Statistical Paper no. 9: Income

List of tables

  • Table 1: Summary of income support recipients by payment type, 2000 to 2010
  • Table 2a: Age Pension qualifying age for women born before 1 July 1952
  • Table 2b: Age Pension qualifying age for people born on or after 1 July 1952
  • Table 3: Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 4: Age Pension customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 5: Age Pension customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 6: Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 7: Disability Support Pension customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 8: Disability Support Pension customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 9: Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 10: Sickness Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 11: Sickness Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 12: Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 13: Mobility Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 14: Wife Pension customers by partner pension type, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 15: Wife Pension customers, characteristics by pension type, June 2010
  • Table 16: Wife Pension customers by state/territory and pension type, June 2010
  • Table 17: Carer Payment customers by payment type of care receiver, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 18: Carer Payment customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 19: Carer Payment customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 20: Carer Allowance customers by carer type, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 21: Carer Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 22: Carer Allowance customers by state/territory and carer type, June 2010
  • Table 23: Austudy Payment customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 24: Austudy Payment customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 25: ABSTUDY scheme customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 26: ABSTUDY scheme customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 27: Youth Allowance (full-time student and apprentice) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 28: Youth Allowance (other) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 29: Total Youth Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 30: Short-term Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 31: Long-term Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 32: Total Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 33: Short-term unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 34: Long-term unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 35: Total unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 36: Total unemployed customers by state/territory, June 2010
  • Table 37: Partner Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 38: Partner Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 39: Widow Allowance customers, characteristics, June 2010
  • Table 40: Widow Allowance customers by state/territory, June 2010
  • Table 41: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 42: Parenting Payment (Single) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 43: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 44: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
  • Table 45: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by payment category of partner, June 2001 to June 2010
  • Table 46: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 47: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 48: Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 49: Special Benefit customers, Special Benefit category by sex, June 2010
  • Table 50: Special Benefit customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 51: Special Benefit customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 52: Family Tax Benefit, customers by category, 2003–04 to 2008–09 entitlement year, as at June 2010
  • Table 53: Family Tax Benefit, customers and children, June 2010
  • Table 54: Family Tax Benefit Part A, customers and children by rate type, June 2010
  • Table 55: Family Tax Benefit Part A, customers and dependent children by age of child, June 2010
  • Table 56: Family Tax Benefit Part B, customers by rate type and age of youngest child, June 2010
  • Table 57: Family Tax Benefit customers, characteristics by payment type, June 2010
  • Table 58: Family Tax Benefit, customers and children by state/territory, June 2010
  • Table 59: Baby Bonus and Maternity Immunisation Allowance customers, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 60: Baby Bonus customers and children by age and sex of customer, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 61: Baby Bonus customers and children by family type, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 62: Baby Bonus customers by payment type, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 63: Baby Bonus customers by state/territory, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 64: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by state/territory, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 65: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by service type, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 66: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by rate type, 2009–10 financial year
  • Table 67: Double Orphan Pension, customers and children, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 68: Double Orphan Pension, customers and children by state/territory, June 2010
  • Table 69: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
  • Table 70: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders, characteristics by sex, June 2010
  • Table 71: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by state/territory and sex, June 2010
  • Table 72: Rent Assistance income units, average rent and Rent Assistance by primary payment type, June 2010
  • Table 73: Rent Assistance income units by primary payment type and sex, June 2010
  • Table 74: Persons paid overseas by Australia by payment type, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Table 75: Persons paid overseas by Australia, country of residence by payment type, June 2010
  • Table 76: Persons paid by Australia under a social security agreement by payment type, June 2010

List of figures

  • Figure 1: Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 2: Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 3: Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 4: Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 5: Wife Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 6: Carer Payment customers, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 7: Carer Allowance customers, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 8: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 9: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
  • Figure 10: Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 11: Double Orphan Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010
  • Figure 12: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
  • Figure 13: Total persons paid overseas by Australia, June 1990 to June 2010

1 Introduction

The purpose of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) is to improve the lives of Australians by creating opportunities for economic and social participation by individuals, families and communities.

FaHCSIA is the Australian Government's principal source of advice on social policy and works in partnership with other government and non-government organisations to manage a diverse range of programs and services designed to support and improve the lives of Australians. FaHCSIA has whole-of-government responsibilities in relation to Indigenous affairs and women.

This statistical overview covers FaHCSIA income support customers, and some income support payments offered through other Australian Government departments. Unless otherwise indicated, the statistics relate to the relevant pay periods closest to 30 June 2010. These periods will generally be within a fortnight either side of that date.

Key sections of the overview are:

  • payments for older people, people with disability and those caring for people with disability, severe medical conditions, or those who are frail aged
  • student and labour market related payments
  • family assistance
  • other payments and services
  • pensioners paid overseas.

Payment and allowance information, including eligibility criteria, are included within each section. Further information to assist with the interpretation of statistics is available from the FaHCSIA and Centrelink websites:

<http://www.centrelink.gov.au>

<http://www.fahcsia.gov.au>.

Confidentiality

In some cases, small cells in tables have been suppressed and replaced with 'n.p.' (not published) for the purposes of confidentiality. Where a small cell can be derived by calculation, consequent suppression of the next smallest cell is performed until the small cell data are protected.


Table 1: Summary of income support recipients by payment type, 2000 to 2010
Payment type
2000
2001(a)
2002
2003
2004
2005
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
                       
Age Pension (incl. Dept of Veterans' Affairs Age Pensions)(b) 1,738,215 1,793,426 1,818,205 1,861,055 1,876,250 1,915,036 1,922,129 1,952,686 2,039,305 2,117,530 2,158,303
Disability Support Pension 602,280 623,926 658,915 673,334 696,742 706,782 712,163 714,156 732,367 757,118 792,581
Sickness Allowance 10,043 11,058 9,540 8,755 8,478 8,367 7,573 7,624 7,437 6,968 6,703
Widow B Pension 8,892 6,456 5,130 2,986 1,879 839 775 732 683 637 600
Wife Pension (partner receives Age Pension)(b) 31,406 26,476 23,730 20,230 19,646 16,946 16,254 14,045 13,395 11,590 10,873
                       
Wife Pension (partner receives Disability Support Pension) 59,935 51,225 44,238 37,880 33,183 28,144 24,627 21,228 18,555 15,847 13,782
Carer Payment 47,550 57,190 67,260 75,937 84,082 95,446 105,058 116,614 130,657 146,870 168,913
Austudy Payment 42,838 41,992 41,187 38,779 35,026 31,174 27,728 27,869 28,776 34,175 37,342
ABSTUDY 42,754 44,627 46,255 47,028 46,555 45,629 35,045 34,489 33,776 34,612 36,308
Youth Allowance (full-time students and apprentices) 309,528 308,663 313,068 304,946 297,140 285,383 271,408 264,008 256,634 278,664 297,023
                       
Youth Allowance (other) 81,984 84,542 90,339 87,486 84,665 79,573 76,276 68,698 64,907 82,907 88,459
Newstart Allowance 552,879 541,004 554,821 512,332 483,093 453,614 437,667 417,793 399,401 520,194 553,893
Partner Allowance 87,416 90,416 102,330 102,811 90,936 71,615 59,800 45,988 38,456 29,369 24,054
Mature Age Allowance(c) 41,577 38,919 40,132 41,078 32,912 20,877 11,697 5,032 754    
Widow Allowance 32,570 36,416 41,277 43,209 45,328 44,329 44,385 40,247 39,131 36,086 33,886
                       
Parenting Payment (Single) 391,393 416,661 427,846 436,958 449,312 450,811 432,958 395,495 360,633 344,096 333,512
Parenting Payment (Partnered) 220,340 204,576 191,576 181,405 177,157 167,272 158,814 144,427 125,922 129,365 124,910
Special Benefit 10,971 12,712 13,091 12,228 11,216 9,408 6,841 6,244 6,003 5,809 6,307
DVA service pension and income support supplement 373,076 378,058 370,721 368,572 341,020 344,311 312,571 295,033 285,089 271,546 256,826
                       
Total 4,685,647 4,768,343 4,859,661 4,857,009 4,814,620 4,775,556 4,663,769 4,572,408 4,581,881 4,823,383 4,944,275

(a) Break in series for allowances. Previously, customers were counted on a 'paid in the fortnight' basis. From this point, customer numbers now represent the customers 'current' at a point-in-time (excludes suspended recipients).

(b) For some years, Wife Age Pensions paid through the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) are captured in Age Pension figures.

(c) Mature Age Allowance was closed to new claimants in September 2003 and there are no recipients of Mature Age Allowance from 2009.

Note: This is not a complete list of social security income support payments.

Source: Centrelink and DVA administrative data.

2 Payments for older people, people with disability and those caring for people with disability, severe medical conditions or those who are frail aged

2.1 Age Pension

The Age Pension is a non-contributory payment for people satisfying age and residence requirements and whose income and assets are below certain limits. It is designed to ensure that senior Australians have adequate means of support.

For men, the current qualifying age for Age Pension is 65 years. For women, the qualifying age is gradually being increased to 65 years.


Table 2a: Age Pension qualifying age for women born before 1 July 1952
Period within which a woman was born
Pension age
Date pension age changes
Prior to 1 July 1935 60 years  
From 1 July 1935 to 31 December 1936 60 years and 6 months 1 July 1995
From 1 January 1937 to 30 June 1938 61 years 1 July 1997
From 1 July 1938 to 31 December 1939 61 years and 6 months 1 July 1999
From 1 January 1940 to 30 June 1941 62 years 1 July 2001
From 1 July 1941 to 31 December 1942 62 years and 6 months 1 July 2003
From 1 January 1943 to 30 June 1944 63 years 1 July 2005
From 1 July 1944 to 31 December 1945 63 years and 6 months 1 July 2007
From 1 January 1946 to 30 June 1947 64 years 1 July 2009
From 1 July 1947 to 31 December 1948 64 years and 6 months 1 July 2011
From 1 January 1949 to 30 June 1952 65 years 1 July 2013

For both men and women born on or after 1 July 1952, the pension qualifying age is progressively increasing from 65 years to 67 years, starting on 1 July 2017, and will reach 67 years in 2023. This change is part of the Secure and Sustainable Pensions reform package. People born before 1 July 1952 will not be affected.


Table 2b: Age Pension qualifying age for people born on or after 1 July 1952
Period within which a person was born
Pension age
Date pension age changes
From 1 July 1952 to 31 December 1953 65 years and 6 months 1 July 2017
From 1 January 1954 to 30 June 1955 66 years 1 July 2019
From 1 July 1955 to 31 December 1956 66 years and 6 months 1 July 2021
From 1 January 1957 67 years 1 July 2023

Other Age Pension eligibility requirements specify that the person claiming must:

  • have been an Australian resident for at least 10 years, with at least five of these years in one continuous period, or
  • have a qualifying residence exemption (arrived as a refugee or under special humanitarian program), or
  • be a woman widowed in Australia, when both she and her late partner were Australian residents, and who has at least two years' residence immediately prior to claiming, or
  • be a person in receipt of Widow B Pension, Widow Allowance or Partner Allowance immediately before reaching Age Pension age.

Special rules apply to residence in countries with which Australia has an International Social Security Agreement.

The Age Pension is also subject to income and assets tests.


Table 3: Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 404,486 30.2   935,982 69.8   1,340,468
               
1991 418,383 30.4   957,466 69.6   1,375,849
1992 447,888 31.0   998,280 69.0   1,446,168
1993 481,196 31.7   1,034,486 68.3   1,515,682
1994 514,217 32.5   1,067,657 67.5   1,581,874
1995 544,571 34.5   1,034,127 65.5   1,578,698
               
1996 570,328 35.6   1,032,506 64.4   1,602,834
1997 597,859 35.6   1,082,355 64.4   1,680,214
1998 618,607 36.6   1,072,987 63.4   1,691,594
1999 639,008 37.1   1,085,581 62.9   1,724,589
2000 659,188 37.9   1,079,027 62.1   1,738,215
               
2001 688,563 38.4   1,104,863 61.6   1,793,426
2002 714,324 39.3   1,103,881 60.7   1,818,205
2003 739,187 39.7   1,121,868 60.3   1,861,055
2004 761,025 40.6   1,115,225 59.4   1,876,250
2005 782,977 40.9   1,132,059 59.1   1,915,036
               
2006 800,310 41.6   1,121,819 58.4   1,922,129
2007 815,912 41.8   1,136,774 58.2   1,952,686
2008 868,179 42.6   1,171,126 57.4   2,039,305
2009 906,769 42.8   1,210,761 57.2   2,117,530
2010 939,442 43.5   1,218,861 56.5   2,158,303

Note: Includes Age Pension payments administered by Centrelink and the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

Source: Centrelink and DVA administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 1: Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 1: Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Includes Age Pension payments administered by Centrelink and the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

Source: Centrelink and DVA administrative data.


Table 4: Age Pension customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 936,681 43.5   1,216,494 56.5   2,153,175 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 65 0 0.0   53,688 4.4   53,688 2.5
65–69 257,147 27.5   308,324 25.3   565,471 26.3
70–74 260,004 27.8   290,207 23.9   550,211 25.6
75–79 207,386 22.1   235,206 19.3   442,592 20.6
80–84 147,431 15.7   170,987 14.1   318,418 14.8
85–89 47,103 5.0   98,653 8.1   145,756 6.8
90–94 13,983 1.5   43,859 3.6   57,842 2.7
95–99 3,341 0.4   13,708 1.1   17,049 0.8
100 and over 286 0.0   1,862 0.2   2,148 0.1
Marital status(a)                
Married/de facto 666,496 71.2   562,311 46.2   1,228,807 57.1
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 270,185 28.8   654,183 53.8   924,368 42.9
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 541,359 57.8   761,451 62.6   1,302,810 60.5
United Kingdom 108,927 11.6   130,426 10.7   239,353 11.1
Italy 56,058 6.0   54,552 4.5   110,610 5.1
Greece 30,381 3.2   34,356 2.8   64,737 3.0
Germany 15,546 1.7   18,842 1.5   34,388 1.6
Other 184,410 19.7   216,867 17.8   401,277 18.6
Home ownership                
Home owner 695,922 74.3   840,729 69.1   1,536,651 71.4
Non-home owner 240,759 25.7   375,765 30.9   616,524 28.6
Payment status                
Current—automatically assessed                
Maximum rate 542,099 57.9   746,778 61.4   1,288,877 59.9
Reduced rate 393,018 42.0   468,290 38.5   861,308 40.0
Total 935,117 99.8   1,215,068 99.9   2,150,185 99.9
Current—-manually assessed 408 0.0   480 0.0   888 0.0
Current total 935,525 99.9   1,215,548 99.9   2,151,073 99.9
Suspended 1,156 0.1   946 0.1   2,102 0.1
Paid under income test(b)                
Single 267,549 28.6   633,730 52.1   901,279 41.9
Partnered 558,036 59.6   464,182 38.2   1,022,218 47.5
Home owner paid under assets test                
Single 17,164 1.8   31,670 2.6   48,834 2.3
Partnered 87,814 9.4   78,408 6.4   166,222 7.7
Non-home owner paid under assets test                
Single 3,077 0.3   5,862 0.5   8,939 0.4
Partnered 2,070 0.2   1,858 0.2   3,928 0.2
Income/assets test not coded(c) 971 0.1   784 0.1   1,755 0.1

(a) Marital status figures will differ from figures on single and partnered pension rate as partnered pensioners may be eligible for a single rate of pension in some limited circumstances. (Social security law provides that where a couple is married or living together their social security pension payment is based on the partnered rate of payment. However, in special circumstances, a partnered person can be treated as single for social security purposes, for example, a member of a couple separated by illness or receiving respite care, or where a member of a couple is in gaol.)

(b) All pensioners paid a full rate of pension are classified as income tested and included in the 'paid under income test' category.

(c) At least one of the variables required to determine the customer's income or assets test category was not coded (that is, partnership category, home ownership type or whether income or assets tested).

Note: Table excludes 5,128 Age Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 5: Age Pension customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 303,149 43.1   400,950 56.9   704,099 32.7
Victoria 229,957 42.6   309,505 57.4   539,462 25.1
Queensland 170,971 44.2   216,221 55.8   387,192 18.0
Western Australia 78,352 43.0   103,955 57.0   182,307 8.5
South Australia 80,436 42.4   109,356 57.6   189,792 8.8
Tasmania 26,219 44.1   33,296 55.9   59,515 2.8
Australian Capital Territory 8,213 40.2   12,242 59.8   20,455 0.9
Northern Territory 3,558 48.1   3,845 51.9   7,403 0.3
Other(a) 35,826 56.9   27,124 43.1   62,950 2.9
Total 936,681 43.5   1,216,494 56.5   2,153,175 100.0

(a) Includes all overseas pensioners, regardless of their length of stay overseas.

Note: Table excludes 5,128 Age Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

2.2 Disability Support Pension

Disability Support Pension is intended to ensure that people who have an incapacity to work because of impairment have an adequate level of income.

As at June 2010, to be eligible for Disability Support Pension a person must be permanently blind or have a permanent physical, intellectual or psychiatric impairment of at least 20 points under the impairment tables. An 'impairment' is defined as permanent under the Social Security Act 1991 if it is fully diagnosed, treated and stabilised and likely to last for at least two years without significant functional improvement. The person must be unable to work for at least 15 hours per week at or above the relevant minimum wage for the next two years or be retrained for such work within the next two years because of that impairment.

To qualify for Disability Support Pension, a person must be aged 16 years or over but have not reached Age Pension age at the time of claiming. If already receiving Disability Support Pension, a person can continue to be paid Disability Support Pension after reaching Age Pension age. The person must also be an Australian resident, living in Australia at the time they claim, and have 10 years' qualifying residence.

There is no period of residence qualification required if the inability to work or permanent blindness occurs while the person is an Australian resident.

Disability Support Pension is subject to income and assets tests.


Table 6: Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 233,251 73.6   83,462 26.4   316,713
               
1991(a) 244,699 73.2   89,535 26.8   334,234
1992 273,697 72.3   104,861 27.7   378,558
1993 291,471 71.7   115,101 28.3   406,572
1994 309,123 70.9   127,111 29.1   436,234
1995 324,672 69.9   139,758 30.1   464,430
               
1996 340,256 68.2   158,979 31.8   499,235
1997 352,607 66.8   174,907 33.2   527,514
1998 361,539 65.3   191,797 34.7   553,336
1999 373,340 64.6   204,342 35.4   577,682
2000 382,351 63.5   219,929 36.5   602,280
               
2001 392,354 62.9   231,572 37.1   623,926
2002 406,893 61.8   252,022 38.2   658,915
2003 412,777 61.3   260,557 38.7   673,334
2004 418,829 60.1   277,913 39.9   696,742
2005 420,073 59.4   286,709 40.6   706,782
               
2006 415,618 58.4   296,545 41.6   712,163
2007 413,033 57.8   301,123 42.2   714,156
2008 413,484 56.5   318,883 43.5   732,367
2009 422,290 55.8   334,828 44.2   757,118
2010 433,456 54.7   359,125 45.3   792,581

(a) Disability Support Pension replaced Invalid Pension, Sheltered Employment Allowance and Rehabilitation Allowance from November 1991 as part of the Disability Reform Package.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 2: Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 2: Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Disability Support Pension replaced Invalid Pension, Sheltered Employment Allowance and Rehabilitation Allowance from November 1991 as part of the Disability Reform Package.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 7: Disability Support Pension customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 433,456 54.7   359,125 45.3   792,581 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 20 12,263 2.8   7,551 2.1   19,814 2.5
20–29 38,877 9.0   28,055 7.8   66,932 8.4
30–39 56,050 12.9   40,812 11.4   96,862 12.2
40–49 89,849 20.7   74,032 20.6   163,881 20.7
50–59 127,172 29.3   124,147 34.6   251,319 31.7
60–64 97,946 22.6   79,313 22.1   177,259 22.4
65 and over 11,299 2.6   5,215 1.5   16,514 2.1
Marital status                
Married/de facto 140,053 32.3   112,589 31.4   252,642 31.9
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 293,403 67.7   246,536 68.6   539,939 68.1
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 327,671 75.6   263,994 73.5   591,665 74.7
United Kingdom/Ireland/Eire 22,696 5.2   18,326 5.1   41,022 5.2
New Zealand 7,522 1.7   6,438 1.8   13,960 1.8
Lebanon 6,340 1.5   5,175 1.4   11,515 1.5
Yugoslavia 5,376 1.2   4,568 1.3   9,944 1.3
Other 63,851 14.7   60,624 16.9   124,475 15.7
Home ownership                
Home owner 125,399 28.9   122,104 34.0   247,503 31.2
Non-home owner 308,057 71.1   237,021 66.0   545,078 68.8
Paid under income test                
Single 291,790 67.3   245,019 68.2   536,809 67.7
Partnered 136,399 31.5   108,842 30.3   245,241 30.9
Home owner paid under assets test                
Single 1,263 0.3   1,282 0.4   2,545 0.3
Partnered 3,527 0.8   3,633 1.0   7,160 0.9
Non-home owner paid under assets test                
Single 350 0.1   235 0.1   585 0.1
Partnered 127 0.0   114 0.0   241 0.0
Duration(a)                
<1 year 27,777 6.4   19,412 5.4   47,189 6.0
1 to <2 years 25,646 5.9   20,055 5.6   45,701 5.8
2 to <3 years 21,547 5.0   17,082 4.8   38,629 4.9
3 to <4 years 19,324 4.5   15,411 4.3   34,735 4.4
4 to <5 years 18,805 4.3   14,541 4.0   33,346 4.2
5 to <10 years 95,755 22.1   76,214 21.2   171,969 21.7
10 years and over 224,602 51.8   196,410 54.7   421,012 53.1
                 
Mean (weeks) 609.9     627.4     617.9  
Median (weeks) 557.0     591.0     573.0  

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date (that is, duration may take into account periods on another income support payment before Disability Support Pension is granted).

