ACT: Annual Report 2009-10: National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness

Table of contents

Part 1 – Introduction & Achievements

1.1 Introduction

Purpose

The purpose of this document is to report on activities under the ACT’s National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH) Implementation Plan during the 2009-2010 financial year. The 2009-2010 Annual Report details the progress of initiatives, achievements and performance measures endorsed in the ACT’s Implementation Plan.

Background

The National Affordable Housing Agreement (NAHA) and its associated National Partnership Agreements on Homelessness and Social Housing, as well as the unprecedented investment in social housing through the Nation Building and Jobs Plan, have established the framework to guide the ACT’s service delivery across the continuum from crisis and homelessness to safe and secure, affordable housing.

The ACT Government entered into a National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness with the Commonwealth to initiate reforms to reduce homelessness. The NPAH commenced on 1 July 2009 and remains in effect until 30 June 2013.

The ACT has developed an Implementation Plan for the period July 2009 – June 2013, which outlines the initiatives to be delivered during this period.  More fundamentally, the Implementation Plan commits the ACT to actively working towards a measurable reduction in homelessness by 30 June 2013.

The ACT sees the NPAH target as a shared responsibility, to be met by both the community and government. It believes the targets will not be achieved through the new services alone and as a consequence, they have been built into the Service Funding Agreements for all ACT funded homelessness, housing support and community housing agencies.

A process of review of homelessness specific and mainstream programs is being undertaken in the ACT. This process will examine current services and how they can be reformed to meet the new directions. For the most part, the ACT entered into three year contracts for services expiring 30 June 2009 for the period 2009-2010 to 2011-2012. The ACT’s targets for the NPAH were embedded within all contracts as was a re-negotiation clause to ensure services can be re-aligned with reform directions within the contracting period. In some cases one year contracts were offered to individual or groups of services requiring more significant reform.

Contracts expiring 30 June 2010 were extended on a similar basis and this process will continue throughout the life of the NPAH as the ACT continues to re-align service delivery.

Context

Addressing homelessness is an essential part of the ACT Government's social inclusion agenda, aimed at maximising the participation homeless people in economic and social life. This is to ensure the homeless cycle remains broken through the provision of community supports to overcome disadvantage.

In meeting our objectives, it is acknowledged there are barriers and challenges to be surmounted.  Homelessness is a complex issue, involving structural factors (such as poverty, community exclusion, education, employment markets and housing supply), as well as individual risk factors (such as addiction, relationship breakdown, mental illness and lack of life skills).  Reducing homelessness in the ACT will therefore require a whole of community and government effort underpinned by a reformed service system.

The ACT has as its goal the elimination of homelessness. Back in 2004, the ACT Social Plan set a target of no rough sleepers by 2013. The ACT sees the totality of the NAHA and associated National Partnership Agreements on Homelessness and Social Housing and the National Building and Jobs Plan (NBJP), as a once in a generation opportunity to deliver this ambition.

The whole of government policy framework for homelessness service delivery in ACT for the period 2004-2008 has been provided by Breaking the Cycle – the ACT Homelessness Strategy. Breaking the Cycle established an integrated service system spanning crisis support to safe and secure long term accommodation and introduced a suite of innovative and contemporary service models. This included a shift from congregate living responses to accommodating individuals and families within their own dwellings and an expansion of flexible outreach support services.

The ACT has the equal lowest rate of homelessness per 10,000 of the population with Victoria and NSW, recording 42 homeless per 10,000 in 2006 and 40 per 10,000 in 2001 (Counting the Homeless 2006). The ACT had 1.3% of the total Australian homeless population on Census Night in 2006, a slight increase from 1.2% in 2001.

Funding

The ACT Government has continued to support the homeless sector despite significantly reduced funding to the ACT under the NAHA. In 2009-2010,
$19.6 million was spent by the ACT and Commonwealth Governments on direct funding of homelessness services in the ACT (an increase of 83% since
2001-2002). In the last ACT Budget additional funding of $750,000 was also allocated to an Early Morning Drop-in Centre in Canberra to expand its operations for homeless people.

The daily average of individuals accommodated is 544 from 304 Housing ACT properties allocated to community agencies under the Housing Asset Assistance Program.

Back to top

1.2   Achievements

Overview

The ACT has made considerable progress in implementing the initiatives under NPAH and has commenced the reform process for the homelessness sector to achieve an overall reduction in homelessness.

There are eight main initiatives being implemented by the ACT to assist in addressing the NPAH outcomes and targets. These are outlined below:

1. A Place to Call Home

1. A Place to Call Home
Purpose Achievements
Additional dwellings to accommodate homeless families 10 dwellings of the proposed 20 built and occupied by tenants including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

2. Street to Home
Purpose Achievements
To actively engage and support the chronic homeless and rough sleepers. Service operational and has already engaged successfully with over 20 rough sleepers including some young people.

3. Building Housing Partnerships
Purpose Achievements
Expanded transitional housing, head tenancy and a tenure neutral sustaining tenancy service. Transitional Support and Head Tenancy initiative has commenced with 27 individual support packages and head tenancy arrangements and 13 dwellings provided for refugees.
Helping Our Senior Tenants service commenced and providing assistance to elderly tenants.
Sustaining Tenancy service – all preliminary work undertaken for service to commence operations in November 2010 with Woden Community Service as lead agency in partnership with Belconnen Community Service and Canberra YWCA.
This will build on the sustaining tenancies and social inclusion activities previously undertaken by these agencies under the Community Linkages Program.

4. Managed Accommodation Program
Purpose Achievements
Supported accommodation program for people leaving custodial environments, focussing on the new ACT prison. Men’s component fully operational and achieving success in providing support and accommodation to men exiting detention.
Women’s component subject to an open tender process to select a service provider.

5. Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI)
Purpose Achievements
Provides tenancies for people with mental illnesses with specialist supports. Service commenced in June 2010 with 10 persons referred and accepted into the program.

6. The Foyer Model
Purpose Achievements
Accommodating and supporting young people aged 16-25 in order to create engagement with education and employment services. Preliminary work to develop the model for the ACT is underway and the identification of the built form of the Youth Foyer established (Note: Funding for this initiative commenced in July 2010).

7. First Point (Central Intake Service) and Social Housing Register (Common Waiting List)
Purpose Achievements
To streamline service entry for people experiencing homelessness ensuring clients do not have to access multiple agencies. Central Intake Service to commence on 1 November 2010 and will be known as ‘First Point’. It will be operated by a local community provider the Canberra. Common Waiting List to commence on 1 September 2010 and will be known as the ‘Social Housing Register’.

8. Supporting Victims of Domestic Violence ‘STAY’ Program
Purpose Achievements
Support women and children experiencing domestic violence to stay in their housing with the perpetrator removed from the tenancy agreement. Initiative is now a fully operational program with an approved business process in place including a Memorandum of Understanding between Housing ACT and the Domestic Violence Crisis Service.

Back to top

Timeline of Achievements

The ACT Government’s approach under the NAHA and NPAH has been to instigate a comprehensive reform agenda to reduce homelessness in partnership with specialist homelessness and mainstream services. 

The year commenced with significant policy work which led to the development of The Road Map’ - a discussion paper on the way forward for ACT homelessness services and related services and the commencement of a significant community engagement process to involve the sector in the implementation of necessary changes and reforms.

The Road Map was released in November 2009 to promote discussion on reform directions and the implementation of new initiatives. The Road Map invited specialist homelessness service providers and other stakeholders to submit feedback on five topic based chapters throughout the period
December 2009 to February 2010.  

Extensive consultation with the community and homelessness sector occurred about the Road Map with round table meetings and forums being held.

The feedback received on The Road Map was used to identify the changes that were required across the service delivery system, internal government processes and inter agency protocols.

As a result of this process the following ACT reform directions were determined:

  • Shift in the provision of support from crisis accommodation response to a “support in place” model;
  • Rebalancing funding over time from accommodation-based support to outreach and preventative approaches, with a move towards ‘tenure neutral’ supports;
  • Maintenance of a network of crisis accommodation places to focus on people requiring a mix of accommodation and support, immediate shelter and those at risk of violence;
  • Move toward a ‘housing first’ approach wherever practicable;
  • Streamline access to services and housing, achieved through the implementation of the Central Access Point;
  • Assertive and persistent engagement with rough sleepers, hard to reach groups and vulnerable Canberrans;
  • Sustaining tenancies to prevent cycles of homelessness; and
  • Increase social inclusion – building foundation skills and links to economic and social participation.

Building on the consultation process, further work was undertaken on the models and project plans for the individual NPAH initiatives. This also included further consultation with and engagement with the homelessness sector service providers.

Procurement processes and/or contracting arrangements were instigated to roll out the implementation of the initiatives.

The ACT’s achievements for 2009-2010 are portrayed in the Timeline Chart included below. 

Timeline of main achievements

Description of graphic

graphic of Timeline of main achievements

Table:  Performance Indicators and Benchmarks for the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness - Australian Capital Territory.

