National Quality Framework Submission: Tables and Figures Description

Submission 20 - Youth and Family Service (Logan City) Inc

Views and ideas on a national quality framework - what is quality service delivery and how can it be supported?

Table 2 is presented in two columns.

Row 1 column 1 is a heading in bold that says Critical Elements of Quality service delivery
Row 1 column 2 is a heading in bold that says How can it be supported?

Column 1
Row 2
Recognition of safe, secure and adequate housing, with security of tenure, as a human right
Column 2
Row 2
Government is signatory to United Nations Declaration on Human Rights - this should underpin all references to housing as a right

Column 1
Row 3
National Quality Standards re - housing
Column 2
Row 3
Use National Community Housing Standards as reference point, rather than completely 'reinvent the wheel'

Column 1
Row 4
Professional staff
Column 2
Row 4
Appropriate funding - to attract/increase numbers of professional staff

Column 1
Row 5
Accountability for services delivered - both by Non Government Organisations and government sectors
Column 2
Row 5
Point 1
Reports to funding bodies be modified to ensure all data requested is meaningful data - with appropriate balance between qualitative data and quantitative data
Point 2
Housing services to adhere to National Community Housing Standards (or similar standard) - including all government social housing
Point 3
Audit results on National Community Housing Standards to be made available to funding body
Point 4
Government housing to be assessed via National Community Housing Standards

Column 1
Row 6
Customer service focus
Column 2
Row 6
Recognise the client as the centre of our practice - staff are paid to deliver a professional service

Column 1
Row 7
More Same House Different Landlord schemes - transfer management of properties, not the tenant
Column 2
Row 7
Explore existing practices that allow and support transition of property management rather than tenant relocation

Column 1
Row 8
Effective feedback / complaints management systems (or service similar to the Victorian Homelessness Advocacy Service)
Column 2
Row 8
This needs to be considered as another arm of homelessness funding to ensure homeless clients are receiving fair and equitable service

Column1
Row 9
Housing - all tenants of social / Department / community housing to be provided with/ have access to management support
Column 2
Row 9
Provision of case management services to homeless clients - recognising that planned, consistent support is a proven method of moving clients on from homelessness

Column 1
Row 10
Connectedness to community
Column 2
Row 10
Case management services provide this through linking with relevant resources

Column 1
Row 11
Any housing provision to be provided under, and in accord with, relevant tenancy legislation
Column 2
Row 11
All housing to offer security of tenure by way of a formal lease in accord with Residential Tenancy law

Column1
Row 12
Security of Tenure
Column 2
Row 12
Focus on provision of long term housing which provides security of tenure. Short term accommodation can perpetuate homelessness

Column1
Row 13
Appropriate housing for individual / family circumstances
Column 2
Row 13
Provision of affordable housing for singles / large / extended families

Column 1
Row 14
Rights based service delivery
Column 2
Row 14
Point 1
Property management being proactive and including Tenant Advice Service contact details in any breach / eviction notices
Point 2
Rent arrears - should be negotiated - rent arrears, when managed well, should rarely result eviction

Column 1
Row 15
Promotion of 'cultural' tolerance - Culturally and Linguistically Diverse / Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander / homeless mental illness limit neighbourhood fatigue / forming of 'ghetto' type areas.
Column 2
Social housing cannot be concentrated in particular areas

Footnote
All of the above can be supported via a quality framework

Submission 24- Anglicare Australia

Figure 3.1 Practice paradigm for a quality service

Figure 3.1 is a flow chart of a practice paradigm for a quality service. An arrow starts the flow chart at level 4

Level 4
Column 2
Heading 2
Empowerment
Level 4 flows up to level 3, heading 3

Level 3
Column 3
Heading 3
Choice
Level 3 flows up to level 2, flows to heading 4

Level 2
Column 4
Heading 4
Action
Level 2 flows up to level 1, heading 5

Level 1
Column 5
Heading 5
Contribution
Level 1 flows around to heading 6 which sits on the right hand side of the flow chart

Right hand side of the flow chart
Heading 6
Social Inclusion
Heading 6 of the chart flows around to the bottom of the flow chart

Along the bottom of the flow chart
Community connections
The bottom of the chart flows around to heading 1 which is on the left hand side of the chart.