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 8: Disability Support Pension customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 141,504 55.2   114,661 44.8   256,165 32.3
Victoria 101,194 52.7   90,979 47.3   192,173 24.2
Queensland 85,537 56.0   67,314 44.0   152,851 19.3
Western Australia 33,817 54.1   28,694 45.9   62,511 7.9
South Australia 40,563 54.5   33,885 45.5   74,448 9.4
Tasmania 14,978 55.1   12,199 44.9   27,177 3.4
Australian Capital Territory 4,005 51.6   3,750 48.4   7,755 1.0
Northern Territory 5,441 56.7   4,163 43.3   9,604 1.2
Other(a) 6,417 64.8   3,480 35.2   9,897 1.2
Total 433,456 54.7   359,125 45.3   792,581 100.0

(a) State/territory not coded.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

2.3 Sickness Allowance

Sickness Allowance is a payment that provides assistance for people who are employed or studying full-time and who are temporarily unable to work or study due to a medical condition and have a job or full-time study to which they can return.

To qualify for Sickness Allowance, a person must be 21 years of age or over but have not reached Age Pension age.

Sickness Allowance may be paid for up to 13 weeks when a customer is temporarily absent from Australia to seek medical treatment of a kind that is not available in Australia.

Sickness Allowance is subject to residence requirements and income and assets tests.


Table 9: Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June(a)
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 56,674 71.6   22,521 28.4   79,195
               
1991(b) 50,991 71.4   20,408 28.6   71,399
1992 30,844 69.8   13,328 30.2   44,172
1993 31,802 68.3   14,777 31.7   46,579
1994 31,274 66.4   15,858 33.6   47,132
1995 31,131 65.8   16,180 34.2   47,311
               
1996(c) 22,254 67.0   10,961 33.0   33,215
1997 10,721 68.0   5,038 32.0   15,759
1998(d) 11,166 68.6   5,119 31.4   16,285
1999 7,799 69.8   3,382 30.2   11,181
2000 6,990 69.6   3,053 30.4   10,043
               
2001 7,598 68.7   3,460 31.3   11,058
2002 6,414 67.2   3,126 32.8   9,540
2003 5,973 68.2   2,782 31.8   8,755
2004 5,613 66.2   2,865 33.8   8,478
2005 5,671 67.8   2,696 32.2   8,367
               
2006 5,011 66.2   2,562 33.8   7,573
2007 4,877 64.0   2,747 36.0   7,624
2008 4,523 60.8   2,914 39.2   7,437
2009 4,182 60.0   2,786 40.0   6,968
2010 3,928 58.6   2,775 41.4   6,703

(a) Prior to 1998, these figures are an average of the number of weekly payments during June. Breakdown by sex for this table was estimated based on the proportion of males and females receiving this allowance from a point-in-time in the relevant quarter.

(b) Sickness Allowance replaced Sickness Benefit from November 1991 as part of the Disability Reform Package. This resulted in some customers transferring to the Disability Support Pension.

(c) From March 1996, unemployed people who became ill did not transfer to Sickness Allowance after 13 weeks. They continued to be paid Youth Training Allowance, Job Search Allowance or Newstart Allowance, subject to Sickness Allowance conditions.

(d) Break in series. Data from 1998 onward are derived from a point-in-time in June of the relevant year.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

Figure description

Figure 3: Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 3: Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Notes: Prior to 1998, the table figures are an average of the number of weekly payments during June. Breakdown by sex for this table was estimated based on the proportion of males and females receiving this allowance from a point-in-time in the relevant quarter. Data from 1998 onward are derived from a point-in-time in June of the relevant year.

Sickness Allowance replaced Sickness Benefit from November 1991 as part of the Disability Reform Package. This resulted in some customers transferring to the Disability Support Pension.

From March 1996, unemployed people who became ill did not transfer to Sickness Allowance after 13 weeks. They continued to be paid Youth Training Allowance, Job Search Allowance or Newstart Allowance, subject to Sickness Allowance conditions.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 10: Sickness Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 3,928 58.6   2,775 41.4   6,703 100.0
Age (years)                
21–24 431 11.0   209 7.5   640 9.5
25–34 915 23.3   462 16.6   1,377 20.5
35–44 912 23.2   640 23.1   1,552 23.2
45–54 919 23.4   931 33.5   1,850 27.6
55–59 401 10.2   340 12.3   741 11.1
60–64 350 8.9   193 7.0   543 8.1
Marital status                
Married/de facto 1,426 36.3   558 20.1   1,984 29.6
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 2,502 63.7   2,217 79.9   4,719 70.4
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 3,086 78.6   2,138 77.0   5,224 77.9
United Kingdom 186 4.7   142 5.1   328 4.9
New Zealand 101 2.6   87 3.1   188 2.8
Philippines n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   65 1.0
Vietnam n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   65 1.0
Other 500 12.7   333 12.0   833 12.4
Duration(a)                
<1 year—total 3,309 84.2   2,275 82.0   5,584 83.3
<7 weeks 765 19.5   492 17.7   1,257 18.8
7 weeks to <3 months 933 23.8   552 19.9   1,485 22.2
3 to <6 months 919 23.4   684 24.6   1,603 23.9
6 months to <1 year 692 17.6   547 19.7   1,239 18.5
1 year and longer—total 619 15.8   500 18.0   1,119 16.7
1 to <2 years 467 11.9   344 12.4   811 12.1
2 to <3 years 86 2.2   68 2.5   154 2.3
3 years and over 66 1.7   88 3.2   154 2.3
                 
Mean (weeks) 30.5     40.3     34.6  
Median (weeks) 16.0     18.0     17.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 3,720 94.7   2,414 87.0   6,134 91.5
0.01 and above 208 5.3   361 13.0   569 8.5

(a) Duration is measured from the allowance start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Notes: The table figures exclude 169 people who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income.

'n.p.'=not published. See 'Confidentiality' on page 1.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 11: Sickness Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 1,062 60.1   705 39.9   1,767 26.4
Victoria 1,134 57.8   828 42.2   1,962 29.3
Queensland 936 59.5   637 40.5   1,573 23.5
Western Australia 278 55.9   219 44.1   497 7.4
South Australia 366 60.4   240 39.6   606 9.0
Tasmania 85 47.8   93 52.2   178 2.7
Australian Capital Territory 33 47.1   37 52.9   70 1.0
Northern Territory n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   41 0.6
Other(a) n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   9 0.1
Total 3,928 58.6   2,775 41.4   6,703 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Notes: The table figures exclude 169 people who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income.

'n.p.'=not published. See 'Confidentiality' on page 1.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

2.4 Mobility Allowance

The purpose of Mobility Allowance is to ensure that people with disability are encouraged to gain, retain or extend their independence. It assists with transport costs for people with disability who cannot use public transport without assistance.

To qualify for Mobility Allowance, a person must be aged 16 years or over, be undertaking an approved activity and be required to travel to and from their home for the purpose of undertaking that activity. A person is considered to be undertaking an approved activity if they are:

  • engaged in paid or voluntary work or vocational training or any combination of these activities for at least 32 hours every four weeks, or
  • undertaking job search activities under an agreement between Centrelink and a service provider funded by the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR), or
  • receiving Newstart Allowance, Youth Allowance or Austudy Payment and meet the activity or study tests for these payments, or
  • participating in a Disability Employment Services—Disability Management Service.

Mobility Allowance is not payable if a person has a car under the Vehicle Assistance Scheme from the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

A person must be an Australian resident and be in Australia when claiming and receiving Mobility Allowance. Reviews of Mobility Allowance are conducted annually. Customers with a temporary medical condition undergo a medical review as part of their annual review.

Mobility Allowance is not an income or assets tested payment; however, there are residence requirements.


Table 12: Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 7,422 56.2   5,785 43.8   13,207
               
1991 7,535 56.0   5,909 44.0   13,444
1992 7,826 56.3   6,085 43.7   13,911
1993(a) 9,118 56.4   7,042 43.6   16,160
1994 11,916 57.3   8,879 42.7   20,795
1995 13,106 57.4   9,745 42.6   22,851
               
1996 14,200 56.8   10,785 43.2   24,985
1997 15,066 56.6   11,529 43.4   26,595
1998 16,346 56.4   12,629 43.6   28,975
1999 17,415 56.2   13,586 43.8   31,001
2000 19,673 56.0   15,481 44.0   35,154
               
2001 20,887 55.6   16,687 44.4   37,574
2002 22,863 55.2   18,593 44.8   41,456
2003 24,370 55.1   19,869 44.9   44,239
2004 25,763 55.0   21,084 45.0   46,847
2005 26,940 54.7   22,275 45.3   49,215
               
2006 28,755 54.6   23,897 45.4   52,652
2007 29,995 54.6   24,947 45.4   54,942
2008 30,151 54.5   25,148 45.5   55,299
2009 30,462 54.3   25,618 45.7   56,080
2010 31,199 54.4   26,150 45.6   57,349

(a) Eligibility requirements were eased in March 1993 to include those undertaking eight hours a week or more of voluntary work, and to include Disability Support pensioners and Sickness Allowance recipients who have job search incorporated into their activity plan.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

Figure description

Figure 4: Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 4: Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 13: Mobility Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 9,157 55.4   7,366 44.6   16,523 28.8
Victoria 8,434 54.0   7,196 46.0   15,630 27.3
Queensland 6,246 56.4   4,823 43.6   11,069 19.3
Western Australia 2,494 55.0   2,039 45.0   4,533 7.9
South Australia 3,423 50.2   3,399 49.8   6,822 11.9
Tasmania 1,007 52.2   922 47.8   1,929 3.4
Australian Capital Territory 287 52.2   263 47.8   550 1.0
Northern Territory 108 48.9   113 51.1   221 0.4
Other(a) 43 59.7   29 40.3   72 0.1
Total 31,199 54.4   26,150 45.6   57,349 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

2.5 Wife Pension

Wife Pension is gradually being phased out. No new grants have been made from 1 July 1995. However, women who received a Wife Pension at that date can continue to receive this payment. To qualify for Wife Pension, a woman must be the wife of an Age or Disability Support pensioner and not receiving a pension in her own right.

Partners of new applicants for Age or Disability Support Pensions need to test their own eligibility for payments such as Age Pension, Parenting Payment, Carer Payment, Disability Support Pension or Newstart Allowance.

Wife Pension is subject to income and assets tests. Residence requirements may apply.


Table 14: Wife Pension customers by partner pension type, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Age Pension(a)
 
Disability Support Pension
 
Rehabilitation Allowance(b)
 
Sheltered Employment Allowance(c)
 
Total(d)
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 23,766 20.5   91,068 78.7   583 0.5   278 0.2   115,695
                           
1991 26,537 21.8   94,006 77.1   1,128 0.9   262 0.2   121,933
1992 30,902 23.2   101,731 76.4   561 0.4         133,194
1993 33,520 23.6   108,327 76.3   166 0.1         142,013
1994 36,539 23.9   116,036 76.0   45 0.0         152,620
1995 39,611 24.5   121,839 75.5   7 0.0         161,457
                           
1996 41,125 27.6   107,803 72.4   3 0.0         148,931
1997 36,577 28.6   91,307 71.4   1 0.0         127,885
1998 36,233 31.2   79,892 68.8               116,125
1999 32,196 32.0   68,523 68.0               100,719
2000 31,406 34.4   59,935 65.6               91,341
                           
2001 26,476 34.1   51,225 65.9               77,701
2002 23,730 34.9   44,238 65.1               67,968
2003 20,230 34.8   37,880 65.2               58,110
2004 19,646 37.2   33,183 62.8               52,829
2005 16,946 37.6   28,144 62.4               45,090
                           
2006 16,254 39.8   24,627 60.2               40,881
2007 14,045 39.8   21,228 60.2               35,273
2008 13,395 41.9   18,555 58.1               31,950
2009 11,590 42.2   15,847 57.8               27,437
2010 10,873 44.1   13,782 55.9               24,655

(a) Includes Wife (Age) Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA). For some years, Wife (Age) Pensions paid through DVA are captured in Age Pension figures.

(b) Rehabilitation Allowance began in March 1983 and was phased out in November 1991 as part of the Disability Reform Package. Rehabilitation Allowance recipients continue on the payment until their program is completed.

(c) Sheltered Employment Allowance customers were transferred to Disability Support Pension in November 1991.

(d) Excludes Wife Disability Wage Supplement. From 1 January 1998, there were no further grants of Disability Wage Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 5: Wife Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 5:  Wife Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Includes Wife (Age) Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA). For some years, Wife (Age) Pensions paid through DVA are captured in Age Pension figures. Excludes Wife Disability Wage Supplement. From 1 January 1998, there were no further grants of Disability Wage Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 15: Wife Pension customers, characteristics by pension type, June 2010
Characteristics
Age Pension(a)
 
Disability Support Pension
 
Total(b)
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 10,834 44.0   13,782 56.0   24,616 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 40 15 0.1   215 1.6   230 0.9
40–49 368 3.4   2,458 17.8   2,826 11.5
50–59 3,486 32.2   7,667 55.6   11,153 45.3
60–64 6,304 58.2   3,329 24.2   9,633 39.1
65 and over 661 6.1   113 0.8   774 3.1
Marital status(c)                
Married/de facto 10,751 99.2   13,742 99.7   24,493 99.5
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 83 0.8   40 0.3   123 0.5
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 4,826 44.5   8,760 63.6   13,586 55.2
Lebanon 623 5.8   692 5.0   1,315 5.3
United Kingdom/Ireland/Eire 501 4.6   720 5.2   1,221 5.0
Italy 812 7.5   360 2.6   1,172 4.8
Greece 664 6.1   501 3.6   1,165 4.7
Other 3,408 31.5   2,749 19.9   6,157 25.0
Home ownership                
Home owner 7,960 73.5   8,915 64.7   16,875 68.6
Non-home owner 2,874 26.5   4,867 35.3   7,741 31.4
Rate                
Full rate 8,462 78.1   9,708 70.4   18,170 73.8
Part rate 2,372 21.9   4,074 29.6   6,446 26.2
Paid under income test(d)                
Single 222 2.0   40 0.3   262 1.1
Partnered 10,371 95.7   13,498 97.9   23,869 97.0
Paid under assets test(d)                
Home owners 227 2.1   130 0.9   357 1.5
Non-home owners 9 0.1   14 0.1   23 0.1
Not coded(e) 5 0.0   100 0.7   105 0.4

(a) Excludes 39 Wife (Age) Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

(b) 'Total' percentages based on combined 'Age' and 'Disability' payments.

(c) Occurrences of 'single' wife pensioners can be attributed to rules that state that if the loss of the survivor's entitlement occurs as a result of the partner's death they can continue to temporarily remain qualified for Wife Pension for up to 14 weeks after the partner's death.

(d) All pensioners paid a full rate of pension are classified as income tested and included in the 'paid under income test' category. Wife Pension can be paid at the single pension rate if the couple is living apart because of ill health—the 'partnered' income and assets tests still apply.

(e) At least one of the variables required to determine the customer's income or assets test category was not coded (that is, partnership category, home ownership type or whether income or assets tested).

Note: Wife pensioners over age 65 years are most likely to be women who are not residentially qualified for Age Pension in their own right (that is, women who have been on Wife Pension since before 1 July 1995 but have not been an Australian resident for 10 years).

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 16: Wife Pension customers by state/territory and pension type, June 2010
State/territory
Age Pension(a)
 
Disability Support Pension
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 3,543 44.7   4,375 55.3   7,918 32.2
Victoria 2,549 46.0   2,990 54.0   5,539 22.5
Queensland 1,895 41.7   2,646 58.3   4,541 18.4
Western Australia 891 42.1   1,225 57.9   2,116 8.6
South Australia 1,062 46.0   1,248 54.0   2,310 9.4
Tasmania 372 38.8   588 61.3   960 3.9
Australian Capital Territory 62 51.7   58 48.3   120 0.5
Northern Territory 42 49.4   43 50.6   85 0.3
Other(b) 418 40.7   609 59.3   1,027 4.2
Total 10,834 44.0   13,782 56.0   24,616 100.0

(a) Excludes 39 Wife (Age) Pension payments administered by the Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

(b) Includes all overseas pensioners, regardless of their length of stay overseas.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

2.6 Carer Payment

Carer Payment is for carers who provide full-time care in the home of the person(s) being cared for, and who, because of the demands of their caring role, are unable to support themselves by participating substantially in the workforce.

To qualify for Carer Payment, a person must be caring for someone who has a severe disability or medical condition and who is:

  • receiving a social security or a Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) income support payment, or
  • not receiving payment solely for reasons of lack of sufficient period of residence in Australia, or
  • not receiving a social security or a DVA income support payment but satisfying the special care receiver income and assets tests.

The person claiming must:

  • be personally providing constant care to a care receiver who satisfies eligibility requirements, and
  • not be in receipt of any other income support payment, and
  • be in Australia at the time the care is given and be a permanent resident of Australia.

A care receiver satisfies the eligibility requirements if they:

  • have a physical, intellectual or psychiatric disability, and
  • are a person who is being provided with constant care, and
  • are likely to suffer from that disability permanently or for an extended period, and
  • have been assessed, rated and given a score of at least 25 under the Adult Disability Assessment Tool (ADAT), or
  • have been assessed, rated and given a score of at least 20 under the ADAT, and have a Carer Allowance child under the age of 16 years or a child under the age of 6 years, or
  • are a child that has been assessed under the Disability Care Load assessment as requiring an intense level of care.

Prior to 1 July 1997, Carer Payment was known as Carer Pension.

Eligibility for Carer Payment for carers of children under 16 years of age was introduced on 1 July 1998.

From 1 July 2009, Carer Payment (Child) assessment changed to being assessed under the Disability Care Load Assessment (DCLA) and the following categories are now covered:

  • a child with severe disability or severe medical condition, or
  • two or more children with disability or medical condition, or
  • a disabled adult and one or more children each with a disability or medical condition, or
  • a child with severe disability or severe medical condition on a short term or episodic basis, or
  • a profoundly disabled child or a disabled child (continuing to qualify for a payment under previous legislation (pre–1 July 2009)).