NPAH Performance Indicator Initiatives/ Programs NPAH Target 2009-2010 Progress Result 2009-2010
Proportion of Australians who are homeless All of the Initiatives to be implemented under the NPA on Homelessness will contribute to a 7% decrease in the number of persons who are homeless in the ACT. Homeless Persons:
Decrease of 3 per cent in the number of people who are homeless to fewer than 1323 people.
Homeless ATSI Persons:
Decrease by 10 per cent in the number of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people who are homeless to fewer than 135 people.
Homeless Persons:
This cannot be measured until next Census.
All implemented initiatives are contributing to reducing the number of homeless persons in the ACT
Homeless ATSI Persons:
This cannot be effectively measured until next Census.
All implemented initiatives are contributing to reducing the number of homeless ATSI persons in the ACT
Proportion of Australians who are experiencing primary homelessness (rough sleeping) Assertive Outreach for Rough Sleepers – Street To Home Initiative Decrease of 5 per cent in the number of people who are sleeping rough to fewer than 74 people Over 20 rough sleepers already engaged by Street To Home Initiative. 15 of 21 rough sleepers offered accommodation accepted it.
The number of families who maintain or secure safe and sustainable housing following family violence Stay at Home Program
A Place To Call Home
Sustaining Tenancy Service
The number of women who maintain safe and sustainable housing following family violence is increased by 5 women. 2 families who had experienced violence were assisted under A Place To Call Home and 3 under STAY program.  There were 288 people assisted under the Community Linkages Program Sustaining Tenancy Outreach Program. It is not known what percentage were assisted to sustain their tenancy after experiencing violence as this data had not been collected.
Increase in the number of people exiting care and custodial settings into secure and affordable housing   Men exiting detention initiative provided through Men’s Accommodation Support Service (MASS). Women Exiting Detention initiative.   Reduction of 5% to fewer than 124 people exiting care and custodial settings into homelessness reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data   SAAP data not available for 2009-10.
29 men who exited detention entered the Managed Accommodation Program with only 2 re-entering prison.
Reduce the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness. Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies, social inclusion and economic participation.
First Point – Central Intake Service
No target set for 2009-10   Sustaining Tenancy Service will commence from 1 November 2010.
The proportion of people experiencing repeat periods of homelessness   Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies, social inclusion and economic participation.
A Place To Call Home
Reduction of 5% to fewer than 95 people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12 months reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data. SAAP data not available.
Sustaining Tenancy Service will commence from 1 November 2010.
Number of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are re-engaged with family, school and work Create Your future  (Not funded under NPAH)
Youth Foyer
No target set for 2009-10 Youth Foyer initiative to commence in March 2011
Number of children (under 12 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are provided with additional support to maintain contact with their school. Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies, social inclusion and economic participation. Increase of 2.5% to more than 82% of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data. SAAP data not available.
Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who receive financial advice, counselling and/or case management. Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies, social inclusion and economic participation. Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are linked with financial advice, counselling and/or case management increased by 50 families. SAAP data not available.
Number of people who are homeless or at risk who are provided with legal services Street Law program (Not funded under NPAH) The number of persons who are homeless or at risk who are linked with legal services increases by 10. Agencies have reported in excess of 10 clients being referred to legal services.
Number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with formal training and development opportunities Formal training and development opportunities are provided by all service providers and Housing ACT The number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities increases by 15 workers. Agencies have reported 291 staff attending training staff attending formal training.  

ACT Research and Data on Homelessness

In 2009-2010 most of the ACT initiatives under NPAH were in a formative stage and it was thus too early to undertake research, evaluation or develop proxy data to determine the effect of the initiatives on reducing homelessness.

This research and evaluation will be undertaken over future years as the new initiatives become fully operational and reforms to the homelessness sector are implemented. Research and evaluation of the Managed Accommodation Program for men exiting detention and the HASI initiative are being planned for 2010 -2011.

The ACT is also working with the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare and other jurisdictions to improve data collection in the homelessness sector.

Back to top

Part 2 - Initiatives and Activities under the Implementation Plan

2.1   Initiatives

This part of the ACT NPAH Annual Report provides details of the eight main initiatives being implemented in the ACT jurisdiction. These are:

  1. A Place to Call Home
  2. Street to Home
  3. Building Housing Partnerships
  4. Managed Accommodation Program
  5. Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI)
  6. The Foyer Model
  7. First Point (Central Intake Service) and Social Housing Register (Common Waiting List)
  8. Supporting Victims of Domestic Violence ‘STAY’ Program

2.1.1 A Place to Call Home

Description

A Place to Call Home is one of the four core outputs to be delivered under the Implementation Plan for the NPAH. The program will provide 20 properties over four years to house homeless families and provide those families with the necessary supports to sustain their tenancies. 

The ACT has constructed the properties in a way that will substantially reduce the responsive and planned maintenance costs. The properties are energy efficient, consistent with measures already being provided to Housing ACT tenants. These measures will reduce energy and repair costs for tenants. Energy costs are a significant factor for people on low incomes in the Canberra climate.

Further, the properties are either built as Universal Design or Class C adaptable housing, ensuring the long term viability of the dwellings to respond to the need for appropriate social housing for a wide range of tenants.

Outcomes

The A Place to Call Home program has a fundamental difference from the more typical ‘pathway’ approach that underpins service delivery in most homeless services in Australia, which graduates people from crisis response through to transitional responses and then to long term housing.

For some chronically homeless people their experience of this model is a series of hurdles that they can be unwilling and unable to overcome. They can be unable or unwilling to comply with the service’s rules and expectations. It needs to be understood that addiction and mental health issues do not proceed in a graduated nor linear manner towards recovery. Often the journey returns to the beginning point and these people never achieve the goal of permanent housing.

Research shows that higher levels of trauma underpin the lives of people who are homeless and that issues such as addiction and mental health problems arise from these trauma-based lives. Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are overrepresented in all these categories. The ACT has therefore made a commitment that half of the properties (ten in total) will be made available to Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families.

The key principle of ‘Housing  First’ is the provision of long term stable housing as a first step, complemented by the co-ordinated provision of services needed by each individual/family to sustain that housing by addressing underlying stressors that present as complex need. An important part of this principle is that housing is not contingent on people accepting or complying with a case management approach or other rules that can underpin a person’s stay in a homeless service or a rehabilitation service.

Activity Locations

The ACT has generally been able to construct the properties on sites across the ACT by using vacant suburban land and new land releases in the northern suburbs of the ACT, such as Franklin. A number of properties may be “substituted” with equivalent Housing ACT stock to ensure that properties will be available in suburbs suitable for the clients’ needs and requirements. 

Details of the properties are:

  • 5 bedroom house at Dunlop
  • Substituted 4 bedroom house at Kambah
  • 5 bedroom house at Franklin
  • 4 bedroom house at Franklin
  • 4 bedroom house at Dunlop
  • Substituted 5 bedroom house at Gordon
  • 4 bedroom house at Dunlop
  • 4 bedroom house at Franklin
  • 5 bedroom house at Dunlop
  • Substituted 4 bedroom house at Ainslie
Date Activity Will Become Operational

The A Place to Call Home initiative is operational with ten properties constructed and either allocated or in process of allocation.

The ACT brought forward its contributions under the A Place to Call Home initiative in 2009-2010 to accelerate the delivery that was required under the original five year program. Under the accelerated program, land for ten dwellings was purchased with construction commencing in April 2009. These first ten properties have been completed and either allocated to clients or are in the process of being allocated to clients. The remaining 10 dwellings under the
A Place to Call Home initiative will be delivered in 2010-2011 to 2012-2013.

Target Group

Clients are identified from existing specialist homelessness services and through Housing ACT’s Gateway Services on the basis that they will benefit from a “housing first approach”. Clients have initially been housed under a head tenancy arrangement with a review period of six months built into each agreement. The dwellings will be public housing stock, with replacement properties allocated to the A Place to Call Home initiative once a client has successfully transitioned to a public housing tenancy. 

It was identified that funds will be required for the head tenancy component, in addition to the outreach support provided by specialist homelessness services. 

The funding will be an average of $11,400 for each family which reflects tenancy management and partial set up costs. This funding requirement has been reflected in the Building Housing Partnerships initiative under the revised ACT Implementation Plan.

Target Group - Clients Need of Target Group
All families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness Families facing disadvantage because of past history of:
  • substance abuse;
  • mental health;
  • trauma;
  • family violence breakdown; and
  • disabilities or impairments.
Repeat episodes of homelessness.
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families
Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Progress/Results for Initiative

The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables, targets and progress/results for the A Place To Call Home initiative:

 

Performance Indicators
Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010
Progress/ Result
2009-2010

Number of dwellings built

8 10
Number of tenancies established 8 tenancies 8 tenancies
Number of tenancies sustained for two years or more Not applicable Not applicable
Number who are less than $500 in arrears on a complying repayment agreement 8 8
Lower than average tenant responsible maintenance
(Not planned maintenance)
40% have lower maintenance costs 100% have lower maintenance costs
Number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander allocated a property 4 families 2 families
Case Study

Alice – Mother with three children who experienced domestic violence

Alice escaped from domestic violence from interstate and sought accommodation and safety for her family in an ACT Women’s Refuge.  At the Refuge, Alice and her family felt safe and secure and were able to be supported to overcome the trauma that had been inflicted on the family by the offending partner.