Left hand side of the flow chart
Social Determinants
The left hand side of the chart flows to Level 4

Column 2
Under heading 2 - Empowerment
Box 1
Philosophy
Greater control over decisions and actions affecting their life and to feel the relationship between efforts and outcomes
Box 2
Practice

  • have a voice that is heard
  • participate in decision -making

Column 3
Under heading 3 - Choice
Box 1
Philosophy
Equitable access to options, unimpeded by social equity barriers.
Box 2
Practice

  • Information
  • Pathways
  • Access points

Column 4
Under heading 4 - Action
Box1
Philosophy
Follow through on decisions unimpeded by social equity barriers.
Box 2
Practice
Self - determination
Resources and means

Column 5
Under heading 5 - Contribution
Philosophy
Recognition of the individuals inherent value and translation into a connection or involvement in the community
Practice

  • Support and encouragement
  • Awareness in the community

Submission 30 - Victorian Aboriginal Legal Service Co-operative Limited

Table 1: Characteristics of police detainees by homelessness (percentage)

Table 1 is a vertical bar graph that presents the characteristics of homeless detainees and non homelessness detainees by percentages.

Gender
83 percent of homeless detainees were male
84 percent of non homeless detainees were male

Age
45 percent of homeless detainees were 30 plus
42 percent of non homeless detainees were 30 plus

Indigenous
21 percent of homeless detainees were Indigenous
14 percent of non homeless detainees were Indigenous

Illicit dependent
53 percent of homeless detainees were dependent on illicit drugs
36 percent of non homeless detainees were dependent on illicit drugs

Alcohol dependent
19 percent of homeless detainees were dependent on alcohol
12 percent of non homeless detainees were dependent on alcohol

Prison (past 12 months)
31 percent of homeless detainees had spent time in prison in the 12 months prior to their arrest
18 percent of non homeless detainees had spent time in prison in the 12 months prior to their arrest

Psychiatric (ever)
31 percent of homeless detainees had experienced a psychiatric illness
15 percent of non homeless detainees had experienced a psychiatric illness

Income - welfare (30 days)
84 percent of homeless detainees sourced income from welfare payments in the 30 days preceding their arrest
63 percent of non homeless detainees sourced income from welfare payments in the 30 days preceding their arrest

Income - illegal (30 days)
38 percent of homeless detainees reported generating income from illegal activities
20 percent of non homeless detainees reported generating income from illegal activities

Source: DUMA 1999-2006, [computer file] in AIC (2008)

Table 2: Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander representation among FHPP clients

Table 2 presents families who accessed the FHPP and there was at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member, who accessed the Family Homelessness Prevention Pilot program by all cases, closed cases and the percentage of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians with in the catchment area.

Wyong New South Wales
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (ALL cases)
= 12 or 20.7 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 8 or 20.5 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 2 percent of people

Dandenong Victoria
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 8 or 9.4 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 7 or 20.5 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 0.4 percent of people

Beenleigh Queensland
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 13 or 15.5 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 12 or 15.6 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 2.4 percent of people

Mandurah Western Australia
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 35 or 39.5 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 32 or 41 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 1.7 percent of people

Launceston Tasmania
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 4 or 5.2 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 4 or 5.8 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 2.8 percent of people

Belconnen Australian Capital Territory
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 4 or 4.9 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 4 or 5.5 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 1 percent of people

Darwin Northern Territory
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 41 or 59.4 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 28 or 58.3 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 8.5 percent of people

Salisbury South Australia
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - ALL cases
= 10 or 100 percent of clients
Families with at least one Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander adult family member - (Closed cases)
= 1 or 100.1 percent of clients
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians in the catchment area
= 2.9 percent of people

Note : Data compiled for the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Commission Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander areas / localities, so may not correspond exactly to Family Homelessness Prevention Pilot catchments. In some cases there is a substantial number of people who have not stated Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status, probably resulting in an underestimate.