Table 17: Carer Payment customers by payment type of care receiver, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Age Pension
 
Disability Support Pension
 
Other(a)
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 4,025 45.8   4,771 54.2         8,796
                     
1991 4,619 45.5   5,478 53.9   64 0.6   10,161
1992 5,574 44.1   6,790 53.8   267 2.1   12,631
1993 6,507 43.3   8,056 53.5   482 3.2   15,045
1994 7,441 42.0   9,450 53.4   808 4.6   17,699
1995 8,324 41.4   10,633 52.9   1,141 5.7   20,098
                     
1996 9,500 37.9   13,483 53.9   2,054 8.2   25,037
1997 10,954 37.1   15,735 53.2   2,869 9.7   29,558
1998 11,740 34.6   18,556 54.6   3,683 10.8   33,979
1999 13,407 33.5   21,392 53.4   5,271 13.2   40,070
2000 15,346 32.3   24,500 51.5   7,704 16.2   47,550
                     
2001 18,097 31.6   28,171 49.3   10,922 19.1   57,190
2002(b)                   67,260
2003                   75,937
2004                   84,082
2005                   95,446
                     
2006                   105,058
2007                   116,614
2008                   130,657
2009                   146,870
2010                   168,913

(a) Includes those caring for a person on a Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) payment other than Age Pension or Disability Support Pension. It also includes those caring for a person not on a FaHCSIA payment.

(b) Figures by pension type are not available from 2002.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 6: Carer Payment customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 6: Carer Payment customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Includes those caring for a person on a Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA) payment other than Age Pension or Disability Support Pension. It also includes those caring for a person not on a FaHCSIA payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 18: Carer Payment customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 52,202 30.9   116,711 69.1   168,913 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 20 715 1.4   1,157 1.0   1,872 1.1
20–29 3,682 7.1   6,720 5.8   10,402 6.2
30–39 6,456 12.4   15,502 13.3   21,958 13.0
40–49 11,055 21.2   28,086 24.1   39,141 23.2
50–59 13,930 26.7   36,179 31.0   50,109 29.7
60–64 9,097 17.4   19,909 17.1   29,006 17.2
65 and over 7,267 13.9   9,158 7.8   16,425 9.7
Marital status                
Married/de facto 31,934 61.2   74,705 64.0   106,639 63.1
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 20,268 38.8   42,006 36.0   62,274 36.9
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 33,663 64.5   73,283 62.8   106,946 63.3
United Kingdom 3,132 6.0   5,456 4.7   8,588 5.1
Lebanon 1,406 2.7   4,298 3.7   5,704 3.4
Iraq 1,925 3.7   2,857 2.4   4,782 2.8
Vietnam 1,174 2.2   3,497 3.0   4,671 2.8
Other(a) 10,902 20.9   27,320 23.4   38,222 22.6
Home ownership                
Home owner 20,985 40.2   58,474 50.1   79,459 47.0
Non-home owner 31,217 59.8   58,237 49.9   89,454 53.0
Rate(b)                
Full rate               74.0
Part rate               26.0
Paid under income test                
Single 19,782 37.9   41,238 35.3   61,020 36.1
Partnered 30,809 59.0   71,376 61.2   102,185 60.5
Home owner paid under assets test                
Single 211 0.4   483 0.4   694 0.4
Partnered 1,104 2.1   3,053 2.6   4,157 2.5
Non-home owner paid under assets test 125 0.2   230 0.2   355 0.2
Income/assets test not coded(c) 171 0.3   331 0.3   502 0.3
Duration(d)                
<1 year 10,787 20.7   24,045 20.6   34,832 20.6
1 to <2 years 8,611 16.5   18,730 16.0   27,341 16.2
2 to <3 years 5,829 11.2   15,125 13.0   20,954 12.4
3 to <4 years 4,850 9.3   12,111 10.4   16,961 10.0
4 to <5 years 3,917 7.5   9,155 7.8   13,072 7.7
5 to <10 years 12,756 24.4   28,565 24.5   41,321 24.5
10 years and over 5,452 10.4   8,980 7.7   14,432 8.5
                 
Mean (weeks) 230.6     212.2     217.9  
Median (weeks) 160.9     156.5     156.5  

(a) Includes any unknown country of birth.

(b) Full/part rate customer counts unavailable due to data integrity issues with the data source. Overall percentage breakdown for 'Total' derived from the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs Annual Report.

(c) At least one of the variables required to determine the customer's assets test category was not coded (that is, partnership category, home ownership type or whether income or assets tested).

(d) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 19: Carer Payment customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 20,197 31.2   44,617 68.8   64,814 38.4
Victoria 12,980 30.2   29,934 69.8   42,914 25.4
Queensland 9,025 29.8   21,213 70.2   30,238 17.9
Western Australia 3,029 30.2   7,005 69.8   10,034 5.9
South Australia 4,312 33.8   8,452 66.2   12,764 7.6
Tasmania 2,082 33.6   4,121 66.4   6,203 3.7
Australian Capital Territory 297 33.2   597 66.8   894 0.5
Northern Territory 255 27.2   684 72.8   939 0.6
Other(a) 25 22.1   88 77.9   113 0.1
Total 52,202 30.9   116,711 69.1   168,913 100.0

(a) Includes unknown postcodes and overseas recipients.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

2.7 Carer Allowance

Carer Allowance is a supplementary payment available to a person who provides daily care and attention for adults or children with a disability or medical condition.

Carer Allowance was introduced on 1 July 1999. It combined Child Disability Allowance with Domiciliary Nursing Care Benefit (the latter of which was the responsibility of the Health and Aged Care portfolio).

  • Carer Allowance may be paid for up to two adults who receive daily care and attention, and/or any number of dependent children with a disability or medical condition. The carer or parent may be eligible to receive a fortnightly payment of Carer Allowance for each eligible person in their care.
  • Parents caring for two children with disabilities, who individually fall just below the qualification for Carer Allowance but whose combined assessment under the Child Disability Assessment Tool (CDAT) meets the threshold for payment, will receive a single rate of Carer Allowance.
  • Customers who were entitled to Child Disability Allowance on 30 June 1998 were eligible for Carer Allowance until 30 June 2003, providing their circumstances did not change, and were not subject to Centrelink-initiated medical reviews during that period. These customers were subject to review against the current eligibility criteria from 1 July 2003.
  • All Domiciliary Nursing Care Benefit recipients as at 30 June 1999 were automatically transferred to Carer Allowance (Adult) on 1 July 1999 when the new Carer Allowance was introduced.

The person claiming must:

  • be personally providing daily care to a care receiver who satisfies eligibility requirements, and
  • provide care and attention in a private home, or participate in the provision of care and attention given to the care receiver during a period of temporary hospitalisation, and
  • provide at least 20 hours per week of personal care on a daily basis if not residing with the care receiver, and be in Australia at the time the care is given and be a permanent resident of Australia.

A care receiver satisfies the eligibility requirements if they are:

  • aged 16 years or over with a disability that causes a substantial functional impairment (as assessed under the Adult Disability Assessment Tool (ADAT)), or
  • a dependent child aged under 16 years:
    • with a disability or medical condition that is included in the list of disabilities or conditions that result in automatic qualification, or
    • assessed under the CDAT as functioning at a level below the standard expected for his or her age, and
    • living with the claimant, and
  • an Australian resident, living with the claimant and likely to suffer from the disability permanently or for an extended period of at least 12 months (unless their condition is terminal).

In respect of a child care receiver only, a person can get either:

  • a fortnightly payment plus a Health Care Card, or
  • a Health Care Card.

Carer Allowance is neither income nor assets tested.


Table 20: Carer Allowance customers by carer type, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Child
Adult(a)
Adult and child
Total
1990 37,746     37,746
         
1991 42,405     42,405
1992 50,797     50,797
1993 61,174     61,174
1994 69,693     69,693
1995 78,898     78,898
         
1996 90,644     90,644
1997 95,520     95,520
1998 90,830     90,830
1999 100,452     100,452
2000(b) 116,955 84,104   201,059
         
2001 111,691 121,755 1,595 235,041
2002 115,404 154,425 2,216 272,045
2003 119,003 177,862 2,744 299,609
2004(c) 96,153 198,598 2,856 297,607
2005 102,535 233,859 3,611 340,005
         
2006 106,622 256,107 4,231 366,960
2007 109,118 279,243 4,902 393,263
2008 113,549 303,661 5,695 422,905
2009 120,090 334,511 6,485 461,086
2010 126,315 362,185 7,233 495,733

(a) From 2002, includes customers not coded by carer type.

(b) Estimates for 2000 were derived from a different Centrelink data source. Caution should be exercised when utilising data for 2000 in conjunction with historical data and data from 2001 onwards.

(c) 2004 reduction was due to cessation of saved (grandfathered) ex Child Disability Allowance customers.

Note: Carer Allowance was introduced on 1 July 1999. It combined Child Disability Allowance with Domiciliary Nursing Care Benefit (the latter of which was the responsibility of the Health and Aged Care portfolio). Excludes Health Care Card only customers.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 7: Carer Allowance customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 7: Carer Allowance customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Carer Allowance was introduced on 1 July 1999. It combined Child Disability Allowance with Domiciliary Nursing Care Benefit (the latter of which was the responsibility of the Health and Aged Care portfolio). Excludes Health Care Card only customers.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 21: Carer Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 125,474 25.3   370,259 74.7   495,733 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 20 1,066 0.8   1,724 0.5   2,790 0.6
20–29 4,800 3.8   17,989 4.9   22,789 4.6
30–39 10,595 8.4   69,963 18.9   80,558 16.3
40–49 19,232 15.3   89,764 24.2   108,996 22.0
50–59 23,104 18.4   74,365 20.1   97,469 19.7
60–69 27,953 22.3   67,414 18.2   95,367 19.2
70–79 24,326 19.4   36,211 9.8   60,537 12.2
80 and over 14,398 11.5   12,829 3.5   27,227 5.5
Marital status                
Married/de facto 90,785 72.4   263,880 71.3   354,665 71.5
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 34,689 27.6   106,379 28.7   141,068 28.5
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 78,561 62.6   258,423 69.8   336,984 68.0
United Kingdom 9,232 7.4   19,639 5.3   28,871 5.8
Italy 5,088 4.1   8,705 2.4   13,793 2.8
Greece 3,884 3.1   6,295 1.7   10,179 2.1
Lebanon 2,019 1.6   6,972 1.9   8,991 1.8
Other 26,690 21.3   70,225 19.0   96,915 19.5
Home ownership                
Home owner 67,024 53.4   206,133 55.7   273,157 55.1
Non-home owner 58,450 46.6   164,126 44.3   222,576 44.9
Duration(a)                
<1 year 23,678 18.9   55,087 14.9   78,765 15.9
1 to <2 years 23,229 18.5   59,711 16.1   82,940 16.7
2 to <3 years 15,168 12.1   43,148 11.7   58,316 11.8
3 to <4 years 12,989 10.4   36,642 9.9   49,631 10.0
4 to <5 years 9,706 7.7   24,017 6.5   33,723 6.8
5 to <10 years 34,227 27.3   115,316 31.1   149,543 30.2
10 years and over 6,477 5.2   36,338 9.8   42,815 8.6
                 
Mean (weeks) 200.6     237.7     228.3  
Median (weeks) 156.5     191.3     182.6  

(a) Duration is measured from the allowance start date.

Note: Excludes 12,860 customers who receive a Health Care Card only.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 22: Carer Allowance customers by state/territory and carer type, June 2010
State/territory
Child(a)
 
Adult(b)
 
Adult and child
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 42,176 33.4   128,803 35.6   2,674 37.0   173,653 35.0
Victoria 33,455 26.5   97,483 26.9   1,866 25.8   132,804 26.8
Queensland 23,847 18.9   66,485 18.4   1,322 18.3   91,654 18.5
Western Australia 10,153 8.0   24,669 6.8   413 5.7   35,235 7.1
South Australia 11,269 8.9   29,155 8.0   648 9.0   41,072 8.3
Tasmania 3,013 2.4   11,042 3.0   241 3.3   14,296 2.9
Australian Capital Territory 1,632 1.3   2,903 0.8   51 0.7   4,586 0.9
Northern Territory 752 0.6   1,595 0.4   17 0.2   2,364 0.5
Other(c) 18 0.0   50 0.0   1 0.0   69 0.0
Total 126,315 100.0   362,185 100.0   7,233 100.0   495,733 100.0

(a) Excludes 12,860 customers who receive a Health Care Card only.

(b) Includes 99 customers not coded by carer type.

(c) Includes overseas payments, unknown state/territory and invalid postcodes.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

 

3 Student and labour market related payments

3.1 Austudy Payment

Austudy Payment provides support for students and Australian apprentices aged 25 years and over. Austudy Payment was introduced on 1 July 1998 and replaced the program formerly known as AUSTUDY.

Students must be full-time and undertaking an approved course with an approved institution. Approved courses generally include secondary education courses, undergraduate courses, associate diplomas and some other diplomas, TAFE courses and some postgraduate courses.

Apprentices must be full-time and have a current Commonwealth Registration Identification number.

Austudy Payment is subject to the personal income and assets tests and the partner income test.

Austudy Payment is subject to residence requirements.


Table 23: Austudy Payment customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 18,842 50.5   18,500 49.5   37,342 100.0
Age (years)                
25–29 8,512 45.2   7,845 42.4   16,357 43.8
30–34 4,258 22.6   3,273 17.7   7,531 20.2
35–39 2,589 13.7   2,175 11.8   4,764 12.8
40–44 1,464 7.8   1,810 9.8   3,274 8.8
45–49 954 5.1   1,674 9.0   2,628 7.0
50–54 548 2.9   1,119 6.0   1,667 4.5
55–59 360 1.9   477 2.6   837 2.2
60 and over 157 0.8   127 0.7   284 0.8
Marital status                
Single or partnered (no child) 14,679 77.9   14,945 80.8   29,624 79.3
Single with children 329 1.7   1,629 8.8   1,958 5.2
Partnered with children 3,834 20.3   1,926 10.4   5,760 15.4
Duration(a)                
<3 months 1,385 7.4   1,484 8.0   2,869 7.7
3 to <6 months 4,050 21.5   4,269 23.1   8,319 22.3
6 to <9 months 1,047 5.6   1,129 6.1   2,176 5.8
9 months to <1 year 1,521 8.1   1,348 7.3   2,869 7.7
1 to <2 years 5,291 28.1   4,609 24.9   9,900 26.5
2 to <3 years 2,208 11.7   2,011 10.9   4,219 11.3
3 years and over 3,340 17.7   3,650 19.7   6,990 18.7
                 
Mean (weeks) 100.0     121.3     110.5  
Median (weeks) 66.0     63.0     65.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 14,052 74.6   12,592 68.1   26,644 71.4
0.01–118.00 1,344 7.1   1,521 8.2   2,865 7.7
Over 118.00 3,446 18.3   4,387 23.7   7,833 21.0
Study level                
Secondary 443 2.4   309 1.7   752 2.0
Tertiary Group A 1,075 5.7   1,162 6.3   2,237 6.0
Tertiary Group B 9,977 53.0   9,329 50.4   19,306 51.7
Tertiary Group C 2,772 14.7   2,912 15.7   5,684 15.2
Tertiary Group D 2,885 15.3   3,369 18.2   6,254 16.7
Other 1,213 6.4   1,202 6.5   2,415 6.5
Not recorded 477 2.5   217 1.2   694 1.9

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date. For customers who previously received AUSTUDY, this duration would have been reset when Austudy Payment was introduced and their durations may be underestimated.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Note: Customer numbers include 1,068 people who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income. Tertiary Group 'A' refers to postgraduate bachelor degrees or postgraduate/graduate diplomas. Tertiary Group 'B' refers to undergraduate bachelor degrees. Tertiary Group 'C' refers to associate diplomas/degrees and TAFE diplomas that require completion of Year 12 for entry, or two-year undergraduate diploma and certificate courses. Tertiary Group 'D' refers to certificate courses. Figures represented in this table are not comparable to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of student income support recipient data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).


Table 24: Austudy Payment customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 6,225 50.2   6,169 49.8   12,394 33.2
Victoria 5,355 51.1   5,134 48.9   10,489 28.1
Queensland 3,118 47.5   3,446 52.5   6,564 17.6
Western Australia 1,452 49.4   1,488 50.6   2,940 7.9
South Australia 1,678 54.8   1,386 45.2   3,064 8.2
Tasmania 582 52.8   521 47.2   1,103 3.0
Australian Capital Territory 319 56.4   247 43.6   566 1.5
Northern Territory 55 50.0   55 50.0   110 0.3
Other(a) 58 51.8   54 48.2   112 0.3
Total 18,842 50.5   18,500 49.5   37,342 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: Customer numbers include 1,068 people who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income. Figures represented in this table are not comparable to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of student income support recipient data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).

3.2 ABSTUDY scheme

The purpose of the ABSTUDY scheme is to address the particular educational disadvantages faced by Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people by improving educational outcomes to a level commensurate with the Australian population in general. ABSTUDY policy aims to encourage eligible Indigenous students to take full advantage of available educational opportunities and improve their employment opportunities.

The main objectives of the ABSTUDY scheme are to:

  • encourage Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people to take full advantage of the educational opportunities available
  • promote equity of educational opportunity, and
  • improve educational outcomes.

ABSTUDY is subject to residence requirements and income and assets tests dependent on the person's individual circumstances. Provisions could include personal or parental income test, and/or family assets test, family actual means test, independent assets test or independent partner income test.


Table 25: ABSTUDY scheme customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 17,314 47.7   18,994 52.3   36,308 100.0
Age (years)                
12 or less 1,363 7.9   1,420 7.5   2,783 7.7
13 2,830 16.3   2,828 14.9   5,658 15.6
14 3,039 17.6   2,852 15.0   5,891 16.2
15 2,756 15.9   2,830 14.9   5,586 15.4
16 2,116 12.2   2,017 10.6   4,133 11.4
17 1,569 9.1   1,625 8.6   3,194 8.8
18 654 3.8   737 3.9   1,391 3.8
19 357 2.1   498 2.6   855 2.4
20 268 1.5   361 1.9   629 1.7
21 and over 2,362 13.6   3,826 20.1   6,188 17.0
Marital status                
Married/de facto 611 3.5   1,324 7.0   1,935 5.3
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 16,703 96.5   17,670 93.0   34,373 94.7
Duration(a)                
<3 months 1,245 7.2   1,381 7.3   2,626 7.2
3 to <6 months 6,823 39.4   7,739 40.7   14,562 40.1
6 to <9 months 586 3.4   634 3.3   1,220 3.4
9 months to <1 year 821 4.7   918 4.8   1,739 4.8
1 to <2 years 4,623 26.7   4,867 25.6   9,490 26.1
2 to <3 years 2,171 12.5   2,271 12.0   4,442 12.2
3 years and over 1,045 6.0   1,184 6.2   2,229 6.1
                 
Mean (weeks) 60.8     59.5     60.1  
Median (weeks) 39.0     34.0     37.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 16,629 96.0   17,737 93.4   34,366 94.7
0.01–118.00 210 1.2   416 2.2   626 1.7
Over 118.00 475 2.7   841 4.4   1,316 3.6
Study level                
Secondary 13,912 80.4   13,810 72.7   27,722 76.4
Tertiary 2,991 17.3   4,988 26.3   7,979 22.0
Other 411 2.4   196 1.0   607 1.7
Student status                
Full-time 16,413 94.8   17,613 92.7   34,026 93.7
Part-time(c) 901 5.2   1,381 7.3   2,282 6.3

(a) Duration is measured from the ABSTUDY start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) Includes concessional and other student status categories.

Note: Figures represented in this table are not comparable to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of student income support recipient data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).