After being in the Refuge for over six months Alice felt strong enough to move into a more permanent arrangement but was still very hesitant about her future and ability to cope as a single mother with children including one child with a disability.

The Refuge was allocated an “A Place to Call Home” property for Alice that met the families’ requirements for a disabled child and was close to schooling and other supports. A funding package of $11,400 was made available to the Women’s Refuge under a head tenancy arrangement to support Alice sustain the tenancy. The Women’s Refuge was also able to support Alice through outreach and other assistance. 

Alice and her family felt safe and secure in their new home and managed with assistance from the Refuge to maintain her tenancy for six months and now felt capable and independent enough to maintain her own tenancy.

The property has now been signed over to Alice who has started a new life with her family in the home.

Barriers and Challenges

An early challenge in the life of the program was how to achieve a ‘housing first’ approach. Currently, to obtain public housing in the ACT there is a comprehensive application form to be filled in, a face to face assessment process (with the possibility of a case conference) before the family’s case is assessed by the Multi Disciplinary Panel to establish the families housing need. While this process is excellent in establishing need under the Public Rental Housing Assistance Program (PRHAP) it was not suitable for establishing a ‘housing first’ need. A mechanism was established for intake into A Place to Call Home through the coordination and partnership of ACT Homelessness services to identify suitable clients for the program based on the criteria for the target group outlined above. This process has proved successful in identifying families who will benefit most from a ‘housing first’ approach. An ability to make an assessment for A Place to Call Home has now been included in determinations.

A further challenge was in relation to the non provision of funding to support services or the management of the head tenancy arrangement under the NPAH. With the decline in funding for the ACT through the NAHA to occur in the future it was important from the inception of the program to set a bench mark that was going to be sustainable in the future. If not, a situation could be created where support for the program from both within Housing ACT and agencies drops off due to lack of resources. After examining all the requirements and needs it was decided that $11, 400 would be allocated per tenancy for support funding to the service agency to ensure the client is able to sustain the tenancy.

Opportunities and Highlights

An opportunity occurred to address a client’s requirements more fully through adopting a property substitution policy for the A Place To Call Home program.  Currently in the ACT there is limited land release occurring in the southern suburbs of the territory and it was not possible for initial properties to be constructed there. In acknowledgement that if families already have supports in place and are connected to a community it is best for them to be housed within natural supports as this creates more sustainable tenancies a property substitution policy was adopted. This policy supported the client’s needs and also ensured that the dwellings were not all congregated in a few new suburbs in the north of the territory where infrastructure was still limited.

Funding for A Place to Call Home Initiative
  • Total funding of $10 million.
  • Additional funding of $11,400 for each family for tenancy management and partial set up costs will be provided under 1.3 Building Housing Partnerships.
  • The Commonwealth funded construction costs per dwellings up to $0.250 million per dwelling, whilst the ACT funded $0.250 million per dwelling to acquire the land.
A Place to Call Home
2008-09
$
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$

Commonwealth funding budget

  2,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000 1,000,000

ACT Government capital funding budget

2,500,000 0 1,000,000 1,000,000 500,000

Actual Expenditure Commonwealth

0 2,000,000      

Actual Expenditure ACT Government

1,856,000 644,000      

Proposed ACT Government Expenditure

 

 

1,000,000 1,000,000 500,000

Back to top

2.1.2 ‘Street to Home’ - an initiative for chronically homeless people (rough sleepers)

Description

The Street to Home program works to assertively engage people experiencing chronic homelessness (particularly ‘rough sleepers’) to re-engage with support services to gain and sustain a successful tenancy.

The Street to Home program coordinates the delivery of services to people on the streets, rather than requiring them to attend appointments in offices. This program provides support to up to 20 rough sleepers where they are found.

Partnerships with other services such as drug and alcohol and mental health have been established to enable coordinated services to be provided to this vulnerable group of homeless people including the establishment of a ‘Who’s New on the Streets’ committee to help identify and monitor the support requirements of people who are sleeping rough.

The program will also link rough sleepers with to access legal support through a partnership with the Streetlaw homeless legal service. Streetlaw is managed by a consortium of community legal agencies and services and is jointly funded by the ACT and Commonwealth Governments outside the NPAH.

Outcomes

The Street to Home program run by St Vincent de Paul is already actively engaging 21 homeless persons including 3 youth. Other transient homeless persons have also been assisted by the program while in the ACT.

The program engages in active outreach with rough sleepers (particularly young people) who do not engage with mainstream services and so remain homeless. The program provides services to people where they are, including health and support services. It has developed strong partnerships with other service providers and Housing ACT to provide an appropriate mix of services between housing, mental health, primary health and other support services.

The service participates in a “Who’s New on the Streets” committee to help identify and monitor people who are homeless, particularly those new to the streets. Membership includes: City Park Rangers, Australian Federal Police, Youth Support Services, the National Capital Authority, ACT Mental Health, the Alcohol and Drug Foundation, Centrelink and Emergency relief providers. This is proving a good mechanism to identify those in need and to obtain support for the individuals identified. 

Activity Locations

The service is centrally located in Braddon in the ACT but is active across all of the ACT and anywhere homeless persons are likely to be located.

Date Activity Became Operational

The Street to Home service in the ACT was subject to an open tender process, with St Vincent De Paul being award the contract. The service was launched by the ACT and Commonwealth Ministers and commenced operation in February 2010.

Target Group

The service targets people who may have complex needs such as those with severe mental illness, drug and alcohol issues, and at risk young people to address their chronic homelessness.

Case Study

Brian – A man in his fifties with no fixed abode.

Brian has a long history of heavy drinking which became even more acute after his wife died. His life subsequently spiralled into longer periods of alcoholic binges to the point where he had lost his house and job and was now sleeping rough on the streets. 

The ‘Street to Home’ service found Brian a little worse for wear after one of his binges collapsed in a bus shelter. He was not interest in any help and cursed the ‘Street to Home’ workers who approached him. After the initial barrage of abuse he was more willing accept some assistance that was offered in the form of blankets and food. He was not interested in going to a refuge as they would not allow him to drink alcohol. The workers managed to establish his name and usual hangouts and advised they would keep in touch.

Regular visits were then made to Brian by ‘Street to Home’ workers who were able to gradually engage with Brian to address his issues although this was sometimes accompanied with abuse. ‘Street to Home’ workers have now established a rapport with Brian and arranged to get him a pension through Centrelink.

Brian now eats well, receives treatment for his medical problems and has accepted help to overcome his alcohol addiction. With further continued contact it is hoped to help Brian accept suitable accommodation and further support.  

ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Progress/Results for Initiative

The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables, targets and progress/ results for the Street to Home initiative:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of Rough Sleepers people engaged by the service
The number of Rough Sleepers who received support to address health and other issues
10 people engaged from start of service
25 people supported from start of service
21 people engaged from start of service -15 of 21 rough sleepers offered accommodation accepted it
30 people supported from start of service
Barriers and Challenges

The initial barriers and challenges faced by the Street To Home program was how to effectively engage with the homeless persons sleeping rough who had been conditioned to avoid contact with other people. This often lead them to being robbed and/or bashed. It was established that a gradual approach with the provision of some basic necessities for the homeless person to survive a night in Canberra allowed for engagement. This established a rapport and further assistance was then able to be offered to the homeless person. The longer the person had been on the streets the longer it usually took to establish this engagement.

Opportunities and Highlights

One of the main highlights of the Street to Home program have been the connection of the service to the St Vincent de Paul Night Patrol.  This has enhanced the capacity of Street to Home to connect with vulnerable Canberrans.

Another highlight was the establishment of the ‘Who’s New to the Streets’ partnerships with non-traditional homelessness support services.  Park Rangers, Police and other services are able to facilitate linkages with the Street to Home program.

Funding for Initiative
  • Total funding of $898,000 has been provided by the Commonwealth.
  • Additional funding for Streetlaw is provided outside the National Partnership Agreement on Homelessness (NPAH).
Street to Home - Rough Sleepers
2008-09
$
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Australian Government funding   180,000 230,000 239,000 249,000
Actual expenditure
 
  180,000      
Proposed expenditure     230,000 239,000 249,000

Back to top

2.1.3 Building Housing Partnerships - Support for people to sustain their tenancies

Description

The purpose of the new Building Housing Partnerships program is to help break the cycle of homelessness and disadvantage in our community. This will be achieved by facilitating, coordinating and delivering a range of support, assistance and living-skills programs for vulnerable tenants, including support to find training and employment.

There are three parts to the program outlined hereunder:

  • Transitional Support and Head Tenancies;
  • Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service; and
  • Helping Our Senior Tenants.

