Disability Services Census 2011 - Data Guide for Disability Service Providers

Introduction

This Data Guide is designed to assist the disability service outlets involved in providing data for the Disability Services Census 2011.  The data collected will inform national reporting purposes under the National Disability Agreement. 

Disability service outlets within the scope of this data collection are those which received funding in 2010-11 from the Commonwealth Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) under the National Disability Agreement.  FaHCSIA funded a range of service types in 2010-11.  These are described below:

  • 4.05 FaHCSIA Funded Respite Care
    FaHCSIA funded respite care is aimed at increasing the provision of immediate and short term respite to carers of young people with severe or profound disabilities.
     
  • 5.02 Supported Employment Services
    Supported Employment Services are commercial businesses that provide employment for people with significant disability in a supported environment. These services are also known as Australian Disability Enterprises.
     
  • 6.01 Advocacy Services
    Advocacy Services assist people with disability to overcome barriers that impact on their daily life and their ability to participate in the community. Service provision focuses on six different models of advocacy: self-advocacy; individual advocacy; citizen advocacy; family advocacy; legal advocacy; and systemic advocacy. The adoption of a range of advocacy models enables advocacy services to deliver flexible and responsive services to meet the needs of people with disability.
     
  • 6.02 Disability Information and Captioning Services
    Disability Information and Captioning Services facilitate access to information by people with disability, their families, carers and professionals, and include services to provide the information necessary to enable people with disability to live full lives in their communities. This includes captioning of all the elements of media entertainment (e.g. television programs, DVDs, cinema) for people who are deaf and/or hearing impaired.
     
  • 6.05 Print Disability Services
    Print Disability Services provide alternative format materials to people, who, because of their disability, are unable to read, hold or manipulate printed materials in standard form. These alternative formats include Braille, large print, audio recordings, computer discs and electronic text.

The Disability Services Census 2011 collects information on the outlet operations of all FaHCSIA-funded disability service outlets on the Service Outlet Form and every consumer who accessed Supported Employment Services through the FaHCSIA Online Funding Management System (FOFMS).

The Data Guide includes all data items collected by FaHCSIA whether directly from disability service outlets or through FOFMS. The Data Guide provides detailed information about every data item collected. For each data item, the following information is provided:

  • Data item name
  • Associated question
  • Definition
  • FOFMS Tab (for Consumer Information only)
  • FOFMS Fields (for Consumer Information only)
  • Classification (i.e. possible response options)
  • Guide for use, and
  • Justification for the collection of the data item.

All of the data items included in the Disability Services Census 2011 are listed at Appendix A. All these data items are required for national reporting purposes under the National Disability Agreement. FaHCSIA recodes some data items from FOFMS in order to meet the set reporting requirements. .

Disability service outlets are required to provide Disability Services Census 2011 data to FaHCSIA by close of business Friday 22 July 2011.

Please read this document as it will help you to complete the Service Outlet Form and Consumer Information for the Disability Services Census 2011.

If you have any comments, suggestions or questions about the information provided in this Data Guide, please contact the Disability Services Census Helpdesk by:

Census Due Cob Friday 22 July 2011

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Service Outlet Form

Before You Begin

The reference week for the Disability Services Census 2011 is Friday 24 June to Thursday 30 June 2011.

Information Requirements

All FaHCSIA-funded disability service outlets must complete the Service Outlet Form. This information is necessary in order to gain a complete and accurate picture of the types of services being received by consumers under the National Disability Agreement.

If the service outlet type is Respite (4.05), Advocacy (6.01), Disability Information and Captioning (6.02) or Print Disability (6.05), the service outlet must complete all Questions (1 through to 6) on the Service Outlet Form. Supported Employment Service outlets (5.02) must complete only Questions 1 through to 5.

Part A: Contact Details

Please provide the name of an appropriate contact officer in the space provided on the Service Outlet Form, together with their phone number, fax number and email address. Please note that ‘appropriate contact officer’ means someone who is involved in completing the forms, rather than the administrative head of the service outlet.

Part B: Service Outlet Details

This information will be automatically generated from the FaHCSIA Online Funding Management System (FOFMS). It includes the organisation name and ID, service name, activity ID, service outlet type, state and postcode.