Table 26: ABSTUDY scheme customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory(a)
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 6,237 47.4   6,913 52.6   13,150 36.2
Victoria 1,167 46.9   1,319 53.1   2,486 6.8
Queensland 4,819 47.5   5,323 52.5   10,142 27.9
Western Australia 2,124 50.6   2,077 49.4   4,201 11.6
South Australia 1,004 45.7   1,195 54.3   2,199 6.1
Tasmania 421 46.5   484 53.5   905 2.5
Australian Capital Territory 130 46.9   147 53.1   277 0.8
Northern Territory 1,399 47.9   1,524 52.1   2,923 8.1
Other(b) 13 52.0   12 48.0   25 0.1
Total 17,314 47.7   18,994 52.3   36,308 100.0

(a) State/territory is the home or residential state/territory of the scheme participant. Participants may be attending an educational institution in a state/territory other than their home state/territory.

(b) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: Figures represented in this table are not comparable to the Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of student income support recipient data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).

3.3 Youth Allowance

Introduced on 1 July 1998, Youth Allowance (full-time student and apprentice) replaced AUSTUDY for full-time students under 25 years and Youth Allowance (other) replaced Sickness Allowance, Youth Training Allowance and Newstart Allowance for young people under 21 years of age who are temporarily incapacitated or unemployed and looking for work.

These changes were introduced in response to concerns from the community about the need for income support arrangements that address changing labour market conditions, the need for increased flexibility and simplicity, and the removal of disincentives to study.

Young people aged 16 to 20 years who are unemployed or aged 16 to 25 years (15 years if considered independent) and undertaking full-time studies, or a combination of approved activities such as part-time work and part-time study, are eligible for Youth Allowance.

A parental means test applies unless the customer is assessed as independent. Independence for Youth Allowance purposes can be obtained in a number of ways, including through minimum levels of prior workforce participation, marital status, or where it is considered by a Centrelink Social Worker unreasonable for the young person to live at home. Single, dependent young people receive the 'at home' rate of payment unless they live apart from their parent(s) for approved reasons.

Residence requirements apply.


Table 27: Youth Allowance (full-time student and apprentice) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 134,733 45.4   162,290 54.6   297,023 100.0
Age (years)                
15 48 0.0   105 0.1   153 0.1
16 26,304 19.5   27,170 16.7   53,474 18.0
17 23,229 17.2   25,770 15.9   48,999 16.5
18 15,505 11.5   18,772 11.6   34,277 11.5
19 14,322 10.6   19,096 11.8   33,418 11.3
20 15,367 11.4   21,347 13.2   36,714 12.4
21 13,637 10.1   18,514 11.4   32,151 10.8
22 10,239 7.6   13,168 8.1   23,407 7.9
23 7,196 5.3   8,611 5.3   15,807 5.3
24 5,194 3.9   5,752 3.5   10,946 3.7
25 and over 3,692 2.7   3,985 2.5   7,677 2.6
Rate                
At home 75,961 56.4   81,450 50.2   157,411 53.0
Away from home or couple 58,772 43.6   80,840 49.8   139,612 47.0
                 
Independent 49,613 36.8   67,562 41.6   117,175 39.4
Dependent 85,120 63.2   94,728 58.4   179,848 60.6
Duration(a)                
<3 months 14,804 11.0   17,050 10.5   31,854 10.7
3 to <6 months 22,492 16.7   27,372 16.9   49,864 16.8
6 to <9 months 10,312 7.7   11,633 7.2   21,945 7.4
9 months to <1 year 11,342 8.4   12,916 8.0   24,258 8.2
1 to <2 years 38,423 28.5   46,115 28.4   84,538 28.5
2 to <3 years 18,099 13.4   22,850 14.1   40,949 13.8
3 years and over 19,261 14.3   24,354 15.0   43,615 14.7
                 
Mean (weeks) 79.6     81.3     80.5  
Median (weeks) 59.0     62.0     61.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 99,044 73.5   102,934 63.4   201,978 68.0
0.01–118.00 13,550 10.1   22,696 14.0   36,246 12.2
Over 118.00 22,139 16.4   36,660 22.6   58,799 19.8
Study level                
Secondary 54,596 40.5   57,080 35.2   111,676 37.6
Tertiary Group A 1,284 1.0   2,122 1.3   3,406 1.1
Tertiary Group B 58,163 43.2   79,395 48.9   137,558 46.3
Tertiary Group C 6,656 4.9   8,268 5.1   14,924 5.0
Tertiary Group D 8,526 6.3   10,964 6.8   19,490 6.6
Apprentices/other 5,023 3.7   3,880 2.4   8,903 3.0
Not recorded 485 0.4   581 0.4   1,066 0.4

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Notes: Data include 6,462 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 4,479 apprentices. Figures represented in this table are not comparable to Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of student income support recipient data.

Tertiary Group 'A' refers to postgraduate bachelor degrees or postgraduate/graduate diplomas. Tertiary Group 'B' refers to undergraduate bachelor degrees. Tertiary Group 'C' refers to associate diplomas/degrees and TAFE diplomas that require completion of Year 12 for entry, or two-year undergraduate diploma and certificate courses. Tertiary Group 'D' refers to certificate courses.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).


Table 28: Youth Allowance (other) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 46,782 52.9   41,677 47.1   88,459 100.0
Age (years)                
15 23 0.0   47 0.1   70 0.1
16 2,622 5.6   2,444 5.9   5,066 5.7
17 6,208 13.3   6,031 14.5   12,239 13.8
18 12,433 26.6   11,751 28.2   24,184 27.3
19 13,087 28.0   11,567 27.8   24,654 27.9
20 12,368 26.4   9,806 23.5   22,174 25.1
21 and over 41 0.1   31 0.1   72 0.1
Rate                
At home 22,603 48.3   17,805 42.7   40,408 45.7
Away from home or couple 24,179 51.7   23,872 57.3   48,051 54.3
                 
Independent 20,986 44.9   20,387 48.9   41,373 46.8
Dependent 25,796 55.1   21,290 51.1   47,086 53.2
Duration(a)                
<3 months 7,463 16.0   5,555 13.3   13,018 14.7
3 to <6 months 7,197 15.4   6,077 14.6   13,274 15.0
6 to <9 months 4,284 9.2   3,564 8.6   7,848 8.9
9 months to <1 year 3,427 7.3   2,822 6.8   6,249 7.1
1 to <2 years 10,779 23.0   9,443 22.7   20,222 22.9
2 to <3 years 7,262 15.5   7,362 17.7   14,624 16.5
3 years and over 6,370 13.6   6,854 16.4   13,224 14.9
                 
Mean (weeks) 74.1     81.7     77.7  
Median (weeks) 56.0     66.0     60.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 41,099 87.9   33,426 80.2   74,525 84.2
0.01–31.00 257 0.5   391 0.9   648 0.7
31.01–118.00 1,695 3.6   2,540 6.1   4,235 4.8
Over 118.00 3,731 8.0   5,320 12.8   9,051 10.2
Main activity type                
Jobsearch 12,964 27.7   13,015 31.2   25,979 29.4
Incapacitated 1,016 2.2   1,121 2.7   2,137 2.4
Work for dole 330 0.7   168 0.4   498 0.6
CDEP participant 438 0.9   240 0.6   678 0.8
Jobs placement, employment & training 239 0.5   175 0.4   414 0.5
Other 31,795 68.0   26,958 64.7   58,753 66.4

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date. This may include periods on Youth Allowance as a full-time student.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Note: Data include 2,521 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income. The figures also include 674 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Youth Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 29: Total Youth Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 181,515 47.1   203,967 52.9   385,482 100.0
Age (years)                
15 71 0.0   152 0.1   223 0.1
16 28,926 15.9   29,614 14.5   58,540 15.2
17 29,437 16.2   31,801 15.6   61,238 15.9
18 27,938 15.4   30,523 15.0   58,461 15.2
19 27,409 15.1   30,663 15.0   58,072 15.1
20 27,735 15.3   31,153 15.3   58,888 15.3
21 13,677 7.5   18,545 9.1   32,222 8.4
22 10,240 5.6   13,168 6.5   23,408 6.1
23 7,196 4.0   8,611 4.2   15,807 4.1
24 5,194 2.9   5,752 2.8   10,946 2.8
25 and over 3,692 2.0   3,985 2.0   7,677 2.0
Rate                
At home 98,564 54.3   99,255 48.7   197,819 51.3
Away from home or couple 82,951 45.7   104,712 51.3   187,663 48.7
                 
Independent 70,599 38.9   87,949 43.1   158,548 41.1
Dependent 110,916 61.1   116,018 56.9   226,934 58.9
Duration(a)                
<3 months 22,267 12.3   22,605 11.1   44,872 11.6
3 to <6 months 29,689 16.4   33,449 16.4   63,138 16.4
6 to <9 months 14,596 8.0   15,197 7.5   29,793 7.7
9 months to <1 year 14,769 8.1   15,738 7.7   30,507 7.9
1 to <2 years 49,202 27.1   55,558 27.2   104,760 27.2
2 to <3 years 25,361 14.0   30,212 14.8   55,573 14.4
3 years and over 25,631 14.1   31,208 15.3   56,839 14.7
                 
Mean (weeks) 78.2     81.4     79.9  
Median (weeks) 59.0     62.0     60.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 140,143 77.2   136,360 66.9   276,503 71.7
0.01–31.00 1,541 0.8   2,505 1.2   4,046 1.0
31.01–118.00 13,961 7.7   23,122 11.3   37,083 9.6
Over 118.00 25,870 14.3   41,980 20.6   67,850 17.6
Student status                
Apprentice 3,258 1.8   1,221 0.6   4,479 1.2
Full-time 131,475 72.4   161,069 79.0   292,544 75.9
Part-time 380 0.2   608 0.3   988 0.3
Not a student 46,402 25.6   41,069 20.1   87,471 22.7

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Note: Figures represented in this table are not comparable to Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) Annual Report published figures due to an improved attribution of income support recipient data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (DEEWR Blue Book dataset).

 

3.4 Newstart Allowance

Newstart Allowance is paid to people between 21 years and Age Pension age who are unemployed and satisfy the activity test. A person satisfies the activity test if they are actively seeking and willing to undertake suitable paid work, including casual and part-time work. The activity test can also be satisfied in other ways including, for example, undertaking a course of vocational training, participating in a labour market program, or entering and complying with the terms of an activity agreement requiring the person to engage in specified activities.

From 1 July 1998, mutual obligation requirements were placed on young people (18 to 24 years) who were unemployed for at least six months. These Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (other) recipients were required to supplement their normal job search efforts with one of a range of activities, including part-time work, voluntary work, Work for the Dole, job search training and intensive employment assistance. From 1 July 1999, mutual obligation requirements were extended to 25 to 34 year olds who have been unemployed for 12 months or more.

Newstart Allowance is subject to residence requirements and income and assets tests. Newstart Allowance customers are required to complete a fortnightly statement (in some circumstances this period may be extended) to advise of changes in circumstances that may affect entitlement to the allowance or the rate payable and, in most cases, to provide details of their job search efforts.

Jobseekers

The jobseeker population is derived for Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (other) recipients by excluding all people who did not receive a payment and those known not to have been required to search for work. People receiving intensive assistance under Job Network arrangements are classified as jobseekers. These people negotiate their activity agreement with their Job Network member. They may not always be undertaking job search. The total number of jobseekers is calculated by adding together the number of jobseekers in receipt of Newstart Allowance and Youth Allowance (other).

In the following tables, customers are defined as short-term (in receipt of a payment for less than 12 months) and long-term (in receipt of a payment for one year or more).


Table 30: Short-term Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 143,736 64.6   78,641 35.4   222,377 100.0
Age (years)                
21–24 26,748 18.6   15,011 19.1   41,759 18.8
25–29 24,343 16.9   9,654 12.3   33,997 15.3
30–34 19,446 13.5   6,932 8.8   26,378 11.9
35–39 18,067 12.6   8,101 10.3   26,168 11.8
40–44 14,820 10.3   8,669 11.0   23,489 10.6
45–49 12,841 8.9   9,469 12.0   22,310 10.0
50–59 19,149 13.3   15,203 19.3   34,352 15.4
60 and over 8,322 5.8   5,602 7.1   13,924 6.3
Marital status                
Married/de facto 36,248 25.2   20,928 26.6   57,176 25.7
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 107,488 74.8   57,713 73.4   165,201 74.3
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 105,399 73.3   55,747 70.9   161,146 72.5
United Kingdom 5,284 3.7   3,267 4.2   8,551 3.8
New Zealand 3,912 2.7   2,248 2.9   6,160 2.8
Vietnam 2,378 1.7   1,419 1.8   3,797 1.7
China 1,583 1.1   1,731 2.2   3,314 1.5
Other 25,180 17.5   14,229 18.1   39,409 17.7
Duration(a)                
<7 weeks 26,740 18.6   14,044 17.9   40,784 18.3
7 weeks to <3 months 21,287 14.8   11,379 14.5   32,666 14.7
3 to <6 months 41,848 29.1   22,901 29.1   64,749 29.1
6 to <9 months 29,093 20.2   16,769 21.3   45,862 20.6
9 months to <1 year 24,768 17.2   13,548 17.2   38,316 17.2
                 
Mean (weeks) 21.6     21.9     21.7  
Median (weeks) 19.0     20.0     19.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 125,289 87.2   61,278 77.9   186,567 83.9
0.01–31.00 571 0.4   521 0.7   1,092 0.5
Over 31.00 17,876 12.4   16,842 21.4   34,718 15.6
Activity type                
Jobseekers 90,222 62.8   41,586 52.9   131,808 59.3
Incapacitated 7,570 5.3   5,653 7.2   13,223 5.9
Other(c) 45,944 32.0   31,402 39.9   77,346 34.8

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures in this table are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and the above table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. The table figures exclude 14,876 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 1,178 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 31: Long-term Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 195,301 58.9   136,215 41.1   331,516 100.0
Age (years)                
21–24 27,542 14.1   17,995 13.2   45,537 13.7
25–29 28,790 14.7   13,324 9.8   42,114 12.7
30–34 24,681 12.6   11,289 8.3   35,970 10.9
35–39 24,520 12.6   14,654 10.8   39,174 11.8
40–44 21,367 10.9   17,049 12.5   38,416 11.6
45–49 18,998 9.7   18,833 13.8   37,831 11.4
50–59 30,933 15.8   30,417 22.3   61,350 18.5
60 and over 18,470 9.5   12,654 9.3   31,124 9.4
Marital status                
Married/de facto 46,626 23.9   34,576 25.4   81,202 24.5
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 148,675 76.1   101,639 74.6   250,314 75.5
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 145,970 74.7   97,371 71.5   243,341 73.4
United Kingdom 7,549 3.9   5,198 3.8   12,747 3.8
Vietnam 4,471 2.3   4,515 3.3   8,986 2.7
New Zealand 4,047 2.1   3,054 2.2   7,101 2.1
China 1,837 0.9   2,716 2.0   4,553 1.4
Other 31,427 16.1   23,361 17.2   54,788 16.5
Duration(a)                
1 to <2 years 79,211 40.6   41,354 30.4   120,565 36.4
2 to <3 years 31,780 16.3   19,796 14.5   51,576 15.6
3 to <4 years 17,492 9.0   12,826 9.4   30,318 9.1
4 to <5 years 12,167 6.2   7,621 5.6   19,788 6.0
5 years or more 54,651 28.0   54,618 40.1   109,269 33.0
                 
Mean (weeks) 225.2     313.9     261.6  
Median (weeks) 128.0     182.0     147.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 169,131 86.6   102,855 75.5   271,986 82.0
0.01–31.00 842 0.4   891 0.7   1,733 0.5
Over 31.00 25,328 13.0   32,469 23.8   57,797 17.4
Activity type                
Jobseekers 85,166 43.6   47,389 34.8   132,555 40.0
Incapacitated 7,849 4.0   6,990 5.1   14,839 4.5
Other(c) 102,286 52.4   81,836 60.1   184,122 55.5

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures in this table are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and the above table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. The table figures exclude 13,859 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 3,733 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 32: Total Newstart Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 339,037 61.2   214,856 38.8   553,893 100.0
Age (years)                
21–24 54,290 16.0   33,006 15.4   87,296 15.8
25–29 53,133 15.7   22,978 10.7   76,111 13.7
30–34 44,127 13.0   18,221 8.5   62,348 11.3
35–39 42,587 12.6   22,755 10.6   65,342 11.8
40–44 36,187 10.7   25,718 12.0   61,905 11.2
45–49 31,839 9.4   28,302 13.2   60,141 10.9
50–59 50,082 14.8   45,620 21.2   95,702 17.3
60 and over 26,792 7.9   18,256 8.5   45,048 8.1
Marital status                
Married/de facto 82,874 24.4   55,504 25.8   138,378 25.0
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 256,163 75.6   159,352 74.2   415,515 75.0
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 251,369 74.1   153,118 71.3   404,487 73.0
United Kingdom 12,833 3.8   8,465 3.9   21,298 3.8
New Zealand 7,959 2.3   5,302 2.5   13,261 2.4
Vietnam 6,849 2.0   5,934 2.8   12,783 2.3
China 3,420 1.0   4,447 2.1   7,867 1.4
Other 56,607 16.7   37,590 17.5   94,197 17.0
Duration(a)                
<1 year 143,736 42.4   78,641 36.6   222,377 40.1
1 to <2 years 79,211 23.4   41,354 19.2   120,565 21.8
2 to <3 years 31,780 9.4   19,796 9.2   51,576 9.3
3 to <4 years 17,492 5.2   12,826 6.0   30,318 5.5
4 to <5 years 12,167 3.6   7,621 3.5   19,788 3.6
5 years or more 54,651 16.1   54,618 25.4   109,269 19.7
                 
Mean (weeks) 138.9     207.0     165.3  
Median (weeks) 66.0     83.0     71.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 294,420 86.8   164,133 76.4   458,553 82.8
0.01–31.00 1,413 0.4   1,412 0.7   2,825 0.5
Over 31.00 43,204 12.7   49,311 23.0   92,515 16.7
Activity type                
Jobseekers 175,388 51.7   88,975 41.4   264,363 47.7
Incapacitated 15,419 4.5   12,643 5.9   28,062 5.1
Other(c) 148,230 43.7   113,238 52.7   261,468 47.2

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures in this table are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and the above table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. The table figures exclude 28,735 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 4,911 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 33: Short-term unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 166,107 63.2   96,659 36.8   262,766 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 18 5,650 3.4   5,111 5.3   10,761 4.1
18–24 43,469 26.2   27,918 28.9   71,387 27.2
25–29 24,343 14.7   9,654 10.0   33,997 12.9
30–34 19,446 11.7   6,932 7.2   26,378 10.0
35–39 18,067 10.9   8,101 8.4   26,168 10.0
40–44 14,820 8.9   8,669 9.0   23,489 8.9
45–49 12,841 7.7   9,469 9.8   22,310 8.5
50–59 19,149 11.5   15,203 15.7   34,352 13.1
60 and over 8,322 5.0   5,602 5.8   13,924 5.3
Marital status                
Married/de facto 37,560 22.6   22,621 23.4   60,181 22.9
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 128,547 77.4   74,038 76.6   202,585 77.1
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 125,939 75.8   72,483 75.0   198,422 75.5
United Kingdom 5,450 3.3   3,410 3.5   8,860 3.4
New Zealand 4,299 2.6   2,587 2.7   6,886 2.6
Vietnam 2,400 1.4   1,437 1.5   3,837 1.5
China 1,627 1.0   1,752 1.8   3,379 1.3
Other 26,392 15.9   14,990 15.5   41,382 15.7
Duration(a)                
<7 weeks 30,680 18.5   16,921 17.5   47,601 18.1
7 weeks to <3 months 24,810 14.9   14,057 14.5   38,867 14.8
3 to <6 months 49,045 29.5   28,978 30.0   78,023 29.7
6 to <9 months 33,377 20.1   20,333 21.0   53,710 20.4
9 months to <1 year 28,195 17.0   16,370 16.9   44,565 17.0
                 