Transitional Support and Head Tenancies

Transitional Support and Head Tenancies will shift in focus from a transitional housing program to a transitional support approach which is not tied to a particular dwelling. Individual support packages will be put in place to create supportive tenancies across different forms of housing tenures, including:

  • Four places per annum under A Place to Call Home;
  • Head leasing support for those who are vulnerable in public housing and need additional support; and
  • Additional support funding to assist those in transitional arrangements out of homelessness and into long term accommodation.

A total of up to 16 dwellings will be provided under the Refugee Transitional Housing program which is a joint partnership between CatholicCare, Companion House and Housing ACT. As well as the ability to utilise Housing ACT redevelopment stock for other transitional options for people who are waiting for long term housing but are not in need of crisis support.

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

Current ACT resources that had been dedicated to sustaining services, under the Community Linkages Program, have been combined with Commonwealth Government funding to create the larger Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS). This new service will provide intensive case management for 700 clients across a range of tenures including social housing, private rental and home ownership. The service will have a strong focus on early intervention targeted at those at risk of losing their housing and becoming homeless.

The new SSTS was subject to an open tender commencing in July 2010, with new services to commence operation on 1 November 2010. The selected service provider Woden Community Service will be required to work closely with Housing ACT, homelessness and housing support services, and will actively participate in sector forums.  While the service will support people from a range of backgrounds and with a range of issues, it will work in partnership with other services that provide specialised support to specific demographic groups, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, the aged and young people.

Helping Our Senior Tenants (HOST)

This initiative auspiced by Housing ACT will assist elderly tenants to sustain their tenancy and help link elderly tenants to other supports when required. Initially. HOST will be focussed on the tenants aged over 90 to engage with them and establish their social connections and needs and create supportive tenancies.

Outcomes

For the last nine years the ACT Government has funded a number of community development and sustaining tenancies services under its Community Linkages Program. With the changes to the policy environment it is now clear that the targets that the ACT Government is required to achieve in reducing homelessness would not have been achieved by continuing those existing services. 

The new Building Housing Partnerships program will provide individual support packages and seek to support tenants from all tenures to sustain their tenancy.

Transitional Support and Head Tenancies

These initiatives will provide support for refugees and people with multiple needs.  The main outcome is for these people to be provided with support to sustain their tenancy and prevent homelessness.

The following tenancies at any one time were supported during 2009-2010:

  • 15 Head tenancies;
  • 5 Transitional tenancies;
  • 7 Youth Transitional tenancies; and
  • 13 Refugee tenancies.

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

In 2009-2010 the ACT sustaining tenancy effort was through the Sustaining Tenancy Outreach Program under the Community Linkages Program. Through this program the following was reported by the services:

  • 288 people received outreach support; and
  • 66 people were provided with brokerage assistance.

The service targeted people who were living in public and community housing and reported that support was provided to only 17 private tenancy matters.

The resources that had been dedicated to the Sustaining Tenancy Outreach Program have been combined with Commonwealth Government funding to create the larger STTS. 

The STTS will support many of the outcomes identified in the NPAH. It will support people who are experiencing difficulties in their lives that may place their tenancies at risk, for instance people displaying disruptive behaviours, people experiencing unemployment, poverty, neighbourhood conflict, domestic or family violence, relationship breakdown, mental health issues, eviction notices, financial hardship, rental arrears and other forms of debt.

The service will be tenure neutral and it will provide support to a minimum of 700 people per annum to assist service users to sustain long term housing. This will include early intervention, outreach and crisis support to individuals at risk and communities with concentrations of disadvantage to sustain long term housing. 

It will also include providing information, case management and advocacy support to tenants who face a direct threat to their housing.  This may take the form of negotiating with landlords and lenders, particularly where tenants have been served with legal notices, such as a Notice to Remedy or Notice to Vacate.

Helping Our Senior Tenants (HOST)

This HOST program aims to assess the needs and requirements of older public housing tenants and ensure they remain connected to their local community.  This is undertaken via face to face visits from Housing ACT staff that utilise a social connectedness tool to assess the ability of aged tenants to live independently and the adequacy of current supports. This ensures they are able to access appropriate services and ensures their health, well-being and ability to sustain a tenancy. Depending on individual needs, active referrals are made to relevant services, including Home and Community Care (HACC) services and the Red Cross Telecross program which provides a daily phone call to check on the well-being of at risk people who live alone in their own homes.

The HOST visits also provide opportunities to discuss downsizing or other options in those cases where they are not coping in their present housing. Housing ACT assists older tenants wanting to stay in their local community to access suitable older person’s accommodation in that same area. This project has initially focussed on the tenants over 90 years.

Activity Locations

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

The STTS through the three partner organisations will work together to respond flexibly to need as it emerges across Canberra, identifying demand and coordinating supports through a single point of access and referral. The service will work in collaboration with First Point, the Central Intake Service for homelessness and housing support services.

Areas of Canberra that will be covered by the service when it becomes operational are:

  • Belconnen;
  • Gungahlin;
  • Inner North;
  • Inner South;
  • Woden and Weston Creek;
  • Tuggeranong; and 
  • Residents of the ACT not included in the regions listed above.
Date Activity Became Operational

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

The STTS in the ACT was subject to an open tender process, with Woden Community Services (WCS) being award the contract.  In October 2010, WCS was selected to provide the Sustaining Tenancies Service, in partnership with Belconnen Community Service and the YWCA of Canberra. The service will commence in November 2010.

Target Group

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

The Building Housing Partnerships STTS initiative will target tenants who need support to sustain a tenancy.

Target Group - Clients Need of Target Group
All persons who need support to sustain a tenancy Needs such as:
  • elderly;
  • financial difficulties;
  • loss of employment;
  • accident;
  • mental health;
  • trauma;
  • family violence breakdown;
  • disabilities or impairments; and
lack of living skills.
Includes:
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander persons
Youth
Persons of CALD backgrounds
ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables and Targets for Transitional Support and Head Tenancies Initiative

The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables and targets for the Building Housing Partnerships Transitional Support and Head Tenancies Initiative:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of households supported
The number of households able to achieve independent living
The number of households able to maintain independence over time
20 households supported
10 households able to achieve independent living  
5 households able to maintain independence for one year or more
27 households supported
11 households able to achieve independent living  
5 households able to maintain independence for one year or more
ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Results for Building Housing Partnerships – Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS) Initiative

The new Building Housing Partnerships STTS initiative is not due to commence until November 2010. The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables, targets and results for the STTS under the former Community Linkages program:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

Reduction in proportion of people entering homelessness services from public housing
Number of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander tenants assisted to sustain a tenancy
The number of at risk tenancies able to be sustained after referral
10% reduction to less than 30
6 tenancies assisted
20 tenancies sustained
SAAP data not available
7 tenants
23 tenancies sustained
ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Results for the HOST Initiative:

The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables, targets and results for the Building Housing Partnerships HOST initiative:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of at risk tenancies sustained
The number of elderly tenants assisted with minor tasks and other matters to enable ageing in place
The number of elderly tenants connected to community supports to enable ageing in place
12 tenancies sustained
12 tenancies assisted  
1
24 tenancies sustained
25 tenancies assisted  
1
Barriers and Challenges

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

There will be challenges in coordinating service delivery across the ACT and to address this issue and provide overall guidance on the service delivery a governance committee will be set up, comprising of representatives from each partner organisation, and as required, a representative from the department.

An evaluation framework will be used to measure changes in people’s circumstances, learnings and outcomes. The framework will be based on a Results Based Accountability model to measure outcomes and outputs.

Opportunities and Highlights

Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS)

The new larger service for sustaining tenancies will provide more opportunities to prevent people becoming homeless by losing their tenancy.

Funding for Transitional Support and Head Tenancies Initiative

The initiative will be partly funded by the NPAH funding with the balance funded by the ACT Government. Funding of $292,000 is available from the Commonwealth as detailed in the Table below. The unspent monies of $57,000 for 2009-2010 is to be apportioned over 2010-2011 to 2012-2013 financial years.

Transitional Support and Head Tenancies
2008-09
$
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth Government funding   57,000 75,000 79,000 81,000
Actual expenditure   0      
Proposed expenditure   57,000      
Proposed expenditure     94,000 98,000 100,000
Funding for Sustaining Tenancy Service (STTS) Initiative

Funding of $2,016,324 is available as detailed in the Table below.  The additional funding was obtained by redirecting funds from the cessation of the Community Linkages Program.

Transitional Support and Head Tenancies
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth Government funding 159,500 256,000 263,000 269,000
ACT Government funding   196,097 426,606 446,121
Actual Expenditure of Commonwealth Government funds 47,846      
Budget Carry Over/shortfall 111,654      
Proposed Commonwealth Government expenditure   367,654 263,000 269,000
Proposed ACT Government Expenditure   196,097 426,606 446,121
Proposed Total Expenditure   563,751 689,606 715,121

Back to top

2.1.4  Managed Accommodation Program (MAP) - Assistance for people leaving correctional facilities to access and maintain stable, affordable housing

Description

Men’s Managed Accommodation Program

The Canberra Men’s Centre (CMC) Men’s Accommodation Support Service (MASS) program commenced in June 2004 providing accommodation and support for single men with high and complex needs, unaccompanied by children. 