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Part C: Service Outlet Operations

1. Weeks Per Year of Operation
 

Question:


How many weeks per year does this service outlet usually operate?


Defined as:

The number of weeks per year that the service outlet usually operates.

Classification:

1-52 The actual number of weeks per year
No regular pattern of operation through the year

Guide for use

  • Number of weeks of operation should be rounded up to the nearest whole week.
  • Please record ‘no regular pattern of operation through the year’ if the service outlet does not have a regular pattern of operation.
  • A service outlet is considered to be operating whenever a service is provided to consumers e.g. if your service outlet closes for only 2 weeks over the Christmas period you should indicate that you operate for 50 weeks per year.
  • This data item is seeking information about the usual weeks of operation of a service outlet.

Justification:

To gain a greater understanding of patterns of service delivery.

2. Days Per Week of Operation


Question:

How many days per week does this service outlet usually operate?

Defined as:

The number of days per week that the service outlet usually operates.

Classification:

1-7 The actual number of days per week
No regular pattern of operation through the week

Guide for use

  • Number of days of operation should be rounded up to the nearest whole day.
  • Please record ‘no regular pattern of operation through the week’ if the service outlet has no regular weekly pattern of operation.
  • A service outlet is considered to be operating whenever a service is provided to consumers. For example, if your service outlet is open for 5 days per week for service provision and 1 day per week for management, then your service outlet should record that it operates 5 days per week.
  • This data item is seeking information about the usual days of operation of a service outlet.

Justification:

To gain a greater understanding of patterns of service delivery.

3. Hours Per Day of Operation


Question:

How many hours per day does this service outlet usually operate?

Defined as:

The number of hours per day that the service outlet is usually open for the provision of service (not the number of hours staffed).

Classification:

1-24 The number of hours per day
No regular pattern of operation through the day

Guide for use

  • Number of hours of operation should be rounded up to the nearest whole hour.
  • Please record ‘no regular pattern of operation through the day’ if the service outlet has no regular daily pattern of operation. Please record ‘no regular pattern of operation through the day’ if, for example, the service outlet operates for flexible hours or on call or has different weekday and weekend operation patterns.
  • A service outlet is considered to be operating whenever a service is provided to consumers. For example, if your service outlet is open between 9am–5pm but is only open for consumers between 10am–3pm, then your service outlet should record that it operates 5 hours per day.
  • This data item is seeking information about the usual hours of operation of a service outlet.

Justification:

To gain a greater understanding of patterns of service delivery.

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Part D: Staffing

4. Staff Hours (Reference Week)
 

Question:


What were the total number of hours worked by paid and unpaid staff of the service outlet (including those worked by contracted staff and volunteers) in the 7-day reference week ending 30 June 2011?

Defined as:

The actual total number hours worked by staff of the service outlet, including contracted staff and volunteers for the 7-day reference week ending 30 June 2011.

Separate figures should be entered for paid staff and unpaid staff (where applicable).

Paid staff: includes the total number of actual paid hours worked by staff (including contract staff) employed by the service outlet on a permanent, part-time or casual basis.

Unpaid staff: includes the total number of actual unpaid hours worked by staff, volunteers or students and others who do not receive payment for the work they performed on behalf of the service outlet.

 

Classification:

4a Paid staff:   0-99999   hours worked
4b Unpaid staff:   0-99999   hours worked

Guide for use

  • This data item is seeking information about the total number of actual hours in the 7-day reference week ending 30 June 2011 worked by paid and unpaid staff.
  • Please record actual staff hours worked, not full time equivalent or rostered staff hours.
  • Staff hours should be rounded up to the nearest whole hour.
  • Inclusions and exclusions for the calculation of actual staff hours worked on behalf of this service outlet:

Include:

  • Staff hours worked by support staff, managers, clerical and administrative staff
  • Hours spent by board members at the service outlet or at committee meetings
  • Staff hours worked as paid overtime (include with paid staff hours) and any unpaid hours worked (include with unpaid staff hours)
  • Staff hours spent on meetings and training
  • Staff hours spent on travelling to a location to assist/visit a consumer
  • Staff hours spent transporting consumers

Exclude:

  • Staff hours for workers on leave, including public holidays, paid/unpaid sick leave
  • Staff hours normally worked in positions that are currently vacant
  • Staff hours allocated to non-National Disability Agreement (NDA) consumers
  • For agencies with multiple service outlet types (and where staff hours per service outlet type are not known), all staff should be apportioned across these service outlets. Only record those staff hours apportioned to a particular service outlet on its service outlet form.
  • This item is asking for hours worked by staff on behalf of this service outlet both directly delivered to consumers and on behalf of this service outlet more generally (ie indirect hours such as related committee meetings).