Mean (weeks) 21.5     21.8     21.6  
Median (weeks) 19.0     20.0     19.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 145,337 87.5   76,068 78.7   221,405 84.3
0.01–31.00 676 0.4   696 0.7   1,372 0.5
Over 31.00 20,094 12.1   19,895 20.6   39,989 15.2
Activity type                
Jobseekers 96,038 57.8   47,185 48.8   143,223 54.5
Incapacitated 8,173 4.9   6,200 6.4   14,373 5.5
Other(c) 61,896 37.3   43,274 44.8   105,170 40.0

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures in this table are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and this table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. Unemployed customers are those who are in receipt of either Youth Allowance with a student status other than full-time student (generally referred to as Youth Allowance (other)) or Newstart Allowance. The table figures exclude 14,876 Newstart Allowance customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 1,178 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 34: Long-term unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 219,712 57.9   159,874 42.1   379,586 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 18 3,203 1.5   3,411 2.1   6,614 1.7
18–24 48,750 22.2   38,243 23.9   86,993 22.9
25–29 28,790 13.1   13,324 8.3   42,114 11.1
30–34 24,681 11.2   11,289 7.1   35,970 9.5
35–39 24,520 11.2   14,654 9.2   39,174 10.3
40–44 21,367 9.7   17,049 10.7   38,416 10.1
45–49 18,998 8.6   18,833 11.8   37,831 10.0
50–59 30,933 14.1   30,417 19.0   61,350 16.2
60 and over 18,470 8.4   12,654 7.9   31,124 8.2
Marital status                
Married/de facto 48,215 21.9   36,557 22.9   84,772 22.3
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 171,497 78.1   123,317 77.1   294,814 77.7
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 168,292 76.6   119,403 74.7   287,695 75.8
United Kingdom 7,651 3.5   5,275 3.3   12,926 3.4
Vietnam 4,523 2.1   4,552 2.8   9,075 2.4
New Zealand 4,371 2.0   3,406 2.1   7,777 2.0
China 1,871 0.9   2,742 1.7   4,613 1.2
Other 33,004 15.0   24,496 15.3   57,500 15.1
Duration(a)                
1 to <2 years 89,990 41.0   50,797 31.8   140,787 37.1
2 to <3 years 39,042 17.8   27,158 17.0   66,200 17.4
3 to <4 years 21,668 9.9   17,313 10.8   38,981 10.3
4 to <5 years 14,284 6.5   9,880 6.2   24,164 6.4
5 years or more 54,728 24.9   54,726 34.2   109,454 28.8
                 
Mean (weeks) 213.8     286.3     244.3  
Median (weeks) 125.0     161.0     138.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 190,182 86.6   121,491 76.0   311,673 82.1
0.01–31.00 994 0.5   1,107 0.7   2,101 0.6
Over 31.00 28,536 13.0   37,276 23.3   65,812 17.3
Activity type                
Jobseekers 92,314 42.0   54,805 34.3   147,119 38.8
Incapacitated 8,262 3.8   7,564 4.7   15,826 4.2
Other(c) 119,136 54.2   97,505 61.0   216,641 57.1

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and this table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. Unemployed customers are those who are in receipt of either Youth Allowance with a student status other than full-time student (generally referred to as Youth Allowance (other)) or Newstart Allowance. The table figures exclude 13,859 Newstart Allowance customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 3,733 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 35: Total unemployed customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 385,819 60.1   256,533 39.9   642,352 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 18 8,853 2.3   8,522 3.3   17,375 2.7
18–24 92,219 23.9   66,161 25.8   158,380 24.7
25–29 53,133 13.8   22,978 9.0   76,111 11.8
30–34 44,127 11.4   18,221 7.1   62,348 9.7
35–39 42,587 11.0   22,755 8.9   65,342 10.2
40–44 36,187 9.4   25,718 10.0   61,905 9.6
45–49 31,839 8.3   28,302 11.0   60,141 9.4
50–59 50,082 13.0   45,620 17.8   95,702 14.9
60 and over 26,792 6.9   18,256 7.1   45,048 7.0
Marital status                
Married/de facto 85,775 22.2   59,178 23.1   144,953 22.6
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 300,044 77.8   197,355 76.9   497,399 77.4
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 294,231 76.3   191,886 74.8   486,117 75.7
United Kingdom 13,101 3.4   8,685 3.4   21,786 3.4
New Zealand 8,670 2.2   5,993 2.3   14,663 2.3
Vietnam 6,923 1.8   5,989 2.3   12,912 2.0
China 3,498 0.9   4,494 1.8   7,992 1.2
Other 59,396 15.4   39,486 15.4   98,882 15.4
Duration(a)                
<1 year 166,107 43.1   96,659 37.7   262,766 40.9
1 to <2 years 89,990 23.3   50,797 19.8   140,787 21.9
2 to <3 years 39,042 10.1   27,158 10.6   66,200 10.3
3 to <4 years 21,668 5.6   17,313 6.7   38,981 6.1
4 to <5 years 14,284 3.7   9,880 3.9   24,164 3.8
5 years or more 54,728 14.2   54,726 21.3   109,454 17.0
                 
Mean (weeks) 131.0     186.7     153.2  
Median (weeks) 65.0     79.0     69.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 335,519 87.0   197,559 77.0   533,078 83.0
0.01–31.00 1,670 0.4   1,803 0.7   3,473 0.5
Over 31.00 48,630 12.6   57,171 22.3   105,801 16.5
Activity type                
Jobseekers 188,352 48.8   101,990 39.8   290,342 45.2
Incapacitated 16,435 4.3   13,764 5.4   30,199 4.7
Other(c) 181,032 46.9   140,779 54.9   321,811 50.1

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

(c) 'Other' activity types include customers involved in paid employment, full-time and part-time voluntary work, part-time study, self-employment development, training, or otherwise exempt from job search for reasons such as major personal crisis, remote location or jury duty.

Note: The figures are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and this table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. Unemployed customers are those who are in receipt of either Youth Allowance with a student status other than full-time student (generally referred to as Youth Allowance (other)) or Newstart Allowance. The table figures exclude 28,735 Newstart Allowance customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 4,911 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 36: Total unemployed customers by state/territory, June 2010
State/territory
Newstart Allowance
 
Youth Allowance (other)
 
Total
Short-term
Long-term
 
Short-term
Long-term
 
Short-term
Long-term
New South Wales 69,857 114,013   11,663 15,423   81,520 129,436
Victoria 50,807 79,244   6,656 10,265   57,463 89,509
Queensland 54,408 64,864   12,419 11,625   66,827 76,489
Western Australia 20,164 24,985   4,165 3,366   24,329 28,351
South Australia 16,314 28,409   2,930 4,302   19,244 32,711
Tasmania 5,598 11,117   997 1,821   6,595 12,938
Australian Capital Territory 1,798 2,522   312 372   2,110 2,894
Northern Territory 3,372 6,205   1,230 871   4,602 7,076
Other(a) 59 157   17 25   76 182
Total 222,377 331,516   40,389 48,070   262,766 379,586

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: The figures are not comparable to the Labour Market and Related Payments (LMRP) publication due to different extract rules. The LMRP reports average numbers over the reporting period and this table is reporting point-in-time numbers as at June 2010. Unemployed customers are those who are in receipt of either Youth Allowance with a student status other than full-time student (generally referred to as Youth Allowance (other)) or Newstart Allowance. The table figures exclude 28,735 Newstart Allowance customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and 4,911 Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participants who received a nil rate of basic Newstart Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

3.5 Partner Allowance

Prior to the introduction of Partner Allowance, allowees with a partner received a married rate of allowance, which included an amount for the support of a dependent spouse. In September 1994, this combined married rate of payment was abolished and half the former married rate was paid directly to the dependent partner as Partner Allowance.

Since 1 July 1995, the payment was only granted to persons born on or before 1 July 1955 who had no dependent children under the age of 16 years and no recent workforce experience defined as at least 20 hours a week for a total of 13 weeks or more in the previous 12 months. It was payable to partners of people aged over 21 years and receiving Youth Allowance, Austudy Payment, Sickness Allowance, ABSTUDY, Student Financial Supplement Scheme, Newstart Allowance, Special Benefit, Age Pension, Disability Support Pension, Mature Age Allowance or a Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA) Service Pension.

Partner Allowance is a non–activity tested payment subject to residence requirements, and income and assets tests. Partners who do not qualify for Partner Allowance need to qualify for another income support payment in their own right, such as Parenting Payment or Newstart Allowance.

Partner Allowance recipients aged over 60 years who have been receiving income support continuously for nine months or more may be eligible for a Pensioner Concession Card.

Partner Allowance was closed to new claimants on 20 September 2003. People already receiving Partner Allowance will continue to receive it while they remain eligible.


Table 37: Partner Allowance customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 1,783 7.4   22,271 92.6   24,054 100.0
Age (years)                
50–54 n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   23 0.1
55–59 n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   7,673 31.9
60–64 1,230 69.0   14,850 66.7   16,080 66.8
65 and over 125 7.0   153 0.7   278 1.2
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 977 54.8   13,394 60.1   14,371 59.7
United Kingdom 205 11.5   1,564 7.0   1,769 7.4
Italy 20 1.1   761 3.4   781 3.2
Vietnam 51 2.9   637 2.9   688 2.9
Greece 42 2.4   580 2.6   622 2.6
Other 488 27.4   5,335 24.0   5,823 24.2
Duration(a)                
<3 years n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   23 0.1
3 to <4 years n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.
4 to <5 years 0 0.0   n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.
5 years or more 1,778 99.7   22,237 99.8   24,015 99.8
                 
Mean (weeks) 580.0     590.4     589.6  
Median (weeks) 538.0     570.0     568.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)                
Nil 1,659 93.0   20,770 93.3   22,429 93.2
0.01–31.00 n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   153 0.6
Over 31.00 n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   1,472 6.1

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Notes: The table figures exclude 54 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income.

'n.p.'=not published. See 'Confidentiality' on page 1.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 38: Partner Allowance customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 602 7.9   7,047 92.1   7,649 31.8
Victoria 393 6.5   5,616 93.5   6,009 25.0
Queensland 320 7.1   4,167 92.9   4,487 18.7
Western Australia 104 5.4   1,831 94.6   1,935 8.0
South Australia 212 8.4   2,313 91.6   2,525 10.5
Tasmania 134 11.5   1,034 88.5   1,168 4.9
Australian Capital Territory n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   91 0.4
Northern Territory n.p. n.p.   n.p. n.p.   76 0.3
Other(a) 8 7.0   106 93.0   114 0.5
Total 1,783 7.4   22,271 92.6   24,054 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Notes: The table figures exclude 54 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income.

'n.p.'=not published. See 'Confidentiality' on page 1.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

3.6 Widow Allowance

Widow Allowance is a non–activity tested income support payment. It recognises the labour market difficulties faced by single older women who may have depended on the support of their partner.

Widow Allowance was closed to new claimants from 1 July 2006 unless the woman was born on or before 1 July 1955.

Widow Allowance is available to women over 50 years of age who were widowed, divorced or separated (including separated de facto) after the age of 40 years. To qualify for Widow Allowance, women must:

  • have no recent workforce experience (defined as at least 20 hours a week for a total of 13 weeks or more in the previous 12 months)
  • currently be in Australia and not be subject to an assurance of support
  • and either:
    • have been an Australian resident for a continuous period of at least 26 weeks immediately before claiming, or
    • have at any time been an Australian resident for a continuous period of at least two years, or
    • have a qualifying residence exemption, or
    • along with her former partner, have been an Australian resident at the time when she became widowed, divorced or separated.

Widow Allowance is subject to residence requirement and income and assets tests.

Widow Allowance recipients are eligible to receive a Health Care Card. Recipients aged over 60 years who have been receiving income support continuously for nine months or more may be eligible to receive a Pension Concession Card.


Table 39: Widow Allowance customers, characteristics, June 2010
Characteristics
Female
No.
%
Total 33,886 100.0
Age (years)    
50–54 34 0.1
55–59 12,263 36.2
60–64 19,335 57.1
65 and over 2,254 6.7
Country of birth (top five countries)    
Australia 18,603 54.9
United Kingdom 2,376 7.0
China 1,286 3.8
Vietnam 1,160 3.4
Philippines 945 2.8
Other 9,516 28.1
Duration(a)    
<1 year—total 2,361 7.0
<7 weeks 214 0.6
7 weeks to <3 months 284 0.8
3 to <6 months 654 1.9
6 to <9 months 566 1.7
9 months to <1 year 643 1.9
1 year and longer—total 31,525 93.0
1 to <2 years 2,678 7.9
2 to <3 years 2,256 6.7
3 to <4 years 2,152 6.4
4 to <5 years 2,033 6.0
5 years or more 22,406 66.1
     
Mean (weeks) 461.3  
Median (weeks) 405.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)    
Nil 30,439 89.8
0.01–31.00 295 0.9
Over 31.00 3,152 9.3

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 342 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and one Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participant who received a nil rate of basic Widow Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 40: Widow Allowance customers by state/territory, June 2010
State/territory
Female
No.
%
New South Wales 11,556 34.1
Victoria 8,726 25.8
Queensland 6,855 20.2
Western Australia 2,673 7.9
South Australia 2,407 7.1
Tasmania 1,070 3.2
Australian Capital Territory 215 0.6
Northern Territory 176 0.5
Other(a) 208 0.6
Total 33,886 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 342 customers who received a nil rate of payment due to their own or partner's income and one Community Development Employment Project (CDEP) participant who received a nil rate of basic Widow Allowance but received CDEP Supplement.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

3.7 Parenting Payment

Parenting Payment was introduced to help people with children, particularly low-income families, by providing an independent income.

Parenting Payment is available to the primary carer of children and is paid to both single and partnered parents—although to only one member of a couple.

Parenting Payment is subject to residence requirements and income and assets tests.

Parenting Payment (Single)

Until 30 June 2006, Parenting Payment (Single) was contingent upon the parent having a qualifying child aged under 16 years and, when the youngest qualifying child was aged 13 years or over, the parent was required to enter into a participation agreement.

From 1 July 2006, Parenting Payment (Single) is an income support payment to a single parent who is the principal carer of a child or children under the age of 8 years. When the youngest qualifying child is aged 6 years or over, the parent must enter into an Activity Agreement. Parents on Parenting Payment (Single) before 1 July 2006 will continue to receive this payment until their youngest child turns 16 years old, as long as they remain eligible, and will have participation requirements from 1 July 2007, or when their youngest child turns 7 years old, whichever is the later.


Table 41: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 11,305 4.5   237,581 95.5   248,886
               
1991 13,616 5.1   252,104 94.9   265,720
1992 16,444 5.7   270,784 94.3   287,228
1993 17,529 5.9   280,915 94.1   298,444
1994 18,897 6.0   294,540 94.0   313,437
1995 19,913 6.1   305,028 93.9   324,941
               
1996 21,964 6.4   320,326 93.6   342,290
1997 23,920 6.7   334,973 93.3   358,893
1998(a) 25,546 6.9   346,740 93.1   372,286
1999 26,830 7.0   355,493 93.0   382,323
2000 27,951 7.1   363,442 92.9   391,393
               
2001 31,661 7.6   385,000 92.4   416,661
2002 32,966 7.7   394,880 92.3   427,846
2003 33,909 7.8   403,049 92.2   436,958
2004 34,866 7.8   414,446 92.2   449,312
2005 34,565 7.7   416,246 92.3   450,811
               
2006 32,368 7.5   400,590 92.5   432,958
2007 25,677 6.5   369,818 93.5   395,495
2008 20,559 5.7   340,074 94.3   360,633
2009 18,348 5.3   325,748 94.7   344,096
2010 16,793 5.0   316,719 95.0   333,512

(a) In March 1998, Parenting Payment was introduced. It replaced Sole Parent Pension and Parenting Allowance.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

Figure description

Figure 8: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 8: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: In March 1998, Parenting Payment was introduced. It replaced Sole Parent Pension and Parenting Allowance.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 42: Parenting Payment (Single) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 16,793 5.0   316,719 95.0   333,512 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 20 60 0.4   8,454 2.7   8,514 2.6
20–29 3,561 21.2   101,112 31.9   104,673 31.4
30–39 6,383 38.0   122,251 38.6   128,634 38.6
40–49 5,006 29.8   73,069 23.1   78,075 23.4
50–59 1,597 9.5   11,248 3.6   12,845 3.9
60 and over 186 1.1   585 0.2   771 0.2
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 13,778 82.0   256,612 81.0   270,390 81.1
New Zealand 516 3.1   9,373 3.0   9,889 3.0
United Kingdom 551 3.3   8,087 2.6   8,638 2.6
Vietnam 349 2.1   8,276 2.6   8,625 2.6
Philippines 59 0.4   2,636 0.8   2,695 0.8
Other 1,540 9.2   31,735 10.0   33,275 10.0
Home ownership                
Home owner 2,407 14.3   53,034 16.7   55,441 16.6
Non-home owner 14,386 85.7   263,685 83.3   278,071 83.4
Rate                
Full 12,010 71.5   208,124 65.7   220,134 66.0
Part 4,445 26.5   103,167 32.6   107,612 32.3
Zero 304 1.8   4,993 1.6   5,297 1.6
Undetermined 26 0.2   324 0.1   350 0.1
Manual 8 0.0   111 0.0   119 0.0
Duration(a)                
<6 months 1,210 7.2   17,382 5.5   18,592 5.6
6 months to <1 year 1,266 7.5   17,345 5.5   18,611 5.6
1 to <2 years 2,321 13.8   32,980 10.4   35,301 10.6
2 to <3 years 1,500 8.9   26,336 8.3   27,836 8.3
3 to <4 years 1,126 6.7   22,256 7.0   23,382 7.0
4 to <5 years 1,443 8.6   24,427 7.7   25,870 7.8
5 years and over 7,927 47.2   175,993 55.6   183,920 55.1
                 
Mean (weeks) 295.1     359.1     355.9  
Median (weeks) 242.0     302.0     298.0  

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 4,875 suspended clients.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 43: Parenting Payment (Single) customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 5,625 5.2   103,080 94.8   108,705 32.6
Victoria 3,251 4.3   72,025 95.7   75,276 22.6
Queensland 4,107 5.6   69,722 94.4   73,829 22.1
Western Australia 1,374 4.3   30,862 95.7   32,236 9.7
South Australia 1,531 5.8   24,640 94.2   26,171 7.8
Tasmania 566 5.9   9,001 94.1   9,567 2.9
Australian Capital Territory 160 4.8   3,152 95.2   3,312 1.0
Northern Territory 174 4.2   4,014 95.8   4,188 1.3
Other(a) 5 2.2   223 97.8   228 0.1
Total 16,793 5.0   316,719 95.0   333,512 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 4,875 suspended clients.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

Parenting Payment (Partnered)

Parenting Payment (Partnered) is payable to only one member of a couple. Until 30 June 2006, Parenting Payment (Partnered) was paid to a parent with a qualifying child aged under 16 years and, when the youngest qualifying child was 13 years or over, the parent was required to enter into a participation agreement.

From 1 July 2006, Parenting Payment (Partnered) is an income support payment to a partnered parent who is the principal carer of a child or children under the age of 6 years. When the youngest qualifying child is aged 6 years or over, the parent must enter into an Activity Agreement. Parents on Parenting Payment (Partnered) before 1 July 2006 will continue to receive this payment until their youngest child turns 16 years old, as long as they remain eligible, and will have participation requirements from 1 July 2007, or when their youngest child turns 7 years old, whichever is the later.