CMC have established the Men’s Managed Accommodation Program as an extension of the MASS program to support men exiting detention at the Alexander Maconochie Centre, the ACT’s new prison.  

Up to fifteen men are accommodated at any one time, with a further ten men provided with outreach support at any one time. Accommodation is initially provided under a head tenancy arrangement with clients housed in place, signed to their own tenancies when support is no longer required. Properties have been sourced from Housing ACT stock.

Women’s Managed Accommodation Program

A Women’s Managed Accommodation Program will provide support and accommodation for women exiting detention at the Alexander Maconochie Centre. The Women’s Managed Accommodation Program will assist up to five women at any one time, with a further five women provided with outreach support at any one time.

Outcomes

Key outcomes of the program include securing and maintaining long-term accommodation, improving basic living skills, addressing complex health and substance abuse issues, and re-engaging with their families and community.

The CMC MASS program operates 24 hours a day 7 days per week and is complemented by a free 1800 number for the use of MASS participants. This facility provides the participants with access to their relevant Caseworker or to the CMC Intake Counsellor and has resulted in a very low level of critical incidents or personal crises for participants.

The ACT model for women exiting detention will include a housing first approach incorporating case management and linkages with the relevant Service Provider. The provision of outreach support for non accommodated Service Users will also be provided. Depending on individual needs, this may include:

  • housing;
  • children/parenting services;
  • family counselling;
  • social inclusion;
  • drug and alcohol counselling;
  • trauma counselling;
  • general health and mental health services;
  • logistical support;
  • life skills training and education;
  • employment assistance; and
  • legal assistance.

The Service Provider will provide a transitional accommodation component for women exiting corrections with housing provided by Housing ACT. This will allow Service Users, when appropriate, to have accommodation whilst they consider their longer term options and support needs. The Service will provide tenancy management for five properties at any one time through a head tenancy arrangement that will allow women to be ‘housed in place’ without having to transition to alternate accommodation.

Activity Locations

The Men’s Managed Accommodation Program operates from the Civic area of Canberra but uses Housing ACT properties across the ACT to accommodate participants.

Date Activity Became Operational

The Men’s Managed Accommodation Program commenced operations in January 2010.

A Women’s Managed Accommodation Program service is planned to commence in December 2010.

Target Group

The Men’s Managed Accommodation Program targets single men who are likely to face homelessness on release from corrections.

The Women’s Managed Accommodation Program will focus on the target group identified through cooperation with the ACT Corrective Services. This group may include single women, women with dependent children, and women from diverse cultural backgrounds, including Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander women.

Case Study

Chris – A 22 year old male referred by Corrections ACT

Chris had a history of homelessness, drug abuse and criminal behaviour and was referred to the MASS program by Corrections ACT as he was unable to comply with his obligations to Probation & Parole and was highly likely to be returned to prison for breaches of his conditions.

Prior to his referral he was diagnosed with depression, suffering with anxiety and suicidal ideation. He was homeless and did not have stable or consistent support from his family or friends and had recently broken up with his girlfriend who had custody of their 5 month old son.

The initial step under the MASS program was to place Chris in his own stable accommodation and then to work with him to put his life in perspective. It was clear to the Caseworker that Chris was unsettled, nervous and unable to focus on the present. It appeared that Chris’s immediate problems were exacerbating his ability to cope with his situation. This related to his homelessness, relationship breakdown and the large amount of community service hours he was required to perform.

The allocation of his own accommodation had an immediate effect on Chris and with consistent interaction with his Caseworker there was a noticeable change in his mood and focus. A brief and simple case plan was developed and assisted Chris in working towards accomplishing relevant and achievable goals using the S.M.A.R.T. approach to case management.

Chris has now worked through most of his issues and is learning how to prioritise his responsibilities.  He was able to negotiate more effectively with Corrections ACT in relation to his community service commitment.

Chris is well on the way to achieving his goals and objectives and continues to be engaged with the program in a less intensive manner.

ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Results for Initiative

The Table below outlines the performance indicators, deliverables, targets and results for the Men’s Managed Accommodation Program initiative:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of tenancies successfully transitioned to independent tenancy
The number of tenancies established for 2 years or more
The number of people provided with outreach
12 tenancies sustained
No target set
12 clients
14 tenancies sustained
Not Applicable
14 clients
Barriers and Challenges

An early challenge was leveraging of funding and the actual allocation of funding from another ACT Government department for the program. The program actually commenced before funding was received from the other department.

Opportunities and Highlights

The MAP has highlighted the benefits for homeless persons if government agencies and community agencies can work together to achieve successful programs and outcomes for clients.

Funding for Initiative
Managed supported accommodation for people exiting the Alexander Maconochie Centre
2008-09
$
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
ACT Government Capital funding 1,540,000        
ACT Government funding 200,000 715,000 724,000 740,000 754,000
Actual ACT Capital Expenditure 1,540,000        
Actual Expenditure ACT Government 200,000 448,680      
Budget Carry Over/shortfall   266,320      
Proposed ACT Government Expenditure     990,320 740,000 754,000
Proposed Total Expenditure     990,320 740,000 754,000

Back to top

2.1.5  Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI) - Services to assist homeless people with mental health issues to secure or maintain stable accommodation

Description

The Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI) has been established in the ACT to increase tenancy and clinical support for tenants with a mental illness similar to the HASI program in NSW. Subject to a successful review of the Initiative within 12 months, the program will be extended and expanded to include tenants with drug and alcohol dependencies.

HASI operates as a three-way service delivery partnership in the ACT:

  • Accommodation support and rehabilitation associated with disability is provided by four non-government organisations (funded by ACT Health);
  • Clinical care and rehabilitation will be provided by ACT Mental Health Services; and
  • Long–term secure and affordable housing and property and tenancy management services is being provided by Housing ACT.

The governance structure for the program includes an HASI Executive Committee comprising Senior Executives from the Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services (including Housing ACT), ACT Health and a representative of the Mental Health Community Coalition.

Reporting to the Executive Committee, a HASI Advisory Committee is responsible for the intake and assessment process and for the establishment of joined up responses at a programmatic and individual case level. The membership of the Advisory Committee includes: Housing ACT, ACT Health, ACT Mental Health Services, CatholicCare, Mental Health Foundation, Richmond Fellowship, Inanna Inc, Carers ACT, Mental Health Community Coalition and representatives from the ACT Mental Health Consumer Network.

Outcomes

The aim of HASI is to provide integrated support packages of housing and mental health support to provide sustainable tenancies in public housing for people with moderate to severe mental health issues.

Date Activity Became Operational

The HASI program commenced in June 2010 and has received 16 referrals of which 10 have been accepted. Of these, accommodation has been provided to four people and the others awaiting the allocation of suitable housing.

The project will be subject to an independent evaluation and it is proposed that approximately $100,000 of unexpended funding from will be used for this purpose.  The remaining unexpended funds will be used for service delivery through additional packages or enhancements to existing packages.

Target Group

Persons with moderate to severe mental health issues.

ACT Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Results for HASI Initiative

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of people provided with support
The number of tenancies successfully transitioned to independent tenancy
The number of tenancies sustained for 2 years or more
3 people
1 clients
No target set
4 people
1 clients
Not applicable
Barriers and Challenges

The main challenge for implementing HASI was keeping the essence of the successful program established by the NSW Government but making it relevant and appropriate for the ACT.

Opportunities and Highlights

HASI has lead to sound partnerships being developed between agencies that has resulted in clients with mental health and other issues being provided with the necessary support and treatment to sustain accommodation in the community.

Case Study

Helen – A 33 year old female with a mental illness

Helen had a history of mental illness which had resulted in numerous periods of homelessness. It had proved difficult to stablise Helen’s condition resulting in numerous admissions to Canberra Hospital.

This was a result of either the treatment not being suitable or Helen not taking her required medication. Helen had also become more reclusive as an outcome of her homelessness and did not trust many people.

Helen was referred to the HASI program and was accepted by the HASI Advisory Committee into the program. A Service Provider placed her in suitable accommodation and provided necessary supports to sustain her tenancy and other assistance measures.

In this secure and supportive environment ACT Health services were able to treat her effectively and stabilise her mental condition. This has resulted in Helen linking with other supports and gradually becoming more involved with community activities.

Helen has also been able to sustain her tenancy.

Funding for Initiative

Unexpended funds for 2009-2010 will be used for service delivery through additional packages or enhancements to existing packages and to carry out an independent evaluation of the program in 2010-2011.

Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI)
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth recurrent 200,000 329,000 339,000 348,000
Actual Expenditure Commonwealth 15,693      
Budget Carry Over/shortfall 184,307      
Proposed Commonwealth Expenditure   513,307 339,000 348,000

Back to top

2.1.6        Youth Foyer Model - Support to assist homeless young people

Description

The ACT’s Youth Foyer initiative will focus on accommodating and supporting young people aged 16-25 in order to create long term stable housing and engagement with education and employment services.  