Justification:

This data item is collected to assist in analysis of staffing inputs for disability support, and to enable a comparison of the staffing requirements of different service types. It is important to include ‘volunteers’ due to the significant contribution they make within many agencies.

5. Staff Hours (Typical Week)
 

Question:

What were the total number of hours worked by paid and unpaid staff of the service outlet (including those worked by contracted staff and volunteers) in a typical (average) week.

Defined as:

The total number of hours worked by staff of the service outlet, including contracted staff and volunteers in a typical or average 7-day week.

Separate figures should be entered for paid staff and unpaid staff (where applicable).

Paid staff: includes the total number of actual paid hours worked by staff (including contract staff) employed by the service outlet on a permanent, part-time or casual basis.

Unpaid staff: includes the total number of actual unpaid hours worked by staff, volunteers or students and others who do not receive payment for the work they performed on behalf of the service outlet.

 

Classification:

5a Paid staff:   0-99999   hours worked
5b Unpaid staff:   0-99999   hours worked

Guide for use

  • This data item is seeking information about the total number of hours worked in a typical (average) week by paid and unpaid staff of this service outlet.
  • Please record the typical (average) staff hours worked, not full time equivalent or rostered staff hours.
  • Staff hours should be rounded up to the nearest whole hour.
  • Inclusions and exclusions for the calculation of typical (average) staff hours worked on behalf of this service outlet:

Include:

  • Staff hours worked by support staff, managers, clerical and administrative staff
  • Hours spent by board members at the service outlet or at committee meetings
  • Staff hours worked as paid overtime (include with paid staff hours) and any unpaid hours worked (include with unpaid staff hours)
  • Staff hours spent on meetings and training
  • Staff hours spent on travelling to a location to assist/visit a consumer
  • Staff hours spent transporting consumers

Exclude:

  • Staff hours for workers on leave, including public holidays, paid/unpaid sick leave
  • Staff hours normally worked in positions that are currently vacant
  • Staff hours allocated to non-National Disability Agreement (NDA) consumers
  • For agencies with multiple service outlet types (and where staff hours per service outlet type are not known), all staff should be apportioned across these service outlets. Only record those staff hours apportioned to a particular service outlet on its service outlet form.
  • This item is asking for hours worked by staff on behalf of this service outlet both directly delivered to consumers and on behalf of this service outlet more generally (ie indirect hours such as related committee meetings).

Justification:

This data item is requested to enable service outlets to indicate that the staff hours worked in the 7-day reference week were or were not typical for the service outlet (ie considerably more or less hours were worked). This data item is collected to assist in analysis of staffing inputs for disability support, and to enable a comparison of the staffing requirements of different service types. It is important to include ‘volunteers’ due to the significant contribution they make within many agencies.

If your service outlet type is Respite (4.05), Advocacy (6.01), Disability Information and Captioning (6.02) or Print Disability (6.05), PLEASE COMPLETE Question 6.

If your service outlet type is Supported Employment (5.02), PLEASE DO NOT complete Question 6. Supported Employment must also complete the Consumer Information available through the FOFMS Portal.

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6. Number of Consumers or Carers Assisted


Question:

How many consumers or carers received assistance from this service outlet during the 2010-11 financial year?

Defined as:

Total number of consumers or carers who received assistance from a particular service outlet during the 2010-11 financial year.