Source: FaCS DB ; ABS Population Distribution Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Australians 2001 Cat No 4705

Table 3: Comparison of characteristics of A&TSI and non-A&TSI families helped under FHPP, closed cases as at 30 June 2004

Table 3 is presented as points in a two column table.

Column 1
Heading1
At the start of support, non - Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families were most likely to:

  • be single parents = 66 percent
  • be living in private rental housing before receiving support = 49 percent
  • have two or fewer children = 71 percent
  • have children under the age of 10 = 82 percent. 72 percent of children in non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families being under the age of 10 and 41 percent being four years or under
  • be living on a total household income of $449 per week or less = 66 percent, with 14 percent living on less than $300 per week
  • have moved twice or more in the last two years

Column 2
Heading 2
At the start of support, Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families were most likely to:

  • be single parents = 63 percent
  • be living in public or community rental housing before receiving support = 43 percent
  • have two or more children = 63 percent
  • have children under the age of 10 = 85 percent, with 69 percent of children in Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander families being under the age of 10 and 40 percent being four years of age and under
  • be living on a total household income of $449 per week or less = 64 percent, with 20 percent living on less than $300 per week
  • have moved three times or more in the last two years = 55 percent

Source: Ryan and Merlo (2005) op cit, p. 16.

Table 4: Reasons for moving house in the last two years by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander status.

Table 4 is a horizontal bar graph that shows the reasons for moving house by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people and non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by percentages.

Eviction
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 13.5 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 31.3 percent

Family violence
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 19.3 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 42.7 percent

Relationship breakdown
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 36.6 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 37.5 percent

Discrimination/harassment
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 6.1 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 11.5 percent

Housing affordability
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 33.3 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 39.6 percent

Lifestyle factors/choices
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 34.2 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 41.7 percent

Health reasons
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 10.7
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
9.4 percent

Release from institution
Non Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 1.4 percent
Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people
= 3.1 percent

Source: Ryan and Merlo (2005) op cit, p. 22

Figure 1: Continuum of services to support families

Figure one is line showing a continuum

Prevention
then
Early Intervention
then
Crisis support
then
Transitional support
then
Sustainable community participation

Source: Ryan and Merlo (2005) op cit, p.28

Submission 34 National Youth Coalition for Housing Inc.

Figure 1 is a flow chart that is presented as a picture showing a support continuum. The pictures show the diversity of people who experience or are at risk of homelessness. There are pictures of children, young people, and a family from a diversity of backgrounds.

Row 1 is a heading
Support continuum

Row 2 is a line of support types with symbols representing arrows linking the support.
At Risk flows to
Prevention flows to
Early Intervention flows to
Supported Accommodation (crisis) and Wrap Around Support
flows to transitional accommodation which flows to Exit

Row three is a picture representation of the support continuum on Row 2 in 6 columns

Column 1
At Risk of Homelessness
There are 4 pictures
Picture 1
Two young children
Picture 2
A young woman
Picture 3
A young woman
Picture 4
Two young men
Column one flows to row 3 column 2

Row 3
Column 2
Prevention
There is one picture
Of an older couple with a child
Column 2 flows to Row 3 column 3 and row 4

Row 3
Column 3
Early Intervention
There is one picture of a couple with two children
Row 3 Column 3 Row 3 column 4 and row 4

Row 3
Column 4
Has two headings and 4 pictures

Heading 1
Intensive support
Additional wrap around non - Supported Accommodation Assistance Program support
Picture 1 and 2
There are two pictures with heading 1 showing two young students.

Heading 2
Intensive Supported Accommodation
Picture 1
A sketch of a house
Picture 2
A man
Row 3 Column 4 flows to column 5 and row 4

Row 3
Column 5
Transition
There are two pictures
Picture 1
A sketch of a block of flats
Picture 2
A sketch of house
The following information is then listed
Post - Post SAAP Accommodation
Medium term semi supported affordable accommodation
Housing
e.g. Common Ground
Foyers
Independent living
Row 3 column 5 flows to column 6 row 3

Row 3
Column 6
Picture 1
There is a sketch of a house
Picture 2
A picture of a man
Picture 3
A picture of a woman
At 'Home' independence of homeless support
Column 6 flows from Row 4

Row 4
Not homeless ...does not need supported accommodation
Row 4 flows to column 6 row 3

Submission 37 - Royal & New Zealand College of Psychiatrists

Figure 1. The Stacey Matrix and the zone of complexity.