Youth Foyers establish pathways for each young person, beginning with a personal commitment to work to change their lives, and make an application to live in a learning environment that will support them in achieving their goals.  This commitment is established by creating a formal contract between the young person and the Foyer.

The project is in the development phase which includes:

  • finalising the most appropriate concept of the model for ACT context;
  • confirming the built form; 
  • consultation with stakeholders and community; and
  • establishing partnerships to operate and provide foyer services and programs such as tenancy management, skills training and mentoring etc.

The Youth Foyer will be the last of the ACT initiatives to be implemented and is linked with the Youth Homelessness Sector Review that is happening to look at appropriate models of service delivery for homeless youth.

Outcomes

The overall outcome of the Youth Foyer is to ensure young people are better prepared and supported to prevent homelessness (turning off the tap) and when in homelessness helping them make the transition out of homelessness to independent living, self-reliance and adulthood through the provision of accommodation, support services and ability to undertake training or employment (breaking the cycle).

The key outcomes of the proposed Youth Foyer will include:

  • provision of stable (and potentially long term), safe and secure accommodation;
  • access to case management and caseworker support when needed;
  • development of skills, competencies and connections young people need to be able to successfully live independently;
  • independent living skills training and peer support;
  • assistance (re)establishing social networks including family relationships;
  • assistance with access to education, training and employment assistance, health and counselling services, other required support services;
  • outreach services, based on assessment of need after exit from program.
Activity Locations

There was no capital funding allocated for the Youth Foyer and it is proposed to access a multi-unit development close to the city that is being constructed under the Nation Building & Jobs Plan for the built form of the Youth Foyer.

This location will meet a key requirement of Youth Foyers to be close to employment, education and training facilities.

Date Activity Became Operational

The program will be subject to a procurement process in late 2010 after the finalisation of the review of youth homelessness services and will be operational in the first half of 2011.

Target Group

The prime target group are young people aged 16-25 who are homeless or at risk of homelessness.  Young people will be identified from multiple sources and be referred to the Youth Foyer.

Case Study

Service has not commenced.

Deliverables

The deliverables for this initiative in 2009-2010 related to the work required to develop a Youth Foyer Model appropriate for the ACT context. These deliverables and results are outlined in the Table below:

Deliverable Progress
1.Development of a concept Model Concept Model developed for ACT context
2. Source built form Built form of Youth Foyer sourced subject to approvals
3.Identify stakeholders All stakeholders identified
Performance Indicators and Targets for Initiative

Performance indicators have been developed for the initiative and are provided hereunder.  Targets have only been set for 2010-2011 when the Youth Foyer will become operational.

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of Number of young people (15 to 25 years) who are re-engaged with family, school and work
The number of Number of young people (15 to 25 years who undertake education, training or /and work
Number of young people (15 to 25 years) who exit the Youth Foyer into safe and secure long term accommodation
Not Applicable.
The Youth Foyer is due to become operational in March 2011
12 young people re-engaged with family, school and work
12 young people who undertake education, training or /and work
Not applicable in 2010-2011
Barriers and Challenges

There are a range of barriers and challenges that will need to be addressed to successfully implement a foyer type model in the ACT. Some of the key ones include:

  • Identifying a suitable property for the built form of the Youth Foyer;
  • Target group – whether able to assist young persons with medium to high needs, persons exiting out of home care, persons exiting remand /detention / Bimberi, university students etc);
  • Safety and security of residents - level required, secure rooms, secure building and grounds etc;
  • Establishing correct partnerships;
  • Service linkages - what linkages to services will be required;
  • Management and operation - level of staffing and type, Concierge, Caretaker etc;
  • Quality assurance and monitoring;
  • Sustainability of the Foyer; and
  • Social inclusion and community engagement for participants.

It will be important for the success of the initiative that these issues are discussed and raised in community consultations.

Opportunities and Highlights

The main opportunities and highlights of the Foyer model will be:

  • a holistic approach to the problems faced by many homeless young people (aged 16 – 25);
  • the bringing together under one umbrella (though not necessarily in one place) services that help support the transition to independence and potentially break the cycle of homelessness.;
  • provision of safe and ‘affordable’ accommodation with personal support and access to learning and employment opportunities;
  • effective outcomes for young homeless persons including employment or training on exit;
  • value for money;
  • services can reach well beyond Foyer residents and provide benefits for local communities;
  • young people are re-engaged with family, school and work;
  • effective transitions for young people into long term accommodation to break the cycle of homelessness; and
  • young people may achieve stability and independence, reducing their need for continuing support services.
Funding for Initiative:
Youth Foyer
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth Government funding   360,000 370,800 381,924
ACT funding To be determined

Back to top

2.1.7                    First Point (Central Intake Service) and Social Housing Register (Common Waiting List) - Improvements in service coordination and provision

Description

The ACT’s Central Intake Service for Homelessness will be known as First Point.  As a result of an open tender process, First Point will be auspiced by the Canberra Fathers and Children Service (CANFaCS) under contract with the Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services. 

First Point will provide placement into homelessness and housing support services for people in the ACT, and will facilitate access to other relevant services as required. First Point will provide a primary, but not sole, access point into the ACT homelessness system.

It will streamline service entry points into the homelessness service system ensuring that clients do not have to negotiate multiple agencies to access services. It will do this through the provision of phone and face to face contact to assist in matching those in need of support to social housing and homelessness services.

The second part of improvements in service coordination and provision is the implementation of the Social Housing Register to establish an integrated waiting list comprising both public and community housing applicants. There will be a phased approach commencing with the inclusion of the current community housing providers with whom Housing ACT has formalised contractual and leasing arrangements.

Subsequently, all additional community housing providers that receive properties constructed under the Nation Building and Jobs Plan will be required to allocate these dwellings from the Social Housing Register.

The final phase of the implementation of the Social Housing Register will be to investigate the possibility of linking affordable housing organisations to create a holistic social housing system including all forms of public, community and affordable housing. To deliver the Social Housing Register modifications to regulations are required.

Outcomes

After undertaking an initial assessment, First Point will be able to place people in crisis directly into specialist homelessness services, housing support services and other nominated housing and support programs.

First Point will operate on the basis of a ‘No Turn Away’ principle. This means that every homeless person who makes contact with First Point will receive a service response. In the event that a person is not able to be offered assistance, First Point will provide follow up contact within 48 hours and then regularly after that time until that person has received an appropriate service response.

CANFaCS will develop clear protocols, policies and procedures (particularly in relation to assessment, prioritisation and allocation) in consultation with the homelessness sector prior to the commencement of the service. Once developed, this information will be disseminated across the sector, as well as across related sectors, in order to ensure cohesive and coordinated service delivery.

The outcomes for the Social Housing Register will be the possibility of creating a holistic social housing system including all forms of public, community and affordable housing to streamline access to these forms of accommodation.

Activity Locations

First Point will be co-located with Housing ACT and will be closely aligned to the introduction of the Social Housing Register spanning public, community and affordable housing. 

Date Activity Became Operational

First Point will commence operations from 1 November 2010. 

The Social Housing Registerwill commence on 1 September 2010.

Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Outcomes for Initiative

The Table below outlines the Performance Indicators for the initiative when it becomes operational. Deliverables and Targets for the First Point initiative will be set for 2010-2011:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

Number of people contacting First Point provided with a service response.
The number of people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are referred to accommodation.
The number of people provided with support services.
Not Applicable. The initiative is to become operational in November 2010.
Funding for First Point

Additional funding to establish First Point was obtained through the re-direction of funds from the cessation of the Canberra Emergency Accommodation Service whose functions were no longer required with the implementation of First Point.

First Point - Central Intake Service
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth Government funding 100,000 128,750 132,613 136,413
Actual expenditure Commonwealth        
Budget Carry Over 100,00      
Proposed Commonwealth expenditure   228,750 132,613 136,413

Back to top

2.1.8 Staying at Home after Domestic Violence Program - Support for women and children experiencing domestic and family violence to stay in their housing

Description

The Staying at Home after Domestic Violence Program initiative has been developed in conjunction with DVCS to provide support for victims of domestic violence to remain housed in their long term accommodation. This Program supports the family to remain in the home, and have the perpetrator removed from the tenancy agreement and rehoused as appropriate. This takes place, where appropriate, after final domestic orders have been granted. The Program commenced in October 2009.

As part of the Program an approved business process is now in place which includes the development of a Domestic Violence Policy Manual, a Memorandum of Understanding between Housing ACT and DVCS and a workflow chart to ensure a smooth and efficient process is in place for identifying Housing ACT tenants eligible for the Program.

The Domestic Violence Policy Manual sets out the policies and procedures for working with women and children escaping domestic violence. The Manual also states the department’s commitment to working in partnership with specialist agencies to ensure effective responses to domestic violence. The domestic violence flowchart clearly outlines the referral definitions and the process for contacting DVCS for tenancy support and the ACT Civil and Administrative Tribunal (ACAT) to register an application under Section 85, substitution of tenancy.

Domestic Violence Training has been provided by DVCS to relevant staff in Housing ACT. Housing Managers and tenancy staff have been informed of the processes for identifying possible domestic violence and when to inform the tenant of their options for applying for sole tenancy of their home.

