housing and private rental to homelessness is reduced by less than 25percent (3,027) by 2013
6 The proportion of people experiencing repeat periods of homelessness 14,800 SAAP(a) clients required three or more support periods(b) in a 12month period 25percent reduction (13,700) in three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12months
7 Number of young people (12 to 18 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are re-engaged with family, school and work To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans
8 Number of children (under 12 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are provided with additional support to maintain contact with their school. To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans
9 Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who receive financial advice, counselling and/or case management. To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans
10 Number of people who are homeless or at risk who are provided with legal services To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans
11 Number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with formal training and development opportunities To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans To be developed and agreed prior to finalisation of the Implementation Plans

(a) Use of SAAP service data is a proxy measure until better data becomes available under this Agreement
(b) Number of people not known – a client may receive more than one ‘support period’

 

Appendix 2 - South Australian NP Expenditure 2009-10 to 2012-13

 
Actual
Forecast
 
2009-10
2010-11
2011-12
2012-13
HNP
Program Expenditure
HNP
NAHA
HNP
NAHA
HNP
NAHA
HNP
TOTAL
Strategy 1: Turning Off the Tap 3,093,000             3,093,000
Strategy 2: Breaking the Cycle 1,432,700             1,432,700
Strategy 3: Better Connected Services 3,852,052             3,852,052
Revised Program Expenditure after Tendering for Services (combining NAHA and HNP funding)
Homelessness Services - Stage 1   16,866,400 9,813,400 17,287,200 10,009,500 17,633,000 10,209,800 30,032,700
Supportive Housing Packages - Jul to Nov 2010   0 579,900 0 0 0 0 579,900
Stage 2 - Interim funding (July - Nov 2010)   8,151,550 375,800 0 0 0 0 375,800
Stage 2 - Specialist Homelessness Services   3,680,200 2,446,600 8,209,800 4,278,200 8,374,100 4,363,900 11,088,700
Stage 2 - Specialist Domestic Violence Services   4,978,100 1,399,600 8,705,200 2,446,500 8,879,000 2,495,600 6,341,700
Service Evaluation and Governance   0 500,000 0 500,000 0 500,000 1,500,000
Social Enterprise   0 100,000 0 100,000 0 100,000 300,000
PSP - Preferred Support Providers   0 250,000 0 0 0 0 250,000
Northern Casework Pilot Extension - HNP   0 680,000 0 0 0 0 680,000
ICT Project:   0 0 0 0 0 0 0
  Maintenance   0 100,000 0 100,000 0 100,000 300,000
  Training   0 153,448 0 0 0 0 153,448
Total Expenditure 8,377,752 33,676,250 16,398,748 34,202,200 17,434,200 34,886,100 17,769,300 59,980,000
 
Funding per Initial Implementation Plan 11,110,000   15,780,000   16,540,000   16,550,000 59,980,000
Variation (under)/overspends -2,732,248   618,748   894,200   1,219,300 0
 
Allocation of Requested Carryovers (2009-10 underspends)
Northern Casework Pilot Extension     680,000   0   0 680,000
ICT Project     253,425   100,000   100,000 453,425
Transitional Accommodation Centres         700,000   700,000 1,400,000
Unallocated Projects     57,000         57,000
S&W underspends     141,823   0   0 141,823
Total     1,132,248   800,000   800,000 2,732,248

 