Classification:

1-99999

Guide for use

  • The total number of individual consumers or carers assisted is required, not instances of service.  Each consumer or carer receiving a service type during 2010-11 should be counted only once, regardless of how many times they accessed the service outlet in 2010-11.
  • The number of people who received a service during 2010-11 is required, not just those who received a service in the 7-day reference week ending 30 June 2011.
  • Service outlets should count the following:
    • Respite (4.05) – number of carers assisted including for referral, service co-ordinating, booking and arranging or the expenditure of ‘brokerage funds’.
    • Advocacy (6.01) – number of people who have received advocacy services in the reporting period.
    • Disability Information and Captioning (6.02) – number of people making a request for information or referral.
    • Print Disability (6.05) – estimated number of people accessing the output from the service.
  • It may not always be feasible to count the actual number of consumers who received assistance from service outlets 6.01–6.05.  Where this is not possible, service outlets are asked to estimate the number of consumers who accessed the service outlet. For example, where there was a number of people who received a 6.01–6.05 service simultaneously (e.g. an interpreter at a conference), estimate the number of people who benefited from the service.  
  • This data item refers to the number of consumers or carers who received assistance from a particular service outlet type, not those consumers ‘on the books’, ‘on waiting lists’, number of ‘beds’ or ‘places’ or who received a service in the reference week.
  • A funded agency may receive funding from multiple sources—however for Disability Services Census 2011 purposes, only those disability services provided to consumers or carers using FaHCSIA funds should be counted.

Justification:

To gain a greater understanding of the number of people assisted from FaHCSIA funded disability service outlets under the National Disability Agreement (NDA) for service planning and monitoring purposes.

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Consumer Information

Information Requirements

All Supported Employment Service outlets (5.02) must complete the Consumer Information for every consumer who received supported employment assistance during the 2010-11 financial year.  The information collected will enable a complete and accurate picture of the characteristics of the consumers who accessed supported employment assistance during the 2010-11 financial year.

Respite (4.05), Advocacy (6.01), Disability Information and Captioning (6.02) and Print Disability (6.05) services are not required to complete Consumer Information.

The Consumer Information is included under the Clients tab in FOFMS.  Navigate to the Clients tab then click Query to search for the client record by using the Client Id or searching for their Name.  The relevant FOFMS tab and field to complete the Consumer Information is specified under each data item below.

Please note:  if a client is exiting your service outlet, the Consumer Information on FOFMS must be completed before they are exited from FOFMS.

1. Date of Birth
 

Defined as:  

The day, month and year the consumer was born.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients

FOFMS Field:       Date of Birth

Classification:    dd/mm/yyyy

Guide for use:      For privacy reasons, age in years will be the output data item rather than date of birth.

Justification:       

Age is needed for analysis of service utilisation, and comparison with population data.  Actual date of birth is used in conjunction with sex and letters of the consumers name to produce the statistical linkage key which is used to statistically reduce the multiple counting of individual consumers across service types.

2. Sex

Defined as:         

The sex of the consumer.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients

FOFMS Field:      Gender

Classification:    

  • Male (M)
  • Female (F)

Justification:       

Needed for analysis of patterns of service utilisation.  Assists in quantifying issues such as sex variation in disability patterns and access to services by different population groups.  Also a component of the statistical linkage key.

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3. Indigenous Status

Defined as:         

Whether or not a consumer identifies themselves as being of Aboriginal and/or Torres Strait Islander origin.

FOFMS Tab:       Clients

FOFMS Field:      Indigenous Origin

Classification:   

  • Australian Aboriginal
  • Torres Strait Islander
  • Aboriginal & Torres Strait Islander
  • Australian South Sea Islander
  • Not Indigenous
  • Did not wish to answer
  • Not stated

Guide for use:    

Responses must not be based on the perceptions of anyone other than the consumer, or their advocate.  Visual assessment by the service provider is not a reliable or acceptable method.

Justification:       

There is a strong case for ensuring that information on peoples of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander origin is collected for planning, evaluation, and delivery of essential services.  Accurately and consistently monitoring any inequalities in service access and wellbeing between people of Indigenous origin and others in Australia is particularly important, as is accounting for government expenditure in this area.

Note:                     FaHCSIA will recode the above classifications in FOFMS in order to meet set reporting requirements.

4. Country of Birth

Defined as:         

The country in which the consumer was born.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Origins

FOFMS Field:      Country of Birth

Classification:  

  • Australia
  • New Zealand
  • United Kingdom
  • Viet Nam
  • Italy
  • Philippines
  • India
  • Malaysia


Guide for use:    

The countries listed are the 8 most frequently reported countries of birth for consumers.  These countries are in line with those used by the Australian Bureau of Statistics in the Standard Australian Classification of Countries (SACC).