Figure 1 is a diagram being used to consider the macrosystem of healthcare, or with those experiencing homelessness.

Figure 2. Grol implementation process.

Figure 2 is a flow chart showing the Grol implementation process. The figure is presented in three columns and 7 rows.

Column 1
Row 1
Heading
Develop a change proposal

  1. Crucial elements well defined
  2. Based on evidence and consensus
  3. Tested in practice, adapted to local needs
  4. Low complexity, compatible to routines
  5. Attractive, accessible format
  6. Credible source

Column 1, row 1 flows to column 1 row 2

Column 1
Row 2
Identify obstacles to change

  1. Obstacles related to clinician, social context of care provision, or organisational context
  2. Obstacles related to stages in change process (dissemination, adoption, implementation, continuation)
  3. Segmentation of target group

Column 1, row 2 flows to column 1 row 3

Column1
Row 3
Link interventions to obstacles

  1. Dissemination: improve interest and understanding
  2. Adoption: improve attitude and intention to change
  3. Implementation: improve actual use
  4. Continuation: fixed habit

Column 1, row 3 flows to column 1 row 4

Column 1
Row 4
Develop a plan

  1. Combination of strategies
  2. Define intermediate and long-term targets
  3. Arrange procedures and tasks
  4. Set a time schedule

Column 1, row 4 flows to column 1 row 5

Column 1
Row 5
Carry out the plan and evaluate progress
Carry out different steps and continually evaluate progress
Column1, row 5 flows to column 1, row 6 and to column 2, row 5

Column 1
Row 6
flow arrows to column 1 row 7 and from column one row 7 back to column 1 row 6

Column 1
Row 7
Intermediate targets achieved
Column 1, row 7 flows to column 1 row 5

Column 2
Row 5 flows from column 1, row 5
Targets not achieved
Column 2, row 5 flows to column 3 row 4

Column 2
Row 4
Adapt the plan
Column 2, row 4 flows to column 1, row 4

Column 2
Row 3
Select new intervention
Column2, row 3 flows to column 1, row 3

Column 2
Row 2
Identify new obstacles
Column 2, row 2 flows or column 1, row 2

Column 1
Row 2
Adapt change proposal
Column 1, row 2 flows to column 1, row 1

Column 3

Shows a flow up from row 5 that connects from the right hand side to all the rows in column 2

Table 2. New Zealand Ministry for Health mental health information strategy.

Table 2 presents the New Zealand Ministry for Health mental health information strategy under two main heading and six sub headings.

Column 1
Row 1
Main Heading 1
Fix

Columns 5 and 6
Row 1
Main Heading 2
Relative roles and responsibilities

Column 1
Row 3
Main heading - Fix
Subheading - Priority area

  1. Shift the focus form information collection to information use

Column 1, row 2 corresponds with all the rows in the other columns

Column 2
Row 3
Subheading - Focus

  1. National Data Collection development

Column 2, row 2 corresponds with row 3 in all the other columns

Column 2
Row 4
Subheading - Focus

  1. Workforce development

Column 2, row 3 corresponds with rows 4 to 6 in all the other columns

Column 3
Row 3
Subheading - Barriers
Limited analysis and reporting of descriptive (MHINC) and evaluative (MH-SMART) data.

Column 4
subheading - Solutions
Row 3
Investigate the feasibility of merging MHINC and MH-SAMRT data items into one extract to reduce and increase opportunities for analysis of both data sets.

Column 5
Row 3
Main heading Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - Ministry of Health
Undertake a feasibility study into merging both data sets into one extract.

Column 6
Row 3
Main Heading - Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - District Health Boards (DHB providers and non governmental organisations)
Participate in the feasibility study to enable a cost-effective solution to be found.