Appendix 3 - Homelessness NP Grant Payments - 2009/10

Project ID   Service Amount $
Strategy 1:  Turning Off the Tap    
Intensive Tenancy Support Program    
HNP0017-01   Southern Country STP  
HNP0019-01   Northern Adelaide STP  
HNP0020-01   Southern Adelaide STP  
HNP0018-01   Eastern Adelaide STP  
HNP0016-01   Western Adelaide STP  
HNP0021-01   Northern Country STP  
Integrated Housing Exits Program    
MOAA011-01   Integrated Housing Exits Program  
Schools Assertive Outreach Program    
HNP0004-01   Supporting Homeless Students  
Aboriginal Youth Early Intervention Program    
MOAA003   Community Connect - Aboriginal Youth Early Intervention Program  
Outreach Homelessness Parenting Program (HAPPI)    
MOAA002   Outreach Homelessness Parenting Program (HAPPI)  
Total Funding Strategy 1:  Turning Off the Tap   3,093,000
Strategy 2:  Breaking the Cycle    
Metropolitan Boarding House Support Service    
HNP0003-01   Northern/Southern Boarding House Outreach Support Program  
HNP0001-01   Eastern Boarding House Outreach Support Program  
HNP0002-01   Western Boarding House Outreach Support Program  
HNP0015-01   The Terrace Boarding House Liaison Worker  
Regional Assertive Outreach Program    
MOAA016-01   Regional Assertive Outreach (Ceduna Assertive Regional Engagement - CARE)  
HNP0044-01   Riverland Assertive Outreach  
Homelessness Financial Clinic (starts 2010-11) $70k    
Supportive Housing Packages for Stimulus Stage 1 brought fwd (150 x $4k each = $600k)    
HNP0029   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0030   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0031   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0032   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0033   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0034   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0035   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0036   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0037   Supportive Housing Packages (Barossa)  
HNP0038   Supportive Housing Packages (Aged/Adults/Families)  
HNP0039   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0040   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0041   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0042   Supportive Housing Packages  
HNP0043   Supportive Housing Packages  
Total Funding Strategy 2:  Breaking the Cycle   1,432,700
Strategy 3:  Better Connected Services    
Service Coordination & Information Data Base (SCID) - Capital Project    
ICT Project - $2.547m approved by HLG (Total $3m)    
Housing SA - ICT cc 2535   Home Case - Homelessness Business Case  
Housing SA - ICT cc 2535   Home Case - Functional  Design  
Housing SA - ICT cc 2535   HomeCase Build work phase $2.24m  
Carryovers into 2010-11 (Bal of $3m =$453,425)    
Northern Casework Pilot Project (Beth Dunning)    
MOAA009   Northern Pilot - Case Work Support  
MOAA017   Northern Pilot Expansion - 2 FTEs for 7 mths  
MOAA018   Nth. Pilot Extension by 12 mths - Carryover $680k to 2010-11 Project  
Service Evaluation & Governance - Nancy Rogers (Bud $500k)    
S&W for 2 FTEs (1xASO7; 1xASO6) charged to cc2859 = $200k pa incl. on-costs Pro-rata for 4 months =$67k  S&W to cc2859  
Social Enterprise - Small one-off grants $100k "Homelessness Innovation Fund"  
HNP0024   Young Parents Partnership Project  
HNP0026   YouthCare Volunteer Mentor Pilot Project for Homeless Youth  
HNP0023   Youth Street Library  
HNP0027   Stepping Stones into Learning, into Employment and out of Homelessness  
HNP0028    Sustaining Tenancies Resource DVD  
HNP0025   Mentor Project  
Regional Integrated Homelessness Program    
MOAA012-01   Regional Integrated Homelessness Program  
Preferred Provider System (Housing & Support) -5 FTEs    
    S&W $400k; G&S $60k  
Transitional Accommodation Centres - ($1.4m)    
  $700k pa for 2 years (11/12 -12/13) - Carryovers    
Total Carryovers into 2010-11 for committed projects    
Unallocated  and underspends    
MOAA019   Supportive Housing Program  
Total Funding Strategy 3:  Better Connected Services   6,584,300
       
TOTAL     11,110,000
     
Summary of Payments:    
Total Funding Strategy 1:  Turning Off the Tap   3,093,000
Total Funding Strategy 2:  Breaking the Cycle   1,432,700
Total Funding Strategy 3:  Better Connected Services   3,852,052
Carryovers     2,732,248
TOTAL     11,110,000

 

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