Justification:       

Country of birth, in conjunction with data on communication method and interpreter services required is an important indicator of potential barriers to social integration.  This information can be used to examine service use in relation to cultural and language diversity.

5. Interpreter Services Required

Defined as:         

Requirement for interpreter services as perceived by the person seeking assistance.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Communication

FOFMS Field:      Interpreter Language

Classification:    

  • No
  • Other Language
  • Auslan
  • Other Sign Language
  • Vietnamese
  • Chinese (all dialects)
  • Spanish
  • Not known


Guide for use:  

  • The classifications listed are the 8 most frequently selected for interpreter language for consumers.
  • This question relates to interpreter services for languages other than English, as well as interpreter services required because a consumer uses sign language or other forms of non-spoken communication.
  • If no interpreter services are required, please select ‘None required’.  This was classified as ‘No’ in the above list but has recently been revised on FOFMS.

Justification:       

Whether or not interpreter services are required is an important indicator of potential barriers to social integration, particularly in conjunction with data on Country of birth and Communication method.

Note:                     FaHCSIA will recode the above classifications in FOFMS in order to meet set reporting requirements.

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6. Communication Method

Defined as:         

The method of communication, including sign language, most effectively used by the consumer.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Communication

FOFMS Field:      Communication Method

Classification:    

  • Little or no communication
  • Other non-spoken communication
  • Sign language (eg Auslan)
  • Spoken language (effective)


Guide for use:    

The communication must be effective, that is the consumer must be able to communicate more than just basic needs, to unfamiliar people, using the method.

Justification:       

Method of communication is an important indicator of potential barriers to social inclusion, particularly in conjunction with data on country of birth and interpreter services required.

Note:                     FaHCSIA will recode the above classifications in FOFMS in order to meet set reporting requirements.

7. Living Arrangements

Defined as:         

Whether the consumer lives alone or with other related or unrelated persons.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Communication

FOFMS Field:      Living Arrangements

Classification:    

  • Lives alone
  • Lives with family
  • Lives with others
  • Not known

Guide for use:

  • Lives with family - includes parents, partner, male and female relatives and foster family.
  • Lives with others - includes sharing with friends or a carer (where the carer is not a family member).
  • The expressed views of consumers living in residential settings should be used to determine whether they live alone or with others.
  • Living arrangements must relate to the same place described in Consumer Suburb/Postcode and Residential Setting. 

Justification:       

Collection of this data item will enable the investigation of links between living arrangements and service utilisation (e.g. are people who live alone more likely to access services?).  The use of living arrangements as an indicator of potential in-home support, and the ability to relate it to ABS data, is also useful for planning purposes.  This data item can also relate to consumer support needs.

8. Consumer Suburb and Postcode

Defined as:         

Suburb and postcode of the consumer’s usual residential address.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients

FOFMS Field:      Address glyph

Classification:    

  • Suburb
  • Australian Postcode

Guide for use:

  • ‘Usual’ means that the consumer lives there four or more days per week on average.
  • The consumer’s suburb and postcode must relate to the same place described in Living Arrangements and Residential Setting.

Justification:       

Required to allow data to be merged into regions for particular analyses to monitor the availability of services in different regions across Australia. This item could also be used for analysis of distances between consumers’ accommodation setting and the receipt of services, and geographical planning for future services on the basis of need.

9.   Residential Setting


Question:

What is the consumer's usual residential setting?

Defined as:

The type of physical accommodation in which the consumer usually resides.

FOFMS Tab:      Clients, Communication

FOFMS Field:     Residential Setting

Classification:

  • Private residence
  • Indigenous Community
  • Domestic-scale supported living facility
  • Supported accommodation facility
  • Boarding house/Private hotel
  • Independent living unit within a Retirement village
  • Residential aged care facility (nursing home or aged care hostel)
  • Mental health facility
  • Hospital
  • Short-term crisis, emergency or transitional accommodation facility
  • Public place/temporary shelter
  • Other