Housing ACT's maintenance contractor has also been identified as requiring training in domestic violence awareness as they are often called in for maintenance or repairs after domestic violence has taken place. Contractors will be trained to identify possible indicators of domestic violence through damage to the property and the process for reporting this to Housing ACT for follow up with the tenant.

Outcomes

The initiative is a preventative measure to ensure families subject to domestic violence stay in their homes and do not become homeless. The perpetrator of the violence is removed from the tenancy. 

Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and Outcomes for Staying at Home after Domestic Violence Initiative

The Table below outlines the Performance Indicators, Deliverables, Targets and results for the Staying at Home after Domestic Violence initiative:

Performance Indicators

Deliverable/ Target
2009-2010

Progress/ Result
2009-2010

The number of clients assessed under Stay at Home Program
The number of families who maintain or secure safe and sustainable housing following family violence
3 clients
3 families
3 clients
3 families

Date Activity Became Operational

December 2009.

Barriers and Challenges

This initiative sought to operationalise an existing provision in the ACT’s Residential Tenancies Act to remove the name of a perpetrator from a tenancy agreement after a final domestic violence order had been granted, allowing the remaining families to remain housed in place. 

During the course of the program it became apparent that there were existing barriers to access final domestic violence orders from the Court, as well as a significant time lag involved. In addition, it was difficult to identify clients willing to come forward to be involved in a ‘test case’.

The project partners overcame this by identifying other solutions to allow people to remain housed in place, including utilisation of the ‘breakdown of tenancy’ provisions of the Act which achieve the same purpose but without the need for final domestic violence orders.

In addition, Housing ACT agreed to provide funding to DVCS for two additional court workers to assist people accessing the legal system. Lastly, Housing ACT has initiated discussions with the ACT Department of Justice and Community Safety to consider possible legislative amendments to facilitate greater tenancy protection for people experiencing violence.

Opportunities and Highlights

The initiative involved a close working relationship between Housing ACT and DVCS. This included a part-time project officer based in each organisation. The project workers worked across sites in both organisations and have facilitated a range of related service delivery improvements for each agency.

Funding for Staying at Home after Domestic Violence Initiative
First Point - Central Intake Service
2008-09
$
2009-10
$
2010-11
$
2011-12
$
2012-13
$
Commonwealth Government funding   100,000      
Actual expenditure Commonwealth   100,00      
Budget Carry Over/shortfall   0      

Back to top

2.2  Performance Reporting

Performance Indicators and Benchmarks

Under the NPAH the ACT have agreed with the Commonwealth on an overall set of performance indicators that provide benchmarks and indicators for reporting targets and milestones on reducing homelessness in the ACT.

The initiatives introduced under the NPAH will assist in meeting these targets and milestones. The ACT recognises however, that these targets cannot be met in totality without a whole of service system response including mainstream services and agencies.

A staged process of review of homelessness specific and mainstream programs is being undertaken in the ACT to increase the effectiveness of the new initiatives and to implement a whole of service system response. This process will examine current services and examine how they can be reformed to meet the new directions and performance targets.

The targets and milestones agreed between the parties under the NPAH are therefore contingent on the whole service system response in the ACT. 

External factors such as changes in economic activity, unemployment etc. can also directly affect performance indicators and outcomes. Taking these factors into account a realistic approach has been taken in setting the overarching performance targets and milestones as detailed and set out in the Table below:

Performance Indicator Initiatives/ Programs Baseline
“Was”
Performance Benchmark
“Will Be”
Reduction/
Increase
Target
2010-2011
Target
2011-2012
Target
2012-2013

Proportion of Australians who are homeless

All of the Initiatives to be implemented under the NPA on Homelessness will contribute to a 7% decrease in the number of persons who are homeless in the ACT.

Homeless Persons:
In the ACT 1364 people are homeless (Counting the Homeless 2006)

 


Homeless ATSI Persons:
In the ACT 149 Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people are homeless (Counting the Homeless 2006)

 

Homeless Persons:
By 2013, a decrease of 7 per cent in the number of people who are homeless to fewer than 1268 people

 

Homeless ATSI Persons:
By 2013, a decrease by one third the number of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people who are homeless to fewer than 100 people

Homeless Persons:
Reduction of 96 people

 

 

 

Homeless ATSI Persons:
Reduction of 49 Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people

 

Homeless Persons:
Decrease of 3 per cent in the number of people who are homeless to fewer than 1323 people.

 

Homeless ATSI Persons:
Decrease by 10 per cent in the number of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people who are homeless to fewer than 135 people.

 

Homeless Persons:
Decrease of 5 per cent in the number of people who are homeless to fewer than 1298 people.

 

Homeless ATSI Persons:
Decrease by 20 per cent in the number of Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander people who are homeless to fewer than 120 people.

 

Homeless Persons:
Decrease of 7 per cent in the number of people who are homeless to fewer than 1268 people.

 

Homeless ATSI Persons:
Decrease in Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander Homelessness population by one third to fewer than 100.

 

Proportion of Australians who are experiencing primary homelessness (rough sleeping)

Assertive Outreach for Rough Sleepers – Street To Home Initiative

In the ACT 6% of homeless people or 78 are sleeping rough (ABS Census 2006)

By 2013, a decrease of 25 per cent in the number of people who are sleeping rough to fewer than 58 people

Reduction of 20 people sleeping rough

Decrease of 10 per cent in the number of people who are sleeping rough to fewer than 70 people

Decrease of 15 per cent in the number of people who are sleeping rough to fewer than 66 people as reported by 2011 Census

Reduction in rough sleeping of 25% to fewer than 58 people by 2013 as reported in the next Census.

The number of families who maintain or secure safe and sustainable housing following family violence

Stay at Home Project

 

0 (Zero) - Number of women who secure or maintain safe and sustainable housing.

 

50 women who experience family violence provided with support to enable them to secure or maintain safe and sustainable housing.

 

Increase of 50 women who secure or maintain safe and sustainable housing.

 

The number of women who maintain safe and sustainable housing is increased by 25 women.

 

The number of women who maintain safe and sustainable housing is increased by 40 women.

The number of women who maintain safe and sustainable housing is increased by 50 women.

 

Increase in the number of people exiting care and custodial settings into secure and affordable housing

 

Men’s exiting detention initiative provided through Men’s Accommodation Support Service (MASS).

Women Exiting Detention initiative.

 

Reduction in the number of people exiting care and custodial settings into homelessness (ACT proxy measure is 131, source Table 8.5 plus Table 8.2 Homeless People in SAAP 2008-09)

 

By 2013, reduce by 25 per cent the number of people released from such institutions into homelessness to fewer than 98 people
 

Reduction of 33 persons exiting into homelessness

 

Reduction of 5% to fewer than 124 people exiting care and custodial settings into homelessness reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data

 

Reduction of 10% to fewer than 111 people exiting care and custodial settings into homelessness reported in the 2011/12 SAAP data

 

Reduction of 10% (25% in total) to fewer than 98 people exiting care and custodial settings into homelessness reported in the 2012/13 SAAP data or new data collection.

 

Reduce the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness.

Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies, social inclusion and economic participation.
First Point – Central intake service

Reduction in the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness. (ACT measure is 354; source Table 8.6 Homeless People in SAAP 2008-09. 35.4% of 1,000).

Baseline Zero - Number of clients supported to sustain tenancies

 

 

Baseline Zero - Number of clients supported under BHP for social inclusion and economic participation.

 

By 2013, reduce by 20 per cent the number of people exiting social housing and private rental into homelessness to fewer than 283 people.

 

 

 

Number of clients supported to sustain tenancies increased by 100

 

 

Number of clients supported under BHP for social inclusion and economic participation increased by 200.

 

 

Reduction of 71 people exiting from social housing and private rental to homelessness.

 

 

 

Increased by 100 clients

 

 

 

Increased by 200 clients.

 

 

 

 

Reduction of 5% to fewer than 336 people exiting from social housing and private rental to homelessness reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data.

 

Number of clients supported to sustain tenancies increased by 50

 

Number of clients supported under BHP for social inclusion and economic participation increased by 100.

Reduction of 5% to fewer than 319 people exiting from social housing and private rental to homelessness reported in the 2011/12 SAAP data.

Number of clients supported to sustain tenancies increased by 75

Number of clients supported under BHP for social inclusion and economic participation increased by 150.

Reduction of 10% (20% in total) to fewer than 283 people exiting from social housing and private rental to homelessness reported in the 2012/13 SAAP data or new data collection.

Number of clients supported to sustain tenancies increased by 100

 

 

Number of clients supported under BHP for social inclusion and economic participation increased by 200.

The proportion of people experiencing repeat periods of homelessness

 

Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies,
- social inclusion and economic participation;

Reduction in the number of SAAP clients requiring three or more support periods in a 12 month period from 100. (Table 4.3 Homeless People in SAAP 2008-09.).

 

By 2013, reduce by 25 per cent the number of people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12 months to fewer than 75 people.