Column 3
Row 4
Subheading - Barriers
Full benefits of investing in information systems are not realised because the workforce is not equipped to use available information

Column 4
Row 4
Subheading - Solutions
Provide training programmes to extend the skills of the current workforce so that staff at all levels are better equipped to interpret and apply information.

Column 5
Row 4
Main heading Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - Ministry of Health
Scope the requirements for national information training initiatives via the Mental Health Workforce Development Programme.

Column 6
Row 4
Main Heading - Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - District Health Boards (DHB providers and non governmental organisations)
Ensure staff has basic information management skills as a core competency for their work.

Column 3
Row 5
Subheading - Barriers
Education providers do not see skills in information management as core competencies

Column 4
Row 5
Subheading - Solutions
Develop training programmes to address the needs of people entering the mental health workforce.

Column 5
Row 5
Main heading Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - Ministry of Health
Liaise with national training organisations, professional bodies and the Clinical Training Agency to determine how best to influence the education sector to meet the requirements for information management in mental health services.

Column 6
Row 5
Main Heading - Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - District Health Boards (DHB providers and non governmental organisations)
Ensure staff orientation programmes include an information management module.

Column 3
Row 6
Subheading - Barriers
Staff training in information management is of variable quality and does not address priority areas

Column 4
Row 6
Subheading - solutions
Develop an accreditation system that offers the sector confidence in the standard and quality of training in information management.

Column 5
Row 6
Main heading Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - Ministry of Health
Investigate developing an accreditation system for professional trainers

Column 6
Row 6
Main Heading - Relative roles and responsibilities
Subheading - District Health Boards (DHB providers and non governmental organisations)
Ensure staff access only those courses provided by accredited trainers and education providers.

Figure 3. WHO quality improvement model for mental health care

Figure 3 presents a flow chart with steps starting from 1 to through 7 in circular fashion with 7 flowing back to 1.

Number 1. Align policy for quality improvement

  • Consultation
  • Partnership
  • Legislation
  • Funding
  • Planning

Number 1 flows to number 2

Number 2. Design Standards
Number 2 flows to number 3

Number 3. Establish Accreditation Procedures
Number 3 flows to 4

Number 4 Monitor services
Number 4 flows to number 5

Number 5. Integrate Quality Improvement into management
Number 5 flows to number 6

Number 6 Improve services
Number 6 flows back to number 4 as a continuous cycle and to number 7

Number 7 Review and Modify
Number 7 flows to number 1

Figure 4. Quality framework for mental health services in Ireland

Figure 4 as presented as four circles inside each other with text in each circle going around. There is information, outside the circles in each corner and at the top and bottom of the page.

Top of page, left hand side
Funding

Top of page, centre
Legislation

Top of page, right hand side
Social Services

Bottom of page, right hand side
Employment/Housing Services

Bottom of page, centre
Political Agenda & Mental health

Bottom of Page, left hand side
Education

Circle number 1 - is in the centre
Service user

Circle number 2
Top
Holistic seamless service
Respectful empathetic relationships
Empowering approach

Circle number 2
Bottom'
Quality environment
Equitable access
Family chosen advocate involvement and review

Circle number 3
Top
Governance

Circle number 3
Right hand side
Corporate effective management systems and structures

Circle number 3
Left hand side
Clinical

  • High staff skills
  • Training
  • Continuous Professional Development
  • Evidence based care
  • Safety

Circle number 4
Top
Quality Mental Health Service

Circle number 4
Bottom
Systemic Evaluation and Review

Table 3. Suggested participant levels in the health care sector

Table 3 presents four columns which list by dot points suggested participant levels in the health sector

Column 1
Heading
Ferlie and Shortell

  • Individual
  • group or team
  • organisation
  • system

Column 2
Heading
World Organisation Family doctors

  • individual practitioner
  • practice
  • local or regional level
  • national or policy level

Column 3
Heading
World Organisation Family doctors

  • patient
  • doctor
  • funder
  • policy maker

Column 4
RACGP

  • consultation
  • setting of care
  • regional
  • national
Content Updated: 14 March 2013