Guide for use

  • This data item should be used to record the ‘usual’ residential setting in which the consumer lives while receiving services from the service outlet.  ‘Usual’ means four or more days per week on average.
  • If it is difficult to determine a ‘usual’ residential setting in 2010-11, please record the residential setting of the consumer during the reference week, Friday 24 June to Thursday 30 June 2011.
  • Private residence - refers to private residences which include a wide range of dwelling types, such as houses, flats, units, caravans, mobile homes, etc.  Private residences may be owned or rented (publicly or privately).
  • Indigenous community - refers to a residence within an Aboriginal/Torres Strait Islander community.  This should be used for consumers living in this type of setting, regardless of whether the residence is a private residence or public place/temporary shelter.  Consumers living in residences within a Torres Strait Islander community should also be recorded here.
  • Domestic-scale supported living facility - refers to community living settings in which consumers reside in a house that provides support in some way by staff or volunteers, such as group homes.  Domestic-scale supported living settings may or may not provide 24-hour care and supervision. 
  • Supported accommodation facility - refers to settings in which consumers reside in an accommodation facility which provides board or lodging for a number of people and which has support services provided on what is usually a 24-hour basis by rostered support workers.  Examples include hostels and large institutions for people with disability.
  • Mental health facility - refers to a psychiatric/mental health community care facility where community care units provide accommodation and non-acute care and support on a temporary basis to people with a mental illness or psychological disabilities.
  • Public place/temporary shelter - includes public places such as streets and parks, as well as temporary shelters such as bus shelters or camps and accommodation outside legal tenure arrangements, such as squats.

Justification:

This data item can be used to assist in comparisons with data from the five-yearly national Census of Population and Housing conducted by the Australian Bureau of Statistics and to assist in analyses of de-institutionalisation policies and practices.

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10a. Primary Disability Group

Question:            

What is the consumer’s primary disability group?

Defined as:         

Disability group is a broad categorisation of disabilities in terms of the underlying health condition, impairment, activity limitations, participation restrictions and environmental factors.

Primary disability group is the disability that most clearly expresses the experience of disability by a person.  The primary disability group can also be considered as the disability group causing the most difficulty to the consumer (overall difficulty in daily life, not just within the context of the support offered by your service).

 

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Disabilities

FOFMS Field:      Primary, Type

Classification:    

  • Intellectual
  • Specific learning/ADD
  • Autism (including Asperger’s Syndrome)
  • Physical
  • Acquired Brain Injury
  • Neurological
  • Deafblind (dual sensory)
  • Vision
  • Hearing
  • Speech
  • Psychiatric

Guide for use:

  • A person’s functioning or disability is conceived as a dynamic interaction between health conditions and environmental and personal factors (WHO 2001).  Disability is an umbrella term for any or all of an impairment of body structure or function, a limitation in activities, or a restriction in participation.  The International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) 2001 recognises two main components of functioning and disability: Body function and Structure; and Activities and Participation.  Environmental factors are a new component in recognition of their influence on functioning and disability.
  • The disability groupings have been accepted for use in the DS NMDS. They have been developed and modified over a period of years in cooperation with government and non-government organisations, including consumer representative organisations.
  • This data item should ideally reflect the views of both the service provider and the consumer.  If there is a difference, the service providers assessment should be recorded.  (If the primary disability group cannot be easily chosen, then define primary disability as the consumer’s disability to which the service caters).  Examples provided have been subject to discussion and are intended as a helpful guide rather than a prescriptive definition.
  • Please note for psychiatric disability one would normally expect there to be a diagnosis. General issues with behaviour (where there is no specific diagnosis) should be reflected in the support needs data item in relation to ‘interpersonal interactions and relationships’ rather than here in ‘disability group’.