 

Reduction of 25 people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency.

 

Reduction of 5% to fewer than 95 people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12 months reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data.

.

Reduction of 10% to fewer than 85 people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12 months reported in the 2011/12 SAAP data.

.

Reduction of 10% (25% in total) to fewer than 75 people experiencing three repeat periods of homelessness at an emergency service in 12 months reported in the 2012/13 SAAP data or new data collection.

Number of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are re-engaged with family, school and work

Youth Foyer

 

To be derived from figures on school retention rates and reporting on the Foyer model.
Commonwealth provide ACT component of Reconnect to ACT as a “point in time” baseline

 

 

Young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are not a student after support. Currently 127 - 63.5% (Table 8.4 Homeless People in SAAP 2008-09.)

 

By 2013, the number of young people (12 to 18 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness supported to re-engaged with family, school and work is increased by 50.

 

 

 

By 2013, reduce by 10 percentage points the number of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are not a student after support to fewer than114.

 

Increase of 50 in number of young people re-engaged with family, school and work.

 

 

 

 

Reduction of 13 young people (5 to 17 years).

Number of young people (12 to 18 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness supported to re-engaged with family, school and work is increased by 25.

 

Decrease of 3% to fewer than 60.5% of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are not a student after support reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data

Number of young people (12 to 18 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness supported to re-engaged with family, school and work is increased by 40.

Decrease of 3% to fewer than 57.5% of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are not a student after support reported in the 2011/12 SAAP data.

Number of young people (12 to 18 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness supported to re-engaged with family, school and work is increased by 50.

 

 

Decrease of 4% (total of 10% points) to fewer than 53.5% of young people (5 to 17 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are not a student after support reported in the 2012/13 SAAP data or new data collection.

Number of children (under 12 years) who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are provided with additional support to maintain contact with their school.

Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies,
- social inclusion and economic participation.

Percentage of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care where service required.

Currently 79.2% (Table 7.4 Homeless People in SAAP 2008-09.)

By 2013, increase by 10 percentage point the number of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care to more than 90% where service required.

10% increase of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care.

Increase of 2.5% to more than 82% of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care reported in the 2010/11 SAAP data.

Increase of 2.5% to more than 85% of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care reported in the 2011/12 SAAP data.

Increase of 5% (total of 10% points) to more than 90% of accompanying children in homelessness services provided with or referred to assistance with school liaison/child care reported in the 2012/13 SAAP data or new data collection.

Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who receive financial advice, counselling and/or case management.

Building Housing Partnerships (BHP) initiative comprising - sustaining social housing and private tenancies,
- social inclusion and economic participation.

Zero Baseline -Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who receive financial advice, counselling
Programs to sustain tenancies include financial advice, counselling and/or case management. Benchmark and targets to be derived from program data.

By 2013, 100 families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness linked with financial advice, counselling and/or case management.

Increase of 100 families.

Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are linked with financial advice, counselling and/or case management increased by 50 families.

Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are linked with financial advice, counselling and/or case management increased by 75 families.

Number of families who are homeless or at risk of homelessness who are linked with financial advice, counselling and/or case management increased by 100 families.

Number of people who are homeless or at risk who are provided with legal services

Street Law program (Not funded under NPAH)

Baseline  0 (Zero)
Assumes zero homeless persons now provided with legal services as service not started until 2010.

By 2013, the number of persons who are homeless or at risk who are provided with legal services will be 20.

Increase of 20 persons provided with legal services.

The number of persons who are homeless or at risk who are linked with legal services increases by 10.

The number of persons who are homeless or at risk who are linked with legal services increases by 15.

The number of persons who are homeless or at risk who are linked with legal services increases by 20.

Number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with formal training and development opportunities

Formal training and development opportunities are provided by all service providers and Housing ACT

Baseline = 291
Assumed zero participants in formal workforce training and development training and development activities.

 

By 2013, the number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities will be at least 25 workers.

 

Increases of 25 workers in specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities.

.

The number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities increases by 15 workers.

 

The number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities increases by 20 workers.

 

The number of staff of specialist homeless services provided with training and development opportunities increases by 25 workers.
 

Back to top

Part 3 - Key Priorities

3.1 Key priorities for 2010-2011

Approach

The overall approach for delivering key priorities for the ACT in 2010–2011 will be:

  • establishing business processes for monitoring and evaluating the initiatives already implemented;
  • to deliver the initiatives due for implementation in 2010 -2011 such as the Youth Foyer Model; and
  • continue reforms to the homelessness sector outlined in the ACT Road Map discussion paper.

How

These above priorities will be accomplished by:

  • research, analysis and consultation with relevant stakeholders to inform service system redesign and reform;
  • engaging with other agencies and community partners to deliver reforms; and
  • providing leadership and direction for the homelessness sector.

Key priorities for each initiative

Key priorities for each initiative under NPAH are:

  1. A Place to Call Home
    • build five dwellings for completion by June 2011.
  2. Street to Home
    • to undertake a post implementation review of the initiative.
    • to seek to obtain data or proxy data on the overall number of Rough Sleepers in the ACT.
  3. Building Housing Partnerships
    • expanding and developing policy and practices for transitional housing and head leasing program
    • extending HOST program to include persons over 80 years and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders persons over 50 years.
  4. Managed Accommodation Program
    • evaluating men’s component of the Managed Accommodation Program.
    • implementing women’s component Managed Accommodation Program.
  5. Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative (HASI)
    • undertake evaluation of program.
  6. The Foyer Model
    • implement initiative.
  7. First Point (Central Intake Service) and Social Housing Register (Common Waiting List)
    • implement First Point initiative.
    • undertake staged implementation of Social Housing Register.
  8. Supporting Victims of Domestic Violence ‘STAY’ Program
    • Discussions to take place with Department of Justice and Community  Safety regarding legislative amendments to the Residential Tenancy Act to support evictions of perpetrators without a final domestic violence order in place.

3.2 Reform Process

Future direction

The ACT currently provides a high level of support and provides a high standard of accommodation services for people who are homeless or at risk of homelessness as indicated in the National Data Collection Annual Report 2008-2009 and the Counting the Homeless Report 2006. The issue to be addressed is that this system while doing a great job of supporting the homeless does very little to prevent homelessness in the first instance.

The problem with the present system is that it is very expensive and needs to move towards a more contemporary approach adopted by somelessness services which focuses on prevention and support rather and roofs over head.

Whilst additional funding has become available under the NPAH for the delivery of new initiatives the existing homelessness service sector also needs to be reformed in order to meet the NPA targets and to respond to the long term funding reductions for the ACT resulting from the Council on Australian Government’s NAHA funding changes.

Although increasing the public housing stock will provide increased exit points for homeless individuals and families, additional non-accommodation support is also required to assist people to maintain tenancies by overcoming barriers to social and economic participation.

Additional resources are required to address the needs of special target groups such as young people, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islanders, victims of domestic violence, and those with mental health or substance abuse issues.

Not all of these responses can be addressed by the homelessness service system but the reform priorities as set out in the ACT Road Map discussion paper lay out a key direction for the ACT in what the system should look like at the end of reform.

The ACT reform objectives will require the redistribution of funding from less effective services to those services which focus on best practice service models.

Back to top


Part 4 - Glossary of Acronyms and Terms

ACT Australian Capital Territory
CMC Canberra Men’s Centre
CSC Client Support Coordinator
DHCS ACT Department of Disability, Housing and Community Services
DVCS Domestic Violence Crisis Service
HASI Mental Health Housing and Support Initiative
HYPP Housing Young People Pilot
MASS Men’s Accommodation Support Service
MDP Multi-Disciplinary Panel
NAHA National Affordable Housing Agreement
NSW New South Wales
OCYFS Office for Children, Youth and Family Support
PSU Psychiatric Services Unit
SAAP Supported Accommodation Assistance Program
SHHS Social Housing and Homelessness Services
STTS Supportive Sustaining Tenancy Services
THP Transitional Housing Program

 

Back to top


Graphic of timeline of main achievements

This graphic illustrates the timeline of main achievement between July 2009 and June 2010

  • Development of proposed initiatives commences.
    A Place To Call Home land identified for purchase.
  • Project implementation plans developed.
    A Place To Call Home land purchased/building commenced.
  • NPAH initiatives developed for consultation with the homelessness sector and community.
    Street To Home tender process.
  • HOST program commenced. Staying at Home for victims of domestic violence commences.
    HASI initiative commenced.
  • Additional dwellings for Transitional Housing expansion and head tenancies identified.
    Youth Foyer commences development.
  • Start of consultation process.
    Presentations at Round Table Meetings and Homelessness Forum.
  • The Road Map discussion paper on NPAH initiatives and way forward released by DHCS.
  • Consultation / Workshop - feedback from The Road Map and related policies.
  • Street To Home initiative commenced.
    Exiting detention program for men commenced.
    A Place To Call Home commences with first tenancy.
  • Sustaining Tenancies Tender process commences.
    Central Intake Service tender process commences.

Return to Timeline graphic

Last updated: