Queensland: Annual Report 2009-10: National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness

Table of contents

Purpose of this report

This report fulfils Queensland’s annual reporting requirement specified in part four of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH).

Item 28 of the NPAH states that the ‘States and Territories will each provide a detailed report on an annual basis to the Commonwealth against the outputs, performance indicators and timelines, as detailed in their respective Implementation Plans.’ It is also a requirement under item 30, that the report be provided within 12 weeks of the end of the financial year.

This report has been structured to respond to the performance benchmarks and indicators developed in response to the requirements of the NPAH.

Queensland’s implementation of the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness

The key objective of the NPAH is that ‘people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness achieve sustainable housing and social inclusion’. The role of the NPAH is to assist the Commonwealth, States and Territories to work together to improve outcomes for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Last year, the Queensland Government developed an Implementation Plan setting out new initiatives and services designed to make a substantial contribution towards reducing homelessness. The plan identifies initiatives to be funded through the NPAH and delivered by five different agencies. The Implementation Plan combines an increased focus on prevention and early intervention, and delivery of housing solutions with appropriate support.

The Queensland Government’s Implementation Plan for the NPAH includes new funding of $284.6 million over five years (2008-09 to 2012-13) to reduce homelessness in Queensland.

The initiatives set out in the Implementation Plan represent significant progress towards achieving the national goals of halving overall homelessness and offering supported accommodation to all rough sleepers by 2020.

The initiatives also contribute to interim targets of the NPAH to be achieved by 2013:

  • reducing overall homelessness by 7 per cent
  • reducing rough sleeping by 25 per cent
  • reducing Indigenous homelessness by 33 per cent.

These targets will be achieved through improvements to existing services as well as implementation of new initiatives. Implementation will be supported by measures to increase the supply of affordable housing through the Australian Government’s National Affordable Housing Agreement and National Partnership Agreements on Social Housing, Remote Indigenous Housing and the Nation Building - Economic Stimulus Plan.

The plan also aims to improve service coordination across specialist homelessness and mainstream agencies, and will develop a best practice methodology for whole-of-community planning to reduce homelessness.

Governance

Queensland’s performance framework and measures under the NPAH were developed in conjunction with the Queensland Homelessness Data Subgroup (formerly the Queensland Homelessness Reform Group) and in collaboration with the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs. This document reports against the 12 performance indicators of the framework.

The Queensland Homelessness Data Subgroup was established as an advisory body to support the establishment of ongoing performance reporting under the NPAH.
The Subgroup reports to the Queensland Homelessness Inter-sectoral Forum, which has been designated as the primary governance mechanism for the Implementation Plan.

The Queensland Homelessness Data Subgroup is primarily responsible for providing advice on the establishment of ongoing performance reporting under NPAH, and in particular will:

  • develop and provide advice for performance reporting systems, including procedures, requirements and approaches
  • provide input into the establishment of a quality management framework for financial and performance reporting
  • provide advice regarding data limitations, risk mitigation strategies and the development of additional methodologies for reporting (e.g. case studies)
  • provide advice regarding data sharing and data improvement strategies (e.g. homelessness flags, Indigenous identifiers, security and privacy requirements)
  • provide input to the development of a program logic that outlines key outcomes, outputs, activities, key policy drivers and other external influences
  • provide input on data issues relevant to the national data reform agenda arising from the Australian Government’s White Paper The Road Home: A National Approach to Reducing Homelessness
  • provide a forum to facilitate information sharing regarding State and national data and performance reporting issues.

Each of the key agencies supporting the NPAH Implementation Plan was invited to be represented on the Queensland Homelessness Data Subgroup. There is a combination of core and information only members to facilitate information flow to agencies, reflecting the different levels of involvement in performance reporting for the NPAH. 

Data and reporting limitations

There have been a number of limitations to performance reporting during 2009-10, including:

  • population headline indicators that rely on Census of Population and Housing data will be available every five years
  • Queensland’s performance framework includes contextual and proxy data which is only available on an annual basis
  • performance data for initiatives is scheduled to be collected and reported on a quarterly basis
  • approximately half of the NPAH initiatives were not operational at the end of 2009-10 and subsequently have no performance data available
  • of those initiatives implemented during 2009-10, some do not have a full year of data available.

Based on the template provided by the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs, one item requested for inclusion in this report has not been possible, namely discussion as to how activities under Implementation Plans are achieving NPAH outcomes. Item 28 of the NPAH states that this annual report need only report on outputs, performance indicators and timeframes detailed in Implementation Plans. It is not currently possible to measure some of the outcome indicators specified in the Agreement. Key factors impacting on outcome reporting include: (a) the need for significant national data reforms (e.g. data linkage and longitudinal data sets) to enable reporting on medium to long-term client outcomes; and (b) the challenges of pulling data together across specialist homelessness and mainstream services.