Table 44: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
2001 20,263 9.9   184,313 90.1   204,576
2002 19,576 10.2   172,000 89.8   191,576
2003 19,196 10.6   162,209 89.4   181,405
2004 18,917 10.7   158,240 89.3   177,157
2005 17,255 10.3   150,017 89.7   167,272
               
2006 15,353 9.7   143,461 90.3   158,814
2007 12,742 8.8   131,685 91.2   144,427
2008 10,246 8.1   115,676 91.9   125,922
2009 10,735 8.3   118,630 91.7   129,365
2010 10,329 8.3   114,581 91.7   124,910

Note: Parenting Payment (Partnered) replaced Parenting Allowance in March 1998. From July 2000, the basic rate of Parenting Payment (Partnered) became part of Family Tax Benefit.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

Figure description

Figure 9: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Figure 9: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Note: Parenting Payment (Partnered) replaced Parenting Allowance in March 1998. From July 2000, the basic rate of Parenting Payment (Partnered) became part of Family Tax Benefit.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 45: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by payment category of partner, June 2001 to June 2010
As at June
Partner's payment
Total
Youth Allowance
Low income
Newstart Allowance(a)
Pension
2001 193 86,329 95,812 22,242 204,576
2002 204 81,078 85,424 24,870 191,576
2003 195 81,792 74,268 25,150 181,405
2004 144 87,945 63,571 25,497 177,157
2005 164 86,184 56,087 24,837 167,272
           
2006 220 82,292 52,891 23,411 158,814
2007 195 82,251 41,181 20,080 143,707
2008 152 73,904 34,575 17,291 125,922
2009 200 71,457 41,483 16,225 129,365
2010 236 67,867 41,307 15,500 124,910

(a) Includes persons whose partner received Newstart Allowance, Sickness Allowance, Special Benefit or other payments.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 46: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 10,329 8.3   114,581 91.7   124,910 100.0
Age (years)                
Under 20 39 0.4   3,005 2.6   3,044 2.4
20–29 1,935 18.7   40,234 35.1   42,169 33.8
30–39 4,472 43.3   49,153 42.9   53,625 42.9
40–49 2,881 27.9   19,536 17.0   22,417 17.9
50–59 851 8.2   2,501 2.2   3,352 2.7
60 and over 151 1.5   152 0.1   303 0.2
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 6,543 63.3   69,941 61.0   76,484 61.2
Vietnam 498 4.8   4,769 4.2   5,267 4.2
China 369 3.6   4,362 3.8   4,731 3.8
Lebanon 196 1.9   3,656 3.2   3,852 3.1
Iraq 193 1.9   3,487 3.0   3,680 2.9
Other 2,530 24.5   28,366 24.8   30,896 24.7
Home ownership                
Home owner 3,397 32.9   38,724 33.8   42,121 33.7
Non-home owner 6,932 67.1   75,857 66.2   82,789 66.3
Rate                
Full 5,852 56.7   69,337 60.5   75,189 60.2
Part 3,585 34.7   35,707 31.2   39,292 31.5
Zero 833 8.1   8,912 7.8   9,745 7.8
Undetermined 59 0.6   606 0.5   665 0.5
Manual 0 0.0   19 0.0   19 0.0
Duration(a)                
<6 months 2,060 19.9   12,729 11.1   14,789 11.8
6 months to <1 year 1,478 14.3   11,177 9.8   12,655 10.1
1 to <2 years 2,117 20.5   17,715 15.5   19,832 15.9
2 to <3 years 997 9.7   11,219 9.8   12,216 9.8
3 to <4 years 605 5.9   8,695 7.6   9,300 7.4
4 to <5 years 604 5.8   8,129 7.1   8,733 7.0
5 years and over 2,468 23.9   44,917 39.2   47,385 37.9
                 
Mean (weeks) 177.3     263.5     256.3  
Median (weeks) 88.0     181.0     172.0  

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 2,106 suspended customers.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).


Table 47: Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 3,486 8.0   40,207 92.0   43,693 35.0
Victoria 2,447 8.1   27,847 91.9   30,294 24.3
Queensland 2,353 9.7   21,974 90.3   24,327 19.5
Western Australia 676 7.1   8,803 92.9   9,479 7.6
South Australia 828 9.2   8,194 90.8   9,022 7.2
Tasmania 379 9.6   3,569 90.4   3,948 3.2
Australian Capital Territory 65 8.8   671 91.2   736 0.6
Northern Territory 75 2.4   2,996 97.6   3,071 2.5
Other(a) 20 5.9   320 94.1   340 0.3
Total 10,329 8.3   114,581 91.7   124,910 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Note: Figures in this table exclude 2,106 suspended customers.

Source: Centrelink administrative data (Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations Blue Book dataset).

3.8 Special Benefit

Special Benefit is an income support payment for people in severe financial hardship due to circumstances beyond their control. Special Benefit is a discretionary payment. The circumstances under which it is granted are determined by the Secretary of the Department of Families, Housing, Community Services and Indigenous Affairs (FaHCSIA).

To qualify for Special Benefit a person must be:

  • in severe financial hardship
  • unable to earn a sufficient livelihood for themselves and their dependants by reason of age, physical or mental disability or domestic circumstances or for any other reason over which the person has no control
  • unable to receive any other income support payment
  • residing in Australia throughout the period for which payment is sought, except under certain rare circumstances, and
  • a permanent Australian resident or the holder of an approved visa.

Special Benefit is subject to income and assets tests.


Table 48: Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 13,592 48.7   14,321 51.3   27,913
               
1991 13,830 46.4   15,981 53.6   29,811
1992 16,168 46.5   18,624 53.5   34,792
1993 12,989 45.0   15,865 55.0   28,854
1994 11,957 46.1   13,990 53.9   25,947
1995 10,446 50.0   10,438 50.0   20,884
               
1996 9,125 48.7   9,602 51.3   18,727
1997 6,811 46.7   7,765 53.3   14,576
1998 4,733 46.2   5,503 53.8   10,236
1999 5,232 44.3   6,576 55.7   11,808
2000 5,313 48.4   5,658 51.6   10,971
               
2001 7,466 58.7   5,246 41.3   12,712
2002 8,060 61.6   5,031 38.4   13,091
2003 7,585 62.0   4,643 38.0   12,228
2004 6,918 61.7   4,298 38.3   11,216
2005 5,625 59.8   3,783 40.2   9,408
               
2006 3,665 53.6   3,176 46.4   6,841
2007 3,104 49.7   3,140 50.3   6,244
2008 2,856 47.6   3,147 52.4   6,003
2009 2,571 44.3   3,238 55.7   5,809
2010 2,645 41.9   3,662 58.1   6,307

Note: Until 1997, the figures are an average of the number of weekly payments during June. From 1998, the figures are customer numbers at a point-in-time. The figures exclude customers who received a nil rate of payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 10: Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 10: Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Note: Until 1997, the figures are an average of the number of weekly payments during June. From 1998, the figures are customer numbers at a point-in-time. The figures exclude customers who received a nil rate of payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 49: Special Benefit customers, Special Benefit category by sex, June 2010
Category
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Assurance of support 24 0.9   47 1.3   71 1.1
Australian citizen child in custody of non-permanent resident 58 2.2   62 1.7   120 1.9
Caring for child 1 0.0   13 0.4   14 0.2
Caring for incapacitated person 0 0.0   1 0.0   1 0.0
Newly arrived refugees in two-year waiting period for Newstart Allowance/Sickness Allowance 95 3.6   89 2.4   184 2.9
                 
Newly arrived migrants (NAM) in waiting period for Special Benefit 27 1.0   23 0.6   50 0.8
NAM in two-year waiting period for:                
Widow Allowance/Parenting Payment/Mature Age Allowance/Carer Payment 2 0.1   42 1.1   44 0.7
Not residentially qualified for Age Pension 1,645 62.2   1,565 42.7   3,210 50.9
Not residentially qualified for Disability Support Pension (pre-10 December 2000) 110 4.2   115 3.1   225 3.6
                 
Other cases (long-term) 18 0.7   38 1.0   56 0.9
Other cases (short-term) 1 0.0   1 0.0   2 0.0
Socially marginalised 10 0.4   1 0.0   11 0.2
Spouse provisional visa (previously Special entry visa) (post-10 December 2000) 468 17.7   1,369 37.4   1,837 29.1
Temporary protection visa from 1 January 2003 29 1.1   4 0.1   33 0.5
                 
Temporary protection visa (not of workforce age) 1 0.0   0 0.0   1 0.0
Under 16 years 156 5.9   292 8.0   448 7.1
                 
Total 2,645 41.9   3,662 58.1   6,307 100.0

Note: The table figures exclude customers who received a nil rate of payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 50: Special Benefit customers, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
Female
Total
No.
%
No.
%
No.
%
Total 2,645 41.9 3,662 58.1 6,307 100.0
Age (years)            
Under 16 214 8.1 349 9.5 563 8.9
16–17 22 0.8 32 0.9 54 0.9
18–20 50 1.9 86 2.3 136 2.2
21–24 73 2.8 328 9.0 401 6.4
25–34 289 10.9 683 18.7 972 15.4
35–44 153 5.8 287 7.8 440 7.0
45–54 89 3.4 189 5.2 278 4.4
55–59 29 1.1 48 1.3 77 1.2
60–64 29 1.1 100 2.7 129 2.0
65 and over 1,697 64.2 1,560 42.6 3,257 51.6
Marital status            
Married/de facto 1,783 67.4 2,310 63.1 4,093 64.9
Single/separated/divorced/widowed 862 32.6 1,352 36.9 2,214 35.1
Country of birth (top five countries)            
China 783 29.6 720 19.7 1,503 23.8
Australia 202 7.6 333 9.1 535 8.5
Philippines 91 3.4 298 8.1 389 6.2
India 151 5.7 195 5.3 346 5.5
Vietnam 119 4.5 207 5.7 326 5.2
Other 1,299 49.1 1,909 52.1 3,208 50.9
Duration(a)            
Less than one year—total 995 37.6 1,847 50.4 2,842 45.1
<7 weeks 179 6.8 331 9.0 510 8.1
7 weeks to <3 months 172 6.5 343 9.4 515 8.2
3 to <6 months 253 9.6 540 14.7 793 12.6
6 to <9 months 225 8.5 373 10.2 598 9.5
9 months to <1 year 166 6.3 260 7.1 426 6.8
One year and longer—total 1,650 62.4 1,815 49.6 3,465 54.9
1 to <2 years 458 17.3 656 17.9 1,114 17.7
2 to <3 years 256 9.7 313 8.5 569 9.0
3 to <4 years 266 10.1 264 7.2 530 8.4
4 to <5 years 199 7.5 217 5.9 416 6.6
5 years or more 471 17.8 365 10.0 836 13.3
             
Mean (weeks) 133.0   96.0   111.5  
Median (weeks) 84.0   50.9   64.0  
Income ($ per week)(b)            
Nil 2,604 98.4 3,599 98.3 6,203 98.4
0.01 and over 41 1.6 63 1.7 104 1.6

(a) Duration is measured from the income support start date.

(b) Income is defined as earned income.

Note: The table figures exclude customers who received a nil rate of payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 51: Special Benefit customers by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 1,406 46.5   1,620 53.5   3,026 48.0
Victoria 757 42.4   1,030 57.6   1,787 28.3
Queensland 191 32.1   404 67.9   595 9.4
Western Australia 112 33.6   221 66.4   333 5.3
South Australia 129 32.1   273 67.9   402 6.4
Tasmania 23 31.1   51 68.9   74 1.2
Australian Capital Territory 22 31.0   49 69.0   71 1.1
Northern Territory 5 26.3   14 73.7   19 0.3
Total 2,645 41.9   3,662 58.1   6,307 100.0

Note: The table figures exclude customers who received a nil rate of payment.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

 

4 Family assistance

The Australian Government offers a range of payments through the Family Assistance Office to support families with their work and family responsibilities.

Each payment is different, depending on the needs of each family.

The main payments are:

  • Family Tax Benefit Part A
  • Family Tax Benefit Part B
  • Child Care Benefit
  • Child Care Rebate
  • Baby Bonus
  • Maternity Immunisation Allowance
  • Double Orphan Pension.

4.1 Family Tax Benefit

Family Tax Benefit (FTB) was introduced to help with the cost of raising children.

Residence requirements apply.

Part A

This is the most common payment to help with the cost of raising children and is paid per child. It includes a supplement per child that becomes payable after the end of the financial year.

Part A is income tested on family income.

Part B

This payment gives extra assistance to single-parent families and to couple families where one income is low. It is paid on a per family basis and includes a supplement that becomes payable after the end of the financial year.

Part B is income tested for single parents, and is income tested on both the lower income earner and the main income earner for two-parent families.

Reconciliation

After the end of each financial year, when an FTB customer and their partner (if applicable) have lodged their tax returns (if required), a reconciliation process occurs that compares the customer's FTB entitlement calculated on their actual income, with the amount they were paid during the year based on their estimated income.

The following table shows 'entitled' customers who, after reconciliation processes, have been found to have at least one day of entitlement to FTB. Note that, for a range of reasons, FTB may be claimed during an entitlement year but there may be no entitlement following reconciliation.


Table 52: Family Tax Benefit, customers by category, 2003–04 to 2008–09 entitlement year, as at June 2010
 
2003–04
2004–05
2005–06
2006–07
2007–08
2008–09(a)
Lump sums            
Entitled 203,813 200,462 210,256 222,628 246,097 129,019
Not entitled (post) 1,578 1,357 1,416 1,648 2,171 3,787
All lump sums 205,391 201,819 211,672 224,276 248,268 132,806
Instalments            
Entitled 1,912,091 1,926,745 1,918,874 1,899,852 1,872,433 1,774,071
Not entitled (post) 64,725 72,300 90,088 100,162 97,144 81,988
All instalments 1,976,816 1,999,045 2,008,962 2,000,014 1,969,577 1,856,059
Not yet reconciled 14,526 18,253 21,947 26,464 28,142 163,035
All customers 2,196,733 2,219,117 2,242,581 2,250,754 2,245,987 2,151,900
All entitled 2,115,904 2,127,207 2,129,130 2,122,480 2,118,530 1,903,090

(a) Preliminary figures. The number of lump-sum customers is not yet final because the claim period for 2008–09 lump-sum payments extends until June 2011; the number of 'not yet reconciled' customers will decrease by the end of June 2011 and the number of customers in the 'all entitled' category will increase.

Note: On 1 March 2011, the major repository of management information relating to FTB Reconciliation and Lump Sum Claim formally moved to a new reporting product. As a part of this change, the quality and breadth of information was improved, with a number of corrections being made to historical data.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Instalments

The following tables relate to fortnightly payments of Family Tax Benefit as at June 2010.


Table 53: Family Tax Benefit, customers and children, June 2010
 
Customer
 
Children
No.
 
No.
Family Tax Benefit, both Part A and B 1,309,167   2,538,527
Family Tax Benefit, Part A only 428,353   826,325
Total Part A 1,737,520   3,364,852
Family Tax Benefit, Part B only 72,083   130,624(a)
Total Part B 1,381,250   2,669,151(a)
Total(b) 1,809,603   3,495,476

(a) The number of children shown for Family Tax Benefit (FTB) Part B is the number of children in the families of FTB Part B customers.

(b) The FTB total of customers and children is the total number who received FTB Part A and/or FTB Part B. It is not the arithmetic total of FTB Part A and FTB Part B customers and children as most customers receive both FTB Part A and FTB Part B.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 54: Family Tax Benefit Part A, customers and children by rate type, June 2010
Family Tax Benefit rate type
Customers
 
Children
No.
%
 
No.
%
Maximum FTB (A) rate with ISP(a) 415,357 23.9   784,852 23.3
Maximum FTB (A) rate without ISP(a) 196,491 11.3   344,404 10.2
Part rate(b) 544,924 31.4   1,186,209 35.3
Base rate 460,916 26.5   791,495 23.5
Tapered base rate 118,177 6.8   251,470 7.5
Invalid code 1,655 0.1   6,422 0.2
Total 1,737,520 100.0   3,364,852 100.0

(a) ISP=Income Support Payment (for example, Newstart Allowance, Disability Support Pension).

(b) Customers receiving less than maximum rate but more than base rate.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 55: Family Tax Benefit Part A, customers and dependent children by age of child, June 2010
Age of child (years)
Customers(a)
 
Children
No.
%
 
No.
%
Under 13 1,413,472 81.3   2,522,512 75.0
13–15 481,425 27.7   549,009 16.3
16–17 160,838 9.3   167,888 5.0
18–20 104,356 6.0   112,614 3.3
21–24 12,077 0.7   12,824 0.4
Total(b) 1,737,520 100.0   3,364,852 100.0

(a) The customer count is the number of customers with at least one dependent child in the age group—hence a particular customer may be counted in more than one category. The total, however, counts each customer once only and is therefore less than the sum of the categories.

(b) Includes 'Invalid code'.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 56: Family Tax Benefit Part B, customers by rate type and age of youngest child, June 2010
Rate type and age of child (years)
Customers
No.
%
Maximum Rate Family Tax Benefit Part B    
Child under 5 years 409,428 29.6
Child 5 years and over 516,414 37.4
Total 925,842 67.0
Part Rate Family Tax Benefit Part B    
Child under 5 years 275,857 20.0
Child 5 years and over 179,551 13.0
Total 455,408 33.0
Total Family Tax Benefit Part B    
Child under 5 years 685,285 49.6
Child 5 years and over 695,965 50.4
Total 1,381,250 100.0

Note: 'Child 5 years and over' includes any counts where customer records have an 'Invalid' code.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 57: Family Tax Benefit customers, characteristics by payment type, June 2010
Characteristics
Family Tax Benefit Part A
 
Family Tax Benefit Part B
 
Family Tax Benefit
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 1,737,520 100.0   1,381,250 100.0   1,809,603 100.0
Age of customer (years)                
Under 18 2,575 0.1   2,565 0.2   2,576 0.1
18–20 21,824 1.3   21,470 1.6   21,896 1.2
21–24 80,463 4.6   76,191 5.5   81,622 4.5
25–34 502,236 28.9   437,944 31.7   525,136 29.0
35–44 741,138 42.7   576,623 41.7   777,017 42.9
45–54 344,071 19.8   234,108 16.9   355,290 19.6
55–59 30,008 1.7   19,926 1.4   30,716 1.7
60–64 9,200 0.5   7,149 0.5   9,310 0.5
65 and over 5,905 0.3   5,274 0.4   5,940 0.3
Invalid code 100 0.0   0 0.0   100 0.0
Family type                
Partnered 1,127,551 64.9   781,570 56.6   1,194,928 66.0
Single parents—total 609,177 35.1   599,029 43.4   613,859 33.9
Female 536,127 30.9   527,064 38.2   539,251 29.8
Male 73,050 4.2   71,965 5.2   74,608 4.1
Not specified 792 0.0   651 0.0   816 0.0
Number of children in the family                
One 675,494 38.9   552,627 40.0   701,979 38.8
Two 662,791 38.1   510,657 37.0   696,770 38.5
Three 281,734 16.2   219,774 15.9   292,071 16.1
Four 84,653 4.9   69,273 5.0   85,895 4.7
Five or more 32,848 1.9   28,919 2.1   32,888 1.8
Country of birth (top five countries)                
Australia 1,255,243 72.2   997,366 72.2   1,309,961 72.4
United Kingdom 67,556 3.9   51,505 3.7   71,696 4.0
New Zealand 57,852 3.3   46,799 3.4   59,923 3.3
Vietnam 36,494 2.1   30,657 2.2   36,940 2.0
China 33,933 2.0   26,077 1.9   34,545 1.9
Other 286,442 16.5   228,846 16.6   296,538 16.4

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 58: Family Tax Benefit, customers and children by state/territory, June 2010
State/territory
Family Tax Benefit Part A
 
Family Tax Benefit Part B
 
Total Family Tax Benefit
Customers
 
Children
 
Customers
 
Children
 
Customers
 
Children
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 550,226 31.7   1,066,705 31.7   441,008 31.9   852,545 31.9   571,912 31.6   1,105,600 31.6
Victoria 430,301 24.8   825,154 24.5   335,754 24.3   641,787 24.0   447,131 24.7   855,598 24.5
Queensland 370,779 21.3   729,657 21.7   293,780 21.3   578,649 21.7   385,851 21.3   757,495 21.7
Western Australia 162,433 9.3   317,610 9.4   138,277 10.0   269,425 10.1   174,383 9.6   339,345 9.7
South Australia 135,964 7.8   255,818 7.6   102,545 7.4   192,305 7.2   139,685 7.7   262,494 7.5
Tasmania 47,667 2.7   91,368 2.7   36,378 2.6   70,022 2.6   48,562 2.7   92,958 2.7
Australian Capital Territory 19,432 1.1   37,151 1.1   15,976 1.2   30,070 1.1   20,751 1.1   39,478 1.1
Northern Territory 20,329 1.2   40,297 1.2   17,501 1.3   34,299 1.3   20,936 1.2   41,411 1.2
Other(a) 389 0.0   1,092 0.0   31 0.0   49 0.0   392 0.0   1,097 0.0
Total 1,737,520 100.0   3,364,852 100.0   1,381,250 100.0   2,669,151 100.0   1,809,603 100.0   3,495,476 100.0

(a) Includes invalid state/territory codes.

Note: The Family Tax Benefit (FTB) total of customers is the total number who received FTB Part A and/or FTB Part B. It is not the arithmetic total of FTB Part A and FTB Part B as most customers receive both FTB Part A and FTB Part B.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

4.2 Baby Bonus and Maternity Immunisation Allowance

Baby Bonus (previously Maternity Payment) was introduced on 1 July 2007 to replace the previous Maternity Allowance and the Baby Bonus Tax Offset. Baby Bonus assists families with the extra costs associated with newborn or adopted children and is available to eligible families who apply within 52 weeks of the baby's birth (including stillbirths) or the date an adopted child came into care.

Baby Bonus is income tested against the families' estimated adjusted taxable income for the six months following the birth of the child. Baby Bonus may also be paid to foster carers or adoptive parents who take on the care of a child shortly after the child's birth, if payment has not already been made to another person for the baby. Baby Bonus payments are available only as 13 fortnightly instalments.

Prior to 1 January 2009, Baby Bonus was available to families who applied within 26 weeks of the birth or adoption, there was no income test and a proportion of payments were made as a lump sum.

Maternity Immunisation Allowance (MIA) is designed to increase immunisation levels in children and to improve the timeliness of immunisation. From 1 January 2009, MIA is paid in two payments. The first payment is paid if a child is fully immunised between 18 and 24 months of age. The second amount is paid if a child is fully immunised between 4 and 5 years of age. Before 2009, MIA was paid in a single payment when the child was between 18 and 24 months of age. Eligibility is subject to the child being immunised in accordance with the National Health and Medical Research Council's Standard Vaccination Schedule, or having a valid exemption. There is no means test for MIA.


Table 59: Baby Bonus and Maternity Immunisation Allowance customers, 2009–10 financial year
 
Families
Children
Baby Bonus 267,793 272,558
Maternity Immunisation Allowance 270,282 276,284

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Baby Bonus

Table notes

The following Baby Bonus tables provide information by age of customer at date of payment.

Customers may be granted more than one payment during a 12-month period (for two different births at two different ages); however, each customer will be counted once only in the total.


Table 60: Baby Bonus customers and children by age and sex of customer, 2009–10 financial year
Age of customer at date of payment (years)
Customers
Children
Male
Female
Total
 
No.
% of age group
No.
% of age group
No.
%
No.
%
Under 18 6 0.2 2,892 99.8 2,898 1.1 2,918 1.1
18–19 82 1.1 7,516 98.9 7,598 2.8 7,681 2.8
20–24 1,234 3.3 35,883 96.7 37,117 13.9 37,600 13.8
25–29 7,220 10.2 63,640 89.8 70,860 26.5 71,920 26.4
30–34 13,332 16.2 69,194 83.8 82,526 30.8 84,053 30.8
35–39 9,752 19.2 40,958 80.8 50,710 18.9 51,850 19.0
40–44 3,895 30.3 8,974 69.7 12,869 4.8 13,168 4.8
45 and over 2,312 71.1 942 28.9 3,254 1.2 3,368 1.2
Total 37,827 14.1 229,966 85.9 267,793 100.0 272,558 100.0

Note: The total figure may not equal the sum of the column—for explanation, please refer to the notes prior to Baby Bonus tables.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 61: Baby Bonus customers and children by family type, 2009–10 financial year
Age of customer at date of payment (years)
Customers
 
Children
Partnered
Single parent
Total
 
Partnered
Single parent
Total
Under 18 884 2,011 2,895   889 2,026 2,915
18–19 3,455 4,140 7,595   3,495 4,183 7,678
20–24 24,113 12,986 37,099   24,440 13,142 37,582
25–29 60,388 10,460 70,848   61,268 10,640 71,908
30–34 75,397 7,121 82,518   76,786 7,258 84,044
35–39 46,166 4,538 50,704   47,191 4,653 51,844
40–44 11,350 1,513 12,863   11,624 1,538 13,162
45 and over 2,858 393 3,251   2,953 412 3,365
Total(a) 224,585 43,149 267,734   228,646 43,852 272,498

(a) The total figure may not equal the sum of the column—for explanation, please refer to the notes prior to Baby Bonus tables.

Note: The table figures exclude 59 customers and 60 children whose family type was not specified.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 62: Baby Bonus customers by payment type, 2009–10 financial year
Age of customer at date of payment (years)
Payment type
Total
Instalment
Lump-sum
Under 18 2,848 52 2,898
18–19 7,475 129 7,598
20–24 36,667 478 37,117
25–29 70,248 656 70,860
30 and over 147,891 1,552 149,344
Total 265,110 2,866 267,793

Note: The total figure may not equal the sum of the column—for explanation, please refer to the notes prior to Baby Bonus tables.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 63: Baby Bonus customers by state/territory, 2009–10 financial year
State/territory
Customers
No.
%
New South Wales 86,138 32.2
Victoria 64,648 24.1
Queensland 57,017 21.3
Western Australia 27,050 10.1
South Australia 18,532 6.9
Tasmania 6,153 2.3
Australian Capital Territory 4,266 1.6
Northern Territory 3,626 1.4
Other(a) 363 0.1
Total 267,793 100.0

(a) Includes unspecified state/territory.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

4.3 Child care support

Child care support policies have been developed to help families participate in the economic and social life of the community through providing support for child care.

Child Care Benefit (CCB) helps families with the cost of approved child care, with financial assistance proportionally higher for lower-income families. Eligible families can have the benefit paid directly to the child care service to reduce their ongoing fees. Alternatively, they can receive the benefit as a lump sum after the end of the financial year. In addition to CCB, families may also receive the Child Care Rebate (CCR) (formerly known as the Child Care Tax Rebate) that pays up to 50 per cent (up from 30 per cent previously) of out-of-pocket costs. CCR is available quarterly to better align with when child care costs are incurred. Final CCR assessments are subject to CCB reconciliation based on taxable income as assessed by the Australian Taxation Office. Families using registered care (that is, informal care provided by a friend or neighbour registered with the Family Assistance Office), rather than care in an approved service, are eligible for the registered care rate of CCB. This is paid for up to 50 hours per week of work-related child care.


Table 64: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by state/territory, 2009–10 financial year
State/territory
No.
New South Wales 266,270
Victoria 181,080
Queensland 201,790
Western Australia 63,530
South Australia 60,370
Tasmania 19,230
Australian Capital Territory 15,480
Northern Territory 7,140
Total(b) 806,550

(a) Based on location of child care service.

(b) Total count does not represent an aggregation of state and territory data as some customers may have used services in more than one state/territory during the period.

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Source: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) administrative data.


Table 65: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by service type, 2009–10 financial year
Service type
No.
Long day care 569,180
Family day care(a) 101,820
Occasional care 10,540
Outside school hours care(b) 215,770
Vacation care 150,930
Total(c) 806,550

(a) Family day care includes in-home care.

(b) Includes before and after school hours care.

(c) Total count does not represent an aggregation of different service types as some customers may have used more than one type of service during the period.

Note: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

Source: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) administrative data.


Table 66: Customers using approved Child Care Benefit services by rate type, 2009–10 financial year
Rate type(a)
No.
%
Maximum rate 230,190 28.5
Partial rate(b) 394,980 49.0
Minimum rate 181,380 22.5
Total 806,550 100.0

(a) Customers can be on more than one rate type within a single year. Where a customer received some CCB during the year, the rate type here represents the last recorded rate type in the year.

(b) Customers receiving some Child Care Benefit (CCB) but less than maximum rate.

Notes: Figures are rounded to the nearest 10.

In the 2008–09 Budget the minimum rate of CCB was replaced with a rate that tapers down to zero. This change resulted in a reduction in the actual percentage of families who appear as receiving CCB as a fee reduction. However, those families affected by this change (by either electing to or having their CCB payment entitlement reduced to zero) still met the other CCB eligibility requirements apart from the income test and could receive the increased Child Care Rebate (CCR) entitlement in this and future years.

Source: Department of Education, Employment and Workplace Relations (DEEWR) administrative data.

4.4 Double Orphan Pension

Double Orphan Pension was first introduced in September 1973. It is a non–means tested payment paid for children under 16 years of age in the care of a guardian, and for full-time dependent students aged between 16 and 21 years who do not receive Youth Allowance.

A double orphan is a child whose parents or adoptive parents have both died, or a child who has one deceased parent and:

  • the whereabouts of the other parent are unknown
  • the other parent is imprisoned for at least 10 years or is being held in custody on a charge for an offence punishable by imprisonment for at least 10 years, or
  • the other parent is residing indefinitely in a mental hospital, nursing home or similar institution.

Refugee children may qualify as double orphans in some circumstances.

To qualify for the Double Orphan Pension a person must have care of a double orphan and be eligible for Family Tax Benefit (FTB) for the child, or would be eligible for FTB but for the income test. There are also residence and citizenship or visa requirements.


Table 67: Double Orphan Pension, customers and children, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June
Customers
 
Children(a)
 
Under 16 years
 
16 to 21 years
 
Total
No.
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
1990 1,873   2,170 93.6   149 6.4   2,319
                   
1991 1,639   1,908 93.9   124 6.1   2,032
1992 1,404   1,666 95.0   87 5.0   1,753
1993 1,356   1,605 95.3   79 4.7   1,684
1994 1,330   1,599 95.2   81 4.8   1,680
1995 1,314   1,616 95.0   85 5.0   1,701
                   
1996 1,319   1,569 92.1   134 7.9   1,703
1997 1,313   1,537 91.2   149 8.8   1,686
1998 1,346   1,567 89.8   178 10.2   1,745
1999 1,243   1,490 92.4   122 7.6   1,612
2000 1,236   1,447 87.9   200 12.1   1,647
                   
2001 1,242   1,503 92.2   127 7.8   1,630
2002 1,207   1,494 94.1   93 5.9   1,587
2003 1,137   1,391 93.9   91 6.1   1,482
2004 1,151   1,411 93.6   97 6.4   1,508
2005 1,286   1,635 94.3   99 5.7   1,734
                   
2006 1,312   1,667 94.2   102 5.8   1,769
2007 1,330   1,728 93.9   112 6.1   1,840
2008 1,382   1,806 93.6   123 6.4   1,929
2009 1,444   1,829 91.4   173 8.6   2,002
2010 1,374   1,739 90.1   192 9.9   1,931

(a) Total number of children attracting a Double Orphan Pension.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 11: Double Orphan Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 11: Double Orphan Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 68: Double Orphan Pension, customers and children by state/territory, June 2010
State/territory
Customers
 
Children(a)
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 329 23.9   481 24.9
Victoria 373 27.1   533 27.6
Queensland 256 18.6   349 18.1
Western Australia 176 12.8   257 13.3
South Australia 176 12.8   231 12.0
Tasmania 43 3.1   55 2.8
Australian Capital Territory 9 0.7   11 0.6
Northern Territory 12 0.9   14 0.7
Total 1,374 100.0   1,931 100.0

(a) Total number of children attracting a Double Orphan Pension.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

5 Other payments and services

5.1 Commonwealth Seniors Health Card

The Commonwealth Seniors Health Card (CSHC) may be issued to people who have reached the qualifying age for Age Pension but who do not qualify for the pension. To qualify for the CSHC, a person must also be an Australian resident, living in Australia and meet the adjusted taxable income test. There is no assets test. The Commonwealth Seniors Health Card provides access to Pharmaceutical Benefits Scheme prescription items at a cheaper rate and a lower Extended Medical Safety Net threshold. Cardholders receive the Seniors Supplement and concessional travel on Great Southern Rail services.


Table 69: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010
As at June
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
2001 97,848 43.3   128,292 56.7   226,140
2002 122,613 44.2   155,068 55.8   277,681
2003 125,261 44.3   157,430 55.7   282,691
2004 129,241 45.0   158,085 55.0   287,326
2005 136,012 45.3   164,153 54.7   300,165
               
2006 143,476 46.2   167,157 53.8   310,633
2007 148,233 46.6   170,045 53.4   318,278
2008 132,336 47.5   146,042 52.5   278,378
2009 134,774 48.2   144,790 51.8   279,564
2010 134,689 49.0   140,091 51.0   274,780

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 12: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Figure 12: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 70: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders, characteristics by sex, June 2010
Characteristics
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
Total 134,689 49.0   140,091 51.0   274,780 100.0
Age of customer (years)                
60–64 0 0.0   7,361 5.3   7,361 2.7
65–69 50,774 37.7   52,343 37.4   103,117 37.5
70–74 38,175 28.3   33,962 24.2   72,137 26.3
75–79 23,602 17.5   20,787 14.8   44,389 16.2
80–84 15,117 11.2   14,409 10.3   29,526 10.7
85–89 5,393 4.0   7,671 5.5   13,064 4.8
90–94 1,330 1.0   2,777 2.0   4,107 1.5
95 and over 298 0.2   781 0.6   1,079 0.4
Status                
Partnered 110,117 81.8   90,892 64.9   201,009 73.2
Single 24,557 18.2   49,188 35.1   73,745 26.8
Other(a) 15 0.0   11 0.0   26 0.0

(a) Includes customers whose marital status was not specified.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 71: Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by state/territory and sex, June 2010
State/territory
Male
 
Female
 
Total
No.
%
 
No.
%
 
No.
%
New South Wales 46,831 48.4   49,955 51.6   96,786 35.2
Victoria 34,177 48.9   35,655 51.1   69,832 25.4
Queensland 25,079 49.9   25,130 50.1   50,209 18.3
Western Australia 13,559 49.4   13,872 50.6   27,431 10.0
South Australia 9,406 49.7   9,518 50.3   18,924 6.9
Tasmania 2,649 50.3   2,620 49.7   5,269 1.9
Australian Capital Territory 2,198 46.0   2,577 54.0   4,775 1.7
Northern Territory 460 53.0   408 47.0   868 0.3
Other(a) 330 48.1   356 51.9   686 0.2
Total 134,689 49.0   140,091 51.0   274,780 100.0

(a) Includes overseas customers.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

5.2 Rent Assistance

Rent Assistance is a non-taxable income supplement paid to individuals and families who rent in the private rental market. Pensioners, allowees and those receiving more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A may be eligible for Rent Assistance.

Rent Assistance can be a payment for site fees in caravan parks and residential parks, mooring fees at a marina, board and lodgings, some retirement village fees and fees paid to occupy non–Commonwealth funded beds in an aged care facility such as a hostel or nursing home.

To qualify for Rent Assistance, a person must:

  • pay or be liable to pay private rent above the applicable minimum rent threshold for their principal home
  • be an Australian resident in Australia (except for temporary absence of up to 26 weeks)
  • not be a home owner (except for mobile homes or people in care situations)
  • not have a partner receiving more than the base rate of Family Tax Benefit Part A
  • not have a partner who receives Rent Assistance with their pension.

Rent Assistance is not paid to:

  • people paying rent to a government housing authority, although in some situations sub-tenants may qualify for Rent Assistance
  • a person who lives in a care facility in an approved Australian Government funded bed
  • single Disability Support Pension recipients aged under 21 years, without dependants, living with parents
  • other single people aged under 25 years, living with parents.

Special rules apply to single sharers and people who pay board and lodging.


Table 72: Rent Assistance income units, average rent and Rent Assistance by primary payment type, June 2010
Primary payment type(a)
Income units
 
Average rent
 
Average Rent Assistance
No.(b)
 
$ per fortnight(c)
 
$ per fortnight(c)
Age Pension 193,164   322   91
Disability Support Pension 219,915   335   101
Newstart Allowance 216,691   359   94
Parenting Payment (Single) 165,773   460   113
Parenting Payment (Partnered)(d) 28,365   555   127
Youth Allowance 86,109   287   80
Family Tax Benefit, Part Aonly 137,324   592   96
Other payments 57,813   374   97
Total 1,105,154   392   98

(a) Members of an income unit may receive more than one type of social security payment and/or Family Tax Benefit (FTB). The primary payment type is based on a hierarchy of pensions first, allowances, Parenting Payment (Partnered) and then FTB Part A. Most families with children are paid Rent Assistance with FTB, but use of primary payments helps to understand the extent of reliance on social security payments.

(b) Income unit numbers relate to those with an ongoing entitlement to a social security or FTB Part A payment at more than the base rate at 4 June 2010 (Housing dataset June 2010).

(c) Rents refer to the combined rent for a couple. Where a customer pays for both accommodation and meals, and cannot separately identify an accommodation charge, two-thirds of the payment is treated as rent. Average rent and Rent Assistance relate only to customers who were paid a daily rate of Rent Assistance at 4 June 2010 (Housing dataset June 2010).

(d) Where a member of a couple receiving Parenting Payment (Partnered) has a partner receiving a social security income support payment, the partner's income support payment will become the primary payment type. Parenting Payment (Partnered) will be the primary payment type only if the partner does not receive an income support payment.

Note: Income units consist of a single person or a couple, with or without dependent children. Eligibility for Rent Assistance depends upon family circumstances including the combined rent paid by members of a couple. Where both members of a couple living together qualify for Rent Assistance, the maximum payment is halved.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 73: Rent Assistance income units by primary payment type and sex, June 2010
Primary payment type(a)
Income units
Both in receipt of Rent Assistance
Female in receipt of Rent Assistance
Male in receipt of Rent Assistance
No.(b)
%
Age Pension 193,164 17.5 38,309 96,495 58,360
Disability Support Pension 219,915 19.9 17,558 96,801 105,556
Newstart Allowance 216,691 19.6 6,967 97,121 112,603
Parenting Payment (Single) 165,773 15.0 158,097 7,676
Parenting Payment (Partnered)(c) 28,365 2.6 189 24,976 3,200
Youth Allowance 86,109 7.8 1,395 49,495 35,219
Family Tax Benefit, Part Aonly 137,324 12.4 504 108,639 28,181
Other payments 57,813 5.2 3,839 38,261 15,713
Total 1,105,154 100.0 68,761 669,885 366,508

(a) Members of an income unit may receive more than one type of social security payment and/or Family Tax Benefit (FTB). The primary payment type is based on a hierarchy of pensions first, allowances, Parenting Payment (Partnered) and then FTB Part A. Most families with children are paid Rent Assistance with FTB, but use of primary payments helps to understand the extent of reliance on social security payments.

(b) Income unit numbers relate to those with an ongoing entitlement to a social security or FTB Part A payment at more than the base rate at 4 June 2010 (Housing dataset June 2010).

(c) Where a member of a couple receiving Parenting Payment (Partnered) has a partner receiving a social security income support payment, the partner's income support payment will become the primary payment type. Parenting Payment (Partnered) will be the primary payment only if the partner does not receive another income support payment.

Notes: Income units consist of a single person or a couple, with or without dependent children. Eligibility for Rent Assistance depends upon family circumstances including the combined rent paid by members of a couple. Where both members of a couple living together qualify for Rent Assistance, the maximum payment is halved.

'–' = not applicable.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

6 Pensioners paid overseas

6.1 Payment rules

Generally there are two standard portability periods:

  • unlimited portability period, and
  • limited 13 weeks portability.

Age pensioners and some Widow B and wife pensioners are entitled to be paid overseas indefinitely if they leave Australia permanently. In special circumstances recipients of Disability Support Pension who have a terminal illness may be granted unlimited portability if they are severely disabled and the purpose of the absence is to be near or with a family member, or to return to their country of origin.