Disability group Examples
Intellectual Effects appearing in the developmental period (age 0–18 years) associated with impairments of mental functions, difficulties in learning and performing certain daily life skills and limitations of adaptive skills in the context of community environments compared to others of the same age. Includes for example, syndromes arising from chromosomal abnormalities and developmental processes such as Down Syndrome, Tuberous Sclerosis, Cri-du-chat Syndrome, Fragile X Syndrome, Prader Willi Syndrome.
Specific learning/ Attention Deficit Disorders (ADD) A general term referring to a group of disabilities, presumed due to central nervous system dysfunction rather than an intellectual disability, covering significant difficulties in the acquisition and use of organisational skills, listening, speaking, reading, writing, reasoning or mathematical skills.
Autism A pervasive developmental disorder involving disturbances in cognition, interpersonal communication, social interactions and behaviour (in particular obsessive, ritualistic, stereotyped and rigid behaviours).
Physical Conditions that are attributable to a physical cause or impact on the ability to perform physical activities, such as mobility. Physical disability often includes impairments of the neuromusculoskeletal systems including, for example, the effects of paraplegia, quadriplegia, muscular dystrophy, motor neurone disease, neuromuscular disorders, cerebral palsy, absence or deformities of limbs, spina bifida, arthritis, back disorders, ataxia, bone formation or degeneration, scoliosis.
Acquired brain injury Characteristically, multiple disabilities arising from damage to the brain acquired after birth. Results in deterioration in cognitive, physical, emotional or independent functioning. May be as a result of accidents, stroke, brain tumours, infection, poisoning, lack of oxygen or degenerative neurological disease.
Neurological Applies to impairments of the nervous system occurring after birth, includes epilepsy and organic dementias (e.g. Alzheimer’s disease) as well as such conditions as multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease.
Sensory and speech Deafblind refers to dual sensory impairments associated with severe restrictions in communication, and participation in community life.
Vision disability encompasses blindness and vision impairment (not corrected by glasses or contact lenses).
Hearing disability encompasses deafness, hearing impairment, hearing loss.
Speech disability encompasses speech loss, impairment and/or difficulty in being understood.
Psychiatric Includes recognisable symptoms and behaviour patterns, frequently associated with distress, which may impair personal functioning in normal social activity. Includes the typical effects of conditions such as schizophrenia, affective disorders, anxiety disorders, addictive behaviours, personality disorders, stress, psychosis, depression and adjustment disorders.

Justification:       

The purpose of this classification is to ensure that data are collected in a consistent way.

10b. Other Significant Disability Group  

Question:            

What are the consumer’s other significant disability group?

Defined as:         

Disability group (other than that indicated as being primary) that also express the experience of disability by the consumer and/or cause difficulty.

FOFMS Tab:        Clients, Disabilities

FOFMS Field:      Primary, Subtype

Classification:    

  • Intellectual
  • Specific learning/ADD
  • Autism (including Asperger’s Syndrome)
  • Physical
  • Acquired Brain Injury
  • Neurological
  • Deafblind (dual sensory)
  • Vision
  • Hearing
  • Speech
  • Psychiatric

Guide for use:    

If the consumer has a secondary disability, the appropriate category should be indicated, other than that of the primary disability group.  For example, a consumer with a primary disability group of acquired brain injury, who also requires support in aspects of their life due to a psychiatric disability, should be coded as ‘psychiatric’.  Acquired brain injury would not be indicated for this example, as it has already been reported in the previous question as the primary disability group.

Justification:       

To enable a more complete picture of the number of people, within the major disability groupings, than would otherwise be available with 'primary disability group' only.  In conjunction with information from Question 10a, it enables a more detailed description of the consumer’s disability, both as additional specific conditions and as conditions associated with the primary condition.

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11. Support Needs

Question:            

How often does the consumer need personal help or supervision with activities or participation in the nine main life areas?

Defined as:

The need for personal help or supervision in each of the areas of:

  1. Self care (e.g. activities such as bathing, dressing, eating and/or toileting)
  2. Mobility (e.g. moving around the home or away from home, including the ability to use transport or drive a motor vehicle, getting in or out of bed or a chair)
  3. Communication (e.g. making self understood and to understand strangers/family/friends/staff, in the consumer's native language or most effective method of communication if applicable)
  4. Interpersonal interactions and relationships (e.g. actions and behaviours needed to make and keep friends and relationships, behaving within accepted limits and coping with feelings and emotions)
  5. Learning, applying knowledge and general tasks and demands (e.g. understanding new ideas, remembering, solving problems, making decisions, paying attention, undertaking single or multiple tasks and carrying out daily routines)
  6. Education (e.g. the actions, behaviours and tasks an individual needs to perform at school, college or any educational setting)
  7. Community (civic) and economic life (e.g. participating in recreation and leisure, religion and spirituality, human rights, political life and citizenship and economic life such as handling money)
  8. Domestic life (e.g. undertaking activities such as shopping, organising meals, cleaning, disposing of garbage, housekeeping, cooking and home maintenance but does not include care of household members, animals or plants)
  9. Working (e.g. undertaking the actions, behaviours and tasks needed to obtain and retain paid employment)
 

FOFMS Tab:     Clients, Communication

FOFMS Field:   Frequency of Help/Supervision:

  • Self-care
  • Mobility
  • Communication
  • Interpersonal Interactions and Relationships
  • Learning, Applying Knowledge and General Tasks
  • Education
  • Community and Economic Life
  • Domestic Life
  • Working

Classification:

The consumer can undertake activities or participate in this life area with this level of help or supervision.

  • Always needs help or supervision or Unable to do
  • Sometimes needs help or supervision
  • Does not need help or supervision but uses aids and/or equipment
  • Does not need help or supervision and no aids and/or equipment used
  • Not known

Guide for use

  • This data item records information about the consumer’s need for help or supervision in their overall life to enable comparison across service types.
  • This means that a need for help or supervision in a particular life area may, or may not, be directly relevant to the service being provided.  As well as this a particular life area may not be relevant to a consumer aged 15 years and over but would be an estimated assessment of what level of support the consumer would need to participate in that particular life area.
  • The need must be due to the consumer’s disability, and should be ongoing (have lasted or be expected to last for 6 months or more).  It must relate to the extent of need over and above that which would be usually expected due to their age, i.e. it should be evaluated in relation to a person of the same age without disability.
  • Where a life area includes a range of examples, e.g. domestic life includes cooking, cleaning and shopping, if a person requires support in any of the areas then the highest level of support should be recorded.
  • Where support needs vary markedly over time e.g. episodic psychiatric disability please record the level of support needed during the reference week, Friday 24 June to Thursday 30 June 2011. 
  • Animals used for personal mobility (i.e. guide dogs) are generally considered to fall into the category of aids and/or equipment.  Also included within this category are wheelchairs, prosthetic and orthotic devices, etc. 
  • A consumer who will never be able to study due to disability, should record the level of support needs that would be required in order to study.

Examples include:

  • A consumer, aged between 15 and 64 years, with a severe intellectual disability with associated physical disability and challenging behaviour might be coded as ‘unable to do or always needs help or supervision’ in all life areas.
  • Some psychiatric conditions may result in a code of ‘sometimes needs help or supervision’ for interpersonal interactions and relationships and working, and a code of ‘does not need help or supervision and does not use aids and/or equipment’ for other life areas.

Justification:          

To assist in analysing usage patterns and service access, and relate to disability population data published by the Australian Bureau of Statistics. Comparisons with other service outlet types, such as between Open Employment (5.01) and Supported Employment (5.02), could demonstrate differences in access patterns for people with specific support needs. Analysis based on this data item and others, such as communication method, living arrangements, residential setting and primary disability group could provide indications of other relationships relevant to service provision. This data item is also designed to be consistent with the International Classification of Functioning, Disability and Health (ICF) 2001.

 

Appendix A

Disability Services Census 2011: List of Data Items
Service Outlet Consumer
Funded agency ID Funded agency ID Primary disability group
Service type outlet ID Service type outlet ID Other significant disability group(s)
Service type Record ID Support needs:
Service type outlet postcode Statistical Linkage Key
  • Self-care
Service type outlet SLA Service start date
  • Mobility
Service type outlet state* Date service last received
  • Communication
Service type outlet geographic area* Service exit date
  • Interpersonal interactions and relationships
Funding jurisdiction Main reason for cessation of services
  • Learning, applying knowledge and general tasks and demands
Agency sector Date of birth
  • Education
Full financial year operation Birth date estimate flag
  • Community (civic) and economic life
Weeks per year of operation Sex
  • Domestic life
Days per week of operation Indigenous status
  • Working
Hours per day of operation Country of birth Informal care arrangements:
Staff hours (reference week) Interpreter services required
  • Carer - existence of
Staff hours (typical week) Communication method
  • Carer - relationship to consumer
Number of consumers** Living arrangements Receipt of Carer Allowance (Child)
  Consumer's postcode Labour force status
  Consumer's state* Main source of income
  Consumer's geographic area* Individual funding status
  Residential setting  
Note:
* Derived from postcode.
** Not collected from Supported Employment outlets. This information is available in FOFMS.
  Denotes data item is collected from disability service outlets
  Denotes data item is collected on FOFMS which needs to be checked and updated by Supported Employment outlets

 

Content Updated: 27 September 2013