All other items have been reported as requested, including:

  • NPAH performance indicators and progress against each target achieved in year one (including specific caveats and calculation information with each table) – included in the Performance and activity section.
  • description and summary of any additional research or proxy data to help build the case that homelessness is being reduced either locally, regionally or state/territory wide – included in the Performance and activity section.
  • details of measure names, description of activity, location of activity, operational dates, description of target groups and case studies – included in the Performance and activity section.
  • key priorities for 2010-11 – included in the Key Priorities 2010-11 section.  

Performance and activity

This part of the report details how Queensland performed against national performance indicators for the NPAH as specified in the Queensland Implementation Plan. Detailed notes on how targets were determined and calculated can be found in that document.

Both performance and activity information is presented to provide a comprehensive response for each performance indicator. Additionally, case studies for RentConnect and A Place to Call Home highlight key successes and provide a balance between qualitative and quantitative reporting.

The performance framework is a mixture of contextual measures, which provide information on the demand for services, and output measures (including proxy measures) for initiatives which deliver services to homeless persons in Queensland.

1. Proportion of Australians who are homeless

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10
26,782 Queenslanders are homeless. By 2010, a 1% decrease in homeless Queenslanders to 26,514 people, i.e. a reduction of 268 Queenslanders who are homeless. Census data not yet available.
2,161 Indigenous Queenslanders are homeless. By 2010, a 1% decrease in homeless Indigenous Queenslanders to 2,139 people, i.e. a reduction of 22 Indigenous Queenslanders who are homeless. Census data not yet available.
Number of applicants for government-managed social housing who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Proxy measure. No target. 8,637 applicants.
Number of allocations to government-managed social housing for applicants who are homeless or at risk of homelessness. Proxy measure. No target. 2,710 allocations.

Data will not be available to assess progress against headline indicators until the 2011 Census of Population and Housing, 

Housing register data indicates 8,637 applicants for social housing during 2009-10 were homeless or at risk of homelessness; and of Queensland’s total social housing allocated in 2009-10, 2,710 (or 65 per cent) were allocated to persons who were homeless or at risk of homelessness.

Although it cannot be directly claimed that Queensland has reduced the number of homeless persons, social housing has provided rental accommodation to more than 10 times the target for homeless Queenslanders, and more than 31 times the target reduction of 22 homeless Indigenous people.

Proportion of Australians who are experiencing primary homelessness (rough sleeping)

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10
5,165 Queenslanders rough sleeping. By 2010, a 1% decrease in the number of Queenslanders sleeping rough to less than 5,113 people, i.e. a reduction of 52 Queenslanders who are sleeping rough. Census data not yet available.
Number of applicants for government-managed social housing who specify they are living on the street or sleeping in a park; or living or squatting in a derelict, makeshift or illegal building. Proxy measure. No target. 958 applicants.
Number of allocations to government- managed social housing for applicants who specify they are living on the street or sleeping in a park; or living or squatting in a derelict, makeshift or illegal building. Proxy measure. No target. 581 allocations.
Homeless Health Outreach Teams (HHOT)
Number of referrals to HHOT
1,080 referrals. 1,817 referrals.
Supportive Long Term Accommodation: Common Ground
Number of clients who are experiencing primary homelessness or are at risk of homelessness due to low incomes, and who access supportive long-term accommodation.
60 clients. Data not yet available1.
Street to Home (Assertive Outreach)
Number of clients experiencing primary homelessness who are assisted into long-term (Street to Home) housing.
180 clients. Data not yet available2.
Crisis Accommodation Enhancements
Number of clients who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who access:
  • crisis accommodation, and/or
  • support services.
3,270 clients. 2,350 clients3.

Notes:     

1. Data for 2009-10 will not be available until October 2010. To provide context regarding demand, using 2008-09 Interim Supported Accommodation and Assistance Program (iSAAP) data, 5,209 clients who met this criteria were provided supported long-term accommodation.

2. Data for 2009-10 is not available, as this initiative commenced in April 2010. To provide context regarding demand, using 2008-09 iSAAP data, 175 clients who met this criteria were assisted into long-term accommodation.

3. This figure will be under-reported as client data for the Dalby Hostel and Townsville Maria House was not  available at the time of reporting.

 

As Census-based homelessness information was not available for this measure, data from the Housing Register has been used in proxy.         
In 2009-10, government-managed social housing made 581 allocations to people who were rough sleeping, which is approximately half the total applications (958) to the Housing Register at this level of need, and is 10 times the target reduction of 52 set against the headline population target.
Of these 581 allocations to applicants living on the street, sleeping in a park, or living or squatting in a derelict, makeshift or illegal building, 187 (or 32 per cent) were made to Indigenous persons.