All other payments generally have a maximum portability period of 13 weeks. Ancillary payments such as Rent Assistance and Pharmaceutical Allowance are also generally portable for temporary overseas absences.

6.2 Australia's agreements as at June 2010

Australia has social security agreements with 23 countries—Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Croatia, Cyprus, Denmark, Finland, Germany, Greece, Ireland, Italy, Japan, Korea (South), Malta, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Norway, Portugal, Slovenia, Spain, Switzerland and the United States.

Australia's international social security agreements are designed to share social security costs between countries by:

  • facilitating access to Australian pensions in Australia for people who have had periods of social security coverage in an agreement country
  • helping Australian residents claim their entitlements to social security from other countries
  • regulating payment of social security benefits to people moving between agreement countries.


Table 74: Persons paid overseas by Australia by payment type, June 1990 to June 2010
As at June(a)
Age Pension
Disability Support Pension
Wife Pension
Widow B Pension
Carer Payment
Parenting Payment(b)
Total
1990 13,996 7,504 4,385 2,385   199 28,469
               
1991 16,658 7,814 4,755 1,845   167 31,239
1992 19,846 8,148 4,682 1,790   159 34,625
1993 23,948 8,455 3,478 1,683   154 37,718
1994 27,287 8,493 3,594 1,665 5 136 41,180
1995 29,712 8,780 3,807 1,658 9 121 44,087
               
1996 32,288 9,074 4,045 1,684 9 110 47,210
1997 35,662 9,061 3,867 1,526 13 89 50,218
1998 38,136 8,964 3,572 1,391 16 76 52,155
1999 38,136 8,964 3,718 1,251 19 55 52,143
2000 42,066 8,707 2,943 1,156 17 43 54,932
               
2001 43,280 8,686 2,689 1,141 18 42 55,856
2002 44,150 8,485 2,098 1,082 16 38 55,869
2003 45,399 8,129 998 1,875 37 23 56,461
2004 47,259 7,867 1,773 859 42 0 57,800
2005 48,871 7,816 1,570 799 54 10 59,120
               
2006 54,966 9,459 1,602 740 103 178 67,048
2007 56,165 8,849 1,431 658 88 44 67,235
2008 57,811 8,365 1,305 657 78 18 68,234
2009 58,012 8,174 1,136 610 187 111 68,230
2010 62,148 7,572 969 575 93 3 71,360

(a) All payments where person is outside Australia long-term (since 2006 defined as more than 6 months).

(b) Parenting Payment (Single) replaced Sole Parent Pension on 20 March 1998.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

Figure description

Figure 13: Total persons paid overseas by Australia, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 13: Total persons paid overseas by Australia, June 1990 to June 2010

Notes: All payments where person is outside Australia long-term (since 2006 defined as more than 6 months).

Parenting Payment (Single) replaced Sole Parent Pension on 20 March 1998.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 75: Persons paid overseas by Australia, country of residence by payment type, June 2010
Zone
Country of residence
Age Pension
Disability Support Pension
Other(a)
Total
Europe Austria 1,013 46 7 1,066
  Belgium 65 9 0 74
  Bosnia and Herzegovina 158 80 4 242
  Bulgaria 28 8 1 37
  Croatia 2,000 487 39 2,526
  Cyprus 715 215 44 974
  Czech Republic 115 28 0 143
  Denmark 127 9 0 136
  Finland 144 10 1 155
  Former Serbia and Montenegro 20 10 1 31
  Former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia 635 246 32 913
  France 133 18 2 153
  Germany 1,677 104 9 1,790
  Greece 8,203 1,423 361 9,987
  Hungary 317 42 5 364
  Ireland 425 28 6 459
  Italy 18,051 470 421 18,942
  Latvia 26 1 0 27
  Malta 2,959 948 191 4,098
  Montenegro 34 24 4 62
  Netherlands 4,128 28 10 4,166
  Norway 34 11 0 45
  Poland 286 112 4 402
  Portugal 1,071 228 44 1,343
  Romania 50 21 0 71
  Serbia 680 287 32 999
  Slovakia 22 12 0 34
  Slovenia 259 29 0 288
  Spain 3,826 292 102 4,220
  Sweden 26 7 0 33
  Switzerland 42 14 0 56
  United Kingdom 2,032 179 52 2,263
  Other Europe(b) 55 6 0 61
  Total Europe 49,356 5,432 1,372 56,160
           
Americas Argentina 158 31 7 196
  Brazil 28 11 2 41
  Canada 1,362 62 11 1,435
  Chile 437 101 14 552
  Colombia 27 16 3 46
  Ecuador 22 6 2 30
  El Salvador 28 4 1 33
  Peru 27 7 0 34
  United States of America 1,029 145 11 1,185
  Uruguay 220 35 11 266
  Other Americas(c) 40 5 1 46
  Total Americas 3,378 423 63 3,864
           
Asia China 129 8 0 137
  Hong Kong 68 1 0 69
  India 88 21 0 109
  Indonesia 60 12 1 73
  Japan 25 4 1 30
  Malaysia 52 5 2 59
  Philippines 373 60 3 436
  Singapore 30 0 1 31
  Sri Lanka 34 4 1 39
  Thailand 280 39 1 320
  Vietnam 84 7 0 91
  Other Asia(d) 75 9 0 84
  Total Asia 1,298 170 10 1,478
           
Africa/Middle East Egypt 64 37 6 107
  Israel 107 9 3 119
  Jordan 17 7 0 24
  Lebanon 509 137 32 678
  South Africa 42 2 0 44
  Syria 51 30 4 85
  Turkey 860 487 96 1,443
  Other Africa/Middle East(e) 79 33 3 115
  Total Africa/Middle East 1,729 742 144 2,615
           
Oceania Fiji 23 1 0 24
  New Zealand 5,483 732 37 6,252
  Other Oceania(f) 75 4 1 80
  Total Oceania 5,581 737 38 6,356
           
Total(g)   62,148 7,572 1,640 71,360

(a) Includes Wife Pension, Widow B Pension, Carer Payment and Parenting Payment (Single).

(b) Comprised of Albania, Belarus, Estonia, Iceland, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Moldova, Monaco, Russian Federation and Ukraine.

(c) Comprised of Aruba, Barbados, Bolivia, Costa Rica, Cuba, Grenada, Guatemala, Jamaica, Mexico, Panama, Paraguay, Puerto Rico, St Lucia, Trinidad and Tobago and Venezuela.

(d) Comprised of Afghanistan, Armenia, Bangladesh, Burma (Myanmar), Cambodia, East Timor, Kazakhstan, Korea (North), Korea (South), Laos, Nepal, Pakistan and Taiwan.

(e) Comprised of Algeria, Bahrain, Burkina Faso, Djibouti, Eritrea, Ethiopia, Ghana, Iran, Iraq, Kenya, Kuwait, Madagascar, Mauritius, Morocco, Namibia, Nigeria, Saudi Arabia, Senegal, Seychelles, Somalia, Sudan, Tanzania, Tunisia and United Arab Emirates.

(f) Comprised of Cook Islands, French Polynesia, Kiribati, New Caledonia, Norfolk Island, Papua New Guinea, Samoa, Solomon Islands, Tokelau, Tonga and Vanuatu.

(g) Includes additional 887 customers from unknown or unspecified countries.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.


Table 76: Persons paid by Australia under a social security agreement by payment type, June 2010
Agreement country
Age Pension
Disability Support Pension
Other(a)
Total
Austria 931 42 5 978
Belgium 40 4 0 44
Canada 1,277 53 3 1,333
Chile 191 50 0 241
Croatia 1,061 236 0 1,297
Cyprus 380 107 21 508
Denmark 105 9 0 114
Finland 84 0 0 84
Germany 1,558 97 4 1,659
Greece 3,011 0 0 3,011
Ireland 236 19 3 258
Italy 16,595 230 353 17,178
Japan 8 0 0 8
Korea, South 4 0 0 4
Malta 2,688 746 156 3,590
Netherlands 4,072 18 9 4,099
New Zealand 10,644 1,832 185 12,661
Norway 25 5 0 30
Portugal 718 117 24 859
Slovenia 160 11 0 171
Spain 3,263 180 82 3,525
Switzerland 32 10 0 42
United States of America 777 131 2 910
Total 47,860 3,897 847 52,604

(a) Includes Wife Pension, Widow B Pension, Carer Payment and Parenting Payment (Single).

Note: Includes payments made in Australia, the agreement country and in third countries.

Source: Centrelink administrative data.

6.3 Overseas pensions

Many Centrelink customers have lived and worked overseas and are eligible to receive overseas pensions, known as comparable foreign payments.

Under the comparable foreign payments legislation, customers may be required to claim their overseas pension if they are entitled.

Requiring customers who are likely to be eligible for a foreign payment to claim ensures a fairer social security system. It reinforces the objective of directing income support towards those in need while at the same time avoiding any unnecessary costs to Australian taxpayers. It also recognises that many Australians are part of the new global labour market.

6.4 Total balance of payments

Yearly expenditure as at June 2010 on Australia's pension payments to people living overseas was A$571.3 million. At the same time, pensions from overseas countries being paid to people residing in Australia totalled A$1.2 billion to Centrelink pensioners, representing a significant inflow of funds into Australia, an increase in the disposable income for pensioners, and a saving for Australian taxpayers.

Figure Description


 
No.   
Text description of diagram
1

Age Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 1 shows the number of people receiving Age Pension by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 2,250,000).

1990
Male = 404,486
Female = 935,982

1991
Male = 418,383
Female = 957,466

1992
Male = 447,888
Female = 998,280

1993
Male = 481,196
Female = 1,034,486

1994
Male = 514,217
Female = 1,067,657

1995
Male = 544,571
Female = 1,034,127

1996
Male = 570,328
Female = 1,032,506

1997
Male = 597,859
Female = 1,082,355

1998
Male = 618,607
Female = 1,072,987

1999
Male = 639,008
Female = 1,085,581

2000
Male = 659,188
Female = 1,079,027

2001
Male = 688,563
Female = 1,104,863

2002
Male = 714,324
Female = 1,103,881

2003
Male = 739,187
Female = 1,121,868

2004
Male = 761,025
Female = 1,115,225

2005
Male = 782,977
Female = 1,132,059

2006
Male = 800,310
Female = 1,121,819

2007
Male = 815,912
Female = 1,136,774

2008
Male = 868,179
Female = 1,171,126

2009
Male = 906,769
Female = 1,210,761

2010
Male = 939,442
Female = 1,218,861

2

Disability Support Pension customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 2 shows the number of people receiving Disability Support Pension by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 800,000).

1990
Male = 233,251
Female = 83,462

1991
Male = 244,699
Female = 89,535

1992
Male = 273,697
Female = 104,861

1993
Male = 291,471
Female = 115,101

1994
Male = 309,123
Female = 127,111

1995
Male = 324,672
Female = 139,758

1996
Male = 340,256
Female = 158,979

1997
Male = 352,607
Female = 174,907

1998
Male = 361,539
Female = 191,797

1999
Male = 373,340
Female = 204,342

2000
Male = 382,351
Female = 219,929

2001
Male = 392,354
Female = 231,572

2002
Male = 406,893
Female = 252,022

2003
Male = 412,777
Female = 260,557

2004
Male = 418,829
Female = 277,913

2005
Male = 420,073
Female = 286,709

2006
Male = 415,618
Female = 296,545

2007
Male = 413,033
Female = 301,123

2008
Male = 413,484
Female = 318,883

2009
Male = 422,290
Female = 334,828

2010
Male = 433,456
Female = 359,125

3

Sickness Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 3 shows the number of people receiving Sickness Allowance by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 80,000).

1990
Male = 56,674
Female = 22,521

1991
Male = 50,991
Female = 20,408

1992
Male = 30,844
Female = 13,328

1993
Male = 31,802
Female = 14,777

1994
Male = 31,274
Female = 15,858

1995
Male = 31,131
Female = 16,180

1996
Male = 22,254
Female = 10,961

1997
Male = 10,721
Female = 5,038

1998
Male = 11,166
Female = 5,119

1999
Male = 7,799
Female = 3,382

2000
Male = 6,990
Female = 3,053

2001
Male = 7,598
Female = 3,460

2002
Male = 6,414
Female = 3,126

2003
Male = 5,973
Female = 2,782

2004
Male = 5,613
Female = 2,865

2005
Male = 5,671
Female = 2,696

2006
Male = 5,011
Female = 2,562

2007
Male = 4,877
Female = 2,747

2008
Male = 4,523
Female = 2,914

2009
Male = 4,182
Female = 2,786

2010
Male = 3,928
Female = 2,775

4

Mobility Allowance customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 4 shows the number of people receiving Mobility Allowance by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 60,000).

1990
Male = 7,422
Female = 5,785

1991
Male = 7,535
Female = 5,909

1992
Male = 7,826
Female = 6,085

1993
Male = 9,118
Female = 7,042

1994
Male = 11,916
Female = 8,879

1995
Male = 13,106
Female = 9,745

1996
Male = 14,200
Female = 10,785

1997
Male = 15,066
Female = 11,529

1998
Male = 16,346
Female = 12,629

1999
Male = 17,415
Female = 13,586

2000
Male = 19,673
Female = 15,481

2001
Male = 20,887
Female = 16,687

2002
Male = 22,863
Female = 18,593

2003
Male = 24,370
Female = 19,869

2004
Male = 25,763
Female = 21,084

2005
Male = 26,940
Female = 22,275

2006
Male = 28,755
Female = 23,897

2007
Male = 29,995
Female = 24,947

2008
Male = 30,151
Female = 25,148

2009
Male = 30,462
Female = 25,618

2010
Male = 31,199
Female = 26,150

5

Wife Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 5 shows the number of people receiving Wife Pension, from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 200,000).

1990 = 115,695
1991 = 121,933
1992 = 133,194
1993 = 142,013
1994 = 152,620
1995 = 161,457
1996 = 148,931
1997 = 127,885
1998 = 116,125
1999 = 100,719
2000 = 91,341
2001 = 77,701
2002 = 67,968
2003 = 58,110
2004 = 52,829
2005 = 45,090
2006 = 40,881
2007 = 35,273
2008 = 31,950
2009 = 27,437
2010 = 24,655

6

Carer Payment customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 6 shows the number of people receiving Carer Payment, from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 175,000).

1990 = 8,796
1991 = 10,161
1992 = 12,631
1993 = 15,045
1994 = 17,699
1995 = 20,098
1996 = 25,037
1997 = 29,558
1998 = 33,979
1999 = 40,070
2000 = 47,550
2001 = 57,190
2002 = 67,260
2003 = 75,937
2004 = 84,082
2005 = 95,446
2006 = 105,058
2007 = 116,614
2008 = 130,657
2009 = 146,870
2010 = 168,913

7

Carer Allowance customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 7 shows the number of people receiving Carer Allowance, from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 500,000).

1990 = 37,746
1991 = 42,405
1992 = 50,797
1993 = 61,174
1994 = 69,693
1995 = 78,898
1996 = 90,644
1997 = 95,520
1998 = 90,830
1999 = 100,452
2000 = 201,059
2001 = 235,041
2002 = 272,045
2003 = 299,609
2004 = 297,607
2005 = 340,005
2006 = 366,960
2007 = 393,443
2008 = 422,905
2009 = 461,086
2010 = 495,733

8

Parenting Payment (Single) customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 8 shows the number of people receiving Parenting Payment (Single) by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 500,000).

1990
Male = 11,305
Female = 237,581

1991
Male = 13,616
Female = 252,104

1992
Male = 16,444
Female = 270,784

1993
Male = 17,529
Female = 280,915

1994
Male = 18,897
Female = 294,540

1995
Male = 19,913
Female = 305,028

1996
Male = 21,964
Female = 320,326

1997
Male = 23,920
Female = 334,973

1998
Male = 25,546
Female = 346,740

1999
Male = 26,830
Female = 355,493

2000
Male = 27,951
Female = 363,442

2001
Male = 31,661
Female = 385,000

2002
Male = 32,966
Female = 394,880

2003
Male = 33,909
Female = 403,049

2004
Male = 34,866
Female = 414,446

2005
Male = 34,565
Female = 416,246

2006
Male = 32,368
Female = 400,590

2007
Male = 25,677
Female = 369,818

2008
Male = 20,559
Female = 340,074

2009
Male = 18,348
Female = 325,748

2010
Male = 16,793
Female = 316,719

9

Parenting Payment (Partnered) customers by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Figure 9 shows the number of people receiving Parenting Payment (Partnered) by sex (male, female), from June 2001 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (2001 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 250,000).

2001
Male = 20,263
Female = 184,313

2002
Male = 19,576
Female = 172,000

2003
Male = 19,196
Female = 162,209

2004
Male = 18,917
Female = 158,240

2005
Male = 17,255
Female = 150,017

2006
Male = 15,353
Female = 143,461

2007
Male = 12,742
Female = 131,685

2008
Male = 10,246
Female = 115,676

2009
Male = 10,735
Female = 118,630

2010
Male = 10,329
Female = 114,581

10

Special Benefit customers by sex, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 10 shows the number of people receiving Special Benefit by sex (male, female), from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 35,000).

1990
Male = 13,592
Female = 14,321

1991
Male = 13,830
Female = 15,981

1992
Male = 16,168
Female = 18,624

1993
Male = 12,989
Female = 15,865

1994
Male = 11,957
Female = 13,990

1995
Male = 10,446
Female = 10,438

1996
Male = 9,125
Female = 9,602

1997
Male = 6,811
Female = 7,765

1998
Male = 4,733
Female = 5,503

1999
Male = 5,232
Female = 6,576

2000
Male = 5,313
Female = 5,658

2001
Male = 7,466
Female = 5,246

2002
Male = 8,060
Female = 5,031

2003
Male = 7,585
Female = 4,643

2004
Male = 6,918
Female = 4,298

2005
Male = 5,625
Female = 3,783

2006
Male = 3,665
Female = 3,176

2007
Male = 3,104
Female = 3,140

2008
Male = 2,856
Female = 3,147

2009
Male = 2,571
Female = 3,238

2010
Male = 2,645
Female = 3,662

11

Double Orphan Pension customers, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 11 shows the number of people receiving Double Orphan Pension, from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 2,500).

1990 = 1,873
1991 = 1,639
1992 = 1,404
1993 = 1,356
1994 = 1,330
1995 = 1,314
1996 = 1,319
1997 = 1,313
1998 = 1,346
1999 = 1,243
2000 = 1,236
2001 = 1,242
2002 = 1,207
2003 = 1,137
2004 = 1,151
2005 = 1,286
2006 = 1,312
2007 = 1,330
2008 = 1,382
2009 = 1,444
2010 = 1,374

12

Commonwealth Seniors Health Card holders by sex, June 2001 to June 2010

Figure 12 shows the number of people holding a Commonwealth Seniors Health Card by sex (male, female), from June 2001 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (2001 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 350,000).

2001
Male = 97,848
Female = 128,292

2002
Male = 122,613
Female = 155,068

2003
Male = 125,261
Female = 157,430

2004
Male = 129,241
Female = 158,085

2005
Male = 136,012
Female = 164,153

2006
Male = 143,476
Female = 167,157

2007
Male = 148,233
Female = 170,045

2008
Male = 132,336
Female = 146,042

2009
Male = 134,774
Female = 144,790

2010
Male = 134,689
Female = 140,091

13

Total persons paid overseas by Australia, June 1990 to June 2010

Figure 13 shows the number of people paid overseas by Australia, from June 1990 to June 2010.

The horizontal axis shows the year (1990 to 2010). The vertical axis shows the number of customers (from 0 to 70,000).

1990 = 28,469
1991 = 31,239
1992 = 34,625
1993 = 37,718
1994 = 41,175
1995 = 44,078
1996 = 47,201
1997 = 50,205
1998 = 52,139
1999 = 52,124
2000 = 54,915
2001 = 55,838
2002 = 55,853
2003 = 56,424
2004 = 57,758
2005 = 59,066
2006 = 66,945
2007 = 67,147
2008 = 68,156
2009 = 68,043
2010 = 71,360

 

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