Homeless Health Outreach Teams (HHOT)

Core Output 16b

HHOTs provide assertive outreach, including direct support services, general assistance and housing referral for people experiencing homelessness and mental health, general health, alcohol and substance misuse concerns.

The existing program started in 2006 and will be expanded to Sunshine Coast and Logan as part of the Implementation Plan for the NPA on Homelessness.

The evaluation of the Queensland Health Homeless Initiative undertaken in 2008, found the existing teams had been highly successful1. The teams and services successfully targeted groups of clients who were not previously accessing services or appropriate assistance. This assessment is supported by the performance output of 1,817 referrals, which exceeded the target of 1,080 by 68 per cent.

Supportive Long Term Accommodation: Common Ground

Core Output 16b

The Brisbane Common Ground Initiative will provide long-term housing and support to people who are chronically homeless to assist them to regain stability and independence.

The initiative is based on the Common Ground model established in New York in 1990, which combines affordable housing with on-site support services that promote health and economic independence.

The apartment complex at 11-15 Hope Street, South Brisbane will incorporate flexible communal spaces, 24/7 concierge and support services. Tenants will be a balanced mix of homeless people and those earning low incomes. Tenants will receive tailored support based on their individual circumstances for as long as they need it.

The Brisbane Common Ground Initiative will accommodate approximately 145 tenants. Full service delivery is expected to commence mid-2011. However, during 2009-10 and 2010-11, and until the building is available for tenancy, support will be available for clients through a ‘street to home’ framework, together with assistance to settle into permanent accommodation.

Street to Home

Core Output 16b

Street to Home is a new service model to support people living on the streets to move into housing, with the aim of permanently ending their homelessness. Assertive outreach teams will provide people with the support they need to move and settle into permanent accommodation.

The Street to Home team in Brisbane commenced operations in April 2010, and as a result, performance data is not available for 2009-10.

Teams will also be set up in Townsville, Cairns and Gold Coast with a phased implementation from 2010. A rural and remote service is proposed to commence in 2011-12 in a location yet to be determined. All teams are due to be fully operational during 2011-12.

Street to Home services participate in the national Interim Supported Accommodation Assistance Program (iSAAP) collection. Based on 2009-10 data 175 clients were assisted into long-term housing and were assessed as meeting the criteria for being in the primary homelessness category when accessing specialist homeless services. Of these, 41 (or 23 per cent) were Indigenous persons. Clients assessed as being in the primary homelessness category were people without conventional accommodation, including people living on the streets and in other public places such as parks, squatting in buildings or using vehicles, for temporary shelter.  

Crisis Accommodation Enhancements

Core Output 16b

Crisis accommodation services for single adults will be enhanced in nine locations across Queensland in 2009-10, specifically South Brisbane, Rockhampton, Townsville (two sites), Mackay, Mount Isa, Cairns, Bundaberg and Toowoomba, to improve case management support. The funding provides general enhancements to existing services that did not have capacity to cope with demand in order to preserve the service.

This initiative was originally designed to target ten locations, however the Dalby Hostel did not receive enhancement funding because it discontinued providing services to single adults and concentrated on families, thereby no longer meeting the funding criteria for the initiative.

2. The number of families who maintain or secure safe and sustainable housing following family violence

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10
Number of iSAAP closed support periods whose presenting reasons include domestic/family violence, and whose type of accommodation tenure immediately after iSAAP support is purchasing their own home, private rental, public housing rental or community housing rental. Proxy measure. No target. 1,195 closed support periods.
Number of applicants for government-managed social housing who identify that:
  • the household needs to leave current housing due to a domestic violence situation, and/or
  • the household needs to leave current housing due to risk of violence from another household member, neighbour or community member.
Proxy measure. No target 688 applicants.
Number of allocations to government-managed social housing for applicants who identify that:
  • the household needs to leave current housing due to a domestic violence situation, and/or
  • the household needs to leave current housing due to risk of violence from another household member, neighbour or community member.
Proxy measure. No target 518 allocations.
Safety Upgrades Program
Number of clients who receive:
  • personal support, and/or
  • safety upgrades.
27 clients. 27 clients.
Breaking the Cycle of Domestic and  Family Violence in Rockhampton 
Number of:
  • complex clients referred to the Breaking the Cycle Team for case management and support, and/or
  • non-complex clients referred out by the Breaking the Cycle Team to support agencies.

Number of domestic and family violence orders in the region granted during the period of operation of the service.

900 clients. Data not yet available1.
Contextual indicator. No target. 540 orders2..

Notes:
1.     2009-10 data will not be available until September 2010.
2.     Reported information relates to the period of operation of the service: 12 November 2009 to 30 June 2010.

As there is currently no national performance benchmark for this measure, iSAAP and Housing Register data have been used as proxy measures.

In 2009-10, 1,195 support periods were provided to individuals whose presenting reasons included domestic/family violence, and whose type of accommodation tenure immediately after support was purchasing their own home, private rental, public or community housing rental. Of these, 221 (or 18 per cent) were Indigenous people.

During the period, 688 applicants for government-managed social housing identified that the household needed to leave their current housing due to a domestic violence situation and/or due to risk of violence from another household member, neighbour or community member; allocations were made to 518 applicants (or 75 percent). Of these, 118 (or 23 percent) were Indigenous applicants.

Safety Upgrades Program

Core Output 17e

This program will enable victims of domestic and family violence to remain in their homes, where it is safe to do so, by upgrading the security of the property. The program will be available to victims of domestic and family violence who have a domestic violence order that includes an ouster condition requiring the perpetrator of the violence to vacate the family home. Approximately 40 clients will receive personal support and safety upgrades to dwellings during the course of the service from November 2009 to November 2010, contingent on service demand and referral numbers.

Service delivery commenced for the three safety upgrades pilot services as follows:  Townsville in December 2009; Gold Coast in January 2010; and Sunshine Coast in March 2010.

Location
Personal Support1 clients
Safety Upgrades2 occasions
Townsville 18 13
Sunshine Coast Data not available Data not available
Gold Coast 9 2
Total 27 15

Notes:
1.     The number of service users receiving personal support.
2.     The number of occasions where work is undertaken on a premise.

Breaking the Cycle of Domestic and Family Violence in Rockhampton

Core Output 17e

This initiative aims to ensure more timely and cohesive services are available for people affected by domestic and family violence in Rockhampton. It will improve the integration of human and justice service systems through better information-sharing and coordinated service delivery.

This initiative includes funding for a range of services including court support, safety upgrades, brokerage support and case management. Access to services will be coordinated through a Case Coordination Team. Funding has been provided through the Treasurer’s Prevention and Early Intervention Incentives Program to the Department of Communities, Department of Justice and Attorney-General, and Legal Aid Queensland to implement this project.

While performance data is not expected to be available for 2009-10 until September 2010, this initiative has made significant progress. Key milestones and achievements include:

  • service was fully operational by 15 November 2009, within expected timelines
  • implementation of risk assessment and innovative common needs assessment tools has occurred
  • effective coordination of the initiative with the Magistrates Court
  • both groups of clients (people experiencing and people using violence) are accessing the service
  • the local Governance Committee is functioning effectively
  • there is a comprehensive evaluation framework in place.

The granting of 540 domestic and family violence orders in the region during the period the initiative was running in 2009-10 (November 2009 to June 2010) demonstrates the level of need for this service. Of these 540 orders, 121 (or 22 per cent) involved one or both parties of Indigenous origin.

3. Increase in the number of people exiting care and custodial settings into secure and affordable housing

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10
Number of applicants identified either as:
  • a prisoner exiting a Corrective Services correctional facility who is assessed as homeless or at risk of homelessness on release, or
  • in contact with Child Safety Services or a referral from Child Safety Services, or
  • leaving a medical institution/facility or hospital and have no other housing to go to.
Proxy measure. No target. 778 applicants.
Number of allocations to government-managed social housing for applicants identified as either:
  • a prisoner exiting a Corrective Services correctional facility who is assessed as homeless or at risk of homelessness on release, or
  • in contact with Child Safety Services or a referral from Child Safety Services, or
  • leaving a medical institution/facility or hospital and have no other housing to go to.
Proxy measure. No target. 187 allocations.
Integrated Transitional Support Model and Offender Reintegration Support Service
Number of prisoners completing the Transitions Program - pre-release service.
700 people assisted. These two measures were combined to provide the revised measure below.
Number of prisoners accessing the Transitional Support Service - pre-release service.

2,000 people assisted.

Revised measure: Number of prisoners accessing transitional support pre-release. 2,700 people. 3,161 people assisted.

Number/proportion of prisoners receiving assistance through the Offender Reintegration Support Service - post-release service.

880 people assisted.

882 people assisted.
Bridging the Gap
Number of prisoners with impaired cognitive functioning who receive:
  • individual case management while in custody (pre-release).
Not applicable. No data available1.
  • specialist post-release support.

Not applicable.

14 people assisted.
Number/proportion of prisoners exiting custody each year identifying a secure accommodation type on discharge2. Contextual indicator.
No target.
No data available3.
Number of prisoners exiting custody each year2. Contextual indicator. No target. No data available3.
Youth Housing and Reintegration Service – Supervised Community Accommodation
Number of young people exiting Youth Detention Centres who are housed in supervised community accommodation.
0 young people assisted (accommodation). Data not yet available4.
Youth Housing and Reintegration Service – Transitional Independent Living Units
Number of young people who are housed in transitional, semi-independent accommodation.
Up to 10 young people assisted
(accommodation).
Data not yet available4.
Youth Housing and Reintegration Service – Support Service
Number of young people who are assisted by the support service.
32 young people assisted. Data not yet available4.
Supported Accommodation for Young People
Number of young people (18 to 24 years) who access supported accommodation under this initiative.
22 young people assisted. 21 in Quarter 3.
23 in Quarter 45.
Number of young people (18 to 24 years) who access supported accommodation. Proxy measure. No target. 1,941 young people6.
Number of young people exiting Youth Detention Centres on supervised release orders per year. Contextual indicator. No target. Data not yet available7.
After Care Service – young adults exiting out of home care
Number of young people (exiting care once they turn 18 years of age) who access practical support to address barriers that prevent them from establishing successful tenancies and accessing employment and education/training.
20 young people. Data not yet available 8.
Supported Independent Living Services for young people under Child Protection Orders
Number of distinct young people aged 15-17 years who are subject to a child protection order and who are provided with a residential placement and support service.
79 placements. Not to be reported9.
Revised measure: Number of young people aged 15-17 years who are subject to a child protection order, and who were living independently. Revised measure. No target. 73 young people10.
Revised measure: Number of young people aged 15-17 years exiting out-of-home care during the year. Revised measure. No target. 522 young people10,11.
Housing and Support Program
Number of applicants identified as an inter-agency priority under the Mental Health Housing and Support Program (HASP).
No target. 51 nominations received.
Number of allocations to government-managed social housing for applicants who identified as an inter-agency priority under the Mental Health Housing and Support Program (HASP). 193 allocations
(including previous and 33 new allocations).
37 new allocations. 193 total allocations across the program.
A Place to Call Home
Number of applicants identified as an inter-agency priority under A Place to Call Home, and who were allocated government-managed social housing.
23 tenancies commenced. 22 tenancies commenced12.
Emergency Department Liaison
The number of support episodes provided to people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who were identified by the Emergency Department Liaison Service and referred to community services.
120 support episodes. 398 support episodes.
The number/proportion of persons separated from mental health units who are homeless (i.e. no fixed address). Contextual indicator. No target. 251 persons.
The number of consumers accessing public sector mental health services who are identified as homeless (i.e. no usual residence). Contextual indicator. No target. 3,825 consumers13.
Post Care Support - Young adults with a disability exiting from the care of the State
Number of clients (young people with a disability who are exiting the care of the State aged 15-17 years) who were provided with transition from care support.
300 clients per year. 69 clients.
Number of clients (young adults with a disability who have exited the care of the State aged 18 to 25 years) who were provided with post-care support. 30 clients.
Total of 300 clients per year will access support and assistance to transition to community-based living and independent adult life. 99 clients in total14.
Young Adults Exiting from the Care of the State (YACS)
Number of young people with a disability who have left the care of the State, and who are supported by the YACS program.
Approximately 130 people per year (including an estimated 60 new clients). 286 young people (including 44 new clients).
Expansion of the Resident Recovery Program
Number of people with a mental illness who are supported (lifestyle support).
Up to 30 people per year will access support. 20 people15.
Number of clients allocated social housing. 15 clients per year will be allocated social housing. 13 clients15.
Young Persons Initiative
Number of young people who are assisted through the Young Persons Initiative.
50 young people. 10 young people16.

Notes:

  1. 2009-10 data is not available as individual case management is to commence in November 2010.  The project is conducting assessments to identify clients with impaired cognitive functioning and their associated support needs to inform individual case management.
  2. Prisoners exiting custody after serving their head sentence of 12 months or longer, not including exits as a result of temporary returns to custody for technical parole violations.
  3. It is anticipated data will be available following the identification and implementation of a nationally recognised definition of homelessness.
  4. Data not yet available as service will commence operation in late-2010.
  5. This measure uses 2009-10 Proxy Periodic Performance Reporting data. It is not possible to disaggregate data across quarters to determine the total number of clients assisted. The service has been at capacity since March 2010.
  6. 2008-09 iSAAP proxy data provides context regarding the total number of clients receiving this type of support, but does not directly measure the initiative.
  7. Data for 2009-10 will not be available until October 2010.
  8. Data for 2009-10 is not available as service delivery commenced in July 2010.
  9. This measure will not be reported as it is not considered an appropriate indicator of young people exiting care into homelessness as young people can exit out-of-home care for a variety of reasons, including reunification with family. Instead this measure is reported as young people who are living independently and exiting out-of-home care. This measure is demand driven.
  10. As 2009-10 data is not expected to be available until October 2010, information is provided for the period 1 April 2009 to 31 March 2010. This measure is demand driven.
  11. Counts all children who exited out-of-home care (including placements with foster carers, provisionally approved carers, kinship carers and residential care services). Exited care is defined as a child who left out-of-home care in the period and did not return within two months. Children who exited out-of-home care more than once during the year are counted once only, irrespective of the number of times they exited. Children exiting care at the age of 18 years are included in the 15-17 year age category.
  12. There were 13 allocations to government-managed social rental housing during 2009-10 identified as an inter-agency priority under A Place to Call Home. This is a proportion of the total 22 tenancies commenced.
  13. Reported data relates to the period 1 January 2010 to 30 June 2010. An individual is counted for each presentation. This measure is under review for 2010-11.
  14. The Transition and Post Care Support Program has experienced delays in staff recruitment which has impacted on the achievement of targets.    
  15. Reported data relates to the implementation support period 1 May 2010 to 30 June 2010.
  16. Data relates to June 2010, when the service commenced.

Queensland’s response to assisting people exiting care and custodial settings into secure and affordable housing is intensive, with 14 of the NPAH initiatives feeding directly into this performance indicator area. These initiatives deliver targeted services to vulnerable people in this group, particularly young people and people with a mental illness.

The Housing Register shows there is a need to support people exiting care and custodial settings with 778 applicants for government-managed social housing who identified as either a prisoner exiting a Corrective Services correctional facility, in contact with Child Safety Services or a referral from Child Safety Services or leaving a medical institution or hospital. Of the 187 allocations made in 2009-10, 38 (or 20 per cent) allocations were to Indigenous persons.

iSAAP data shows that in 2008-09, of the 1,941 young people who accessed supported accommodation, 458 (or 24 percent) were of Indigenous origin.

Integrated Transitional Support Model and Offender Reintegration Support Service

Core Output 16d

The Integrated Transitional Support Model provides prisoners exiting custody with the opportunity to access transitional support. Delivery of effective pre-release planning support and coordinated linkages with housing providers has the potential to significantly reduce the likelihood of immediate post-release homelessness. The Integrated Transitional Support Model adopts an early intervention approach to addressing homelessness.

During 2009-10, the service was provided in the State’s correctional centres in Greater Brisbane, Rockhampton, Cairns, Maryborough, Gold Coast, Rathdowney, Townsville and Woodford.

In 2009-10, 3,161 offenders accessed integrated transitional support, exceeding the target of 2,700 by 17 per cent.

Bridging the Gap

Core Output 16d

Service delivery for the Bridging the Gap initiative commenced in March 2010 and provides specialised disability care during incarceration and post-release support for prisoners in South East Queensland who have impaired cognitive functioning and who may have extreme or challenging behaviour. Five of the prisoners who were referred were from inner regional correctional centres and five were of an Indigenous cultural status.

No additional performance or contextual information is available for 2009-10.

Youth Housing and Reintegration Service

Core Outputs 16b and 16c

  • Supervised Community Accommodation (Core Output 16b)
  • Transitional Independent Living Units (Core Output 16c)
  • Support Service (Core Output 16b and 16c)

Youth Housing and Reintegration Service (YHARS) support providers were appointed for Townsville, Rockhampton and Toowoomba, and tender processes are underway for the selection of support providers in Mount Isa and Hervey Bay.

YHARS assists young people aged 12 to 20 years who are homeless or at risk of homelessness to transition to greater stability and independence, where appropriate. Support focuses on family and community living, maintaining tenancies and linking young people with education and employment.

Supported Accommodation for Young People

Core Output 16c

The purpose of this initiative is to provide supported accommodation for young people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness, where their homelessness is compromising their engagement in education and training. This initiative is based on elements from the Youth Foyer model and commenced in Logan in October 2009.

This initiative seeks to provide clients with stable accommodation and support services, in the context of case management, in order to assist them to:

  • achieve education or training outcomes
  • increase capacity for independent living
  • increase connectivity and sense of belonging within their local community
  • reconnect with family where appropriate
  • transition to independent accommodation.

The NPAH funds the support component of the model.

While aggregation of clients supported across quarters is not available, the service has exceeded the target of 22 young people supported in Quarter 4 of 2009-10, and the service has been at capacity since March 2010.

Youth Housing and Reintegration Service - After Care Service

Core Output 16d

In Townsville, Toowoomba, Rockhampton and Inala, YHARS service providers also provide an After Care Service to assist young people from across the State transition from the care of the child protection system.

The YHARS support service will have access to a range of accommodation options appropriate to clients’ housing needs.

Establishment of initiatives in this program is well-progressed and will commence service delivery in early 2010-11.

Supported Independent Living Services for young people under Child Protection Orders

Core Output 16d

Supported Independent Living Services provide ongoing accommodation and support for young people aged 14 to 17 years who are under a Child Protection Order.  Support services include independent living skills. Fourteen supported independent living services will be provided across Queensland. As this service is demand driven, the level of output and therefore the ability to meet performance targets is a reflection of such demand, rather than the overall performance of the service.

Revised performance measures for this service show that during 2009-10, 73 young people subject to a child protection order were living independently, with 16 (or 22 per cent) being of Indigenous origin. In addition, 522 young people exited out-of-home care during the year, with 138 (or 26 per cent) being of Indigenous origin.

Housing and Support Program

Core Output 16d

The existing Housing and Support Program has been extended to assist people with a psychiatric disability to live in the community. Support services focus on a recovery-oriented model to include housing, clinical and non-clinical support.

The target for new allocations in 2009-10 was exceeded by four allocations. Of the 37 new allocations made in 2009-10, 3 (or 8 per cent) were provided to people of Indigenous cultural status. The baseline target of 193 is a total including previous allocations made before the 2009-10 reporting period.

A Place to Call Home

Core Output 16a

A Place to Call Home is a joint Commonwealth/State initiative that aims to:

  • provide tenancy and other support services for up to 12 months in order to stabilise the tenant’s circumstances and ensure a long-term tenancy
  • remove the need for households to relocate to another property once intensive support is no longer required
  • stop people moving in and out of homelessness.

Queensland will provide at least 143 dwellings over five years to June 2013 for people who are homeless. Referrals and support are provided through the Department of Communities Child Safety Services’ Referral for Active Intervention and Family Intervention Services.

The table below shows that as at 30 June 2010, 30 dwellings had been purchased through the initiative, seven dwellings above the 2009-10 target.

As part of the initiative, 75 individuals were referred and housed, with 36 (or 48 per cent) being of Indigenous origin. The number of individuals assisted per dwelling is demand driven and this was lower than expected. This measure is being reviewed for 2010-11.

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10
Queensland will provide at least 143 dwellings between July 2008 and June 2013. 23 dwellings. 30 dwellings.
Number of people assisted in Queensland Implementation Plan with 'Families' the 2008-09 unit measure. 23 families housed. 22 tenancies commenced1.
Queensland will have at least 420 individuals occupy dwellings between July 2008 and June 2013 (420 is the sum of families and individual unit measures mentioned in the Queensland Implementation Plan). 94 individuals. 75 individuals2.

Notes:

  1. The target was not met due to delays associated with late referrals from referral agencies and/or availability of housing stock to meet needs, eg large families.
  2. The number of individuals assisted per dwelling is demand driven and the size of families accessing the service influence how many individuals can be supported.

Case Study - A Place to Call Home and Referral for Active Intervention service

Due to another rent increase, the Smith family (a pseudonym)  – a single mother, her toddler son and a primary school age daughter with Down Syndrome – were at risk of homelessness. The children and mother had also been experiencing long-term ongoing respiratory problems resulting from extreme damp and mould in their home. All were being treated for chronic asthma, and the daughter had respiratory complications associated with her disability which were increasingly difficult to manage.

The family’s home, which they had tenanted for six years, was in considerable structural disrepair. Mould was appearing within days of cleaning, but had become impossible to contain, covering entire walls and ceilings. Other health and safety concerns included termites and termite damage, creating unstable floors; plumbing issues in the bathroom and toilet; and cracked foundations.

The family attempted to negotiate a fair rent for the property, given that it needed substantial repair, however, the landlord/rental agent was unwilling to negotiate. The cost of housing meant that the mother was unable to respond fully to her or her children's medical needs or engage them in positive social/community activities.

Good Beginnings, a home visiting service, referred the Smiths to Mackay’s Referral for Active Intervention (RAI) service, with concerns for the family and the mother's emotional wellbeing.

After working with the Smiths to identify a range of alternative housing options, RAI assisted the family to apply for social housing and nominated them for supported accommodation through A Place to Call Home. It was requested they be housed in close proximity to the special school the daughter attended.

Soon after, the local Housing Service Centre sourced alternative housing, and the family was offered a low set house with bathroom railings and a fenced yard, located within walking distance to the daughter’s school.

RAI also sought practical support to help the family to move house. A cleaning service cleaned the house after the family exited, enabling the mother to spend time helping the children adjust to the new house. Although not part of their usual services, a local welfare agency provided two workers at no cost, and a truck to move the larger household items, reducing the financial stress of moving. The mother arranged additional respite child care through the Department of Communities, enabling her to finish packing and to move smaller household items.

With this support, the Smiths were able to make the transition to the new accommodation with relatively little stress. Soon after moving in to the new premises, the mother said she finally felt like she was at home, and that she and her children felt much more settled.  

Since the move, the family’s health has improved dramatically. They are also in a more stable financial position, and able to afford more child-focused social and community activities. The stress associated with housing insecurity is no longer impacting on the mother's emotional wellbeing.

A Place to Call Home is helping to prevent homelessness occurring for people at risk of experiencing homelessness. Families can receive up to twelve months practical support, parenting support and skills development, information, referral, advocacy, home visiting and counselling. Intensive family support has included assisting families to access affordable and appropriate housing; and address barriers to maintaining successful tenancies.

In Mackay, the program is delivered through the Good Beginnings Home Based Family Support Program, the Department of Communities, Flexible Family Support Program Welfare agency, and Referral for Active Intervention.

Emergency Department Liaison Service

Core Output 16d

Queensland Health is trialling welfare workers in four emergency departments in Queensland to identify and assist people who are homeless presenting at Gold Coast Hospital, Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital (Herston), Princess Alexandra Hospital (Woolloongabba) and Logan Hospital. Service delivery commenced in April 2010.

It was not possible to record the discrete number of people who were assisted through this program due to the episodic nature of the service and the possibility of clients accessing the service multiple times at one location or across multiple locations. Data shows however that during 2009-10 there were 398 support episodes where a person who had no usual address was referred to community services.

Contextual information as to the possible demand for the Emergency Department Liaison service shows that for six months in 2009-10 up to 3,825 clients accessed mental health services who had no usual address. Of these, 554 (or 14 per cent) were of Indigenous origin.

Post Care Support - Young Adults with a Disability Exiting from the Care of the State

Core Output 16d

This program provides a continuum of care to young people with a disability who are turning 18 years of age and who are exiting the care of the State to community-based living and independent adult life. Support services include access to appropriate housing, links to specialist disability services, mental health and general health, counselling services, and universal and community services when required.

Services will be delivered by 12 Transition Officers based in government departments and three Transition Officers based in non-government agencies located in South East Queensland. Services will be delivered in Gold Coast, Logan, Brisbane North, Brisbane South, Moreton, Toowoomba, Sunshine Coast, Maryborough/Bundaberg, Rockhampton/Gladstone, Townsville/Mackay and Cairns.

To date, ten government-based Transition Officers have been recruited and have delivered support to 99 young people since November 2009. Commencement of government-based service will occur in Rockhampton/Gladstone and Brisbane in July 2010, with non-government based Transition Officers expected to commence in October 2010.

Young Adults Exiting from the Care of the State – YACS

Core Output 16d

The YACS program is an existing transition from care program that was expanded to increase the level of individualised support provided to young adults exiting the care of the State. The program helps young adults to participate in their community and develop and maintain community living arrangements. In 2009-10, 286 young people were supported, exceeding the target by 120 per cent. The level of achievement of this program reflects the increased intake of young people into the child safety system in Queensland.

Expansion of the Resident Recovery Program

Core Output 16d

The Resident Recovery Program helps break the cycle between acute care, hostels and boarding houses and homelessness. The program provides individualised, flexible and responsive support for adults who are 18 years and over, who have moderate to severe mental illness, and are about to be discharged from an inpatient mental health care facility to boarding house or hostel accommodation. The program provides short to medium-term support to people who are being actively case managed while living in boarding house or hostel accommodation, or when they move into a home of their own.

Stage one (Brisbane) commenced in June 2010 and stage two (Ipswich and Toowoomba) will commence service delivery in September 2010. The target of 30 people assisted was not met as the service was not operational for the full year, having commenced delivery in June 2010. Despite this, the initiative has made substantial progress during this short period of operation, providing lifestyle support to 20 people with a mental illness, and providing 13 with social housing.

Young Persons Initiative

Core Output 17c

Two new services (in Cairns and Logan) have been established for young people aged 18 to 25 years who are showing early signs of mild to moderate mental health problems.  Each service offers intensive and focused support for young people experiencing mental health issues.  A young person may stay in the accommodation for up to three weeks, and be supported in the community for up to three months.

This initiative will be supported primarily through general practice and associated private allied mental health workers, and the public mental health system where needed. Services have been undertaking establishment, staff recruitment and policy development. 

Service delivery to young people commenced in June 2010 and during this month 10 young people were assisted.

4. Reduce the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness

Performance Measure Target 2009-10 Actual 2009-10

Number of iSAAP closed support periods for clients whose type of accommodation tenure immediately before iSAAP support was public housing rental, community housing rental or private rental.

Proxy measure. No target.

8,424 closed support periods1.

RentConnect
Number of discrete clients who receive personalised assistance (information, advice and/or referrals) to locate and apply for private rental property per year.

1,000 clients assisted.

1,093 clients assisted2.

HomeStay Support
Number of clients who receive assistance to maintain their tenancies in social housing and private rental accommodation.

600 clients.

681 clients.

Participate in Prosperity Initiative
Number of social housing tenants of workforce age who access education, training or employment assistance.

75 clients.

76 tenants.

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